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Surrealism throughout its imaginative diaspora circa 1947. It was during this period that The Passive Vampire appeared, a text which Petre Răileanu deemed “Luca's first properly surrealist text,”4 for in it Luca allows “displacement without impediments,” and the radical vivacity of the subconscious spirit where “the Possible replaces the Real.” During the same year (1945) that The Passive Vampire appears, Luca, along with fellow surrealist, Dofi Trost, co-authored Dialectics of the Dialectic, “the capital text... for the Romanian Surrealist Group,” which “affirmed unshakable fidelity to Breton,” to “objective chance” while also intoning an organic critique of surrealism, warning the French group of a phantom tendency just to become another “artistic style.”5 On this latter point, Artaud voiced similar concerns to Breton during this same period when he rejected the latter's conscription of his drawings for gallery display. Never was his energy trumpeted through concealed posture. He was always racing against psychic self-engulfment composing at the scale of frenzy, his violation of grammar being a natural progression of his poetic lahar. He was a master of the indecipherable; he possessed no inclination to compose from imported slates, to list literary influence as a mode of retreat. Luca — always roaming as a neolithic wolf searching for the prey of the unanswerable. His instinct was none other than words that equated with visceral diamonds, which then transmuted to erotic declarations, moist, venereal with contagion. His language remains a circulatory immersion always tainted with treason, with the ravenous as its triumphant genetics of being.

Will Alexander, “Fulminate Inscription as Shadow” Hyperion: On the Future of Aesthetics, Vol. VII, No. 3 (fall 2013) 121–124.                                                                                                               4

Michael Leong, “Surrealism In a Minor Key: Recent Translations of Gherasim Luca,” Hyperallergic (2012). Last accessed October 14, 2013: http://hyperallergic.com/54928/surrealism-in-a-minor-key-recent-translations-of-gherasim-luca/ 5

From Krzysztof Fijalkowski’s intro to Gherasim Luca’s The Passive Vampire (Prague: Twisted Spoon Press, 2009).

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Profile for Contra Mundum Press

Gherasim Luca Centenary Issue  

Essays and reflections in English and French on Romanian surrealist Gherasim Luca, including Luca's own texts and art. Also featuring rumi...

Gherasim Luca Centenary Issue  

Essays and reflections in English and French on Romanian surrealist Gherasim Luca, including Luca's own texts and art. Also featuring rumi...

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