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To “irrationalize” love and particularly erotic behavior, to cite the imperative expressed by Sarane Alexandrian, was one of the more perilous experiences of the surrealist group in Bucharest. It can be found in certain books by Gellu Naum, including Medium (1945), Castelul orbilor/Castle of the Blind (1946), Albul osului/The White of the Bone (1947), and later in Zenobia (1985).6 In more radical fashion, Luca set out his own positions in The Passive Vampire, Anphitrite, in the cubomania productions, and in The Inventor of Love. Of particular interest is Parcurg imposibilul/I Roam the Impossible, which Luca never undertook to translate or rewrite in French. This text presents several types of discourse superimposed on one another: the imperative transitivity of a manifesto, the denotative effectiveness of scientific demonstration, and the incantatory power of strange poetry. Situating himself as “subjectively lyrical and objectively in love,” Luca sets down his experiences in the realm of mediumistic love in an atmosphere impregnated with “poetic satanism.” Indeed, my room, where during the last few months the most inaccessible secrets of love are being unveiled, this room where I feel at all times as a traveler, as a guest to a permanent dialogue with Satan and his faithful demons, offers me as usual the disconcerting and irritating view (the fire and pitch of popular imagination) that makes possible the conspiratorial rendezvous of the infernal forces between the walls of my room.7 In the course of his experimentation, he discovers with amazement the gifts of his beloved, the woman-medium “whose somnambulistic and devoted love causes her to perceive, in advance of my own thought processes, the messages addressed to me from the depths of my being, this lover who anticipates me, who thinks me, who communicates to me only the day after I had radiated from afar a series of actions which she executes in a state of ambulatory automatism and irresistible frenzy.”8 Luca prolongs beyond a season his own sojourn in Hell wherein mingle love, poetry, magic, knowledge, desire. The woman with her mediumistic qualities reveals 6

Zenobia was published in France in 1995, translated and presented by Luba Jurgenson and Sebastian Reichmann (Paris: Maren Sell/Calmann-Lévy). 7 From “I Roam the Impossible,” in The Inventor of Love, translated by Julian & Laura Semilian (Lanham, MD: Black Widow Press, 2009) 36. 8 Ibid., 37.

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Profile for Contra Mundum Press

Gherasim Luca Centenary Issue  

Essays and reflections in English and French on Romanian surrealist Gherasim Luca, including Luca's own texts and art. Also featuring rumi...

Gherasim Luca Centenary Issue  

Essays and reflections in English and French on Romanian surrealist Gherasim Luca, including Luca's own texts and art. Also featuring rumi...

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