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C A N A D A ’ S

G U I D E

T O

F I N E

T I M E P I E C E S

Concord C1 Tourbillon Gravity The world’s coolest tourbillon (pg.12)

PG. 4 WHAT TO SPEND? | PG. 6 TOP TRENDS | PG. 8 CARBON FiBRE ACCESSORiES | SCATOLO DEL TEMPO | PG. 10 BOND’S WATCHES PG. 12 WATCH TERMiNOLOGY | PG. 14 TiPS ON COLLECTiNG


www.timeandstyle.ca IN CINEMAS NOVEMBER

E D I TO R I A L John McGouran | Publisher Michael La Fave Editorial and Creative Director Carol Besler | Watch Editor Paul Vella | Art Director Jeremy Freed | Managing Editor Leo Petaccia | Associate Editor

AD

Brigitte Foisy | Style Editor Roslyn Costanzo | Associate Style Editor Theresa Quick | Associate Style Editor Alex Hughes | Editorial Intern Contributing Writers Rod Cleaver

OMEGA

Letters to the editor: letters@contempomedia.ca.

A DV E R T I S I N G

PAGE 2

John McGouran Sales Director 416-258-8538 john.mcgouran@contempomedia.ca Paul Olechowski Senior Account Manager 416-854-3619 paul@contempomedia.ca

media inc

Time & Style is published by Contempo Media Inc. No part of this publication may be copied or reprinted without the express written consent of the publisher. Contempo Media Inc. 370 Queen’s Quay West, Suite 203 Toronto, ON M5V 3J3 416-591-0093 Volume 1, Issue 1, December 2008

Tick talk As songwriter Guy Clark said, “the only difference between men and boys is the price of their toys.” Quite right; this is as it should be, except that, at some point, price shouldn’t be the only difference. As a man, it’s time to think about adding a sense of style to your toy chest. Take your watch for example. You have no doubt already ditched your ordinary cell phone for a 3G BlackBerry, swapped the canvas knapsack for a Prada briefcase, and the anorak for a proper overcoat. So what’s with the dime-store digital? No matter what you drive, wear or text with, you must know that you will increase your chances of being taken seriously by wearing a great watch. There is something reassuringly authentic about a great timepiece. Unlike most other luxury products, watches were born of two things: necessity and curiosity. The ancients needed to rotate crops; you need to keep lunch appointments. A timepiece is necessary for the organization of society. That said, the watch has become an important expression of personal style. It can be tastefully subtle (compared with, say, a Lamborghini, which can’t be displayed in either the boardroom or on the basketball court), and yet utterly distinctive, as the watches in this section prove. Since the invention of the escapement mechanism some 200 years ago, one finicky watchmaker after another has demonstrated his inability to simply leave it at that. There is now a very specific watch for everything from mountain climbing to dealmaking, from diving to dancing. There are hundreds of options to suit every activity known to man, including just kicking back and doing nothing. You’re going to need more than one. Timepieces have come a long way since the sun dial. We’re launching Time & Style to get you caught up. Within these pages you’ll find trendsetting timepieces, a brief glossary to help you distinguish a GMT from a tourbillon, and even a few favourite picks from the man with the best toy chest of them all, James Bond. Carol Besler, Watch Editor

Quantum Of Solace © 2008 Danjaq, United Artists, CPII. 007 TM and related James Bond Trademarks © 1962-2008 Danjaq and United Artists. All Rights Reserved. 007 TM and related James Bond Trademarks are trademarks of Danjaq licensed by EON Productions Limited

3 TIME & STYLE


www.timeandstyle.ca IN CINEMAS NOVEMBER

E D I TO R I A L John McGouran | Publisher Michael La Fave Editorial and Creative Director Carol Besler | Watch Editor Paul Vella | Art Director Jeremy Freed | Managing Editor Leo Petaccia | Associate Editor

AD

Brigitte Foisy | Style Editor Roslyn Costanzo | Associate Style Editor Theresa Quick | Associate Style Editor Alex Hughes | Editorial Intern Contributing Writers Rod Cleaver

OMEGA

Letters to the editor: letters@contempomedia.ca.

A DV E R T I S I N G

PAGE 2

John McGouran Sales Director 416-258-8538 john.mcgouran@contempomedia.ca Paul Olechowski Senior Account Manager 416-854-3619 paul@contempomedia.ca

media inc

Time & Style is published by Contempo Media Inc. No part of this publication may be copied or reprinted without the express written consent of the publisher. Contempo Media Inc. 370 Queen’s Quay West, Suite 203 Toronto, ON M5V 3J3 416-591-0093 Volume 1, Issue 1, December 2008

Tick talk As songwriter Guy Clark said, “the only difference between men and boys is the price of their toys.” Quite right; this is as it should be, except that, at some point, price shouldn’t be the only difference. As a man, it’s time to think about adding a sense of style to your toy chest. Take your watch for example. You have no doubt already ditched your ordinary cell phone for a 3G BlackBerry, swapped the canvas knapsack for a Prada briefcase, and the anorak for a proper overcoat. So what’s with the dime-store digital? No matter what you drive, wear or text with, you must know that you will increase your chances of being taken seriously by wearing a great watch. There is something reassuringly authentic about a great timepiece. Unlike most other luxury products, watches were born of two things: necessity and curiosity. The ancients needed to rotate crops; you need to keep lunch appointments. A timepiece is necessary for the organization of society. That said, the watch has become an important expression of personal style. It can be tastefully subtle (compared with, say, a Lamborghini, which can’t be displayed in either the boardroom or on the basketball court), and yet utterly distinctive, as the watches in this section prove. Since the invention of the escapement mechanism some 200 years ago, one finicky watchmaker after another has demonstrated his inability to simply leave it at that. There is now a very specific watch for everything from mountain climbing to dealmaking, from diving to dancing. There are hundreds of options to suit every activity known to man, including just kicking back and doing nothing. You’re going to need more than one. Timepieces have come a long way since the sun dial. We’re launching Time & Style to get you caught up. Within these pages you’ll find trendsetting timepieces, a brief glossary to help you distinguish a GMT from a tourbillon, and even a few favourite picks from the man with the best toy chest of them all, James Bond. Carol Besler, Watch Editor

Quantum Of Solace © 2008 Danjaq, United Artists, CPII. 007 TM and related James Bond Trademarks © 1962-2008 Danjaq and United Artists. All Rights Reserved. 007 TM and related James Bond Trademarks are trademarks of Danjaq licensed by EON Productions Limited

3 TIME & STYLE


Watches can cost very little or more than the average home. What should you expect at each price point.? Time & Style helps. What should I pay for a watch? It depends. Even this, our best estimation of what you might reasonably expect from a watch in a given price range, comes with a caveat: these are not rules, they are guidelines, and there are exceptions. There are so many variables—case and bracelet construction and materials, dial finish, movement specifications and calibers, finishing, components, level of workmanship, exclusivity and, yes, brand name—within these categories, and from one brand to another, that it is impossible to be more than general. To get started read this page, visit a reputable dealer, ask some questions and try on some watches. UNDER $1,000: The watch is likely to have a mineral rather than a sapphire crystal, which means it is less scratch resistant. While it is possible to find a watch with a mechanical movement under $1,000, it is unlikely you’ll find one that is reliable and made to Swiss standards for less than at least $600. You would be better off with quartz in this range; it will be more accurate and will last longer. In terms of metal, the watch could be stainless steel or gold plated (or both). A multi-function quartz movement can provide extra functions, such as alarm, chronograph or date window, but a mechanical watch in this price segment is unlikely to do more than simply tell the time. That said, there are one or two entry-level brands that offer sapphire crystals and decent automatic movements, some with date windows.

TAG Heuer Formula 1 – $900

With a red dial and stainless steel bracelet, a rotating, titanium-carbide coated bezel, screw-in crown, double safety clasp, luminescent hands and hour markers and scratch-resistant sapphire crystal this Tag is an overachiever at this price.

$1,000–$5,000: At this point, you will start finding mechanical, automatic movements, some with complications—that is, extra modules on a basic movement for additional functions, such as power reserve or chronograph. Both quartz and mechanical watches in this category are constructed, finished and calibrated to a higher standard, and are usually Swiss (some COSC certified) or Japanese made. Steel watches in this category should be of a high quality of no less than 316L steel. Combinations of steel and solid gold are available at this price. If it’s solid gold, it will be on a strap, rather than a solid gold bracelet. Hands and markers on the dials in this

segment are likely to be finished with Superluminova, a photoluminescent material that makes them glow in the dark. Bracelets should be supple and well constructed, with links that are individually cast, milled, polished and assembled. Dials might be finished with a guilloché pattern or set with mother-of-pearl. The crystal should be sapphire.

Longines Admiral GMT – $2,950

The 24-hour chapter ring is located in black on the bezel, in contrast to the silvered dial for ease of legibility. Classic yet masculine.

$5,000 PLUS: This is where it gets really interesting. Complicated movements, including day/date, perpetual calendar, moon phase indicator, power-reserve, alarm, minute-repeater, tourbillon. There are many quartz watches in this price range, usually produced by the top luxury brands, and they are well finished, with superior components and detailing. Over $10,000, you can expect to see solid gold and platinum watches (both case and bracelet). For a little more, you can add diamonds; for a lot more, you can add a lot of diamonds. If you go for the full pavé option (covered in diamonds), keep in mind that baguette (square) diamonds are more masculine. Dials are guilloched or composed of mother-of-pearl, enameled, handpainted or made of an exotic mineral such as lapis lazuli or aventurine. You start to get hand finishing in this category, including polished, engraved and otherwise finished components in the movement and on the rotor, which are often visible through a crystal caseback or a window in the dial.

The Patek Philippe Nautilus – $142,300

With moon phase, date, power reserve indicator and seconds subdial—and 5.7 carats of baguette diamonds set into the dial of the 40 mm white-gold case the Nautilus is as fully loaded as it gets.

Special thanks to Michel Cliff, manager of the watch department at Birks on Bloor in Toronto for his expert guidance.

4 TIME & STYLE

©2008 movado group, inc.

Which Watch?

WYNTON MARSALIS, composer-performer, virtuoso. new vizio® chronograph in stainless steel, tungsten carbide, carbon fiber and rubber. movado.com


Watches can cost very little or more than the average home. What should you expect at each price point.? Time & Style helps. What should I pay for a watch? It depends. Even this, our best estimation of what you might reasonably expect from a watch in a given price range, comes with a caveat: these are not rules, they are guidelines, and there are exceptions. There are so many variables—case and bracelet construction and materials, dial finish, movement specifications and calibers, finishing, components, level of workmanship, exclusivity and, yes, brand name—within these categories, and from one brand to another, that it is impossible to be more than general. To get started read this page, visit a reputable dealer, ask some questions and try on some watches. UNDER $1,000: The watch is likely to have a mineral rather than a sapphire crystal, which means it is less scratch resistant. While it is possible to find a watch with a mechanical movement under $1,000, it is unlikely you’ll find one that is reliable and made to Swiss standards for less than at least $600. You would be better off with quartz in this range; it will be more accurate and will last longer. In terms of metal, the watch could be stainless steel or gold plated (or both). A multi-function quartz movement can provide extra functions, such as alarm, chronograph or date window, but a mechanical watch in this price segment is unlikely to do more than simply tell the time. That said, there are one or two entry-level brands that offer sapphire crystals and decent automatic movements, some with date windows.

TAG Heuer Formula 1 – $900

With a red dial and stainless steel bracelet, a rotating, titanium-carbide coated bezel, screw-in crown, double safety clasp, luminescent hands and hour markers and scratch-resistant sapphire crystal this Tag is an overachiever at this price.

$1,000–$5,000: At this point, you will start finding mechanical, automatic movements, some with complications—that is, extra modules on a basic movement for additional functions, such as power reserve or chronograph. Both quartz and mechanical watches in this category are constructed, finished and calibrated to a higher standard, and are usually Swiss (some COSC certified) or Japanese made. Steel watches in this category should be of a high quality of no less than 316L steel. Combinations of steel and solid gold are available at this price. If it’s solid gold, it will be on a strap, rather than a solid gold bracelet. Hands and markers on the dials in this

segment are likely to be finished with Superluminova, a photoluminescent material that makes them glow in the dark. Bracelets should be supple and well constructed, with links that are individually cast, milled, polished and assembled. Dials might be finished with a guilloché pattern or set with mother-of-pearl. The crystal should be sapphire.

Longines Admiral GMT – $2,950

The 24-hour chapter ring is located in black on the bezel, in contrast to the silvered dial for ease of legibility. Classic yet masculine.

$5,000 PLUS: This is where it gets really interesting. Complicated movements, including day/date, perpetual calendar, moon phase indicator, power-reserve, alarm, minute-repeater, tourbillon. There are many quartz watches in this price range, usually produced by the top luxury brands, and they are well finished, with superior components and detailing. Over $10,000, you can expect to see solid gold and platinum watches (both case and bracelet). For a little more, you can add diamonds; for a lot more, you can add a lot of diamonds. If you go for the full pavé option (covered in diamonds), keep in mind that baguette (square) diamonds are more masculine. Dials are guilloched or composed of mother-of-pearl, enameled, handpainted or made of an exotic mineral such as lapis lazuli or aventurine. You start to get hand finishing in this category, including polished, engraved and otherwise finished components in the movement and on the rotor, which are often visible through a crystal caseback or a window in the dial.

The Patek Philippe Nautilus – $142,300

With moon phase, date, power reserve indicator and seconds subdial—and 5.7 carats of baguette diamonds set into the dial of the 40 mm white-gold case the Nautilus is as fully loaded as it gets.

Special thanks to Michel Cliff, manager of the watch department at Birks on Bloor in Toronto for his expert guidance.

4 TIME & STYLE

©2008 movado group, inc.

Which Watch?

WYNTON MARSALIS, composer-performer, virtuoso. new vizio® chronograph in stainless steel, tungsten carbide, carbon fiber and rubber. movado.com


Watch Trends Just as in fashion, timepieces are subject to eeting fads. We’ve selected the more enduring trends for you.

F

ashion experts tell us that in times like these, classic dressing is the way to go—invest in staples rather than shopping for the season. When it comes to fine watches, this habit is not the exception but the rule. There are no “seasons� in watch design. There are annual introductions, usually in very limited editions, but a “trend� can last for years, in some cases, a lifetime, because there is always some classic element. The following six watch design directions have both immediate relevance and staying power. You might say they’re timeless. 1. VINTAGE. The watch industry is about nothing if not tradition. The elite brands have a century of archives to draw on, and producing replicas has become a way of acknowledging a brand’s heritage. Some retro styles have a modern twist, others are faithful versions of the original. All have improved movements. The vintage-inspired William Baume Collection from Baume & Mercier bears the hallmarks of the original 1950s-era collection: an exceptionally large crown, a more rounded case, a silvered dial, tapered hands and a retrograde date indicator. $4,990.

4. SQUARE. Ever since Cartier introduced the SantosDumont in 1911, it has been hip for watches to be square. The past two years in particular have produced a wave of four-sided styles, with a distinctively masculine edge. TAG Heuer classic Monaco chronograph, with black dial and black alligator strap. $3,900 5. ROSE GOLD. Rose gold has a subtle, almost brownish colour that is considered less flashy than yellow gold. It was the colour traditionally used for special-edition watches, but is now mainstream and usually mixed with black in sportier collections. (Gold is alloyed with copper and silver; rose gold simply has a higher proportion of copper).

       

The Movado Series 800 Chronograph in 18k red gold falls into the “sports/elegance� genre, with pinstripe engraving on the black dial and subtle, integrated pushers. $7,700 on a black strap. –C.B.

1.

2.

2. BLACK. This perennial fashion colour has gone totally Johnny Cash in terms of watch design. Dial, markers, bezel and bracelet are piled black-on-black, with cases that are either PVD-coated (physical vapour deposition) or DLC-coated (diamond-like carbon) for extra strength and colour. Engraved metals or carbon fibre, the black leather jacket of watch dials, add texture. The all-black Ebel Tekton, with technofibre strap, is a European football (soccer) watch—made specifically for the FC Bayern Munich team—with a retrograde timer for the two 45-minute periods that comprise a match. Hence the calibre number, 245. $12,900

3.

3. DIAMONDS. Diamonds are now so ubiquitous on women’s watches that not only the fashion brands are set with them. The trend has spilled over to the men’s category in an endeavour to add value and, of course, style. The trick is to keep it subtle to avoid the pimp look. The Harrison from Esquire is a stainless-steel dress watch with an elegant, coin-edged bezel, a Swiss quartz movement and a black, engraved dial set with 12 diamond hour markers. $395

6 TIME & STYLE

4.

5.

           !" #$%&'((() *!+ ,  - !. -,-/ 0! 1 .1/21 /3  !- 4/+ / 0 5.+6 +2.!7 . 3 5 1 +0!, .+ 5 1 /37 ,+

 8       9


Watch Trends Just as in fashion, timepieces are subject to eeting fads. We’ve selected the more enduring trends for you.

F

ashion experts tell us that in times like these, classic dressing is the way to go—invest in staples rather than shopping for the season. When it comes to fine watches, this habit is not the exception but the rule. There are no “seasons� in watch design. There are annual introductions, usually in very limited editions, but a “trend� can last for years, in some cases, a lifetime, because there is always some classic element. The following six watch design directions have both immediate relevance and staying power. You might say they’re timeless. 1. VINTAGE. The watch industry is about nothing if not tradition. The elite brands have a century of archives to draw on, and producing replicas has become a way of acknowledging a brand’s heritage. Some retro styles have a modern twist, others are faithful versions of the original. All have improved movements. The vintage-inspired William Baume Collection from Baume & Mercier bears the hallmarks of the original 1950s-era collection: an exceptionally large crown, a more rounded case, a silvered dial, tapered hands and a retrograde date indicator. $4,990.

4. SQUARE. Ever since Cartier introduced the SantosDumont in 1911, it has been hip for watches to be square. The past two years in particular have produced a wave of four-sided styles, with a distinctively masculine edge. TAG Heuer classic Monaco chronograph, with black dial and black alligator strap. $3,900 5. ROSE GOLD. Rose gold has a subtle, almost brownish colour that is considered less flashy than yellow gold. It was the colour traditionally used for special-edition watches, but is now mainstream and usually mixed with black in sportier collections. (Gold is alloyed with copper and silver; rose gold simply has a higher proportion of copper).

       

The Movado Series 800 Chronograph in 18k red gold falls into the “sports/elegance� genre, with pinstripe engraving on the black dial and subtle, integrated pushers. $7,700 on a black strap. –C.B.

1.

2.

2. BLACK. This perennial fashion colour has gone totally Johnny Cash in terms of watch design. Dial, markers, bezel and bracelet are piled black-on-black, with cases that are either PVD-coated (physical vapour deposition) or DLC-coated (diamond-like carbon) for extra strength and colour. Engraved metals or carbon fibre, the black leather jacket of watch dials, add texture. The all-black Ebel Tekton, with technofibre strap, is a European football (soccer) watch—made specifically for the FC Bayern Munich team—with a retrograde timer for the two 45-minute periods that comprise a match. Hence the calibre number, 245. $12,900

3.

3. DIAMONDS. Diamonds are now so ubiquitous on women’s watches that not only the fashion brands are set with them. The trend has spilled over to the men’s category in an endeavour to add value and, of course, style. The trick is to keep it subtle to avoid the pimp look. The Harrison from Esquire is a stainless-steel dress watch with an elegant, coin-edged bezel, a Swiss quartz movement and a black, engraved dial set with 12 diamond hour markers. $395

6 TIME & STYLE

4.

5.

           !" #$%&'((() *!+ ,  - !. -,-/ 0! 1 .1/21 /3  !- 4/+ / 0 5.+6 +2.!7 . 3 5 1 +0!, .+ 5 1 /37 ,+

 8       9


Carbon Fibre Accessories

GISELE WEARS THE EBEL BRASILIA www.ebel.com

Extensively used in automobile racing and aerospace, carbon fibre brings sex appeal and mystery to anything.

Schedoni Carbon Fibre Briefcase

Schedoni started making bespoke shoes over a century ago, but now produces some of the finest luggage in the world. This briefcase has a carbon fibre exterior, titanium name badge, and is lined with the same suede as is used to adorn Ferrari’s F1 seats. $4,980

Dunhill Sentryman

Dunhill Sentryman Bold, uncomplicated and masculine, the Sentryman collection’s simplicity is modern, with detailing that looks back to classic British designs for inspiration. $950

Porsche Design Smoking Accessories

Carbon fibre might make for stronger, lighter and faster race cars but it also makes for incredibly sexy stuff. Case in point: Porsche Design’s carbon fibre portable humidor, lighter and ashtray. Lighter, P’3635 in carbon black $610, Travel humidor, P’3682 in carbon fibre $1,000, and Ashtray, P’3683 in carbon fibre $600

Winsome Watch Winder

The Scatola del Tempo watch winder has a built-in program selector to rotate your watch according to its power reserve. This prevents either overwinding or leaving the movement static, neither of which are good for an automatic watch. Made of solid brass and fine leather, it also serves as a stunning presentation case. $12,000

MONTREAL LOU GOLDBERG JEWELLERS 514 935 4612

8 TIME & STYLE

TORONTO EUROPEAN JEWELLERY 416 254 1184

CALGARY CALGARY JEWELLERY LTD 1 866 245 3131

VANCOUVER RODEO JEWELLERS 604 266 6339


Carbon Fibre Accessories

GISELE WEARS THE EBEL BRASILIA www.ebel.com

Extensively used in automobile racing and aerospace, carbon fibre brings sex appeal and mystery to anything.

Schedoni Carbon Fibre Briefcase

Schedoni started making bespoke shoes over a century ago, but now produces some of the finest luggage in the world. This briefcase has a carbon fibre exterior, titanium name badge, and is lined with the same suede as is used to adorn Ferrari’s F1 seats. $4,980

Dunhill Sentryman

Dunhill Sentryman Bold, uncomplicated and masculine, the Sentryman collection’s simplicity is modern, with detailing that looks back to classic British designs for inspiration. $950

Porsche Design Smoking Accessories

Carbon fibre might make for stronger, lighter and faster race cars but it also makes for incredibly sexy stuff. Case in point: Porsche Design’s carbon fibre portable humidor, lighter and ashtray. Lighter, P’3635 in carbon black $610, Travel humidor, P’3682 in carbon fibre $1,000, and Ashtray, P’3683 in carbon fibre $600

Winsome Watch Winder

The Scatola del Tempo watch winder has a built-in program selector to rotate your watch according to its power reserve. This prevents either overwinding or leaving the movement static, neither of which are good for an automatic watch. Made of solid brass and fine leather, it also serves as a stunning presentation case. $12,000

MONTREAL LOU GOLDBERG JEWELLERS 514 935 4612

8 TIME & STYLE

TORONTO EUROPEAN JEWELLERY 416 254 1184

CALGARY CALGARY JEWELLERY LTD 1 866 245 3131

VANCOUVER RODEO JEWELLERS 604 266 6339


Secret Agent Standard Time EXPRESS YOUR INNER BOND WITH THESE 007 WATCHES by Carol Besler

1.

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3.

4.

T

he world’s favourite spy, in his perpetual mission to save the world, is invariably in possession of four things: a cool car, a big gun, a beautiful woman and a great watch. And although it is surely every man’s fantasy to break the sound barrier in a custom Aston Martin with, say, Honey Ryder or Xenia Onatopp along for the ride (with your Walther PPk at the ready), it can be argued that the most important and practical of these accoutrements is the watch. Get the right timepiece, and who knows what far-fetched scenarios might follow. Throughout the series of 22 Bond films, including the latest, Quantum of Solace, Bond has worn only five brands: Breitling, Rolex, Omega, Seiko and Hamilton. Thanks to Q, they have variously performed double duty as rocket launchers, laser cutters, detonators, knuckle-dusters, a Geiger counter and an explosive device.Alas, the real-life equivalents do not incorporate these elements, but the important thing is that they look as if they could. For over a decade, 007’s watch of choice has been some version of the Omega Seamaster. Daniel Craig, the current and baddest Bond of all, wears a special-edition Seamaster in Quantum of Solace. But the first few 007s wore a Rolex Submariner, beginning with 1962’s Dr. No. A Brietling Top Time Diver Ocean made an appearance in 1965’s Thunderball, followed by a Hamilton Pulsar in 1973’s Live and Let Die. Then Seiko, the inventer of quartz movements, dominated the next four Bond films. The Submariner surfaced again, sharing airtime with Hamilton in Live and Let Die, this time equipped with a buzz-saw. The Omega franchise began with GoldenEye in 1995—concurrent with the revival of mechanical watchmaking. it was specially equipped with a laser beam that allowed Pierce Brosnan to escape from a train where he was being held captive. Four films later, the Omega Seamaster has built a reputation as the Bond watch of choice—and a collectors’ favourite. Last year, watch auction house Antiquorum sold two original Omegas worn by Daniel Craig in Casino Royale for $49,500 US and $177,140 US. Laser beams not included. MODERN EQUIVALENTS

1. Omega Quantum of Solace Seamaster Planet Ocean

A helium escape valve is about as cool as it gets for a real-life watch without the “Q” treatment. Omega’s self-winding co-axial chronograph will take you to a depth of 600 metres (2,000 feet). The black dial’s textured surface is reminiscent of the grip of Bond’s trademark Walther pistol.The 007 logo is engraved on the caseback. This is a limited edition of 5,007 pieces. $4,900

Q-INSPIRED CAR WATCH You never see James Bond fumbling in his pocket for his car keys, and neither will you if are lucky enough to drive an Aston Martin. Elite watchmaker Jaeger LeCoultre’s AMVOX 2 chronograph is fitted with a transponder that will, at a touch of the crystal, open the door of your Aston Martin DBS.The watch is a pushpiece-free chronograph, activated by pressing the crystal at 12 o’clock (to start and stop) and 6 o’clock (to reset). A lever lock on the case side prevents inadvertent activation during high-speed chases. Non-Aston Martin drivers can get an AMVOX 3, the same watch but without the open/close door transponder and, instead of a chronograph, it is fitted with tourbillon and GMT functions. It retains the numerals, leatherwork and delicate grill from Aston Martin design features, and is limited to 300 pieces. AMVOX 3: $82,000: AMVOX 2: $37,900.

2. Breitling Superocean Heritage Chrono

in Thunderball (1965) Bond’s Breitling Top Time was equipped with a Geiger counter, which helped Sean Connery locate two atomic bombs in the possession of SPECTRE.Today’s steel Superocean Heritage automatic chronograph may not be a radiation detector, but it’s definitely a babe magnet. $4,800 on a steel bracelet.

3. Rolex Oyster Perpetual Submariner

The Submariner is not for sissies. if you can stand the pressure at depths of 300 metres (1,000 feet), so can this classic Rolex. A triple-lock crown seals the case, made of especially tough, Rolex-forged steel.The ceramic and gold bezel will never scratch, and the fliplock clasp holds the watch firmly to your wrist in the event of hand-to-hand combat. $6,260

4. Seiko Alarm Chronograph

The classic TV-screen dial defined the futuristic watch designs of the ’70s, epitomized by Seiko, the inventor of quartz.This modern equivalent chronograph can measure up to 60 minutes in 1/5-second increments. it includes a tachymeter and second time zone. Souped-up Seikos appear in The Spy Who Loved Me (1974), For Your Eyes Only, Octopussy and Moonraker. $445 10 TIME & STYLE


Secret Agent Standard Time EXPRESS YOUR INNER BOND WITH THESE 007 WATCHES by Carol Besler

1.

2.

3.

4.

T

he world’s favourite spy, in his perpetual mission to save the world, is invariably in possession of four things: a cool car, a big gun, a beautiful woman and a great watch. And although it is surely every man’s fantasy to break the sound barrier in a custom Aston Martin with, say, Honey Ryder or Xenia Onatopp along for the ride (with your Walther PPk at the ready), it can be argued that the most important and practical of these accoutrements is the watch. Get the right timepiece, and who knows what far-fetched scenarios might follow. Throughout the series of 22 Bond films, including the latest, Quantum of Solace, Bond has worn only five brands: Breitling, Rolex, Omega, Seiko and Hamilton. Thanks to Q, they have variously performed double duty as rocket launchers, laser cutters, detonators, knuckle-dusters, a Geiger counter and an explosive device.Alas, the real-life equivalents do not incorporate these elements, but the important thing is that they look as if they could. For over a decade, 007’s watch of choice has been some version of the Omega Seamaster. Daniel Craig, the current and baddest Bond of all, wears a special-edition Seamaster in Quantum of Solace. But the first few 007s wore a Rolex Submariner, beginning with 1962’s Dr. No. A Brietling Top Time Diver Ocean made an appearance in 1965’s Thunderball, followed by a Hamilton Pulsar in 1973’s Live and Let Die. Then Seiko, the inventer of quartz movements, dominated the next four Bond films. The Submariner surfaced again, sharing airtime with Hamilton in Live and Let Die, this time equipped with a buzz-saw. The Omega franchise began with GoldenEye in 1995—concurrent with the revival of mechanical watchmaking. it was specially equipped with a laser beam that allowed Pierce Brosnan to escape from a train where he was being held captive. Four films later, the Omega Seamaster has built a reputation as the Bond watch of choice—and a collectors’ favourite. Last year, watch auction house Antiquorum sold two original Omegas worn by Daniel Craig in Casino Royale for $49,500 US and $177,140 US. Laser beams not included. MODERN EQUIVALENTS

1. Omega Quantum of Solace Seamaster Planet Ocean

A helium escape valve is about as cool as it gets for a real-life watch without the “Q” treatment. Omega’s self-winding co-axial chronograph will take you to a depth of 600 metres (2,000 feet). The black dial’s textured surface is reminiscent of the grip of Bond’s trademark Walther pistol.The 007 logo is engraved on the caseback. This is a limited edition of 5,007 pieces. $4,900

Q-INSPIRED CAR WATCH You never see James Bond fumbling in his pocket for his car keys, and neither will you if are lucky enough to drive an Aston Martin. Elite watchmaker Jaeger LeCoultre’s AMVOX 2 chronograph is fitted with a transponder that will, at a touch of the crystal, open the door of your Aston Martin DBS.The watch is a pushpiece-free chronograph, activated by pressing the crystal at 12 o’clock (to start and stop) and 6 o’clock (to reset). A lever lock on the case side prevents inadvertent activation during high-speed chases. Non-Aston Martin drivers can get an AMVOX 3, the same watch but without the open/close door transponder and, instead of a chronograph, it is fitted with tourbillon and GMT functions. It retains the numerals, leatherwork and delicate grill from Aston Martin design features, and is limited to 300 pieces. AMVOX 3: $82,000: AMVOX 2: $37,900.

2. Breitling Superocean Heritage Chrono

in Thunderball (1965) Bond’s Breitling Top Time was equipped with a Geiger counter, which helped Sean Connery locate two atomic bombs in the possession of SPECTRE.Today’s steel Superocean Heritage automatic chronograph may not be a radiation detector, but it’s definitely a babe magnet. $4,800 on a steel bracelet.

3. Rolex Oyster Perpetual Submariner

The Submariner is not for sissies. if you can stand the pressure at depths of 300 metres (1,000 feet), so can this classic Rolex. A triple-lock crown seals the case, made of especially tough, Rolex-forged steel.The ceramic and gold bezel will never scratch, and the fliplock clasp holds the watch firmly to your wrist in the event of hand-to-hand combat. $6,260

4. Seiko Alarm Chronograph

The classic TV-screen dial defined the futuristic watch designs of the ’70s, epitomized by Seiko, the inventor of quartz.This modern equivalent chronograph can measure up to 60 minutes in 1/5-second increments. it includes a tachymeter and second time zone. Souped-up Seikos appear in The Spy Who Loved Me (1974), For Your Eyes Only, Octopussy and Moonraker. $445 10 TIME & STYLE


Watch Words The current renaissance in mechanical watchmaking, which began in the mid-1990s, has fostered more improvements in wristwatch technology, components, materials and design than any advancements in the previous 25 years. As a result, buying a watch is now almost as puzzling as buying a stereo system. Or hair products. As with either of those, the first thing to learn is the lingo.

COMPLICATION: Any function other than the indication of hours, minutes and seconds. It can be timerelated (a chronograph, minute repeater, tourbillon, dual time or power reserve indicator), or not (an altimeter, depth gauge or compass).

TOURBILLON: The tourbillon is a pure blue-chip complication, invented in 1801 to regulate deviations in timekeeping due to the effects of gravity. There is no more coveted (or expensive) work of horology and none more difficult to execute. The convention is to open a window on the dial to expose the mechanism. Two things distinguish the Concord C1 Gravity tourbillon from its contemporaries. The escapement mechanism is inclined in the vertical position, and the cage in which it is housed is extended to a position outside the case at 4 o’clock. The watch is also a flyback chronograph. It is made in very limited quantities. $320,000

CHRONOGRAPH: A timepiece with a stopwatch function in the form of a central seconds hand that can be started, stopped and returned to zero to measure intervals of time. It conventionally has three subdials that clock regular seconds and totalize chronograph hours and minutes. A flyback chronograph is one that can be stopped and started with a single pusher. A split-seconds or rattrapante chronograph has two central seconds hands that can be used to time two intervals that start, but do not stop at the same time. The Panerai Luminor 1950 is a rattrapante chronograph and all-round tough-guy watch, with trademark crown protector in brushed steel. This is one of four in-house mechanical movements made by Panerai. $14,400

12 TIME & STYLE

CHRONOMETER: Often confused with chronograph, a chronometer is a watch that has met the standards of the Contrôle Officiel Suisse des Chronomètres (COSC), the Swiss lab that runs watches through a series of tests over several days, in different positions and at different temperatures. If it passes the torture test, the watch is a COSC-certified chronometer. PERPETUAL CALENDAR: This is a watch with day/date/year indicators, and is called perpetual because it automatically adjusts to months with 30 days and to the 28 or 29 days in February. Unless it takes into account century years that are not leap years, it will need adjusting in 2100, 2200 and 2300 (because of a weird glitch in the Gregorian calendar), so when you bequeath the watch to your heirs, be sure to leave instructions. The IWC Da Vinci’s claim to fame is its four-digit date window, especially exciting at the turn of the millennium, when all four digits moved at once. The Da Vinci is an automatic, with a 44-hour power reserve. $24,000 in steel ALARM: A watch that automatically sounds at a preset time. Handy when travelling (hence often included in a dual timer) or in the absence of a secretary to remind you of appointments. A vibrating function prevents you from needlessly alarming others. Tissot’s T-Touch Expert is something of a showoff, with 15 functions, including two alarms, an altimeter, chronograph, compass, barometric pressure gauge and thermometer. It contains a Swiss multifunction quartz movement. $1,195

GMT DUAL TIMER: Greenwich Mean Time is expressed in a wristwatch on a 24-hour dial or subdial, which usually represents local time, while a second time zone is represented on a 12-hour scale. A dual timer often has a day/night indicator, in case you get confused on those long flights (or late nights). “Toronto Black,” the new C1 World Timer from Concord has Toronto in its list of cities, plus a mechanical selfwinding movement with a steel and DLC (diamond-like carbon) case and vulcanized rubber strap. Limited edition of 20 pieces. $21,000 MINUTE REPEATER: It strikes the hour, quarter-hour and minutes automatically (called a “passing strike”) or “repeats” them on demand at the push of a button. A low-pitched note signals each hour, a double high/low strike marks the quarter hours and a high-pitched chime indicates minutes that have passed since the last quarter. The chime is produced by two tiny hammers that strike a gong—actually a metal (usually steel) rod positioned around the perimeter inside the case. The repeater was invented in order to check the time at night without having to light a candle, in the days before electricity. SELF­WINDING (AUTOMATIC): Refers to a mechanical watch equipped with a rotor that winds the mainspring by using the movement of the wearer’s arm. A manual-wound watch requires the mainspring to be wound via the crown. SKELETONIZED: A mechanical watch with the bridges and plates cut away to expose the wheels and levers of the movement, all of which are highly decorated. It can be seen through a sapphire crystal caseback or front. Often confused with an “open worked” watch, in which the movement is visible but not decorated. –C.B.

13 TIME & STYLE


Watch Words The current renaissance in mechanical watchmaking, which began in the mid-1990s, has fostered more improvements in wristwatch technology, components, materials and design than any advancements in the previous 25 years. As a result, buying a watch is now almost as puzzling as buying a stereo system. Or hair products. As with either of those, the first thing to learn is the lingo.

COMPLICATION: Any function other than the indication of hours, minutes and seconds. It can be timerelated (a chronograph, minute repeater, tourbillon, dual time or power reserve indicator), or not (an altimeter, depth gauge or compass).

TOURBILLON: The tourbillon is a pure blue-chip complication, invented in 1801 to regulate deviations in timekeeping due to the effects of gravity. There is no more coveted (or expensive) work of horology and none more difficult to execute. The convention is to open a window on the dial to expose the mechanism. Two things distinguish the Concord C1 Gravity tourbillon from its contemporaries. The escapement mechanism is inclined in the vertical position, and the cage in which it is housed is extended to a position outside the case at 4 o’clock. The watch is also a flyback chronograph. It is made in very limited quantities. $320,000

CHRONOGRAPH: A timepiece with a stopwatch function in the form of a central seconds hand that can be started, stopped and returned to zero to measure intervals of time. It conventionally has three subdials that clock regular seconds and totalize chronograph hours and minutes. A flyback chronograph is one that can be stopped and started with a single pusher. A split-seconds or rattrapante chronograph has two central seconds hands that can be used to time two intervals that start, but do not stop at the same time. The Panerai Luminor 1950 is a rattrapante chronograph and all-round tough-guy watch, with trademark crown protector in brushed steel. This is one of four in-house mechanical movements made by Panerai. $14,400

12 TIME & STYLE

CHRONOMETER: Often confused with chronograph, a chronometer is a watch that has met the standards of the Contrôle Officiel Suisse des Chronomètres (COSC), the Swiss lab that runs watches through a series of tests over several days, in different positions and at different temperatures. If it passes the torture test, the watch is a COSC-certified chronometer. PERPETUAL CALENDAR: This is a watch with day/date/year indicators, and is called perpetual because it automatically adjusts to months with 30 days and to the 28 or 29 days in February. Unless it takes into account century years that are not leap years, it will need adjusting in 2100, 2200 and 2300 (because of a weird glitch in the Gregorian calendar), so when you bequeath the watch to your heirs, be sure to leave instructions. The IWC Da Vinci’s claim to fame is its four-digit date window, especially exciting at the turn of the millennium, when all four digits moved at once. The Da Vinci is an automatic, with a 44-hour power reserve. $24,000 in steel ALARM: A watch that automatically sounds at a preset time. Handy when travelling (hence often included in a dual timer) or in the absence of a secretary to remind you of appointments. A vibrating function prevents you from needlessly alarming others. Tissot’s T-Touch Expert is something of a showoff, with 15 functions, including two alarms, an altimeter, chronograph, compass, barometric pressure gauge and thermometer. It contains a Swiss multifunction quartz movement. $1,195

GMT DUAL TIMER: Greenwich Mean Time is expressed in a wristwatch on a 24-hour dial or subdial, which usually represents local time, while a second time zone is represented on a 12-hour scale. A dual timer often has a day/night indicator, in case you get confused on those long flights (or late nights). “Toronto Black,” the new C1 World Timer from Concord has Toronto in its list of cities, plus a mechanical selfwinding movement with a steel and DLC (diamond-like carbon) case and vulcanized rubber strap. Limited edition of 20 pieces. $21,000 MINUTE REPEATER: It strikes the hour, quarter-hour and minutes automatically (called a “passing strike”) or “repeats” them on demand at the push of a button. A low-pitched note signals each hour, a double high/low strike marks the quarter hours and a high-pitched chime indicates minutes that have passed since the last quarter. The chime is produced by two tiny hammers that strike a gong—actually a metal (usually steel) rod positioned around the perimeter inside the case. The repeater was invented in order to check the time at night without having to light a candle, in the days before electricity. SELF­WINDING (AUTOMATIC): Refers to a mechanical watch equipped with a rotor that winds the mainspring by using the movement of the wearer’s arm. A manual-wound watch requires the mainspring to be wound via the crown. SKELETONIZED: A mechanical watch with the bridges and plates cut away to expose the wheels and levers of the movement, all of which are highly decorated. It can be seen through a sapphire crystal caseback or front. Often confused with an “open worked” watch, in which the movement is visible but not decorated. –C.B.

13 TIME & STYLE


Collector’s Corner

INTRODUCING THE WOMEN’S ESQ FUSION CHRONOGRAPH

Now that we’ve whet your appetite and you’re itching to start amassing watches, take a moment to read the words of master collector and reseller Rod Cleaver. their heritage to reproduce models such as the Monaco, Monza, Autavia and Carrera. Most die-hard collectors build themed collections, concentrating on only one brand or watch type. Some yearn to possess every incarnation of a particular model, sometimes dissecting it down to the size of font on the dial. As a beginner, your first objective should be to set a budget on what you can afford to commit to a collection. Next, decide if you are a new watch person or a vintage watch aficionado. The new watches come with warranties, and servicing will likely be more convenient as the manufacturer’s service centre will be able to take care of your issues for some time to come. Vintage pieces, which should also come with a warranty if purchased from a reputable reseller, may require a bit more commitment down the road. You may find yourself spending hours on the Internet helping your trusted watchmaker search for discontinued parts. Some of the top brands such as Patek Philippe, Rolex and Omega still service their vintage pieces and often have restoration services for older collectible pieces. When buying a new watch, ensure you are dealing with an authorized dealer who will supply a valid warranty card. This not only ensures troublefree servicing but also adds value if at some point down the road the watch becomes collectible. Many manufacturers will not honour grey market or imported pieces and occasionally serial numbers are removed from these watches to protect the dealer, who likely violated their franchise agreement by exporting them. If you’re leaning towards vintage pieces, remember you are buying the dealer, not the watch. It’s a phrase passed on often from collectors to newcomers. The idea is that a reputable dealer will stand behind the watch he or she is selling and will guarantee the authenticity of the item. Many online forums and collector groups maintain lists of both recommended dealers and ones to avoid. With a clear idea of what you are looking for, watch collecting can be a very rewarding experience. At the very least, it will likely introduce you to a community of like-minded individuals. In the end, most collecting comes down to the people. It’s why we do it.

14 TIME & STYLE

©2008 ESQ SWISS, a division of Movado Group, Inc.

A

watch is a unique form of collectible. It is essentially an obsolete instrument in the mold of the sextant or telescope. Just about every electronic device we carry displays the date and time more accurately than a mechanical timepiece. Why then does the wristwatch persist? A watch has become a statement of the individual’s personality and style. It really has become the most prominent piece of jewelry a man wears. When starting a collection, decide what type of collector you want to be: the hoarder or the exhibitionist. The hoarder buys and hides away the pieces he or she acquires. One collector I know has approximately 700 watches stashed away in multiple safety deposit boxes and has never worn more than a handful of them. The exhibitionist proudly wears the pieces he owns. I have always been confused by the collector who seeks out the most desirable pieces, often paying a premium for one in unworn condition, only to slap it on his wrist and head out for a cup of coffee. Alternately, some would argue that there’s no point in having fine watches if you aren’t going to wear them. It’s up to you. One invaluable piece of advice is to buy what you like or find appealing. Chances are if you find the watch attractive, someone else will as well, and thus demand is born. There are some elements of the market that are traded as blue chip investments, but these are not for the entry-level collector. It is not unusual for top-level pieces to fetch $100,000 and some can reach over $500,000. Historically, re-editions of popular or iconic watches generally tend to do well as collectibles. Longines has reissued versions of their famed Lindberg pilot’s watch more than once. Rolex has recently released new versions of their popular GMT pilot’s watch as well as the hyper-collectible Milgauss model, first produced as an anti-magnetic model for workers in electrical plants in the 1950s. One particular watch that has essentially gone cosmetically unchanged and remained in production for over 50 years is the Omega Speedmaster, which also happens to be the first watch worn on the moon. Both vintage examples and new limited edition models are sought after on the collector circuit. Tag Heuer has also tapped into

Rose gold-plated. Diamonds. Stainless steel. Mother-of-pearl. Sapphire crystal. Leather. A dynamic fusion of sport and elegance in a boldly feminine watch design.

ESQSWISS.COM


Collector’s Corner

INTRODUCING THE WOMEN’S ESQ FUSION CHRONOGRAPH

Now that we’ve whet your appetite and you’re itching to start amassing watches, take a moment to read the words of master collector and reseller Rod Cleaver. their heritage to reproduce models such as the Monaco, Monza, Autavia and Carrera. Most die-hard collectors build themed collections, concentrating on only one brand or watch type. Some yearn to possess every incarnation of a particular model, sometimes dissecting it down to the size of font on the dial. As a beginner, your first objective should be to set a budget on what you can afford to commit to a collection. Next, decide if you are a new watch person or a vintage watch aficionado. The new watches come with warranties, and servicing will likely be more convenient as the manufacturer’s service centre will be able to take care of your issues for some time to come. Vintage pieces, which should also come with a warranty if purchased from a reputable reseller, may require a bit more commitment down the road. You may find yourself spending hours on the Internet helping your trusted watchmaker search for discontinued parts. Some of the top brands such as Patek Philippe, Rolex and Omega still service their vintage pieces and often have restoration services for older collectible pieces. When buying a new watch, ensure you are dealing with an authorized dealer who will supply a valid warranty card. This not only ensures troublefree servicing but also adds value if at some point down the road the watch becomes collectible. Many manufacturers will not honour grey market or imported pieces and occasionally serial numbers are removed from these watches to protect the dealer, who likely violated their franchise agreement by exporting them. If you’re leaning towards vintage pieces, remember you are buying the dealer, not the watch. It’s a phrase passed on often from collectors to newcomers. The idea is that a reputable dealer will stand behind the watch he or she is selling and will guarantee the authenticity of the item. Many online forums and collector groups maintain lists of both recommended dealers and ones to avoid. With a clear idea of what you are looking for, watch collecting can be a very rewarding experience. At the very least, it will likely introduce you to a community of like-minded individuals. In the end, most collecting comes down to the people. It’s why we do it.

14 TIME & STYLE

©2008 ESQ SWISS, a division of Movado Group, Inc.

A

watch is a unique form of collectible. It is essentially an obsolete instrument in the mold of the sextant or telescope. Just about every electronic device we carry displays the date and time more accurately than a mechanical timepiece. Why then does the wristwatch persist? A watch has become a statement of the individual’s personality and style. It really has become the most prominent piece of jewelry a man wears. When starting a collection, decide what type of collector you want to be: the hoarder or the exhibitionist. The hoarder buys and hides away the pieces he or she acquires. One collector I know has approximately 700 watches stashed away in multiple safety deposit boxes and has never worn more than a handful of them. The exhibitionist proudly wears the pieces he owns. I have always been confused by the collector who seeks out the most desirable pieces, often paying a premium for one in unworn condition, only to slap it on his wrist and head out for a cup of coffee. Alternately, some would argue that there’s no point in having fine watches if you aren’t going to wear them. It’s up to you. One invaluable piece of advice is to buy what you like or find appealing. Chances are if you find the watch attractive, someone else will as well, and thus demand is born. There are some elements of the market that are traded as blue chip investments, but these are not for the entry-level collector. It is not unusual for top-level pieces to fetch $100,000 and some can reach over $500,000. Historically, re-editions of popular or iconic watches generally tend to do well as collectibles. Longines has reissued versions of their famed Lindberg pilot’s watch more than once. Rolex has recently released new versions of their popular GMT pilot’s watch as well as the hyper-collectible Milgauss model, first produced as an anti-magnetic model for workers in electrical plants in the 1950s. One particular watch that has essentially gone cosmetically unchanged and remained in production for over 50 years is the Omega Speedmaster, which also happens to be the first watch worn on the moon. Both vintage examples and new limited edition models are sought after on the collector circuit. Tag Heuer has also tapped into

Rose gold-plated. Diamonds. Stainless steel. Mother-of-pearl. Sapphire crystal. Leather. A dynamic fusion of sport and elegance in a boldly feminine watch design.

ESQSWISS.COM


Time & Style 2008  

Time & Style 2008

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