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CTS Cement

Public Relations Portfolio 2011-2012 Edition


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Even Greener Concrete May 2011 By Ken Vallens By now, concrete’s status as a green building material has been well-established: It’s durable and sustainable, enhances energy efficiency, and often contains recycled materials. Concrete has been used as the primary building material on a number of LEED-certified buildings around the country, including office buildings, condominiums, schools, and hospitals. But one company is making concrete even greener—in their fast-setting, high-strength, Rapid Set cement, CTS Cement has increased the use of recycled materials, reduced the amount of carbon emissions produced during manufacturing, and increased durability to create a line of cement products that’s better for the environment. Studies show that Rapid Set cement has a carbon footprint that’s 32 to 36 percent lower than portland cement (Fig. 1). CUTTING CARBON EMISSIONS The primary green benefit of Rapid Set cement can be found in reduced carbon emissions during the manufacturing process. Cement is made by heating limestone and other materials in a kiln. The resulting hard substance, called “clinker,” is ground with a small amount of gypsum to make the cement. During the heating process, the raw materials decompose, releasing carbon dioxide into the atmosphere. The combustion of the fuel used to heat the kiln (usually coal) also produces carbon dioxide, in a similar form to car exhaust. While the manufacture of Rapid Set cement doesn’t completely eliminate these emissions, it does reduce them sharply. The main reason is that the kiln used to produce Rapid Set cement requires less fuel than for portland cement, producing only 0.21 pounds of combustion-based CO2 per pound of cement. (portland cement produces approximately 0.36 pounds.) Further, because the Rapid Set mix relies on less limestone than portland cement, the material breakdown that happens during production also yields less CO2. The thermal decarbonation of limestone in Rapid Set produces only 0.40 pounds of CO2, compared to 0.54 pounds with portland cement.

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5/18/2011


Modern Contractor Solutions™

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REDUCING THROUGH RECYCLING Most traditional concrete mixes contain some recycled material— typically, existing concrete that has been recycled as aggregate. But CTS goes a step further by using by -products from other recycling processes (including aluminum and other industrial by-products) as raw materials for its Rapid Set cement mix. Using these by-products has a number of benefits. The recycling process alone prevents raw materials such as bauxite from being removed from the ground, and generates 95 percent less air pollution and 97 percent less water pollution than the creation of new aluminum. The waste generated during aluminum creation, such as red mud, is also eliminated with aluminum recycling. LIFE CYCLE CONSIDERATIONS The enhanced green benefits of Rapid Set don’t end with the production process, though—the durable, high-strength concrete has an estimated life cycle more than twice that of portland cement, according to tests on the Seattle/Tacoma International Airport’s pavement. Because of its rapidstrength formation, lower porosity, and subsequent internal self-desiccation, Rapid Set offers greater resistance to common concrete pavement problems like carbonation, freeze-thaw susceptibility, and acid rain leaching. CASE STUDY Flagship Store in NYC Eliminates Graywater When the Molvena, Italy-based Diesel Jeans Company decided to renovate some prime real estate on Fifth Avenue in Manhattan for a new flagship store, the environment weighed in as the design and construction team made decisions regarding materials for the project. “The owners were looking for an industrial floor that would produce no graywater during maintenance,” says Matt Johnson, principal of Green Earth Floors of Tuckahoe New York. “The floor we provided—a terrazzo strip design with a half-inch Rapid Set TRU Self Leveling (topping, resurfacer, and underlayment) topping—will only need water and conditioner for its maintenance, which will result in no graywater from bleaches and detergents.” In recent years, graywater has become a concern for many due to dwindling reserves of groundwater and overloaded or costly sewage treatment plants. Johnson and his crew from Green Earth Floors began work in November of 2008. The project was completed in 2 weeks. The scope of work included a total of 6,000 square feet on the building’s first and third floors. Green Earth Floors used Rapid Set Acrylic Primer, set the terrazzo strips to the required elevations, mixed and poured the TRU Self-Leveling to ½-inch depth, and let it cure for 4 hours. “One of the good things about this project is that they chose Rapid Set TRU Self Leveling as their flooring solution,” says Johnson. “With this topping, we have very little wait time on the cure. We can start our grind and polish within hours after the pour. On the other hand, new concrete requires a minimum of 14 days before the polish process can be started.” The Rapid Set TRU used for the project is self-leveling. According to Johnson, the floor reached a

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5/18/2011


Modern Contractor Solutions™

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1/16 of an inch level with a floor flatness of 40. A total of 850 bags of Rapid Set TRU were used. To color the concrete, Green Earth Floors used three different shades of stain from Scofield to achieve the unique color the owner desired. Next, Green Earth applied a Scofield lithium densifier. According to Green Earth Floors, a scoff test indicates that the Diesel Jeans store also has very safe floors, in wet or dry conditions. “We don’t seal anything, so the floor stays somewhat porous and that helps displace water,” says Johnson. “You can walk on it whether it’s wet or dry.” The flagship Diesel Jeans store on Fifth Avenue opened in January of 2009. The owners and design team are very pleased with the outcome of their environmentally friendly, polished concrete floors. ■ About the Author: Ken Vallens is vice president product development at CTS Cement Manufacturing Corporation, which manufactures Rapid Set® professional-grade cement products for concrete repairs and new construction projects. For more information, visit www.ctscement.com. Download a pdf version of this article. | Adobe Reader is required.

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5/18/2011


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Contact: Janet Ong, Marketing Director CTS Cement Manufacturing Corporation | Rapid Set® Products 800-929-3030 ext. 110 -- http://www.ctscement.com

The Court of Appeal of the State of California Affirms Ruling against Ultimax Cement in Case against CTS Cement Manufacturing Corporation (Cypress, CA — Aug. 1, 2011) — The Court of Appeal of the State of California affirmed an earlier ruling by the Los Angeles Superior Court of California against Ultimax Cement and its principal, Hassan Kunbargi, in their alleged trade secret misappropriation case against CTS Cement Manufacturing Corporation and Edward K. Rice. In 2006, Ultimax Cement and Hassan Kunbargi filed suit in California Superior Court against CTS and its Chairman, Edward K. Rice, alleging unfair competition and misappropriation of trade secrets. The suit was a follow-up to a 2002 patent infringement case brought by Ultimax, alleging that CTS had infringed three of its patents and stolen its trade secrets. In a January 2008 ruling, the U.S. District Court had dismissed Ultimax’s trade secret claim. The suit in Superior Court of California centered once again around Ultimax’s contention that CTS had misappropriated confidential information, namely the combination of lithium carbonate and citric acid in rapid-setting calcium sulfoaluminate cements. Ultimax asked the court for monetary damages against CTS. In a sweeping Statement of Decision that adopted CTS’s positions, the Honorable Judge Jon M. Mayeda found, among other things, that the combination of citric acid and lithium carbonate in cement was not a secret and was well known in the industry, that CTS and Rice did not misappropriate anything from Ultimax, that CTS and Rice never used the allegedly confidential information, and that, in any event, Ultimax did not prove that it suffered any damage. Judge Mayeda denied Ultimax and Kunbargi any monetary relief, stating that “even though Ultimax always had the ability to sell its cement and always had access to the formula [which, in fact, it did not even follow], Ultimax was never able to earn a profit.” In a blistering ruling against Ultimax and the failings of its legal representation, the California Court of Appeal affirmed the judgment of the Superior Court. CTS Cement Manufacturing Corporation was represented by the law firm of Leonard, Dicker & Schreiber, LLP in Beverly Hills. Ultimax Cement and Kunbargi were represented by Saied Kashani, Esq. ###


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L.A. Superior Court affirms ruling against Ultimax Posted By Tina Barbaccia On August 3, 2011 @ 2:15 am In Construction News | No Comments

The Court of Appeal of the State of California affirmed an earlier ruling by the Los Angeles Superior Court of California against Ultimax Cement and its principal, Hassan Kunbargi, in their alleged trade secret misappropriation case against CTS Cement Manufacturing Corp. and Edward K. Rice. In 2006, Ultimax Cement and Hassan Kunbargi filed suit in California Superior Court against CTS and its Chairman, Edward K. Rice, alleging unfair competition and misappropriation of trade secrets. The suit was a follow-up to a 2002 patent infringement case brought by Ultimax, alleging that CTS had infringed three of its patents and stolen its trade secrets. In a January 2008 ruling, the U.S. District Court had dismissed Ultimax’s trade secret claim. The suit in Superior Court of California centered once again around Ultimax’s contention that CTS had misappropriated confidential information, namely the combination of lithium carbonate and citric acid in rapid-setting calcium sulfoaluminate cements. Ultimax asked the court for monetary damages against CTS. In a sweeping Statement of Decision that adopted CTS’s positions, the Honorable Judge Jon M. Mayeda found, among other things, that the combination of citric acid and lithium carbonate in cement was not a secret and was well known in the industry, that CTS and Rice did not misappropriate anything from Ultimax, that CTS and Rice never used the allegedly confidential information, and that, in any event, Ultimax did not prove that it suffered any damage. Judge Mayeda denied Ultimax and Kunbargi any monetary relief, stating that “even though Ultimax always had the ability to sell its cement and always had access to the formula [which, in fact, it did not even follow], Ultimax was never able to earn a profit.”

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8/4/2011


CA Court Affirms Innocence of CTS Cement in Ultimax Espionage Suit (ForConstructio...

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CA Court Affirms Innocence of CTS Cement in Ultimax Espionage Suit Posted: August 8th, 2011 07:13 PM CDT

,

CYPRESS, CA - The Court of Appeal of the State of California affirmed an earlier ruling by the Los Angeles Superior Court of California against Ultimax Cement and its principal, Hassan Kunbargi, in their alleged trade secret misappropriation case against CTS Cement Manufacturing Corporation and Edward K. Rice. In 2006, Ultimax Cement and Hassan Kunbargi filed suit in California Superior Court against CTS and its Chairman, Edward K. Rice, alleging unfair competition and misappropriation of trade secrets. The suit was a follow-up to a 2002 patent infringement case brought by Ultimax, alleging that CTS had infringed three of its patents and stolen its trade secrets. In a January 2008 ruling, the U.S. District Court had dismissed Ultimax's trade secret claim. The suit in Superior Court of California centered once again around Ultimax's contention that CTS had misappropriated confidential information, namely the combination of lithium carbonate and citric acid in rapid-setting calcium sulfoaluminate cements. Ultimax asked the court for monetary damages against CTS. In a sweeping Statement of Decision that adopted CTS's positions, the Honorable Judge Jon M. Mayeda found, among other things, that the combination of citric acid and lithium carbonate in cement was not a secret and was well known in the industry, that CTS and Rice did not misappropriate anything from Ultimax, that CTS and Rice never used the allegedly confidential information, and that, in any event, Ultimax did not prove that it suffered any damage. Judge Mayeda denied Ultimax and Kunbargi any monetary relief, stating that "even though Ultimax always had the ability to sell its cement and always had access to the formula [which, in fact, it did not even follow], Ultimax was never able to earn a profit." Printable version may be for personal use only. Content may not be duplicated, re-used or otherwise replicated without expressed, written consent from ForConstructionPros.com and/or the original author/source. Visit ForConstructionPros.com daily for the latest industry news, commentary, features and more.

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8/10/2011


Aggregate Research : CA Court finds CTS Cement ‘not-guilty’in Ultimax Espionage Suit

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CA Court finds CTS Cement ‘not-guilty’in Ultimax Espionage Suit Http://www.aggregateresearch.com/article.aspx?ID=22950 Aug, 10 2011

(California) -- The Court of Appeal of the State of California has given a clean chit to CTS Cement Manufacturing Corporation and Edward K. Rice in the alleged trade secret misappropriation case filed against them by Ultimax Cement and its principal, Hassan Kunbargi. This also affirms an earlier ruling by the Los Angeles Superior Court of California. In 2002, a patent infringement case was brought by Ultimax, alleging that CTS had infringed three of its patents and stolen its trade secrets. This was followed by a suit in California Court in 2006 against CTS and its Chairman, Edward K. Rice, alleging unfair competition and misappropriation of trade secrets. In a January 2008 ruling, the U.S. District Court had dismissed Ultimax's trade secret claim. In its suit in Superior Court of California, Ultimax contented that CTS had misappropriated confidential information, namely the combination of lithium carbonate and citric acid in rapid-setting calcium sulfoaluminate cements. Ultimax appealed to the court for monetary damages against CTS. However, the Honorable Judge Jon M. Mayeda dismissed Ultimax’s claims of the trade secret. He also ruled that CTS and Rice never used the allegedly confidential information, and therefore did not cause any damage to Ultimax. Judge Mayeda also denied Ultimax and Kunbargi any monetary relief. He said that "even though Ultimax always had the ability to sell its cement and always had access to the formula [which, in fact, it did not even follow], Ultimax was never able to earn a profit." By: Rashmi Kalia (ARI-C NEWS)

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8/17/2011


Concrete Repair - ForConstructionPros.com

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Repairs In Review by REBECCA WASIELESKI (/CONTACT/10116720/REBECCA-WASIELESKI) and KIMBERLEY SCHMITT (/CONTACT/10234125/KIMBERLEY-SCHMITT)

Updated: October 6, 2011

With numerous concrete panels experiencing faulting over the years due to the loss of load transfer, it was time for a five-mile stretch of U.S. Highway 195 to be repaired. A major artery connecting Spokane, Wash., to Lewiston, Idaho, the concrete pavement dated back to the mid-1960s. Acme Concrete Paving, Inc., located in Spokane, Wash., took on the project using dowel bar retrofit as the repair method. Jim Allen, project manager, says DBR was chosen because it is a cost-effective repair option that doesn’t require removing and replacing the whole road. “Over time the concrete faults at the joints, and then the roads get rough,” Allen says. “This stabilizes it from happening again.” To complete the repairs, Acme Concrete used two concrete cutting and breaking slot saws. The saws cut three slots at a time with a group of three slots in each wheel path. First, the crew would cut the slots and then jackhammer out the concrete in between the saw cuts. After that, the crews would prep the slots by sand blasting them and sealing the transfer joints so the mix wouldn’t run down the joint. Next, they placed the dowel bars in the slots. During the day, traffic was reduced in some areas while the crew completed the repairs. Crews completed prep work on 1,000-foot stretches of roadway, spending 10 to 15 minutes at each joint. Finally, crews poured Rapid Set DOT Repair Mix from CTS Cement into the slots and then put a curing compound on the surface. Using mobile mixers, the crew had a continuous mix process mixing just enough Rapid Set mix to fill the six slots and move ahead. After the mix set, the crews would come back and re-cut the joints. When the project was completed, Acme Concrete had installed 8,500 DBRs between the existing concrete panels. The biggest challenge Allen and his crew faced was the weather. “We started in spring and the weather was really wet,” he says. “You can’t do dowel bar retrofits when it rains because you can’t cover the holes to prevent the water from getting in.”

Turning the look of old concrete into new After years of heavy foot traffic, the sidewalks around the San Francisco International Airport departure area were damaged and spalled. DSM Structural Concrete Services of Grass Valley, Calif., was hired to repair the sidewalks. Donnie Militano, owner, saw repairing the existing concrete as the best option for the project. To complete the repairs, DSM Concrete went with ARDEX CD Fine concrete dressing, a portland cement-based repair product with polymers. ARDEX CD Fine produces a new wear layer and fills in small surface defects such as gouges and cracks. By using ARDEX CD Fine, DSM Concrete was able to resurface and restore without having to remove and replace the concrete surfaces, ultimately making the repaired areas look like new. San Francisco airport chose a black repair mix because the original curbsides were black when they were poured, Militano says. The project began with the DSM Concrete crew blasting the area with 4,000 psi hot water to both clean the area and open up the pours of the concrete. Then, the crew applied two coats of ARDEX CD Fine. Crew members did this by first troweling down a scratch coat. Next, the crew trowel applied the top coat and used a flexible-blade trowel to wipe out all of the lines on the top coat. About a half an hour after the repair product was applied, the surface was dry and the crew was able to apply a water-based, acrylic urethane concrete sealer. In order to work with the high foot-traffic area, DSM Concrete completed the project 200 lineal feet at a time. “We would barricade a section off,” Militano says. “Then we would apply the sealer, and then we would open it up to the public.” The sections were open to foot traffic within three to four hours of completing the repairs. DSM Concrete completed about 1,000 square feet a day, finishing the project in four months, Militano says. The completion of the sidewalk repairs was so successful that the project was expanded to include the island areas and curbs. By the end of the project, DSM Concrete resurfaced 90,000 square feet at the San Francisco airport.

Speed is critical on repairs at the Nassau Expressway The Nassau Expressway serves as a major artery leading to JFK International Airport outside of New York, N.Y. Approximately 40 years old, the roadway has seen increased traffic demands since its inception and recently underwent extensive repairs to several miles of its concrete pavement.

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10/17/2011


Concrete Repair - ForConstructionPros.com

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The New York DOT contracted Tully Construction, Flushing, N.Y., to perform both partial-depth concrete patching and full-depth repairs along three miles of the roadway. Because the Nassau Expressway is such a heavily used roadway, the New York DOT required repairs be done at night, between 9 p.m. and 6 a.m., with only minimal road closures. Tully devised a closure strategy and safety plan that allowed traffic to flow adjacent to the lanes being repaired. Tully Construction performed the partial-depth patching with ProSpec Premium Patch 200. Mixed with 38-inch stone, the fast-setting, rapid strength gain repair product can be opened up to traffic in one to two hours. The Tully crews mixed the material on demand with a mobile mixer, which kept aggregate, water and patch materials separate until the mix was needed. The working time of the field mixed concrete is approximately 20 minutes. DOT inspectors identified and marked the areas that required patching. Tully saw cut a rectangular perimeter around each area and removed the unsound concrete using lightweight pneumatic hammers. The Tully crews placed the mix directly from the mobile mix machine onto the roadway. ProSpec Premium Patch 200 requires minimal finishing and texturing work. On the Nassau Expressway project, the material set in about 30 minutes, and crews were able to open up the repair area to traffic after about an hour. Tully used 2,500-pound super sacks of the patching material, purchased through construction materials supplier Axela Services, LLC. In all, about 7,000 square feet of pavement was repaired. Other sections of the Nassau Expressway were in need of repairs beyond partial-depth patching. Those areas received full-depth repair with Super-Slab precast concrete panels by The Fort Miller Co., Inc. The Super-Slab is a precast slab-on-grade system for highway, exit ramp, airport pavement and other roadway replacement. The slabs are crane set, and adjacent panels are connected with load transfer dowels. “The advantage of this system is speed,” says Joe Rizzo, Northeast district sales manager with ProSpec. “They can perform full-width, full-depth repairs with nighttime closures instead of months behind barriers and the time it takes to pave. And they can open the road to traffic the next day.” The placement of the Super-Slab precast concrete panels required the Tully crews to take down the existing road to the subbase. Crushed stone aggregate was placed and graded and the panels lowered on top. ProSpec’s Slab Dowel Grout was used to fill in around the load transfer dowel slots and also to fill in any voids between panels and existing pavement. Throughout the Nassau Expressway project, Tully crews placed 1,500 Super-Slab panels. Fourteen trucks of Slab Dowel Grout were placed using a Machine Technologies automatic water feed mixing pump.

Repair of Route 66 U.S. Route 66 — the “Main Street of America,” as it is known to many — dates to 1926 and is a quintessential American icon. But, even landmarks such as the “Mother Road” need to be repaired every so often to keep them up and running for another generation. So, city officials in Winslow — the city made famous by The Eagles’ 1972 hit song “Take It Easy” — selected Phoenix-based dbA Construction to repair this famed federal highway. The 2009 project comprised of a full-depth and partial-depth repair of a 12-block section in downtown Winslow. In total, dbA Construction used 8,610 70-pound bags of QUIKRETE FastSet Concrete Mix for the project. “QUIKRETE FastSet Concrete Mix had the right setup time with the traffic control constraints and the phasing of the project,” said Jay Cano, project manager for dbA Construction. The product achieves 3,000 psi in three hours and 7,000 psi in 28 days, and provides 20 to 30 minutes working time for mixing, placing and finishing operations. The fast setting, high early strength concrete mix is designed to build or repair sidewalks, driveways, highways, bridge decks, parking lots and floors. It has less shrinkage than ordinary portland cement concrete, and the mix is available with an integral corrosion inhibitor. Crews were able to keep lane closures to a minimum, ensuring traffic flowed through Winslow while the roadwork was completed. Of course, the location also added to the overall uniqueness of the project. “Working on Route 66 and getting to see all the tourists coming to stand on the corner of Winslow certainly made this project unique,” Cano said. Additional reporting by Rebecca Wasieleski and Kimberley Schmitt

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10/17/2011


Facing a Tight Schedule - Concrete Construction

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Your information resource to the concrete industry From: Concrete Construction October 2011 Web Exclusive

Posted on: September 29, 2011

Facing a Tight Schedule Missouri’s largest bridge improvement project benefitted from fast-setting grout. By:Jon Brown

This side profile of a panel shows a keyway joint using Rapid Set Cemet All. In 2009, the Missouri Department of Transportation (MoDOT) initiated the largest bridge improvement project in the state’s history. The Safe & Sound Bridge Improvement Program is a twopronged program designed to improve 802 of Missouri’s worst bridges within five years—with a goal of completion by the end of 2013. The $487 million design/build project will implement a total replacement of 554 bridges in Missouri.

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10/14/2011


Facing a Tight Schedule - Concrete Construction

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In the program, 248 bridges were identified for rehabilitation, and 174 of those projects were completed by the end of 2010. The bridges are put out for bid in groups according to location, type, or size to expedite the design and construction process. The 554 bridges scheduled for full replacement were packaged in a single design/build contract with KTU Constructors. KTU Constructors is a joint venture of: Kiewit Western Co., Omaha, Neb., which specializes in construction and mining; Traylor Bros. Inc., Evansville, Ind., which is a heavy civil contractor; and United Contractors Inc., Great Falls, S.C., a heavy highway contractor. By the end of 2010, KTU had completed 156 bridges. More than 300 are scheduled for construction in 2011. As part of this program, 90 bridges in the Mid-Missouri area were scheduled for repair or replacement, including the Highway J Bridge near Chillicothe, which was replaced in June 2010.

The contractor sprays a curing compound on the keyway joints.

Rehabilitating Highway J Replacement was necessary to ensure public safety on the Highway J Bridge because it had deteriorated beyond repair. During the construction process, workers installed seven precast, prestressed concrete slabs. To keep construction moving quickly, a fast-setting, high-strength, nonshrinking grout was used. The keyways were grouted with CTS Cement’s Cement All fast-setting grout, because it showed high early strength and excellent bonding characteristics during mock-up testing. The high strength was essential to make the individual prestressed concrete beams function as one structure. “Bonding was a critical element of this project,” says Jon Brown, product support manager for CTS Cement, Cypress, Calif. “The construction team was looking for a product that would bond the edges of these keyways.” The grout’s ability to seal the bridge is a critical element checked during the MoDOT National Bridge Inventory (NBI) inspection following construction. The NBI is a database, compiled by the Federal Highway Administration, with information on all bridges and tunnels in the United States that have roads passing above or below. During the state’s inspection, the bridge is flooded and observed for any leakage. “If there’s any leaking through the beam joints, it will automatically derate the bridge and subsequently has the potential to reduce the overall life of the bridge,” explains Mark Thompson, Northeast regional quality control manager for KTU. “We’re trying to construct the best possible bridge, and the NBI bridge rating is one of the measures of that success.”

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10/14/2011


Facing a Tight Schedule - Concrete Construction

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The renovation of Missouri’s Highway J Bridge was aided by a fast-setting, highstrength, nonshrinking grout.

The process The fast-setting grout was used to fill the keyways between the cored slab and box beam girders and in the holes where dowels connect the beams to the piers and abutments. Additionally, it was used to fill the 2- to 3-inch keyways to allow the individual cored slabs to operate as one unit. First, workers set the beams and panels to construct the keyways. Once the keyways were sealed and plugged on both ends, grouting commenced on the six keyways, with 105-foot spans each. The depth of each keyway measured approximately 6 to 7 inches. The grouting process began with predampening of the keyways. Four bags of the grout were mixed at a time in a gas-powered mortar mixer with the allotted dose of water to produce a consistent, flowable mixture. “A couple of things we made sure to do was have everything ready to pour and people in place, as the grout sets up very quickly,” says Kelly Henderson, foreman, Cramer and Associates, Grimes, Iowa—a KTU Constructors subcontractor on the Highway J Bridge and seven other replacement projects. The fast-setting grout could set in 15 minutes, so delays were not an option. Because construction occurred during hot weather, the crew needed more time, so CTS Cement’s SET Control setting additive was added to increase the working time an additional 5 to 10 minutes. “We also used water cooled with ice because we poured in hot weather,” says Henderson. Then they found it was necessary to alter the mixture’s fluidity, so another additive, CTS Cement’s FLOW Control, was used. “We tried several different states—a plastic state, a fluid state, and a

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10/14/2011


Facing a Tight Schedule - Concrete Construction

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flowable state,” says Thompson. “We found the flowable state produced the results we wanted, filling the keyway without voids in it.” During the process, the crew found that setting the mixer on a high rpm helped fully break up the material in the mixer. Henderson found cleaning the mixer once every three batches helped avoid buildup. After mixing was complete, workers placed the grout in 5-gallon buckets and poured it into the keyways. Then workers knocked the grout down with trowels. After the initial set of the grout, curing started. Days later, the surface was sandblasted and then sealed. “Cement All takes very minimal efforts to cure compared to the other approved products,” says Henderson.

Pictured is a top view of a keyway joint.

Short timeframe One challenge with this project was completing the work within the requirement of a tight schedule. The 58-day timeframe did not allow for rain days or delays. Henderson and his crew have completed Highway J and two other bridges using this fast-setting grout within the days allotted. “We decided to use Cement All over the other types of grout because it enables us to get on the bridge and schedule work to be done on it the next day without worry of whether the grout will have the strength needed to do so,” says Henderson. On the Highway J Bridge project, fast-setting grout achieved the strength required within 24 hours. “We always reached between 7000 to 10,000 psi within 18 to 24 hours, well above the required 3000 psi within 24 hours,” says Henderson. The final evaluation of the bridge indicated that using a fast-setting, high-strength, nonshrink grout was a success. The bridge scored the highest possible NBI rating of 9-9-9, indicating excellent conditions in the three primary elements of the bridge—the deck, superstructure, and substructure.

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10/14/2011


Rapid Set Mortar Mix from CTS Cement Manufacturing Co.

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11/23/2011 1:09 PM


Shrinkage-Compensating Concrete Makes New High-Tech 10-Story Warehouse a Reality By Ed Russell, Director Type-K Cement, CTS Cement Manufacturing Corp. and Will Braswell, P.E., S.E., BBM Structural

O

nly the sky appears to be the limit for Orlando-based Nephron Pharmaceuticals Corp. The generic respiratory medicine company is nearing completion of a new fast-track (humorously referred to as “blast-track” at the jobsite) addition to their existing 30,750-square-foot precast double-tee warehouse. The addition has a new 14,900-square-foot low bay warehouse for typical warehouse operations and a new 21,000square-foot high bay warehouse with an Automated Storage and Retrieval System (ASRS) structure that will house millions of vials of medicine. What do these two different warehouses require in terms of height? The low bay has a typical clearance height of 30 feet but the high bay is 115 feet tall, which is a remarkable 10 stories. Most warehouses are only two to three stories tall, but this ASRS warehouse needs the height to function at its best. The high bay is being built for a different type of storage. Nephron will use mechanical cranes and steel racks to store and retrieve pallets of Nephron’s manufacturing materials and products on and from the upper levels of the computer-controlled warehouse. This new design will have a substantial effect on Nephron’s operations – they will be able to store 10 times more product per square foot than a traditional storage facility. To accomplish this construction feat requires special construction, engineering and materials. The High Bay ASRS building is a “rack supported” structure, whereby the racking system is load-bearing and not only supports the dead and live gravity loads, but also resists the lateral wind loads. An extremely tight tolerance of L/2000 was specified by the manufacturer for the allowable settlement and deflection of the foundation system, so it was determined that a pile supported mat slab was the optimal foundation to support the superstructure. “This project has been an extremely challenging building design,” said Daniel Silvestre, President, Silvestre Engineering. “Blending together, European, German and American standards, codes and norms for this type of building, took a huge effort and real team work. From the ownership to the design team to the builder, everyone worked very hard to achieve the project’s goals.” “We had to meet requirements of the current Florida Building Code, ASCE 07, AISC, AISI, ASTM, FEM (Federation Europeenne de la Manutention), current DIN norms, etc.,” said Silvestre. “The high bay warehouse racking system was originally drawn and calculated under European and German standards. We had to convert all that information into U.S. standards and codes. There were numerous calculations, reviews and analyses done prior to breaking ground.” Construction of the high bay began with installation of the 535 piles, which were completed in only 16 days. The mat slab concrete placement came next and was scheduled to begin at 9:00 p.m., due to the cooler temperatures and to avoid the frequent afternoon rain showers that Central Florida experiences during the summer months. Although there were heavy showers in the afternoon on the day of the pour, the skies cleared a few hours before the start and continued to be clear throughout the night and into the next morning, as the pour was being completed. Maturity sensors were placed in the slab that provided early indications that the specified 28 day compressive strength was going to be easily achieved and provided the necessary data to determine when the crane could crawl up on the slab so the erection process could begin. Building such a specialized structure called for a unique material to be used in the construction of the foundation. The foundation consists of a mat slab that is 102-feet by 206 feet and 32 inches thick. This slab was placed on Design Cost Data /March-April 2012

The foundation consists of a mat slab that is 102-feet by 206 feet and 32 inches thick. The engineer’s main concern was that there could be no control or construction joints in the slab. To achieve this, the engineer chose CTS Cement’s Type-K Shrinkage-Compensating Concrete.

535 augercast piles and was tied to the piles with reinforcing extending out of the piles and hooked into the slab. The reinforcing of the slab consisted of #6 bars at 9 inches on center each way top and bottom. The engineer’s main concern was that there could be no control or construction joints in the slab. To achieve this, the engineer chose CTS Cement’s Komponent. The Komponent system is a method for making a Shrinkage-Compensating Concrete (SCC). The Komponent system when mixing 85 percent portland cement and 15 percent Komponent at the batch will make a ASTM C 845 Type K expansive cement that is used to make SCC. According to the American Concrete Institute (ACI) committee report 223R-10 “Guide for the Use of Shrinkage-Compensating Concrete,” Type K expansive cement when mixed with water will increase in volume. This increase in volume will decrease when the water of convenience is gone. This volume increase in the concrete will induce tensile stress into the reinforcing steel putting the concrete into compression. Keeping concrete in compression during the early stage of curing will minimize the shrinkage cracking, which is not the case when using portland cement concrete. This was proven in this project as the finished slab has no cracking, no control joints or construction jointing. The outcome of using Type-K shrinkage-compensating cement was that the 102-foot by 206-foot slab is crack free and has a dense and durable surface. The new warehouse facility will join the current 200,000 square feet housed in six existing buildings, all within the same area. These facilities include production and packaging, warehouse space, scientific labs, sales, marketing and administration. When the new warehouse is complete, the Nephron facility will operate 24 hours a day in two 12-hour shifts. The project team included General Contractor, J Raymond Construction Corporation, Architect, Associated Consulting International, Inc., and Structural Engineers: BBM Structural Engineers, Inc. (SEOR) and Silvestre Engineering, Inc. (High Bay Specialty Engineer). CTS Cement is the largest manufacturer of Rapid Set® fast-setting hydraulic cement and Type K shrinkage compensating products. Advantages of Rapid Set® cement products compared to portland cement include greater earlier strength, rapid hardening, non-shrink, high sulfate resistant, chloride resistant, and long lasting repairs. For more information about CTS Cement, please visit www.ctscement.com.

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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Contact: Janet Ong, Marketing Director CTS Cement Manufacturing Corporation | Rapid Set® Products 800-929-3030 ext. 110 -- http://www.ctscement.com

Facts: 1. CTS Cement Manufacturing Corporation is the leading manufacturer of specialty fast-setting hydraulic cement and shrinkage compensating cement. 2. New self-organized structures in cement have been discovered by CTS Cement Manufacturing Corporation. 3. CTS Cement Manufacturing Corporation is the producer of Rapid Set® Cement - an advanced, high-performance, hydraulic cement.

CTS Cement Discovers New Self-Organized Structures in Cement (Cypress, CA — April 10, 2012) — CTS Cement Manufacturing Corporation – the leading manufacturer of specialty fast-setting hydraulic cement and shrinkage compensating cement – has announced the discovery of new structures in cement.

Discovered in mixtures of coal fly ash and hydrated calcium sulfoaluminate cement, these intriguing structures consist of micron-sized glass spheres upon which needles have grown radially. Whereas these needles usually grow randomly in Rapid Set® cement, they organize themselves as spines on round fly ash particles in fly ash/cement mixtures.

According to Dr. Eric Bescher, Vice President for Cement Technology at CTS Cement, this is the first time these complex structures have been seen. These structures are very small, typically a few tens of microns in size and can only be seen clearly under an electron microscope.

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“We are excited about discovering these new self-organized inorganic architectures, said Bescher. “Think of these structures as micron-sized sea urchins shells embedded in cement paste. We have some indications that they may play a beneficial role in the reinforcement of concrete or in shrinkage mediation. Our work is in progress and we are investigating the influence they could have on other properties of construction materials.”

CTS Cement is not aware of reports on similar structures in scientific literature to date. It is possible these structures grow and develop only in calcium sulfoaluminate/fly ash mixtures. Bescher explains that the discovery is the result of attempts to make the already green Rapid Set even greener. “By substituting some of the Rapid Set cement with fly ash, we will further reduce the already minimal carbon footprint of the cement while finding a use for a waste material,” said Bescher. “In this process, we stumbled onto something unexpected and exciting, the significance of which is to be determined.”

CTS Cement is in the process of further investigations on the so-called self-organized BescherBalls to understand their significance and the role they can play in construction materials. BescherBalls is the working name for these innovative structures. “We have much more to learn about this ingenious design and the formation mechanism of these structures,” says Bescher. “Our research teams are hard at work.”

Jerry Hoyle, CTS President, noted that this discovery will likely offer the design and construction industry a new alternative for specifying concrete as a green solution. “As a long-time leader in the concrete industry, we are excited that our commitment to research and development efforts has provided new opportunities for our marketplace,” said Hoyle. To learn more about BescherBalls, contact Janet Ong at jong@ctscement.com.

About Eric Bescher Eric P. Bescher is Vice President for Cement Technology. He has worked with CTS Cement since 1997. He holds a master’s degree and a doctorate in materials science from the University of California Los Angeles and a bachelor’s degree in materials science from the University of Rennes, France. He is the co-recipient of the Academy of Czech Engineering Award for 2000 and the author of more than 40 research articles and several patents. He is Associate Adjunct Professor at the University of California Los Angeles, where he teaches undergraduate and


graduate courses in Materials Science, and a Distinguished Professor at the Zhengjiang University, Hangzhou China. His work focuses on the fundamentals of advanced cementitious materials. Bescher is a founding member and member of the board of the International Sol-Gel Society.

About CTS Cement: CTS Cement Manufacturing Corporation manufactures Rapid Set® professional-grade cement products for concrete repairs and new construction projects. Contractors, owners, engineers and architects choose Rapid Set® to eliminate problems they have with other concrete repair materials, to save time and money, when superior durability is required, and results need to be aesthetically pleasing. For more information about CTS Cement and Rapid Set, please visit http://www.ctscement.com.

These structures are very small - 20 to 100 microns in size - and can only be seen clearly under an electron microscope

keywords: Cement, fast-setting hydraulic, shrinkage compensating, CTS

Photos: 

BescherBalls: BescherBalls (self-organized structures), © 2012 CTS Cement Manufacturing Corporation.

EricBescher

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“As a long-time leader in the concrete industry, we are excited that our commitment to research and development efforts has provided new opportunities for our marketplace,” said Hoyle. To learn more about BescherBalls, contact Janet Ong at jong@ctscement.com. About Eric Bescher Eric P. Bescher is Vice President for Cement Technology. He has worked with CTS Cement since 1997. He holds a master’s degree and a doctorate in materials science from the University of California Los Angeles and a bachelor’s degree in materials science from the University of Rennes, France. He is the co-recipient of the Academy of Czech Engineering Award for 2000 and the author of more than 40 research articles and several patents. He is Associate Adjunct Professor at the University of California Los Angeles, where he teaches undergraduate and graduate courses in Materials Science, and a Distinguished Professor at the Zhengjiang University, Hangzhou China. His work focuses on the fundamentals of advanced cementitious materials. Bescher is a founding member and member of the board of the International Sol-Gel Society. About CTS Cement: CTS Cement Manufacturing Corporation manufactures Rapid Set® professional-grade cement products for concrete repairs and new construction projects. Contractors, owners, engineers and architects choose Rapid Set® to eliminate problems they have with other concrete repair materials, to save time and money, when superior durability is required, and results need to be aesthetically pleasing. For more information about CTS Cement and Rapid Set, please visit http://www.ctscement.com. These structures are very small - 20 to 100 microns in size - and can only be seen clearly under an electron microscope

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From: Concrete Construction 2012 Posted on: March 28, 2012

Tilt-Up Concrete Association Launches Initiative to Update Wind Bracing Guideline Your information resource to the concrete industry

The Tilt-Up Concrete Association (TCA) – a non-profit international organization that serves to expand and improve the use of Tilt-Up as the preferred construction method – has launched an initiative to review and update its “Guideline for Temporary Wind Bracing of Tilt-Up Concrete Panels during Construction.” First released in 1994 and then updated in 1998 and 2005, the Association recognized the need for an update to this vital piece of literature. Since 2005, the prevalence of ground anchoring systems (sometimes referred to as helical anchors) has become more common in the Tilt-Up industry as a cost-effective solution for bracing panels. The updated guideline will include discussion of proper uses and specification of such ground anchoring systems. Additionally, the updated guideline will improve upon the methodology for evaluating the proper floor slab thickness for brace anchorage. While the previous guidelines provided a formula for determining the thickness of the floor slab, the new guideline will further explore the shear and flexural stresses imposed on the slab-ongrade when used as the brace anchorage. The guideline will also be updated to reflect the requirements of the most current ASCE 7 document, which is ASCE 7-10. This effort will be led by Scott Collins, Assistant Chief Engineer at Meadow Burke and Richard Lindstrom, Director of Engineering at Dayton Superior, who will serve as the co-authors of the guidelines. The update will be published later this year.

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CTS Cement Discovers New Self-Organized Structures In Cement http://www.topix.com/fr/rennes/2012/04/cts-cement-discovers-new-self-organized-structures-in-cement April 16, 2012

Full story: OfficialWire CTS Cement Manufacturing Corporation the leading manufacturer of specialty fast-setting hydraulic cement and shrinkage compensating cement has announced the discovery of new structures in cement.

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CTS Cement discovers new self-organized structures in cement CYPRESS, CALIF. – CTS CEMENT MANUFACTURING CORPORATION – THE LEADING MANUFACTURER OF SPECIALTY FAST-SETTING HYDRAULIC CEMENT AND SHRINKAGE COMPENSATING CEMENT – HAS ANNOUNCED THE DISCOVERY OF NEW STRUCTURES IN CEMENT.

CYPRESS, Calif. – CTS Cement Manufacturing Corporation – the leading manufacturer of specialty fastsetting hydraulic cement and shrinkage compensating cement – has announced the discovery of new structures in cement. Discovered in mixtures of coal fly ash and hydrated calcium sulfoaluminate cement, these intriguing structures consist of micron-sized glass spheres upon which needles have grown radially. Whereas these needles usually grow randomly in Rapid Set® cement, they organize themselves as spines on round fly ash particles in fly ash/cement mixtures. According to Dr. Eric Bescher, Vice President for Cement Technology at CTS Cement, this is the first time these complex structures have been seen. These structures are very small, typically a few tens of microns in size and can only be seen clearly under an electron microscope. “We are excited about discovering these new self-organized inorganic architectures, said Bescher. “Think of these structures as micron-sized sea urchins shells embedded in cement paste. We have some indications that they may play a beneficial role in the reinforcement of concrete or in shrinkage mediation. Our work is in progress and we are investigating the influence they could have on other properties of construction materials.” CTS Cement is not aware of reports on similar structures in scientific literature to date. It is possible these structures grow and develop only in calcium sulfoaluminate/fly ash mixtures. Bescher explains that the discovery is the result of attempts to make the already green Rapid Set even greener. “By substituting some of the Rapid Set cement with fly ash, we will further reduce the already minimal carbon footprint of the cement while finding a use for a waste material,” said Bescher. “In this process, we stumbled onto something unexpected and exciting, the significance of which is to be determined.” CTS Cement is in the process of further investigations on the so-called self-organized BescherBalls to understand their significance and the role they can play in construction materials. BescherBalls is the working name for these innovative structures. “We have much more to learn about this ingenious design and the formation mechanism of these structures,” says Bescher. “Our research teams are hard at work.” Jerry Hoyle, CTS President, noted that this discovery will likely offer the design and construction industry a new alternative for specifying concrete as a green solution. “As a long-time leader in the concrete industry, we are excited that our commitment to research and development efforts has provided new opportunities for our marketplace,” said Hoyle.

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CTS Cement Discovers New Self-Organized Structures in Cement

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Discovery in flyash cement mix shows strength potential http://www.worldcement.com/sectors/environmental/articles/Flyash_mix_shows_potential.aspx

April 16, 20

Flyash/cement mix shows new structure While attempting to create more environmentally friendly cement products, CTS Cement Manufacturing Corporation, a manufacturer of specialty fast-setting hydraulic cement and shrinkage compensating cement, has discovered new structures in mixtures of coal flyash and hydrated calcium sulfoaluminate cement. Self-organising structures The structures consist of micron-sized glass spheres upon which needles have grown radially. Whereas ®

these needles usually grow randomly in the company’s Rapid Set cement, in flyash/cement mixes they organise themselves as spines on round flyash particles. They are very small, typically a few tens of microns in size, and can only clearly be seen under an electron microscope. According to Dr. Eric Bescher, Vice President for Cement Technology at CTS Cement, this is the first time these complex structures have been seen. Strength benefits “Think of these structures as micron-sized sea urchins shells embedded in cement paste,” said Bescher. “We have some indications that they may play a beneficial role in the reinforcement of concrete or in shrinkage mediation. Our work is in progress and we are investigating the influence they could have on other properties of construction materials.” New discovery CTS Cement believes that this is a new discovery. The company thinks it may be possible that these structures grow and develop only in calcium sulfoaluminate cement/flyash mixtures. The discovery was made when substituting some of the Rapid Set cement with an alternative raw materi flyash. The aim of this is to reduce the product’s carbon footprint; it may be that the new discovery can offer even greater benefits. BescherBalls The structures have been named BescherBalls and CTS Cement is undertaking further investigations to understand what part they might be able to play in future construction materials. “We have much more to learn about this ingenious design and the formation mechanism of these structures,” says Bescher. “Our research teams are hard at work.” Adapted from press release by Katherine Markham Published on 13/04/2012

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From: Concrete Construction 2012 Posted on: April 11, 2012

CTS Cement Discovers New Self-Organized Structures in Cement Your information resource to the concrete industry

CTS Cement Manufacturing Corporation – the leading manufacturer of specialty fast-setting hydraulic cement and shrinkage compensating cement – has announced the discovery of new structures in cement. Discovered in mixtures of coal fly ash and hydrated calcium sulfoaluminate cement, these intriguing structures consist of micron-sized glass spheres upon which needles have grown radially. Whereas these needles usually grow randomly in Rapid Set cement, they organize themselves as spines on round fly ash particles in fly ash/cement mixtures. According to Dr. Eric Bescher, Vice President for Cement Technology at CTS Cement, this is the first time these complex structures have been seen. These structures are very small, typically a few tens of microns in size and can only be seen clearly under an electron microscope. “We are excited about discovering these new self-organized inorganic architectures, said Bescher. “Think of these structures as micron-sized sea urchins shells embedded in cement paste. We have some indications that they may play a beneficial role in the reinforcement of concrete or in shrinkage mediation. Our work is in progress and we are investigating the influence they could have on other properties of construction materials.” CTS Cement is not aware of reports on similar structures in scientific literature to date. It is possible these structures grow and develop only in calcium sulfoaluminate/fly ash mixtures. Bescher explains that the discovery is the result of attempts to make the already green Rapid Set even greener. “By substituting some of the Rapid Set cement with fly ash, we will further reduce the already minimal carbon footprint of the cement while finding a use for a waste material,” said Bescher. “In this process, we stumbled onto something unexpected and exciting, the significance of which is to be determined.” CTS Cement is in the process of further investigations on the so-called self-organized BescherBalls to understand their significance and the role they can play in construction materials. BescherBalls is the working name for these innovative structures. “We have much more to learn about this ingenious design and the formation mechanism of these structures,” says Bescher. “Our research teams are hard at work.” Jerry Hoyle, CTS President, noted that this discovery will likely offer the design and construction industry a new alternative for specifying concrete as a green solution. “As a long-time leader in the concrete industry, we are excited that our commitment to research and development efforts has provided new opportunities for our marketplace,” said Hoyle.

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4/19/2012


CTS probes new high early cement-fly ash microstructures’ performance prospects Thursday, 12 April 2012 13:49

Source: CTS Cement Manufacturing Corp., Cypress, Calif.

In research on hydrated calcium sulfoaluminate cement and fly ash mixtures, Rapid Set powder producer CTS has discovered glass spheres upon which needles grow radially, organizing themselves as spines on round fly ash particles.

While Rapid Set cement specimens have exhibited random needle growth, Vice President for Cement Technology Dr. Eric Bescher notes this is the first time such complex structures—typically a few tens of microns in size that can only be seen clearly under an electron microscope—have been observed. Think of these new self-organized inorganic architectures, he explains, “as micron-sized sea urchin shells embedded in cement paste. We have some indications they may play a beneficial role in the reinforcement of concrete or in shrinkage mediation, [and] are investigating the influence they could have on other properties of construction materials.” CTS is not aware of reports on similar structures in scientific literature to date and cites the possibility that they only develop in calcium sulfoaluminate/fly ash mixtures. The discovery stems from attempts to make the already green Rapid Set product even greener, notes Bescher, adding, “By substituting some of the Rapid Set cement with fly ash, we will further reduce the already minimal carbon footprint of [our] cement while finding a use for a waste material. In this process, we stumbled onto something unexpected, the significance of which is to be determined.” The producer continues investigation of the so-called, self-organized BescherBalls—a working name for the microstructures. “We have much more to learn about this ingenious design and the formation mechanism of these structures,” says Bescher. “Our research teams are hard at work.”

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CTS Cement Manufacturing Corporation wns decade-long patent case on rapid-hardening cement against Ultimax Cement CYPRESS, CALIF. – PUTTING AN END TO A DECADE-OLD PATENT LITIGATION BROUGHT BY ULTIMAX, HASSAN KUNBARGI, HEARTLAND CEMENT SALES COMPANY AND THE K.A. GROUP AGAINST CTS CEMENT MANUFACTURING CORPORATION (“CTS”), MANUFACTURERS OF RAPID SET CEMENT, ITS CHAIRMAN EDWARD K. RICE, AND A NUMBER OF CTS CUSTOMERS, THE HONORABLE ANDREW J. GUILFORD OF THE U.S. DISTRICT COURT FOR THE CENTRAL DISTRICT OF CALIFORNIA RULED THAT RICE AND CTS HAVE A SHOP RIGHT IN THE PATENT THEY ALLEGEDLY INFRINGED.

CYPRESS, Calif. – Putting an end to a decade-old patent litigation brought by Ultimax, Hassan Kunbargi, Heartland Cement Sales Company and the K.A. Group against CTS Cement Manufacturing Corporation (“CTS”), manufacturers of Rapid Set Cement, its Chairman Edward K. Rice, and a number of CTS customers, the Honorable Andrew J. Guilford of the U.S. District Court for the Central District of California ruled that Rice and CTS have a shop right in the patent they allegedly infringed. Under the law, this shop right gave CTS and Rice a free license to practice the patent for the duration of its existence. The Court further ruled, as additional grounds supporting its decision in CTS’s favor, that Ultimax had also unreasonably delayed filing its suit to CTS’s prejudice. The Court found that this delay, along with other factors, also combined to bar Ultimax from asserting infringement claims against CTS pursuant to the doctrines of laches and equitable estoppel. In 2002, Ultimax and Heartland Cement sued CTS Cement Manufacturing Corporation in Federal Court, alleging infringement of 47 claims in three patents. Following a lengthy legal battle, CTS successfully prevailed on all claims but one. This single claim of the ‘556 patent went to two jury trials in 2011. The first resulted in a mistrial because the judge became ill. The second trial left a jury divided on several significant issues. However, Judge Guilford ruled on April 20, 2012, that CTS has an irrevocable and royalty-free right to practice the alleged invention. The Court ruled that the evidence conclusively demonstrated that Kunbargi used CTS’s facilities, resources, and personnel to develop the patent at issue. Jerry Hoyle, the President of CTS, is grateful that CTS prevailed in this matter. “CTS is vindicated by the Court’s finding that we have shop rights in this alleged invention. The innovations in cement technology that Mr. Kunbargi claimed to have pioneered would not have been possible without the financial and scientific resources that CTS provided him while he was working for CTS," said Hoyle. Eric Bescher, Ph.D., Vice President of Technology for CTS, pointed out that, in his opinion, “The Ultimax patents, which clearly refer to calcium sulfoaluminate clinker blends with Portland Cement, were not infringed in the first place. Rapid Set® contains no Portland Cement.” This CTS victory follows another Ultimax loss in California state court, where it had falsely claimed that CTS had misappropriated trade secrets belonging to Ultimax and committed unfair competition. CTS Cement was represented by Richard Leonard of Leonard, Dicker & Schreiber LLP, and Thomas Gray of Orrick, Herrington & Sutcliffe LLP. Ultimax was represented by Saied Kashani.

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5/3/2012


CTS Cement Manufacturing Corporation Wins Decade-Long Patent Case - Concrete Con... Page 1 of 3

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From: Concrete Construction 2012 Posted on: April 25, 2012

CTS Cement Manufacturing Corporation Wins Decade-Long Patent Case on Rapid-Hardening Cement Against Ultimax Cement Your information resource to the concrete industry

Putting an end to a decade-old patent litigation brought by Ultimax, Hassan Kunbargi, Heartland Cement Sales Company and the K.A. Group against CTS Cement Manufacturing Corporation (“CTS”), manufacturers of Rapid Set Cement, its Chairman Edward K. Rice, and a number of CTS customers, the Honorable Andrew J. Guilford of the U.S. District Court for the Central District of California ruled that Rice and CTS have a shop right in the patent they allegedly infringed. Under the law, this shop right gave CTS and Rice a free license to practice the patent for the duration of its existence. The Court further ruled, as additional grounds supporting its decision in CTS’s favor, that Ultimax had also unreasonably delayed filing its suit to CTS’s prejudice. The Court found that this delay, along with other factors, also combined to bar Ultimax from asserting infringement claims against CTS pursuant to the doctrines of laches and equitable estoppel. In 2002, Ultimax and Heartland Cement sued CTS Cement Manufacturing Corporation in Federal Court, alleging infringement of 47 claims in three patents. Following a lengthy legal battle, CTS successfully prevailed on all claims but one. This single claim of the ‘556 patent went to two jury trials in 2011. The first resulted in a mistrial because the judge became ill. The second trial left a jury divided on several significant issues. However, Judge Guilford ruled on April 20, 2012, that CTS has an irrevocable and royalty-free right to practice the alleged invention. The Court ruled that the evidence conclusively demonstrated that Kunbargi used CTS’s facilities, resources, and personnel to develop the patent at issue. Jerry Hoyle, the President of CTS, is grateful that CTS prevailed in this matter. “CTS is vindicated by the Court’s finding that we have shop rights in this alleged invention. The innovations in cement technology that Mr. Kunbargi claimed to have pioneered would not have been possible without the financial and scientific resources that CTS provided him while he was working for CTS," said Hoyle. Eric Bescher, Ph.D., Vice President of Technology for CTS, pointed out that, in his opinion, “The Ultimax patents, which clearly refer to calcium sulfoaluminate clinker blends with Portland Cement, were not infringed in the first place. Rapid Set contains no Portland Cement.”

http://www.concreteconstruction.net/cement/cts-cement-manufacturing-corporation-wins-de... 5/3/2012


CTS Cement Manufacturing Corporation Wins Decade-Long Patent Case - Concrete Con... Page 2 of 3

This CTS victory follows another Ultimax loss in California state court, where it had falsely claimed that CTS had misappropriated trade secrets belonging to Ultimax and committed unfair competition. CTS Cement was represented by Richard Leonard of Leonard, Dicker & Schreiber LLP, and Thomas Gray of Orrick, Herrington & Sutcliffe LLP. Ultimax was represented by Saied Kashani.

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After 10 Years, CTS Wins Patent War : PaintSquare News

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Q: If Sam invents a lucrative product while working for Jane at ABC Corp., who has dibs on the invention and its proceeds? Sam, Jane and/or ABC? A: All of the above, a federal judge has ruled. And on that basis, CTS Cement Manufacturing Corp. has successfully vanquished its last patent infringement claim by arch-rival Ultimax Cement Corp. after 10 long years. ‘Shop Right’ Putting an end to patent litigation that began in 2002, U.S. District Court Judge Andrew J. Guilford ruled April 20 that CTS founder and chairman Edward K. Rice has a “shop right” to the patent that Ultimax had accused him of infringing.

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CTS Cement, founded in the 1960s, is the largest manufacturer of specialty fastsetting hydraulic cement and shrinkage compensating cement.

A shop right, under patent law, is an implied license under which a firm may use a patented invention that was developed by an employee who was using the firm’s equipment or inventing at its expense. Both California-based companies manufacture a rapid-hardening, high-strength cement used for repair applications on highways, bridges, runways, sidewalks, and other major structures. Long History

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5/3/2012


After 10 Years, CTS Wins Patent War : PaintSquare News

The ruling brought an end to a long and painful case involving two men who were once mentor and protégé. The relationship between Rice and Ultimax owner Hassan Kunbargi dates to 1984, when Kunbargi was a graduate student at the University of California- Los Angeles. There, Kunbargi began experimenting with cement chemistry. Rice became Kunbargi’s mentor and sought an adjunct faculty position at UCLA so that he could serve as Kunbargi’s advisor.

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In late 1985, Kunbargi began to work for Rice’s company, CTS, which had been founded in the 1960s. (Rice, who holds 19 patents in concrete and building technology, had founded two other companies before that.) In addition, Kunbargi and Rice worked as independent contractors for another company, Fibermesh Inc. Inventions and Patents In 1989, Kunbargi left Rice’s company after showing him a new invention—“Very Early Setting High Strength Early Cement”—that Kunbargi would patent a year later. Kunbargi also patented two other inventions. In June 2002, Ultimax, Kunbargi, Heartland Cement Sales Company and the K.A. Group sued CTS for infringement of 47 claims involving the three patents, misappropriation of trade secrets, and several business torts.

Ultimax Ultimax cement products have been used in a number of airport projects. The company’s slogan is “the last word in cement.”

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Following a lengthy legal battle, CTS successfully prevailed on all but one claim involving the initial patent. That claim went to two jury trials in 2011. The first resulted in a mistrial because the judge became ill. The second trial left a jury divided on several significant issues, which Guilford’s ruling last month finally resolved. Rights and Delays Guilford ruled April 20 that CTS had an irrevocable and royalty-free right to use the patented invention, because evidence showed that Kunbargi had used CTS’s facilities, resources, and personnel to develop it. The judge ruled that that “shop right” gave CTS and Rice a free license to practice the patent for the duration of its existence. “CTS is vindicated by the Court’s finding that we have shop rights in this alleged invention,” said CTS president Jerry Hoyle. “The innovations in cement technology that Mr. Kunbargi claimed to have pioneered would not have been possible without the financial and scientific resources that CTS provided him while he was working for CTS.”

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Added Eric Bescher, Ph.D., Vice President of Technology for CTS: “The Ultimax patents, which clearly refer to calcium sulfoaluminate clinker blends with Portland Cement, were not infringed in the first place. Rapid Set contains no Portland Cement.” Ultimax did not respond Wednesday (May 2) to a request for comment.

Tagged categories: Bridges; Cement; Concrete repair; Construction; Lawsuits; Roads/Highways

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5/3/2012


CTS prevails in decade-long Ultimax patent litigation :HGQHVGD\0D\

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NEWS SCOPE BY CP STAFF

CTS Cement prevails in decade-long Ultimax patent litigation Ending a 10-year-old patent litigation against CTS Cement Manufacturing, Cypress, Calif.-based producer of Rapid Set Cement, plus Chairman Edward Rice and a number of customers, U.S. District Court for the Central District of California Judge Andrew Guilford ruled that Rice and CTS have a shop right in the patent they allegedly infringed. The plaintiffs were Ultimax, Hassan Kunbargi, Heartland Cement Sales Co. and the K.A. Group. Under the law, this shop right gave CTS and Rice a free license to practice the patent for the duration of its existence. The Court further ruled, as additional grounds supporting its decision in CTS’s favor, that Ultimax had also unreasonably delayed filing its suit to the defendant’s prejudice. The Court found that this delay, along with other factors, also combined to bar Ultimax

from asserting infringement claims against CTS pursuant to the “doctrines of laches and equitable estoppel.” In 2002, Ultimax and Heartland Cement sued CTS Cement in Federal Court, alleging infringement of 47 claims in three patents. Following a lengthy legal battle, CTS successfully prevailed on all claims but one. This single claim of the 556 patent went to two jury trials in 2011, the first of which resulted in a mistrial because the judge became ill. The second trial left a jury divided on several significant issues. However, Judge Guilford ruled last month that CTS has an irrevocable and royalty-free right to practice the alleged invention. The Court ruled that the evidence conclusively demonstrated that Kunbargi used CTS’s facilities, resources and personnel to develop the patent at issue.

CTS President Jerry Hoyle expressed gratitude that the company prevailed in this matter. “CTS is vindicated by the Court’s finding that we have shop rights in this alleged invention. The innovations in cement technology that Mr. Kunbargi claimed to have pioneered would not have been possible without the financial and scientific resources [we] provided him while he was working for CTS,” he said. This CTS victory follows another Ultimax loss in California state court, where it had claimed that CTS had misappropriated trade secrets belonging to Ultimax and committed unfair competition. CTS Cement was represented by Richard Leonard of Leonard, Dicker & Schreiber LLP, and Thomas Gray of Orrick, Herrington & Sutcliffe LLP; Ultimax was represented by Saied Kashani.

$500K SETTLES CLAIMS OF RUNWAY PAVING CONTRACTOR’S ALLEGED DBE FRAUD

Cleveland-based Anthony Allega Cement Contractor Inc. will pay the United States $500,000 to resolve Department of Justice allegations that it knowingly submitted false claims surrounding compliance with the U.S. Department of Transportation’s Disadvantaged Business Enterprise (DBE) program. Allega was the prime contractor on a new runway at Cleveland’s Hopkins International Airport from 2001–2006; contract terms required it to comply with DOT DBE regulations and accurately report DBE participation. The United States alleged that Allega claimed mate-

rials and services were provided by a company known as Chem-Ty Environmental. Justice officials contend Chem-Ty was merely a “pass through” entity used to make it appear as if a DBE had performed the work. “The Disadvantaged Business Enterprise program helps businesses owned by minorities and women work on federal construction projects,” says Stuart Delery, Acting Assistant Attorney General for the Justice Department’s Civil Division. The government’s claims were based upon an investigation by his division, the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the

Northern District of Ohio, DOT’s Office of Inspector General (OIG) and Federal Aviation Administration. “Prime contractors and subcontractors are cautioned not to engage in fraudulent DBE activity and encouraged to report any suspected DBE fraud,” says Michelle McVicker, OIG regional special agent in charge. “Our agents will continue to work with the Secretary of Transportation, the Federal Aviation Administrator, and law enforcement and prosecutorial colleagues to expose and shut down DBE fraud schemes throughout Ohio and the United States.”

PCA’s Sullivan: 2012 shipments looking better than first forecast Stronger than expected job creation and the beginning of an industry recovery means gains in real construction spending will materialize this year—after seven years of consecutive declines. According to the new forecast from Portland Cement Association, increases in cement consumption will follow. PCA revised its fall forecast upward from 1.1 percent, to a modest 3.7 percent increase in 2012 cement consumption, followed by a 7.6 percent jump in 2013 and a 14.1 percent surge in 2014. The forecast includes marginal im8 | MAY 2012

provements to nonresidential construction, an upward revision to housing starts and an aggressive cement intensity gain, which is the amount of powder used per real dollar of construction activity. “Cement usage is greatest at the early stages of construction with foundation work. The retreat of building starts during the recession had a huge impact on consumption and intensity,” said PCA Chief Economist Ed Sullivan. “A construction start rebound in 2012, coupled with concrete’s competitive price compared to other building materials,

translates to increases.” With successive years of economic and employment growth, the structural issues facing the construction industry will diminish, Sullivan said. For example, home foreclosures’ adverse impact will fade, and return on investment for nonresidential investments will improve. Partially because of these improvements, state budget deficits will eventually be replaced by surpluses. PCA forecasts all sectors of construction to be positive during 20142015, which typically results in large gains in cement consumption.

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NEWS SCOPE MATERIALS

CTS PROBES PERFORMANCE OF NEW HIGH EARLY CEMENT-FLY ASH MICROSTRUCTURES

In research on hydrated calcium sulfoaluminate cement and fly ash mixtures, Rapid Set brand producer CTS Cement Manufacturing Corp. has discovered needle-like formations that grow radially and organize themselves as spines on round fly ash particles. While Rapid Set cement specimens have exhibited random needle growth, Vice President for Cement Technology Dr. Eric Bescher notes this is the first time such complex structures— typically a few tens of microns in size that can only be seen clearly under an electron microscope—have been observed. Think of these new self-organized inorganic architectures, he explains, “as micron-sized sea urchin shells embedded in cement paste. We have some indications they may play a beneficial role in the reinforcement of concrete or in shrinkage mediation, [and] are investigating the influence they could have on other properties of construction materials.” CTS is not aware of reports on similar structures in scientific literature to date and cites the possibility that they only develop in calcium sulfoaluminate/fly ash mixtures. The discovery stems from attempts to make the already green Rapid Set product even greener, notes Bescher, adding, “By substituting some of the Rapid Set cement with fly ash, we will further reduce the already minimal carbon footprint of [our] cement while finding a use for a waste material. In this process, we stumbled onto something unexpected, the significance of which Eric P. Bescher is Vice Presiis to be determined.” dent for Cement Technology The producer continues investiga- and has worked with CTS Cetion of the so-called, self-organized ment since 1997. He holds a BescherBalls—a working name for master’s degree and doctorate the microstructures. “We have much in materials science from the more to learn about this ingenious University of California Los design and the formation mecha- Angeles. As Associate Adjunct Professor at UCLA, he teaches nism,” says Bescher. “Our research undergraduate and graduate teams are hard at work.” — CTS Ce- Materials Science, and focuses ment, Cypress, Calif., www.ctsce- advanced cementitious matement.com rials fundamentals.

MAY 2012 | 9


World of Concrete 2012: CTS TRU Self-Leveling | US Building Digest

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LITIGATION BLOG Strange Bedfellows - Patent Owner's Lengthy Relationship With Accused Infringer Puts Claim To Sleep After 10 Years Of Litigation, Jury Trial

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Federal Circuit Court of Appeals, and a four-week jury trial after the case was remanded that resulted in a hung jury, the Central District of California granted the defendant's post-trial motion and found the patent owner's claim was stale. In Ultimax Cement Mfg. Corp. v. CTS Cement Mfg. Corp., Case No. SACV 02-578AG,

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PR-USA.net

CTS Cement Discovers New Self-Organized Structures in Cement CTS Cement Manufacturing Corporation -- the leading manufacturer of specialty fast-setting hydraulic cement and shrinkage compensating cement -- has announced the discovery of new structures in cement.

Discovered in mixtures of coal fly ash and hydrated calcium sulfoaluminate cement, these intriguing structures consist of micron-sized glass spheres upon which needles have grown radially. Whereas these needles usually grow randomly in Rapid Set速 cement, they organize themselves as spines on round fly ash particles in fly ash/cement mixtures.

According to Dr. Eric Bescher, Vice President for Cement Technology at CTS Cement, this is the first time these complex structures have been seen. These structures are very small, typically a few tens of microns in size and can only be seen clearly under an electron microscope.

"We are excited about discovering these new self-organized inorganic architectures, said Bescher. "Think of these structures as micron-sized sea urchins shells embedded in cement paste. We have some indications that they may play a beneficial role in the reinforcement of concrete or in shrinkage mediation. Our work is in progress and we are investigating the influence they could have on other properties of construction materials."

CTS Cement is not aware of reports on similar structures in scientific literature to date. It is possible these structures grow and develop only in calcium sulfoaluminate/fly ash mixtures. Bescher explains that the discovery is the result of attempts to make the already green Rapid Set even greener. "By substituting some of the Rapid Set cement with fly ash, we will further reduce the already minimal carbon footprint of the cement while finding a use for a waste material," said Bescher. "In this process, we stumbled onto something unexpected and exciting, the significance of which is to be determined."

CTS Cement is in the process of further investigations on the so-called self-organized BescherBalls to understand their significance and the role they can play in construction materials. BescherBalls is the working name for these innovative structures. "We have much more to learn about this ingenious design and the formation mechanism of these structures," says Bescher. "Our research teams are hard at work."

Jerry Hoyle, CTS President, noted that this discovery will likely offer the design and construction industry a new alternative for specifying concrete as a green solution.

"As a long-time leader in the concrete industry, we are excited that our commitment to research and development efforts has provided new opportunities for our marketplace," said Hoyle. To learn more about BescherBalls, contact Janet Ong at jong@ctscement.com.

About Eric Bescher Eric P. Bescher is Vice President for Cement Technology. He has worked with CTS Cement since 1997. He holds a master's degree and a doctorate in materials science from the University of California Los Angeles and a bachelor's degree in materials science from the University of Rennes, France. He is the co-recipient of the Academy of Czech Engineering Award for 2000 and the author of more than 40 research articles and several patents. He is Associate Adjunct Professor at the University of California Los Angeles, where he teaches undergraduate and graduate courses in Materials Science, and a Distinguished Professor at the Zhengjiang University, Hangzhou China. His work focuses on the fundamentals of advanced cementitious materials. Bescher is a founding member and member of the board of the International Sol-Gel Society.

About CTS Cement: CTS Cement Manufacturing Corporation manufactures Rapid Set速 professional-grade cement products for concrete repairs and new construction projects. Contractors, owners, engineers and architects choose Rapid Set速 to eliminate problems they have with other concrete repair materials, to save time and money, when superior durability is required, and results need to be aesthetically pleasing. For more information about CTS Cement and Rapid Set, please visit http://www.ctscement.com. http://pr-usa.net

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These structures are very small -- 20 to 100 microns in size -- and can only be seen clearly under an electron microscope

Facts: 1. CTS Cement Manufacturing Corporation is the leading manufacturer of specialty fast-setting hydraulic cement and shrinkage compensating cement. 2. New self-organized structures in cement have been discovered by CTS Cement Manufacturing Corporation. 3. CTS Cement Manufacturing Corporation is the producer of Rapid Set速 Cement -- an advanced, highperformance, hydraulic cement.

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CTS Cement discovers new structures in cement Discovery made in mixtures of coal fly ash and hydrated calcium sulfoaluminate cement.

(CW GROUP) CTS Cement Manufacturing has announced the discovery of new structures in cement, reports MSN. Discovered in mixtures of coal fly ash and hydrated calcium sulfoaluminate cement, these intriguing structures consist of micron-sized glass spheres upon which needles have grown radially. Whereas these needles usually grow randomly in Rapid Set cement, they organize themselves as spines on round fly ash particles in fly ash/cement mixtures. "We are excited about discovering these new self-organized inorganic architectures, said Bescher. "Think of these structures as micron-sized sea urchins shells embedded in cement paste. We have some indications that they may play a beneficial role in the reinforcement of concrete or in shrinkage mediation. Our work is in progress and we are investigating the influence they could have on other properties of construction materials," Dr. Eric Bescher, Vice President for Cement Technology at CTS Cement said. CTS Cement is not aware of reports on similar structures in scientific literature to date. It is possible these structures grow and develop only in calcium sulfoaluminate/fly ash mixtures. "By substituting some of the Rapid Set cement with fly ash, we will further reduce the already minimal carbon footprint of the cement while finding a use for a waste material," said Bescher. Copyright CW Group. All rights reserved. Unauthorized distribution expressly prohibited.

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ash fly structures cts mixtures calcium sulfoaluminate bescher new needles sized grow micron rapid coal set hydrated discovery

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Las Vegas Mural Brought to Life - Concrete Construction

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From: Concrete Construction August 2012 Posted on: August 14, 2012

Las Vegas Mural Brought to Life Your information resource to the concrete industry By Brandon Godbey

Launch Slideshow

Attendees at the World of Concrete (WOC) 2012 were in for a special treat when they saw the unveiling of the Las Vegas Coop project. After 4 months of planning, five companies— Ameripolish, Metzger McGuire, CTS Rapid Set, Ermator, and Runyon Surface Prep—began to contemplate a project that would show how to overlay a distressed slab and turn over a completed 1000-square-foot project in 4 days. We were developing new systems and processes and needed a platform to show people how to implement them on jobsites. We came together and worked out a plan. But we soon realized that the plan needed some adjustment. This is how we turned a nightmare into a finished product!

Day 1: The Thursday before the show started, Dan Markwood of Runyon, Joe Zingale of CTS Rapid Set, Clemet Jones of Jones Tile, and I met together and discovered that the area for our display had about 13 inches of fall to a central drain for the Las Vegas Mural Brought to Life parking lot and contained 30 tons of fill. Our process has Play Slideshow >> always been to place an overlay over concrete, so this immediately posed a challenge. The WOC staff provided the material and manpower to bring the entire area up to a working surface that was acceptable. We had to change the plan to accommodate the amount of material needed and pour a slab first, before we were able to begin the overlay. Day 2: Prior to coming to the show, we duplicated the process of pouring the overlay several times and in different weather conditions. We had experience pouring in almost every environment from 22-degree-slab temperatures to 90-degree-air temperatures. We also had experience grinding and repairing with products that were designed for topical applications. And although we had done extensive preparation, we had never poured in the desert heat with 45 mph winds! Faced with this new challenge, we decided to wait until the next day to pour. Day 3: It was colder and windier than the previous day, but we decided to push through. The first lift was 1 1/2 inches with wire mesh overlapped. We used a HTC 650 grinder for our grinding process to protect the overlay from cracking. Next, we needed to extend the Tru Self-Leveling concrete overlay with washed and dried pea gravel because we were about 30 bags short of completing the pour. The team from CTS was very accommodating with providing additional materials when needed, with their network of representatives coming at a moment’s notice. After receiving the extra products, we finished securing mesh and tied up loose ends to prepare for the initial pour of underlay. The crew began mixing the product with a Strong FloorMate.

http://www.concreteconstruction.net/polishing/las-vegas-mural-brought-to-life.aspx?printe... 8/17/2012


Las Vegas Mural Brought to Life - Concrete Construction

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Day 4: Bright and early on Day 4, we blasted the slab with a 14-inch unit. The process took about 1 1/2 hours to complete. The result was a beautiful profile with just a few areas to mend before cleaning off. Next, we primed the surface in preparation for a 3/8-inch Tru topping for polishing. We were able to get Armor Hard primer down before is began to rain and then come back to clean the slab and prepare to pour the middle 500foot section. Once again, we encountered high winds, so we created a wind break with plastic sheeting to keep the pour as protected as possible. Next, we fired up the pump again and completed the pour that night around 7:00 pm. Day 5: We arrived to find the slab in what appeared to be great condition! We were ready to begin grinding as we noticed the slab needed a little more time. Project Participants After a few hours we came back to work and experienced very few issues • Chris Swanson of Colour, Rescue, Calif. grinding to a good polish. We were finally right where we needed to be to finish • Rachel Bruce of Floormaps, the project by Wednesday evening or Thursday morning. The next step was to Fayetteville, Ark. prep the rest of the area and leave 250 square feet to do during show hours. • Ameripolish, Lowell, Ark. • Metzger McGuire, Concord,

N.H. Day 6: It was the first day of the show and most people were very intrigued by • CTS Rapid Set, Cypress, Calif. our booth. We had several people mention they were happy to see a group • Ermator, Tampa, Fla. display a process in a jobsite setting. The Jones crew was making progress • Runyon Surface Prep., Carmel, Ind. toward turning the center section over to Chris Swanson of Colour, Jason • Jones Tile, Roach, Mo. Campbell of Ameripolish, and Rachael Bruce of Floormaps for the layout and design portion of the project. As the day went on, Swanson was ready to begin layout in the center while the rest of us poured the section of Patriot Blue in the end farthest away. We faced yet another obstacle when we realized that there was a mistake with improper amount of water to mix with the the product. The Tru had more of a quicksand consistency than the desired milkshake consistency. We decided to move the product in place and water cure and broadcast the aggregate early. We knew it needed to be grouted and could crack, but we were happy to have an opportunity to show people how to do those things. As we cured the Blue we decided to pour the Caramel to show how to tie the slabs in without bleeding colors together. The team worked the rest of the day grinding, polishing, pouring, and finessing layout.

Day 7: The design team was getting ready to apply dye while the rest were grinding the areas we poured the previous day. We were having consistent traffic around the display and had to place ropes around the perimeter of the tent to keep the work area clear. We finished three of the other areas and prepared the last area to pour. Chris, Rachel, and Jason were masking and dying a 500-square foot stenciled section while Clemet and the guys poured the last section. After the last section was walkable, we moved the ropes in for the spectators to be able to watch Chris work his magic. We spent the rest of the afternoon watching Chris and company layout, spray, and remask. The process was just a little ahead of schedule at that point. Chris had an exceptional talent of being able to see and do things with design that astounded me. He created details in the design that were amazing. Jones Tile began cleaning, burnishing, and helping with all the other details that needed to be done for completion. Clemet and the guys amazed me with their attention to detail and willingness to do whatever necessary to get the job done. Day 8: It was finally all completed with the exception of the unveiling of the mural. The guys all worked hard! Even though we were met with so many challenges, like having to pour a concrete slab, we completed the project as planned. I don’t remember when we announced that Chris only had to finish the black background, but I remember looking up to quite a crowd! It was absolutely wonderful! When Chris and I originally discussed the idea, he asked what we wanted and I said plainly, “I’m not sure. I mess up stick figures and you could run with whatever you have in mind.” But I didn’t expect he would create what he did! We—the entire crew involved—spent the rest of the day staring at the Las Vegas mural that was brought to life and explaining what we did to make this project a success.

Keywords Subject Polishing, Slab

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Concrete Travels 250 Feet Down A Mountain For Culvert Pipe Repair

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9/20/2012 4:46 PM


Quick rebuild of the Page Avenue Bridge in St. Louis

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Roads & Bridges

Published on Roads & Bridges (http://www.roadsbridges.com) Home > Quick rebuild of the Page Avenue Bridge in St. Louis

Quick rebuild of the Page Avenue Bridge in St. Louis Submitted by bwilson on Fri, 2012-09-28 10:08 Bridges [1] The Page Avenue Bridge over the River Des Peres in St. Louis was worn and deteriorated after years of use. Around 60 years old, the bridge needed a new deck and replacement of the substructure above the walls. The bridge was part of the Missouri Safe and Sound Bridge Improvement Program which involved repairing or replacing around 550 bridges. Missouri Department of Transportation (MoDOT), the owner of the bridge, hired joint venture KTU Constructors to work on the repairs. Concrete Strategies was hired by KTU to work on the replacement of the deteriorated concrete.

Since the bridge was still in use, it was necessary to make the repairs quickly, so the traffic flow would be minimally disrupted. The bridge deck had to be at 4,000 psi before it could open to traffic. To quickly achieve such a high psi, Concrete Strategies recommended replacing some of the portland cement with CTS Cement’s Komponent [2], an ASTM C845 cement for producing non-shrink grout and shrinkage-compensating concrete. When incorporated into a concrete mix design, the cement can reduce or eliminate shrinkage cracking in concrete, and reduce the number of joints in the concrete. Typically, about 15% of the cement is replaced with Komponent to meet the requirements of ASTM C845 Type-K cement.

On this project, MoDOT had a minimum 7-day wet cure and a 14-day cure time, with incentives for early completion. Concrete Strategies wanted a faster cure time, so they designed a new mix with Komponent and presented samples to MoDOT. The samples produced a 3-day wet cure and a 4-day total cure. MoDOT came back several times later to observe the samples for cracking, but the samples held up. The mix was approved for use.

“This is the first time in history that Type K has been used on a MoDOT bridge,” said David Murray, project manager for Concrete Strategies.

http://www.roadsbridges.com/print/10268

10/12/2012


Quick rebuild of the Page Avenue Bridge in St. Louis

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Additionally, CTS Cement’s Rapid Set was used in the shoring design and the soil retention walls as part of the jacking and cribbing plan.

“The jacking and cribbing part of the project was significant. We had to close the lanes, excavate, pour, and then open up the lanes in 12 hours total,” said Murray. Company Reference: CTS Cement Manufacturing Corporation | Rapid Set Products [3] Web URL: www.ctscement.com By Line: Ed McLean Contact Email: info@ctscement.com Fax: 714.379.8270 Image: On this project, MoDOT had a minimum 7-day wet cure and a 14-day cure time, with incentives for early completion. [4] The bridge deck had to be at 4,000 psi before it could open to traffic. [5] COW NL Image Caption: On this project, MoDOT had a minimum 7-day wet cure and a 14-day cure time, with incentives for early completion. Phone: 800.929.3030 Source URL: http://www.roadsbridges.com/quick-rebuild-page-avenue-bridge-st-louis Links: [1] http://www.roadsbridges.com/taxonomy/term/8 [2] http://www.ctscement.com [3] http://www.roadsbridges.com/cts-cement-manufacturing-corporation-rapid-set-products [4] http://www.roadsbridges.com/sites/default/files/007.JPG [5] http://www.roadsbridges.com/sites/default/files/009.JPG

http://www.roadsbridges.com/print/10268

10/12/2012


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

CONTACT:

Rebecca Wasieleski, Editor Concrete Contractor (800) 547-7377, ext. 1321 Rebecca.Wasieleski@cygnus.com

CTS Rapid Set TRU Self-Leveling named a Top Product of 2012 October 23, 2012 (Fort Atkinson, Wis.) – Rapid Set TRU Self-Leveling from CTS, Cypress, Calif., was named one of the Contractors’ Choice Top Products of 2012 by the readers of Concrete Contractor magazine. The topping/resurfacer/underlayment is a hydraulic cementbased product for indoor or outdoor jobsites that also can be polished. “Every year, we run hundreds of products in Concrete Contractor,” said Editor Rebecca Wasieleski. “This special recognition goes to the products that have drawn the most interest from the 29,000 concrete contractors that subscribe to our magazine.” The Top Products of 2012 are featured in the October/November 2012 issue of Concrete Contractor and also in a special online gallery at http://www.forconstructionpros.com/magazine/conc/conc-top-products. Concrete Contractor delivers product news, business management tips and information on the latest trends and techniques to 29,000 concrete contractors. Concrete Contractor is published by Cygnus Business Media, Fort Atkinson, Wis., a leading business-to-business publishing company. ###

1233 Janesville Avenue Fort Atkinson, WI 53538  (800) 547-7377  FAX (920) 568-2244 www.ForConstructionPros.com


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