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This wonderful time, these some months later, Sabine drove me over to meet this truly delightful person, whom I immediately liked. There is something about faces I instantly take to, or not. I first wrote on and translated André Breton, as I said, because of loving his face, and I wrote on Glenn Gould not just because of a passion for Bach, but also his own impassioned face. And I greatly liked Micheline Catti’s face and her home and her art and — to sum it up and stop there, which is here — her warmth. Now that is what you feel in Luca’s oeuvre — this kind of passion for words and expressions that manage to change the “s’ombre” not only to “somber,” but to the ongoing action, as the word actively takes its shadow into itself. That, now, seemed, and continues to seem, positive to me. Nothing about Gherasim Luca’s work or those around him can leave the reader cold or passive. It is an impassioned statement that engages and ennobles, albeit unconsciously, the poetic act. And that is worth repeating, worth rePEATing.

New York, January 2013

Mary Ann Caws, “Something About This Thing: A Memoir Luca” Hyperion: On the Future of Aesthetics, Vol. VII, No. 3 (fall 2013) 86–90.

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Profile for Contra Mundum Press

Gherasim Luca Centenary Issue  

Essays and reflections in English and French on Romanian surrealist Gherasim Luca, including Luca's own texts and art. Also featuring rumi...

Gherasim Luca Centenary Issue  

Essays and reflections in English and French on Romanian surrealist Gherasim Luca, including Luca's own texts and art. Also featuring rumi...

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