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AUCTION Aboriginal & Oceanic Works of Art Tuesday 14th November 2017 6pm

COOE E ART MarketPlace


Specialists for this Sale: Adrian Newstead OAM adrian@cooeeart.com.au P: +61 (0) 412 126 645 Mirri Leven mirri@cooeeart.com.au P: +61 (0) 416 379 691 Fine Art Bourse: Tim Goodman tim.goodman@fineartbourse.com P: +61 (0) 481 780 302


AUCTION Aboriginal & Oceanic Works of Art Tuesday 14th November 2017 6PM Auction Location: Bent St Foyer, Chifley Tower, 2 Chifley Square, Sydney Online Auction: www.fineartbourse.com VIP Auction Launch Thursday 9th 6 - 8 pm Viewing Times: Friday 10th - Monday 13th 10am - 6pm Tuesday 14th 10am - 2pm Book Launch: The Greatest Passion of All - Jacquie McPhee Sunday 12th 10am - 1pm Launch & Viewing Location: Cooee Art 326 Oxford St. Paddington, NSW

COOE E ART MarketPlace


Welcome

Welcome to the CooeeArt MarketPlace and its very first Aboriginal and Oceanic art auction staged in collaboration with the on-line auction platform Fine Art Bourse (FAB). This unique hybrid sale will begin with a gala preview of our 84 lot offering at our Oxford Street premises on the 9th of November (on view 10th to 14th). The auction will be conducted at 6pm EST in the beautiful upper foyer of Chifley Tower, 2 Chifley Square in the Sydney CBD and on a server in Hong Kong simultaneously. It will be accessible in real time around the world on any device.

The highlight of the sale is Emily Kame Kngwarreye’s international art sensation Earth’s Creation I, (275 x 632 cm) painted in 1994. It is the largest and most important work by this artist remaining in private hands. No painting in the history of Aboriginal art has an exhibition provenance to match that of this masterpiece. It has been shown at the Art Galleries of Queensland, New South Wales, Victoria and South Australia and the National Museum of Australia. It was reproduced on huge billboards throughout Tokyo during the Emily Kame Kngwarreye exhibition at the National Art Gallery in Japan, and was last seen publically in the curated exhibition at the Gardini during the Venice Biennale in 2015. In addition to this magnificent centerpiece there will be 83 other lots encompassing many regional Aboriginal styles and periods and several fine Oceanic pieces drawn from twenty private collections. Amongst them paintings by Nyurrapaya Nampitjinpa (Mrs. Bennett), Clifford Possum Tjapaltjarri, Bill Whiskey, Tommy Watson and the renowned Kimberley painters Rover Thomas, Queenie McKenzie and Freddie Timms. Our small but lovely Oceanic offering includes a very fine New Ireland headdress and a Sepik Karawari figure that is estimated to have been made at least as long ago as the 18th century. Also of note are a selection of works illustrated in the beautiful book, The Greatest Passion Of All, from the collection of renowned West Australian interior designer Jacquie McPhee, and paintings from the APY lands being sold unreserved to raise money for the Western Desert Dialysis Appeal project, the Purple House. Cooee Art Gallery is Australia’s oldest exhibiting Indigenous fine art gallery and this auction marks our first sale under our recently launched Cooee Art MarketPlace. Our passion and commitment are entirely focused on the Indigenous art of Australia and Oceania. Our specialist resources have taken decades to build and are available free of charge to our clients (both sellers and potential buyers). Detailed profiles and market inflormation for all of the prominent artists in this sale are available on our website. Please do not hesitate to contact Mirri Leven and myself, or Tim Goodman of FAB, at the viewings or by email at any time to discuss any of the works on offer.


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Lot 01

Minnie Pwerle (c.1915-2006) Awelye, Women’s Ceremony, 2003 synthetic polymer on canvas 124 x 94 cm $4,000 - 6,000 PROVENANCE Dacou Gallery Cat #7323 FireWorks Gallery, Brisbane Private Collection, Qld EXHIBITED Exhibited Minimal Fuss, FireWorks Gallery Brisbane 2004


Lot 02

Emily Kame Kngwarreye (c.1910-1996) Sacred Grasses, 1994 synthetic polymer on linen 91.5 x 122 cm $10,000-15,000   PROVENANCE Delmore Gallery Cat # 941049, Barry Stern Gallery, Paddington, Sydney Private Collection, NSW


Lot 04

Freddie Timms (1944 - 2017)

Untitled, 2007 natural earth pigments on Belgian linen 95 x 180 cm $12,000- 15,000 PROVENANCE Jirrawun Arts, Wyndham Cat. # FT 11 2007 275 Private Collection, Melbourne Deutscher and Hackett, Important Aboriginal & Oceanic Art, Melbourne, March 2013 Private Collection, QLD

Lot 03

Mirdidingkingathi Juwarnda Sally Gabori (c.1924–2015) My Country, 2007 synthetic polymer paint on canvas 100 x 198 cm $7,000 - 10,000 PROVENANCE Mornington Island Art, QLD Cat Nu. 2560-L-SG-0907 Simon Turner, Wooloongabba Art Gallery, QLD Private Collection, QLD


Lot 05

Emily Kame Kngwarreye (1916-1996) Yam Seed Dreaming, c.1994/95 synthetic polymer on Belgian linen 123 x 89 cm $25,000 - 35,000 PROVENANCE Commissioned by Dacou Aboriginal Art Gallery, Cat # EK482 Gallery Savah, Sydney, May 1996, cat.no.47 (solo show) Private Collection, NSW The painting is accompanied by a DVD of Emily painting the work. In this work Emily strikes out with linear tracings that demonstrate the various colours she associates with the mature phase of the Yam’s life cycle - when the ripe fruit and seeds start the process of drying. Intermingling with the fruit and seeds are the falling leaves and flowers of summer that draw the emus to feed on her country and to raise their young. Here Emily is at one with her world. She moves with full confidence and resolve after the excitement and satisfaction of an abundant season. We witness the transformation of the desert after an abundant season as the country dries out. The grass seeds fall and scatter, settling into thickly carpeted sweeping swathes on the desert floor.


Lot 06

Trevor Nickolls (1949-2012) Spirit ’98, 1998 synthetic polymer on canvas 83 x 128 cm $14,000 -18,000 PROVENANCE Estate of the Artist, SA The work Spirit ‘98 is cross-cultural, referencing Wandjina and other Aboriginal spirits placed in amongst modern day cultural references. A Wandjina is driving the Holden car, wearing an Akubra hat and just an undershirt. Painted in 1998, it was created as an homage during the anniversary of the Holden car, a vehicle Nickolls drove at an early stage in his painting career. A black hand is holding a stop sign. The words ‘Stop Dog’ refers to GOD when read in reverse. The dog is a dingo. The Aboriginal child with one leg refers to Aboriginal disadvantage. Nickolls includes multiple layers of meaning and adds the usual fun element. At the top of the painting is a small UFO with a green extra-terrestrial being inside. Nickolls was chosen alongside Rover Thomas to represent Australia at the Venice Biennale in 1990.


Lot 07

Jan Billycan (1930-2016)

Kirriwirri, 2005 synthetic polymer and sand on Belgian linen 165 x 106 cm $10,000 - 14,000 PROVENANCE Short Street Gallery, WA Private Collection, WA Cooee Art Gallery, NSW Private Collection, NSW


EXHIBITED Cooee Art Gallery at Australian Galleries, April 2016, Australian Galleries Sydney REFERENCE Illustrated in exhibition catalogue ‘Cooee Art Gallery at Australian Galleries’, Australian Galleries Sydney The artist’s statement accompanying the painting reads: “This place is the birth place of my father’s clan. Our clan is also named Kirriwirri, and call each individual members of this clan Kirriwirri. There is a a big warla (mud flat) at this place. This is what this painting is about.”


The Jacquie McPhee Collection Part 1

Amongst all the people we have been fortunate to meet through Aboriginal art during the past 30 years, Jacquie McPhee holds a special place in our hearts. Her desire to discover new and exciting artworks and regional movements has fueled her ever-deepening emersion into Aboriginal art. This has been driven by a genuine love for the artists and their luminous vision. This love has seen her influence dozens of friends as her collection grew to more than 200 significant objects and paintings. Walking into her stunning Quindalup home is like entering the gates of heaven. It is an enchanting, lively and deeply moving experience. One cannot fail to be reminded of Picasso’s sentiment that art has the power to wash the dust of everyday life from the soul.   Though she has rarely, if ever, sold a work from her personal collection, a group of 19 paintings are being offered through this auction to help fund the next stage in Jacquie’s life. Each of these lovely works are illustrated in her magnificent new book The Greatest Passion of All, Jacquie’s beautiful tribute the artists who created them. A personally signed copy will accompany each painting purchased. Jacquie will be in Sydney signing books on Sunday the 12th of November for the launch of ‘The Greatest Passion of All’. All welcome from 10am till 1pm.


Lot 08

Daniel Walbidi (1982 - )

Kirriwirri, 2008 synthetic polymer on Belgian linen 60.5 x 60.5 cm $7,000 - 9,000 PROVENANCE Short Street Gallery, WA The Jacquie McPhee Collection, WA ILLUSTRATED The Greatest Passion of All, Jacquie McPhee, 2017, page 235


Lot 09

Bill Whiskey Tjapaltjarri (c.1920 - 2008) Rockholes and country near the Olgas, 2008 synthetic polymer on Belgian linen 60 x 45 cm $3,000 - 5,000 PROVENANCE Watiyawanu Artists, NT Japinka Gallery, WA The Jacquie McPhee Collection, WA ILLUSTRATED The Greatest Passion of All, Jacquie McPhee, 2017, page 106


Lot 10

Carol Maayatja Golding (1930 - ) Walu Tjukurrpa, 2007 synthetic polymer paint on canvas 152 x 101 cm $6,000 - 8,000 PROVENANCE Warakurna Artists, NT The Jacquie McPhee Collection, WA ILLUSTRATED The Greatest Passion of All, Jacquie McPhee, 2017, page 60 Carol Maayatja Golding was born at Walu rockhole not far from Warakurna. This painting depicts a story from Carol’s birth country. There were two men and one little boy camping at Walu. The men went hunting and left the little boy behind. The men returned with an emu and pulled out it’s heart. The boy was holding the heart and blood spilt onto the rocks. He ran away with the heart and turned into wind. The emu’s blood trail stained the rocks and can still be seen there today.


Lot 11

Cory Wakartu Surprise (1920 - 2011) Juntartu Jila, 2006 synthetic polymer paint on Belgian linen 60 x 60 cm $3000 - 4000 PROVENANCE Mangkatja Arts, Fitzroy Crossing, WA Palya Art, NT The Jacquie McPhee Collection, WA ILLUSTRATED The Greatest Passion of All, Jacquie McPhee, 2017, page 130


Lot 12

Daniel Walbidi (1982 - )

All the Jila, 2006 synthetic polymer paint on Belgian linen 167 x 122 cm $18,000 - 25,000


PROVENANCE Short Street Gallery, WA The Jacquie McPhee Collection, WA ILLUSTRATED The Greatest Passion of All, Jacquie McPhee, 2017, page 236


Lot 13

Tjungkara Ken (1969 - )

Ngayuku Ngura - My Country, 2009 synthetic polymer paint on canvas 122 x 153 cm $5,000 - 7,000 PROVENANCE Tjala Arts, SA The Jacquie McPhee Collection, WA ILLUSTRATED The Greatest Passion of All, Jacquie McPhee, 2017, page 82


Lot 14

Jan Billycan (c.1930 - 2016)

Untitled, 2007 natural earth pigments and acrylic paint on wood 60 x 90 cm $4,000 - 6,000 PROVENANCE Short Street Gallery, Broome, WA The Jacquie McPhee Collection, WA ILLUSTRATED The Greatest Passion of All, Jacquie McPhee, 2017, page 220 “This is where Jan bin born. Two jila, women’s country. This shows Kirrriwirri which is the birthplace of Jan’s family. This shows tali (sand dunes) and along this line is Yulparija country for Mardu people. There is lot’s of kaja, (water) here. Wungarlku.” - Artist statement


Lot 15

Bugai Whylouter (1940 - )

Kartaru (Well 24), 2008 synthetic polymer on Beglian linen 125 x 106 cm $3,500 - 4,500 PROVENANCE Martumili Artists, WA Randell Lane Fine Art, WA The Jacquie McPhee Collection, WA ILLUSTRATED The Greatest Passion of All, Jacquie McPhee, 2017, page 205


Lot 16

Ulkalara Kantamarra Napaltjarri (c.1940 - ) Mother’s Story, Ininti Beans, 2010 synthetic polymer paint on Belgian inen 150 x 30 cm $1,500 - 1,800 PROVENANCE Watiyawanu Artists, NT The Jacquie McPhee Collection, WA ILLUSTRATED The Greatest Passion of All, Jacquie McPhee, 2017, page 296


Lot 17

Important Solomon Islands Ceremonial Paddle, C.19th carved hard wood length 108 cm; blade width 145 cm $4,000 - 6,000 PROVENANCE Collected in the field, Solomon Islands Brenchley collection, England Private Collection, NSW Janus head blade and carved crocodile finial


Lot 18

Gope Board, c.19th - 20th Papuan Gulf, PNG pigments on carved wood length 187; width 30; depth 4 cm $5,000 - 7,000 PROVENANCE Anc. Coll. Fernleigh Castle, Sydney Illust, Anthony Meyer catalogue Item 8 (bw copy of page entry available) A large and well carved Gope board c. 19th - 20th century representing a mythological clan ancestor. These boards were kept in the men’s house as a constant reminder of genealogical lineage.


Lot 19

A very rare Ancestor carving, C. 18th - 19th Karawari, Sepik River Basin, PNG carved wood 71 x 30 x 16 cm $6,000 - 8,000 PROVENANCE Senta Taft Hendry collected this work in situ in the late 1950s. Senta Taft founded the famous Galeries Primitif in Sydney in 1961, and ran it continuously until her death in 2015 Private Collection, NSW During the late 1950s and early 1960s, many ancient carvings were discovered in caves close to the Karawari River, and remain to this day the oldest, surviving artefacts, due to the perfect preservation qualities in the caves.


Lot 20

Headdress c. 1900-1920 New Ireland Province, PNG earth pigment on carved wood 26 x 24 x 9 cm (base) 92 x 23 x 25 cm (Mask) 121 cm total height $6,000 - 8,000 PROVENANCE Tatua Village on Tabar Island in north New Ireland Province, PNG. Sotheby’s Australia Oceanic Art c.1990, Melbourne VIC Private Collection, NSW Made to honour the deceased, this Malagan sculpture features a ges figure and flying fish owned by a particular family. These were typically displayed on a platform during mortuary ceremonies and revealed at the climax as a highlight of the great feast.


Lot 21

Robyne Latham (1956 - )

Pod II, 2014 stoneware, thrown and hand built. Terra sigillata slip and sagger fired in She-oak. 44 x 24 x 24 cm $3,000 - 5,000 PROVENANCE Direct from the artist, VIC Private Collection, VIC EXHIBITED Winner, Shepparton Indigenous Ceramic Art Awards in 2014


Lot 22

Dorothy Napangardi (1956 - 2013) Salt on Mina Mina, 2008 synthetic polymer on Belgian linen 198 x 122 cm $30,000 - 40,000 PROVENANCE Gallery Gondwana, Alice Springs, NT Private Collection, NSW


Lot 23

Owen Yalandja (1962 - )

Yawk Yawk Spirits, 2014 natural earth pigment and PVA fixative on Kurrajong (Brachychiton diversifolius) 2 Sculptures - 167hx7w cm & 196h x 7w cm $12,000 - 15,000 PROVENANCE Maningrida Arts and Culture, NT Private Collection QLD EXHIBITED Four Spirits From Maningrida, Fireworks Gallery, Brisbane, 2015 Yawk Yawk in the Kunwinjku/Kunwok language of Western Arnhem Land means ‘young woman’ or ‘young woman spirit being’.


Lot 24

Mirdidingkingathi Juwarnda Sally Gabori (c.1924–2015) Dingkarri, 2006 synthetic polymer on canvas 91 x 121 cm $4,000 - 6,000 PROVENANCE Mornington Island Arts and Crafts Cat #1687-L-SG-1006 Private Collection, WA


Lot 25

Minnie Pwerle (1922 - 2006) Awelye Atnwengerrp, 2004 synthetic polymer on Belgian linen 153 x182 cm $25,000 - 35,000 PROVENANCE Dacou Gallery, NT Fireworks Gallery, QLD, Cat No# FW7691 Private Collection, QLD


The bold linear patterns of stripes and curves throughout Minnie’s painting depicts the women’s ceremonial body paint design. After smearing their bodies with animal fat, the women trace these designs onto their breasts, arms and thighs singing as each woman has a turn to be ‘painted up’. The songs relate to the Dreamtime stories of Ancestral Travel and other plants, animals and natural forces. Awelye-Women’s ceremony demonstrates respect for the land and in performing these ceremonies they ensure wellbeing and happiness within the communities.


Lot 26

Bill Whiskey Tjapaltjarri (1920 - 2008) Rockholes near Olgas, 2008 synthetic polymer on Belgian linen 180 x 180 cm $45,000 - 55,000 PROVENANCE Watiyawanu Artists, Mt Liebig, NT Peta Appelyard Fine Art, NT Private Collection, NT


Lot 27

Emily Kame Kngwarreye (c.1910-1996) Wild Flowers, 1995 synthetic polymer paint on Belgian linen 180 x 283 cm $90,000 - 130,000 PROVENANCE Dacou Gallery, SA Commissioned by Gallerie Australis, SA Cat Num. GAEK 95 1004 Private Collection, Switzerland


The density and richness of colour in this work represents an abundance of wild flowers after winter rain. The painting is an aerial perspective as Emily perceived her country in the spring of 1995. From late 1991 onwards Emily explored a range of techniques having largely abandoned the fine dotting and submerged linear tracing which characterised her earlier works. She began using larger brushes to create broader, circular dabs of paint which often involved ‘double dipping’ the brush in a second colour before applying the paint to the canvas. This technique enabled her to work vigorously while making delicate flower-like impressions as are seen in this magnificent work of the period.


Lot 28

Greg Weight (1946 - )

Portrait of Emily Kngwarreye, 1994 selenium toned silver gelatin photograph, edition 7/15 103 x 69.5 cm $1,000 - 1,500 REFERENCE Greg Weight, Australian Artists: Portraits, Chapter and Verse, Sydney 2004, Illust p19 Utopia: The Genius of Emily Kngwarreye, National Museum of Australia Press, Canberra, 2008, Illust p 221 EXHIBITED Australian Galleries Sydney, 2004


Lot 29

Walangkura Napanangka (c.1946 -2014) Untitled, 2007 synthetic polymer paint on Belgian linen 151 x 60 cm $5,000 - 7,000 PROVENANCE Papunya Tula, NT Waterhole Arts, NSW Private Collection, QLD


Lot 30

Naata Nungurrayi (1932- )

Marrapinti, 2010 synthetic polymer on Belgian linen 152 x 122 cm $30,000 - $40,000 PROVENANCE Yanda Aboriginal Art, NT Private Collection NSW Naata’s preference for pale creamy ochres imparts this work with a calming softness while her unhurried technique brings the visual elements together with a spacious sense of harmony. Like several other Pintupi women artists, Naata liked to apply paint thickly, as though molding a rich and textured surface, reflecting her feel for the earth, which underscored her spiritual and cultural foundations and that of her people.


Lot 31

Clifford Possum Tjapaltjarri (1933 - 2002) Mount Wedge, 1985 synthetic polymer on Belgian linen 100 x 180 cm $90,000 -120,000 PROVENANCE Papunya Tula Artists: Cat. no. CP850356. Private Collection, ACT. Lawson~Menzies , Aboriginal Fine Art, Sydney, 23/05/2007 Private Collection Qld


Clifford Possum was one of the initial founders of the Western Desert Art Movement and the keeper of the mythologies associated with Mount Wedge (Kerrinyarra). They include the travels of possum, kangaroo, emu, snake, centipede, rock wallaby and a number of other ancestor beings related in song and ceremony as having passed through this place during the Dreamtime. This rare and important work, painted for Papunya Tula Artists in 1985, demonstrates Clifford Possum’s remarkable and decisively different vision in the representation of his Dreamings. The formal composition of his paintings set him apart from his contemporaries amongst other early Central and Western desert painters. In this visually arresting image he has depicted clan designs associated with Ulpulku, a site to the west of Mount Wedge. This is a rock wallaby site as seen by the tracks passing through the centre of the work. The roundels with U shapes on either side are campsites where ‘kungas’, young women, are seated. The necklets they wore during ceremonies are shown.


Lot 32

Yala Yala Gibbs Tjungurrayi (c. 1928-1998) Senior Pintipi Mens Dreaming, 1997 synthetic polymer paint on Belgian linen 153 x 61 cm $6,000 - 8,000 PROVENANCE Papunya Tula Artists, NT YY9707148 Cat #6 Utopia Art Sydney, NSW Private Collection, NSW


Lot 33

Bobby West Tjupurrula (1958 - ) Tingari Cycle, 2002 synthetic polymer on Belgian linen 180 x 150 cm $15,000-18,000 PROVENANCE Papunya Tula Artists, NT Cat #: BW0203039 Private Collection, NSW Lawson~Menzies, Aboriginal Art Auction, Sydney, Nov 2004 Private Collection, VIC The Tingari Cycle is a secret song cycle sacred to initiated men. The Tingari are Dreamtime Beings who travelled across the landscape performing ceremonies to create and shape the country associated with Dreaming sites.


Lot 34

Rover Julama Thomas (1926-1998) 41 to 42 Well, 1996 natural earth pigments on Belgian linen 120 x 120 cm $25,000 - 35,000 PROVENANCE Warmun Traditional Artists, NT Cat # RT 0056 Private Collection, VIC The boggy, twisted road through the desert between these two wells on the Canning Stock Route passes through country with the highest sand dunes, some of them up to fifty feet in height. This work was inspired by his return journey to his birthplace deep in the Great Sandy Desert in the company of Maxine Taylor and Terry Brooks of Warmun Traditional Artists in the year it was created. Rover vividly remembered his first trip in the back of a horse and dray, and how he was dangled from the end of a long rope down the wells to fetch buckets of water.


Lot 35

Attr. Ignatia Djanghara (1930 - ?) Wandjina, c.1980 natural earth pigment on wood 46 x 75 (framed) 27 x 55 cm (bark) $1,500 - 2,000 PROVENANCE Purchased Laswon’s, Tribal Art Sale, C.1990 Private Collection, NSW


Lot 36

Lilly Karedada (1937 - )

Wandjinas, 1995 Natural earth pigments on paper 113 x 73 cm $4,500 - 5,500 PROVENANCE Warringarri Aboriginal Arts, WA Cat. No: 11900295 Mossgreen Auctions, Contemporary Aboriginal Art, Melbourne, 08/04/2008, Lot No. 80 Private Collection, VIC The Wandjina are exclusive to areas of the Kimberley in Western Australia and are said to exercise power over the rains. For custodians, such as members of the Djanghara and Karedada families, portable images of the Wandjina are viewed as purely reproductions of the ‘real’ spirits adorning the cave walls at their most important Dreaming sites. Wandjina images on bark, board, canvas, slate or paper were first produced for trade and exchange with missionaries travelling by lugger along the Kimberley coastline prior to mid 1970s. However the primary artistic inspiration and purpose in creating these works lay in the artist’s responsibility for maintaining the ancestral sites, and repainting them to ‘keep them strong’.


Lot 37

Kitty Kantilla (c.1928 - 2003) Untitled, 1997 natural earth pigment on linen 97 x 59 cm $8,000 - 12,000 PROVENANCE: Jilamara Arts, NT Cat #AK3015 Artitja Fine Art, WA Private Collection WA Kitty Kantilla started making artefacts and carvings in the mid 1940s and was a foundation member of Melville Island’s Jilamara Arts Centre’s painting movement in the 1980s. The incised designs (jilamara) used by Tiwi people as decoration on their unique poles used in the burial (Pukamani) ceremony, are the basis of art in other media such as paintings and prints. So what appears as abstracted lines and geometric shape, have both ritualistic and story-telling bases.


Lot 38

Jimmy Kurntu Pike (1940-2002) Kalpurtu Makari, 1998 synthetic polymer on canvas 121 x 91 cm

PROVENANCE Japingka Gallery, WA Private Collection WA

$6,000-8,000 Japingka is the main Jila (living water) on Jimmy Pike’s father’s and grandfather’s country. Kalpurtu are magic spirits that bring rain and lightning. Kalpurtu live in the waterhole. When they smell strangers coming, they stand up and reveal themselves. Walmajarri people light a fire in the distance and if the smoke goes straight to the waterhole they know the Kalpurtu are standing. An old man will run fast to the Jila and sing out “Japingka wawla! We’re coming! Get Down Please! We want to get water”. Then, when the Kalpurtu goes down people thank him. Here a small Kalpurtu called Makari is depicted with long hair and a beard.


Lot 39

Queenie McKenzie Nakarra (1930 - 1998) Dreaming Places – Gidja Country, 1996 natural earth pigment on linen 160 x 200 cm $60,000 - 90,000 PROVENANCE Waringarri Arts, Kununurra, WA Cat # AP0791 William Mora Galleries, Melbourne, VIC Cat # S5740 Private Collection, VIC EXHIBITED Queenie McKenzie, William Mora Galleries, 1997 REFERENCE Jennifer Joi Field, Written in the Land: The Life of Queenie McKenzie Melbourne Books, 2008, Illust. pp180-181 This painting shows important Dreaming Places in Queenie’s country. The hill at the top is Wirdim (Red Butt), on Texas Downs Station. There is a big yellow sand dune on the side of the hill here. At the base of the hill is a fishing hole (shown in black). People sit and fish on the rock nearby (shown as circles). The row of hills below, are hills on the other side of the river. Wirdim is linked to Doolngayim (Argument Gap) in the Northern Territory. Doolngayim is shown at the bottom of the painting as the hill with vertical cracks in striking colours. The wavy line below is the Victoria Highway, which runs through the gap today. Wirdim and Doolngayim are connected by the story of Ganggamerl, an old spirit woman who set off from Wirdim in the Dreamtime and kidnapped a boy. He called out to his brothers at Newry Station, but Ganggamerl took him back to Wirdim. He soon escaped back to his own country. At the left centre is Nanny Goat Hill, near Texas Downs homestead. Below Nanny Goat Hill, on the left, is Yarlga, an Echidna Dreaming place. The artist was born in Yarlga country and Echidna was one of her Dreamings. The area is a source of a white stone also called Yarlga, which was traditionally used to make spearheads. The stone is sharp like the quills of the Dreamtime Echidna. To the right of Yarlga are hills in Darrawoonging country, where two boys who stole ‘ant bed’ drowned in a waterhole.


Lot 40

Patrick Mung Mung (c.1949 - ) Purnululu, 2007 natural earth pigments on canvas 150 x 180 cm $15,000 - 22,000 PROVENANCE Warmun Art Centre, WA Private Collection, NSW Purnululu (the Bungle Bungle ranges in the East Kimberley) was Patrick’s grandfather’s and great grandfather’s country. Patrick Mung Mung was the son of senior Gija leader George Mung Mung a renowned teacher and community elder. He grew up on Texas Downs Station and was amongst the last to leave when the stockman life ended in the 1970s.


Lot 41

Rover Julama Thomas (1926-1998) Spiders Web in Yari Country, 1994 Oilstick on paper 120 x 80 cm; 142.5 x 103.5 (framed) $6,000 - 8,000 PROVENANCE Commissioned by Kimberley Art, VIC. Catalogue number: KA00284 Private collection, NSW. Christies, Modern Aboriginal Art, Sydney, 12/10/2004, Lot No. 85 Private Collection, VIC Accompanied by the original certificate and a photo of Rover Thomas holding the artwork Rover has depicted an important Dreaming, which took place near a sacred Wati-Kujarra, Two Men Dreaming Site, deep in the Great Sandy Desert. The certificate reads: ‘Yellow is Rocks. Red represents dust. Old tracks lead to different Important Sites’


Lot 42

Queenie Nakarra McKenzie (1930-1998) Old Jack near Queenie’s place, Texas Station, 1997 natural earth pigment on canvas 101 x 81.5 cm $8,000 - 12,000 PROVENANCE: Utopia Art Sydney, Cat #Q1.2.97 Private Collection, NSW ‘I bin born Old Texas, dat called Salt Pan country. Salt water you gotta drinkim’. No more goodfella water, all salt – bitter. I bin born la dat country.’ Artist statement


Lot 43

Mabel Julie Wiringgoon (1933 - ) Karnkiny Ngarrangkarni, 2006 natural earth pigments on Belgian linen 230 x 152 cm $8,000 - 12,000 PROVENANCE Warmun Art Centre, Kununurra, Western Australia Mossgreen Auctions, The Ross & Rona Clarke Collection, Brisbane, 09/09/2012, Lot No. 72 Private Collection, QLD In the Ngarrangkarni (Dreamtime), Karnkiny the fishing man or Kurlmi went out fishing to this one fishing spot. He got all the fish and separated the big ones from the little ones. He chucked all the big fish away in another river and kept all the little fish (kundarrning). they swam down this hill in the Ngarrangkarni and you can still see them there today (in stone). When you go fishing at this spot you can only catch little fish. this is Mabel’s country, Darrajayin (Springvale Station).


Western Desert Dialysis Appeal Part 1

The first remote renal dialysis clinic in Central Australia was established in Kintore in 2004. Today there are 24 dialysis machines in 11 locations, across state borders from the tropics to the desert. A new 4-chair dialysis unit and 2 nurses houses are being built Pukatja, Ernabella in the APY lands. It will be licensed and operational in 2018. Of the first year’s operational funding, $160,000 has been raised in the past 12 months. Only $100,000 remains. You can help get this project over the line by purchasing a beautiful work of APY Land art. The money raised through the sale of lots 44 - 49 and 78 - 84, will be used for this purpose. These artworks have been donated by a generous supported of the project and are being sold without reserve.

Lots 44 - 49 and 78 - 84

Or you can donate directly to the WDNWPT via the website (http:// www.westerndesertdialysis.com/contacts/donations ) or by mail to WDNWPT, PO Box 5060, Alice Springs, NT 0871


Lot 44

Tjunkaya Tapaya (1965 - )

Kungkarangkalpa, 2010 synthetic polymer paint on Belgian linen 170 x 100 cm

PROVENANCE Ernabella Arts, SA accompanied by a certificate cat. num. 195-10 TT Alcaston Gallery, VIC Private Collection, ACT

$2,000 - 3,000 EXHIBITED Ernabella Artists, Ara Irititja manu ara kuwaritja Ernabella-la. Old days and New Days in Ernabella, 19th October - 5 November 2010, Alcaston Gallery, VIC


Lot 45

Jimmy Baker (1920 - 2010)

Tjuta, 2005 synthetic polymer paint on Belgian linen 122 x 142 cm $6,000 - 10,000 PROVENANCE Ninuku Artists, SA accompanied by a certificate cat. #TPJB05047 Private Collection, ACT


Lot 46

Maringka Baker (c.1950 - )

Pukara, 2007 synthetic polymer paint on Belgian linen 152 x 107 cm $8,000 - 12,000 PROVENANCE Tjungu Palya, SA accompanied by a certificate cat #07267 Private Collection, ACT “This is a dangerous place, Pukara. There is a Wanampi here (water snake). Wanampi kutjara (two water snakes), father and son. The two snake men saw that the Anangu women were collecting bush foods. The son snuck back to where the food was at night and stole all the food the women had collected. They saw him and speared him in the side. Tjukupa mulapa. This is a true story. The two snakes still live at this place.� - Artist Statement


Lot 47

Sandra Ken (c.1968 - )

Tjala Tjukurpa - Honey Ant Story, 2011 synthetic polymer paint on Belgian linen 101 x 152 cm $2,000 - 3,000 PROVENANCE Tjungu Palya, SA accompanied by a certificate cat #381-11 Gallery Gabrielle Pizzi, VIC Private Collection, ACT EXHIBITED Malparara - Friends Together, Gallery Gabrielle Pizzi, Melbourne VIC, 2011 “Sandra is telling the story of the Tjala or Honey Ants which are found about a metre underground beneath Mulga trees. The Honey Ant tunnels that lead down to the ant’s nests are called Nyinantu. The Honey Ant larvae are called ipilykaipilyka. Honey Ants are highly favoured food source.” - Artist Statement


Lot 48

Patricia Tjunkin (1981 - )

Kanpi, 2008 synthetic polymer paint on Belgian linen 105 x 113 cm $1,800 - 2,200 PROVENANCE Tjungu Palya, SA accompanied by a certificate cat #08016 Private Collection, ACT “Kalaya Ngura nyinapai (this is where all the emu’s sat in their home). Tjitji kulunypa nyinapai (all the small emu children sat too). This country is Kanpi. I have learn’t all about my country and culture from my grandfather Jimmy Baker. Ninti pulka (he is very knowledgeable).” - Artist Statement


Lot #49

Mona Shepherd Mitakki (1954 - ) Husband and Wife Story, 2011 synthetic polymer paint on Belgian linen 101 x 152 cm $800 - 1,200 PROVENANCE Tjungu Palya, SA accompanied by a certificate cat #261-11 Short Street Gallery, WA Private Collection, ACT


Lot 50

Kitty Kantilla (1928-2003)

Parlini Jilamara (Old Designs), 1996 natural earth pigment on Belgian linen 118 x 101 cm $15,000-18,000 PROVENANCE Jilamara Arts and Crafts, Cat # SC96002, Private Collection, SA Sotheby’s, Important Aboriginal Art, Melbourne, 28/06/1999 Private Collection, WA A seemingly abstract iconography lies at the heart of Kitty Kantilla’s art. Far from being non-representational, however, the different combination of dots, lines and blocks of colour called jilamara (design) together invoke inside elements of ritual and reveal the essence of Kantilla’s cultural identity. Like other Tiwi artists, Kantilla gained her artistic knowledge in ceremonial contexts before learning to express her individuality by carving and painting objects of the Pukumani (mourning) ceremony. This work is composed largely of densely textured blocks of colour on black the elegant geometry is broken by minor segments of dots and lines. The artist is working with cloudy white, intense red and dense yellow on black: chords in a four-part harmony. The composition is infused with tonal and textural variations: the end result remains a measured and balanced synthesis.


Lot 51

Marie Celine Porkilani (c.1926 - 1994) Paru Woman, Mopaditi, 1987 natural earth pigments on ironwood 235 x 13 x 13 cm $5,000 - 8,000 PROVENANCE Tiwi Pima Art, Bathurst Island, NT Collector’s Gallery, Sydney Private Collection NSW Mopaditi are spirits of the dead. Pukamani poles such as this represent individual people who have passed away and act as a mourning process that can continue after the deceased person has been buried. Marie Celine was one of a group of elderly ladies who lived at Paru on Melville Island in the late 1980s. Their exhibition, Carved Wooden Sculptures by Tiwi Women from Paru, was held at Collectors Gallery, Sydney, in 1988. The women included Kitty Kantilla, Topsy Kerinauia, and Mary Puraminni. The carvings were notable for energetic and provocative figures. Many were tiered such as this fine example.


Lot 52

Yannima Tommy Watson (c.1935 - ) Pikarli, 2008 synthetic polymer paint on Belgian linen 157.5 x 199 cm $45,000 - 55,000 PROVENANCE Agathon Gallery, NSW Metro Gallery, VIC Private Collection, NSW


Lot 53

Kathleen Ngal (1934 -)

Untitled, 2008 synthetic polymer paint on Belgian linen 120 x 210 cm $12,000 - 15,000 PROVENANCE Delmore Gallery, NT Cat Num.08F05 Metro Gallery, VIC Private Collection, NSW


The Ngal women are custodians who paint Anekwetji, which is also called a bush plum. The Anekwetj is a small fruit, sourced from a bushy shrub with small bright green leaves. The various colours underlying the surface of the painting represent the different degrees of ripeness of the plum, with purple being the most suitable indictor for eating. Kathleen takes a layered approach to the canvas, and gives it her stamp of validity through her choice of colours. Her final flourish of a white dotted overlay across the canvas represents the sun-dried leaves, seeds, husks and grasses of Arlperre and allows a beautiful pink hue to radiate from the surface of the painting.


Lot 54

Emily Kame Kngwarreye (c.1910-1996) Earth’s Creation I, 1994 synthetic polymer paint on Belgian linen 632 x 275 cm (4 panels at 158 x 275 cm each) Estimate Upon Request


PROVENANCE Created during workshop at Arlpara, Utopia organised by Dacou Gallery Private Collection, SA Lawson~Menzies, Aboriginal Fine Art sale, May 2007 Mbantua Gallery and Cultural Museum, Alice Springs, NT A folio of 9 images of Emily painting Earth’s Creation I accompanies the work. In addition, a lengthy video of the artist at work on this major commission can be acquired by application to the artist’s family.


EXHIBITED Emily Kame Kngwarreye, Alhalkere, Paintings from Utopia Queensland Art Gallery, February – April 1998 Art Gallery of New South Wales, May - July 1998 National Gallery of Victoria, September - November 1998 Utopia: The Genius of Emily Kame Kngwarreye National Museum of Osaka, February – April 2008 National Art Centre, Tokyo, May – July 2008 National Museum of Australia, August – October 2008 Northern Territory Parliament House, Darwin, December 2008 – February 2009 All the World’s Futures, Venice Biennale International Exhibition, Giardini della Biennale, May – November 2015 PUBLICATIONS Neale, Margo (ed.) (1998). Emily Kame Kngwarreye, Alhalkere, Paintings from Utopia, Queensland Art Gallery, MacMillan, p.31 Illust.pp116-117 Neale, Margo (ed.) (2008). Utopia : the genius of Emily Kame Kngwarreye. Canberra: National Museum of Australia Press. Illust. pp124-125 Neale, Margo (ed.) (2008). Utopia : the genius of Emily Kame Kngwarreye, Japan: National Museumof Art, Osaka, National Art Centre, Tokyo, Yomiuri Shimbun, National Museum of Australia, pp20-21 Illust. pp160-161 Dr. Anne Runhardt (ed.) (2009). Emily Kame Kngwarreye, The Person and her Paintings, Ability Press, Adelaide, pp134-135 illust. pp188-189 In addition, Earth’s Creation I has been the subject of dozens of press and magazine articles. For a short list of selected writing visit https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Earth%27s_Creation


Earth’s Creation is an awe-inspiring artistic tour de force: a masterpiece on a grand scale: a magical medley of the ‘whole lot’, as Emily described it; stories of the earth, her land, the vegetation, the ceremonies, the seasons, and her people. Like no other single work, it showcases Emily’s artistic verve, and demonstrates her bold self-assuredness, total lack of self-consciousness and complete certainty when approaching a work on this monumental scale. In its creative spontaneity, genius of colour, evocative power and stylistic realisation, it can be compared in turn to the works by international masters Pollock, Kandinsky, Matisse, de Kooning and Monet. It was created while sitting on the canvas, moving around as she painted continuously, until the entire surface was completed. From every part of the work. the sublime orchestration engages the eye with dazzling energy and flowing movement. Rainbow-like, the vibrant greens, aquamarine blues, duck egg yellows and vermillion reds simultaneously glow and pulsate. These are offset by flows of white, that illuminate from behind creating a mystical, ethereal feel. As with the very finest of her paintings, it is entirely intuitive, painted during a single session in which she never stepped back to look. When completed she simply walked away, such was her assuredness about its content and meaning. Few artists have painted the country as she has, with an ability to penetrate its very soul.


The Jacquie McPhee Collection Part 2


Lot 55

Freddie Timms (1944 - 2017)

Moat Creek Yard, 2007 natural earth pigment on Belgian linen 122 x 135 cm $13,000 - 15,000 PROVENANCE Jirrawun Arts, WA Raft Artspace, Parap, NT The Jacquie McPhee Collection, WA EXHIBITED Last Tango in Wyndham, Raft artspace, NT Feb - March 2008 ILLUSTRATED The Greatest Passion of All, Jacquie McPhee, 2017, page 250 Moat Creek Yard is a mustering yard on Bow River Station, country belonging to the artist’s family. The grey circle in the middle shows the stockyard where cattle are branded. Below the yard can be seen the waterhole on Moat Creek that flows into another creek. The small black circle towards the top of the painting represents a windmill bore. The light and dark grey areas are all flat plains country. The white and lighter grey sections at the top edge represent hills and ranges. The two hills are depicted in the black on either side at the bottom of the painting.


Lot 56

Beyala Puntungka Mapanangka (1966 - ) Untitled 2010 synthetic polymer paint on canvas 122 x 152 cm $5,000 - 7,000 PROVENANCE Randell Lane Fine Art, WA The Jacquie McPhee Collection, WA EXHIBITED Art of Women - Randell Lane Fine Art, WA 25th August-15th September 2010 Illustrated: The Greatest Passion of All, Jacquie McPhee, 2017 ILLUSTRATED The Greatest Passion of All, Jacquie McPhee, 2017, page 188


Lot 57

Naata Nungurrayi (1932- )

Untitled, 2009 synthetic polymer paint on Belgian linen 122 x 152 cm $22,000 - 36,000 PROVENANCE Yanda Aboriginal Art, NT Private Collection NSW ILLUSTRATED The Greatest Passion of All, Jacquie McPhee, 2017, page 245


Lot 58

Eileen Yaritja Stevens (1919 - 2008) Piltati, 2007 synthetic polymer paint on Belgian linen 101 x 146 cm $6,000 - 8,000 PROVENANCE Ninuku Artists, N.T Randell Lane Fine Art, WA The Jacquie McPhee Collection, WA ILLUSTRATED The Greatest Passion of All, Jacquie McPhee, 2017, page 116-117 “Wati kutjara minyma kutjara (two men and two women). The two women have gone hunting and the men are making spears. They are using kangaroo sinew to bind them. The men, who are really Wanampi (water snakes) have been drawing on the cave walls. Walka winki kulpingka (designs all over the cave).� Artist Statement


Lot 59

Pungkai Peter Bertani (1958 - ) Tali Tjuta, 2008 synthetic polymer paint on canvas 135 x 201 cm $10,000 -15,000 PROVENANCE Ceduna Aboriginal Arts & Cultural Centre, SA The Jacquie McPhee Collection, WA ILLUSTRATED The Greatest Passion of All, Jacquie McPhee, 2017, page 166 “Red sand hills to the north and white sand hills to the south meet at the Great Bight. The mid point is Ooldea where many tribes met to pass on to other mobs stories, songs and culture. My late Munju mother Kumina Stevens from Nyapari told stories how she walked to the Bight and back again to her country. Ooldea is well recorded by Daisy Bates where many mobs met. Daisy was given the name of Kulbadi which is Ngoongah word for Magpie.� Artist Statement


Lot 60

Cory Wakartu Surprise (1920 - 2011) Round One Waterhole This One, 2010 synthetic polymer paint on canvas 120 x 90 cm $7,000 - 9,000 PROVENANCE Mangkatja Arts, Fitzroy Crossing, WA Raft Artspace, Alice Springs, NT The Jacquie McPhee Collection, WA ILLUSTRATED The Greatest Passion of All, Jacquie McPhee, 2017, page 131


Lot 61

Thunduyingathi Bijarrb May Moodoonuthi (1929 - 2008) Burrkunda, 2007 synthetic polymer paint on canvas 102 x 197 cm $4,000 - 6,000 PROVENANCE Mornington Island Arts & Craft, QLD The Jacquie McPhee Collection, WA ILLUSTRATED The Greatest Passion of All, Jacquie McPhee, 2017, page 298 “Burrkunda are scars us Bentinck ladies have on our bodies.” Artist Statement


Lot 62

Hector Jandanay Joongoorra (1929 - 2007) Warily Country, 2005 natural earth pigments on canvas 80 x 60 cm $3,000 - 5,000 PROVENANCE Warman Art Centre, WA The Jacquie McPhee Collection, WA ILLUSTRATED The Greatest Passion of All, Jacquie McPhee, 2017, page 99


Lot 63

Lloyd Kwilla (1980 - )

Water Bushfire Series, 2006 natural earth pigments on Belgian Linen 80 x 100 cm $3,500 - 4,500 PROVENANCE Red Rock Art, WA The Jacquie McPhee Collection, WA ILLUSTRATED The Greatest Passion of All, Jacquie McPhee, 2017, page 259 The artist has spent most of his life in his traditional country on the northern fringes of the Great Sandy Desert northern Western Australia. His father Billy Thomas (Karnta Karnta) has taught him a great deal about the land and its features. This painting shows a small waterhole close to the canning stock route called ‘Kulyayi’ all around are Sandhills ‘Tali’ that are ablaze with wildfire.


Lot 64

Nellie Stewart (1940 - 2011)

Minyma Kutjara, 2009 synthetic polymer paint on Belgian linen 203 x 199 cm $9,000 - 12,000 PROVENANCE Tjungu Palya, NT The Jacquie McPhee Collection, WA ILLUSTRATED The Greatest Passion of All, Jacquie McPhee, 2017, page 295


Lot 65

Emily Kame Kngwarreye (c.1910-1996) Awelye, 1995 synthetic polymer paint on paper 49.5 x 74.5 (paper) 63 x 88 cm (framed) $3,000 - 5,000 PROVENANCE Utopia Art Sydney, Cat # 59-495 Private Collection, NSW EXHIBITED A New Expression, Utopia Art Sydney, 1995 Cat#12


Lot 66

Nyurapayia Nampitjinpa (Mrs Bennett) (1935-2013) Untitled, 2011 synthetic polymer paint on Belgian linen 243.5 x 183 cm $90,000 - 120,000


PROVENANCE Commissioned by Yanda Aboriginal Art Private Collection NSW PUBLICATIONS McGregor K and Hobbs R, The Art of Nyurapayia Nampitjinpa (Mrs. Bennett) with introduction by Nicholas Rothwell, McMillan Art Publishing, Melbourne 2014, Illustrated pp 184 and 185.


Lot 67

Minnie Pwerle (1922 - 2006)

Awelye, 2005 synthetic polymer paint on Belgian linen 145 x 121 cm $5,000 - 8,000 PROVENANCE Dacou Gallery, cat. # DG 05 920 Robert Steele Gallery, New York Private Collection, New York


Lot 68

Weaver Jack (c.1928 - 2010) Nimpi, c. 2007 synthetic polymer paint on canvas 100 x 80 cm $3,500 - 4,500 PROVENANCE Short Street Gallery, WA Aboriginal and Pacific Art Gallery, Sydney, Cat #10293 Private Collection, WA


Lot 69

Jimmy Mawukura Nerrimah (c. 1930 -2013) Kurtul Jila, 2007 synthetic polymer paint on Belgian linen 120 x 60 cm $3,000 - 4,000

PROVENANCE Mangkaja Art Center WA Fireworks Gallery, QLD Private Collection, QLD


Lot 70

Kathleen Petyarre (1940 - )

Mountain Devil Lizard Dreaming, 2007 synthetic polymer paint on Belgian linen 120 x 120 cm $8,000 - 10,000 PROVENANCE Gallerie Australis, SA Cat #GAKP0707515 Private Collection, Qld


Lot 71

Gloria Petyarre Tamerre (1938 - ) Untitled Leaves, 2002 synthetic polymer paint on polyester 180 x 180 cm Est: $18,000 – 25,000 PROVENANCE: Utopia Art, Sydney Sydney Cat # GP2113 Private Collection, VIC EXHIBITED Utopia Art Sydney, 2002


Lot 72

Yannima Tommy Watson (c.1935 - ) Wipe, 2015 synthetic polymer paint on Belgian linen 181 x 305 cm $75,000 - 100,000


PROVENANCE Yanda Art, NT. Accompanied by working images Private Collection, France


Lot 73

Queenie McKenzie Nakarra (1930-1998) Driving in the Blue Mountains, 1998 natural earth pigments on Belgian linen 46 x 60 cm $3,000 - 4,000 PROVENANCE In 1998, Queenie travelled to Sydney for her exhibition at Cooee Gallery. She accompanied Adrian and Anne Newstead on a day trip to the Blue Mountains. She was impressed by the size of the mountains and trees. They visited Mount Tomah and as they drove home at night she was taken by the bush fires still burning in the Grose Valley.


Lot 74

Rover Julama Thomas (1926 - 1998) ‘Bubba’ Dog Dreaming, 1996 natural earth pigments on Belgian linen 100 x 108 cm $25,000-35,000 PROVENANCE Warmun Traditional Artists Cat # RT 0056 Adam Knight Fine Art, Melbourne Private Collection NSW


Lot 75

Jack Dale Mengenen (c.1922 - 2013) Gulwarmedan, 2008 natural earth pigments on canvas 282 x 214 cm $35,000 - 45,000


PROVENANCE Neil Mcleod Fine Art, VIC Private Collection, VIC accompanied by several photos of the artist painting the artwork. REFERENCE Jack Dale Mengenen, Jack Dale Mengenen and Neil McLeod, Circa Press, 2012 Illust pp 6-7


Lot 76

Trevor Nickolls (1949-2012) The Flood, 2012 synthetic polymer paint on canvas 46 x 60 cm $4,000 - 6,000 PROVENANCE Estate of the Artist This painting refers to the biblical flood as well as floods that are a part of nature in Australia. Nickolls was deeply concerned about human beings tinkering with nature in this, as in all of his works, Nickolls includes playful elements. Here the redhead famously depicted on the ubiquitous match box is being interviewed for television in the foreground as the floodwaters rise.


Lot 77

Irenie Ngalinba (1978- )

Was Wak, 2007 natural earth pigment on stringy bark and wood 193 x 70 cm cm (bark) 156 x 24 x 24 cm (hollow log) $10,000 - 12,000 Provenance Maningrida Arts, NT Private Collection, QLD


Western Desert Dialysis Appeal Part 2


Lot 78

Wawiriya Burton (c.1960 - )

Ngayuku Ngura - My Country, 2009 synthetic polymer paint on Belgian linen 122 x 152 cm $2,000 - 3,000 PROVENANCE Tjala Arts, SA accompanied by a certificate cat #385-09 Private Collection, ACT “In this painting Wawiriya has depicted her country. The different colours and designs represent variations in the landscape.� Artist Statement


Lot 79

Jimmy Baker (1920 - 2010)

Kanpiku Tjukurpa, 2008 synthetic polymer paint on Belgian linen 60 x 90 cm $2,000 - 4,000 PROVENANCE Maruku Arts, NT - Original Certificate cat nu. EX224 Private Collection, ACT “Nyangatja ngayuku ngura Kanpinya. Wati ngaringu Kanpila tjiraratjura.” This is my country kanpi. A man lay down there with his legs outstretched.” Artist Statement Jimmy’s Tjukurpa (dreaming) related to Kanpi is to do with the Kalaya or Emu People as well as Wanampi or Water Serpent. Jimmy paints their camp sites and travelling tracks and talks about the food they drink, but doesn’t elaborate on their Creation Law. Coded in Jimmy’s Creation or Law stories is the information needed to hunt and survive and his paintings are a celebration of the stretch of his culture.”


Lot 80

Nyayati Young (c.1949 - )

Walpiti, 2005 synthetic polymer paint on Belgian linen 88 x 200 cm $800 - 1,200 PROVENANCE Ninuku Artists, SA accompanied by a certificate cat #NYUNY05055 Private Collection, ACT


Lot 81

Yaritji Stevens (c.1952 - )

Seven Sisters, 2011 synthetic polymer paint on Belgian linen 150 x 200 cm $2,000 - 3,000 PROVENANCE Tjungu Palya, SA accompanied by a certificate cat #11563 Private Collection, ACT “This is the Seven Sister’s Dreaming. You can see the sisters sitting around the different campsites- the middle is a special campsite. This country is over near Fregon- there are plenty of rockholes and creeks.” Artist Statement


Lot 82

Rupert Jack (1951 - )

Moses-ku Tjukurpa, 2014 synthetic polymer paint on Belgian linen 150 x 68 cm $2,000 - 3,000 PROVENANCE Ernabella Arts, SW accompanied by certificate Alcaston Gallery, VIC Private Collection, ACT


Lot 83

Teresa Baker (1977 - )

Kapi, 2007 synthetic polymer paint on Belgian linen 115 x 133 cm $3,000 - 5,000 PROVENANCE Tjungu Palya, SA accompanied by a certificate cat #07785 Private Collection, ACT


Lot 84

Josephine Watari (1955 - )

Mick Mamungari, 2009 synthetic polymer paint on Belgian linen 97 x 118 cm $800 - 1,200 PROVENANCE Ninuku Artists, SA accompanied by a certificate cat #09354 Private Collection, ACT


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Specialists for this sale: Adrian Newstead OAM adrian@cooeeart.com.au P: +61 (0) 412 126 645 Mirri Leven mirri@cooeeart.com.au P: +61 (0) 416 379 691 Fine Art Bourse: Tim Goodman tim.goodman@fineartbourse.com +61 (0) 481 780 302

COOE E ART MarketPlace

Auction Aboriginal & Oceanic Works of Art Catalouge  

14th November 2017 6pm Bent St Foyer, Chifley Tower, 2 Chifley Square, Sydney

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