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room, always alone, even when my sex, in a perpetual state of erection, magnetically lures from the distance a woman’s skirt, even when the woman’s skirt perpetually caresses me, indulgent, allowing.1 And which ends with this plea that a child half Luca’s age would recognize, and which Luca now accepted at last, having nothing else to give: I write these lines in the hope that they will be read by a king of thieves ferocious enough to receive me among his peers, a band of civic thieves, civic assassins, civic brigands with whom I would like to spend the rest of the days remaining until the end of the war. (Ibid., 134) In order to render Luca’s voice without appealing to its literalness, which would undercut the collective drama he lived through too much, I sought in his poems the kind of evidence I have just provided. More present as intonation than description, as one condition that fueled his desperation, but a condition he had no control over and which imposed its power on him and his friends, allowing them to dispose of it in the only ways they could — clandestinely — I also knew that discretion here was a necessity; that and a kind of imported balance between the quotidian and the poetic that Luca generally abjured for obvious reasons. I do not believe, at the same time, that I misjudged Luca or his voice in the style I performed it in, seeking the emotional source in his lines as if they were transparent to the world he endured. And that world, in turn, colored his lines and sometimes the very reason he took up his pen to chart, upon a sheet of paper, an exceptionally propulsive arc through it. Equally important was determining if Inventor of Love was more than relevant for us during these opening years of the twenty-first century struck by wars, terrorism, ethnic cleansing, revolution, barbaric intolerance, religious fanaticism, misogyny, disasters natural and man made, bank engendered theft                                                                                                               1

“The Kleptobject Sleeps,” Inventor of Love and Other Poems, 133.

 

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Profile for Contra Mundum Press

Gherasim Luca Centenary Issue  

Essays and reflections in English and French on Romanian surrealist Gherasim Luca, including Luca's own texts and art. Also featuring rumi...

Gherasim Luca Centenary Issue  

Essays and reflections in English and French on Romanian surrealist Gherasim Luca, including Luca's own texts and art. Also featuring rumi...

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