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SITES C o n s t r u c t i o n

I ssue N o .90 - J anuary 2015

Monthly Construction news, tenders, project focus, and forthcoming exhibitions in Qatar

PAGES 11-23

EXCLUSIVE

green building


SITES Creating an Intermodal Qatari companies win awards transport system for Qatar 2

Construction

The third phase of expansion of the Hamad International Airport (HIA) is estimated to cost $3 billion. “When the third phase is ready, HIA would be able to handle 53 million passengers a year against its current capacity of 30 million,” Qatar Civil Aviation Authority Chairman Abdul Azeez Al Noaimi said, while speaking at a panel discussion hosted by the Ministry of Transport at its special tent in Darb al-Saai recently. Al Noaimi said the work on the second phase of expansion of the airport had already started. The part of Doha Metro, linking different areas within the HIA, would be ready by the middle of next year, Zawya.com quoted him as saying. Qatar Aeronautical College Director General Ali Al Malki said that arrangements were being made to shift the institution’s entire operations to the HIA Complex. The college, he said, would be able to offer more professional educational programs in civil aviation and related fields in coming years. Al Malki also informed that negotiations were going on with Qatar Foundation for Education, Science and Community Development (QF) for setting up an aeronautical university of world standards. Speaking later, Qatar Rail Managing Director and senior engineer Abdulla Abdulazeez Al Turki Al Subaie said that more than 40% of the boring work for 38 stations of the Doha Metro was already completed. In all, 16% of the total work of the Doha Metro had been completed, he said while disclosing that 21 boring machines would be deployed in different areas of Doha in 2015. While informing that 70% of the construction design of Doha Metro was already completed, the senior Qatar Rail official said the project featured 85km of railway lines in two directions, spread over three lines - Blue, Red and Green. Regarding the Lusail Light Rail Project, Al Subaie said an 8km tunnel was completed and more than 7km of electrical and mechanical works was also finished. The light rail project features 35 stations covering a distance of 32km. “Works within Qatar for the GCC Rail for passenger and freight transport would begin next year and the first rail movement is expected sometime in 2018,” he added. Source: Zawya.com

GWC to develop Bu Sulba logistics hub for QR685m

Gulf Warehousing Company QSC (GWC) was awarded the contract to develop the Bu Sulba logistics hub during the “Manateq Storage Project” launch on 14 December 2014. This logistics development will be aimed at serving small and medium enterprises (SMEs) located primarily in the South to Central part of Doha up to Al Gharrafa in addition to Al Wakra city. The Bu Sulba hub will be a self-contained centre spread across an area of 517,376 sqm with a builtup area exceeding 40 percent of the total. This development will feature around 194 warehousing units of different specifications optimised for SMEs, as well as a container yard, labour accommodation, first aid centre, a mosque, and commercial and other amenities. The new warehouses will offer a variety of storage solutions ranging from dry, temperature-controlled, chilled and frozen as well as bulk storage, while taking into consideration the specific needs of the SMEs. “The role that SMEs play in growing and diversifying the economy has been well-established, which has not gone unnoticed by government authorities, who opened the bid on this land to empower SMEs and provide them with suitable environment to grow,” said GWC Chairman Sheikh Abdulla bin Fahad bin Jassem bin Jabor Al Thani (pictured). “GWC has been a key contributor to the country’s most advanced logistics infrastructure, developing key facilities across the nation and serving nearly all industrial verticals. The project is considered part of GWC’s responsibility toward the Qatar National Vision 2030 on the one hand, and a complement to the company’s portfolio of services offered on the other.”

Saint-Gobain and Sika in buy-out standoff

The management of tunnel-waterproof-membrane provider Sika is yet to agree on terms for a potential sale to French building materials supplier Saint-Gobain. Reports suggested Saint-Gobain signed a SFr2.75 billion ($2.87 billion) deal to gain control of Sika, despite the Swiss group’s top guns threatening to resign if the deal went ahead, as they were not consulted. “The rumor that there has been an agreement between Sika management and Saint-Gobain is unfounded. There has been no development,” Sika spokesman Dominik Slappnig said. Saint-Gobain considers Sika’s US portfolio as lucrative stream compared with the poor state of the European construction market. Pierre-André de Chalendar, SaintGobain’s chief executive, stated he expected growth to the tune of €100 million ($125 million) a year from 2017 and €180 million a year from 2019 should Sika ink the deal. De Chalendar hoped the situation with the management and the board to stabilize soon. Source: worldtunnelling.com/Luke Buxton

News

Qatar’s ASTAD Project Management and Traffic Tech (Gulf) companies have won awards at a regional recognition ceremony held in Dubai recently. ASTAD Project Management, Qatar’s leading project management consultancy for building and infrastructure, has won the Sustainability Initiative of the Year award for its contribution to the Qatar Foundation Solar Smart Grid project at the Construction Week Awards 2014. Traffic Tech (Gulf) was named the Sub-Contractor of the Year at the event. The Sub-Contractor of the Year category was fiercely competitive where Traffic Tech emerged the winner among other shortlisted companies from Qatar and other GCC countries. The judges said that Traffic Tech’s submission was “particularly impressive” and that it managed to stand out as an organization with a proven track record of delivery. The awards were part of the GCC edition of the Construction Week Awards 2014 held in Dubai. The award for ASTAD Project Management was presented to Abdulaziz Al Mulla, its Chief Commercial Officer. The Qatar Foundation Solar Smart Grid project, which is located at various facilities within the Education City campus in Doha, represents an unprecedented opportunity to move the energy industry into a new era of reliability, availability and efficiency. It is composed of solar photovoltaic (PV) installations that generate 7,922 kilowatts of clean energy annually and result in savings of approximately 3,961 tonnes of CO2 emissions every year. The most cutting-edge feature of the project is the design and construction of the Energy Monitoring Center (EMC) that will enable real-time administration of all solar and power quality monitoring systems from a central location, aiding in their efficient operation and maintenance. Having demonstrated a significant contribution to sustainable development over the last year, the environmentally-friendly initiative is the first commercial PV project in Qatar to be granted approval for grid connection from Kahramaa (Qatar General Electricity and Water Corporation). Commenting on the award, ASTAD Project Management CEO Ali Al-Khalifa said: “We are honored to receive this outstanding regional award. ASTAD and Qatar Foundation share a common set of values and goals that are in keeping with Qatar National Vision 2030, which calls on us to harness climate action solutions through abundant natural resources like solar energy. “This project has proven to be a catalyst for increased growth in the renewable energy sector as it demonstrates a successful application of the economic and environmental benefits of solar technology.” Apart from the clean energy generated, the Qatar Foundation Solar Smart Grid project will contribute to an unprecedented transfer of knowledge through the Energy Monitoring Center. The center will allow visitors, students, and researchers to view individual system outputs and technical grid data, while familiarizing themselves with Qatar Foundation’s various green initiatives that are well aligned with the Qatar Green Building Council. The Sustainability Initiative of the Year is just one of numerous accolades that ASTAD Project Management and Qatar Foundation have garnered this year. In September, ASTAD and Qatar Foundation won the Health and Safety Initiative of the Year at the 2014 Construction Week Qatar Awards for the QF Migrant Workers’ Welfare Initiative (Karama). Moreover, as a reflection of ASTAD’s exemplary contribution to the National Museum of Qatar, it received the coveted Most Innovative Project of the Year award at the Qatar Contractors Forum. The award for the Traffic Tech Group was handed over to Husam Musharbash, its President and CEO, by Simon Moon, CEO at Atkins. “This is great. We were shortlisted for the Qatar awards and we never expected we would win the regional one so it’s really great for us,” said Musharbash. “We are very proud. We’ve been in business for 28 years and we’ve won a lot of awards, but this is one of the most important ones for us,” he said. “We’ve been doing a lot of fast track projects and the project that I think has won us the award is the Doha Corniche traffic signals project that we did in a very short period of time and that was very challenging to us. “This award further strengthens our market position as we aim to double our turnover in the next five years by being a major contributor to Qatar’s massive intelligent transportation system projects,” he added.

Astad Project Management Chief Commercial Officer Abdulaziz Al Mulla (left) and Sustainability Manager Sheikh Soud Al-Thani (centre) receiving the award.


Construction

Exclusive

SITES

3

Qatar Green Building Council to launch ‘Green Pages’ Qatar Green Building Council (QGBC), member of Qatar Foundation for Education, Science and Community Development (QF) has many firsts to its name. QGBC, as it is known, opened its first energy efficient Passivhaus in February 2013. There are only 25,000 Passivhaus’ around the world. Passivhaus is a German word that refers to the rigorous, voluntary standard for energy efficiency in a building. QGBC partnered with Barwa Real Estate (BRE) and Kahramaa to launch this groundbreaking experiment in the region’s green building industry. The Passivhaus boasts an exceptionally low energy, airtight building design that requires minimal energy for cooling the indoor space, thereby reducing its carbon footprint. The project aims to educate the public about the Passivhaus concept and generate community discussions about green living and sustainable practices for residents of Qatar to implement in their daily lives. Alongside the Passivhaus project, QGBC is currently undertaking other exciting projects as well. Construction Sites spoke to Eng. Meshal Al Shamari, Director of QGBC about their work. QGBC is one of the 98 members of the World Green Building Council (WGBC). Qatar Green Building Council (QGBC) is a non-profit, membership-driven organisation providing leadership and encouraging collaboration in conducting environmentally sustainable practices for green building design and development in Qatar. The latest project that they will be launching for the construction sector is the ‘Green Directory’. Al Shamari first revealed plans to release the country’s first ever national green directory a few months ago in August 2014. It is planned to be published on an annual basis with its first edition targeted to be released in March 2015. The directory aims to work as a reference for clients interested in promoting sustainable development in Qatar. “One of the challenges the industry faces here is the non-availability of the right information, so many investors or developers would like to use green materials, but they don’t know what services and materials are already available in Qatar. So, what we are trying is to create kind of a platform for those products

that is open to everybody,” emphasized Shamari. Giving more details of the project, he said that the document’s marketing is scheduled to start in January 2015, registration to be featured in the green directory will be free of charge. “Companies that would like to register to be in the directory, need to register with QGBC,” he said. Shamari added that QGBC hoped that the directory would be able to be the missing link in the construction industry’s product supply chain. ‘It will be similar to the Yellow Pages, as it will indicate whether the product is available in Qatar, how to get it and who to get it from’. There will be 64 categories including; consultancies, Facility Management companies, furniture, detergents, primary materials, cladding and paints. Shamari said that changes in behaviour in the construction sector will be gradual and that is what is demonstrated by the phased changes in the Qatar Construction Standards. QCS 2014 was released a few months ago in November 2014 and it includes an entire section on more environmentally friendly requirements for the building sector (QCS: Section 7). However, he noted that this section was already there in 2010 but it was not mandatory. Now it has been made mandatory for the pub-

lic works sector and it is expected that it will be made mandatory for the entire sector by 2016. Of course, he added, conventional wisdom tells us that when you give someone a choice they will always take the easiest one, but this has not stopped the concerned ministries from developing ‘green codes’. He emphasised that it was understood that if there was no self-interest or financial interest that sector would not change its behaviour. For example in the US and the UK the incentive to comply with green standards are market driven. Owners that have Agrade properties (highest green rating) are entitled to ask for higher rental. These properties have low utility bills, which in Europe and the US is major persuasive factor, while those properties graded B or C, might be cheaper, but will have higher utility bills as they are less energy efficient. Shamari acknowledged that this might not work in the Gulf as energy is cheap, but it illustrates that there are different ways to persuade the market apart from direct government regulation. The strategy from Kahramaa is therefore to introduce regulation and enforce it over time. Organisations like QGBC work together with government departments to advocate green behaviour and educate residents of Qatar on their responsibilities towards the

environment. The role that QGBC plays in the green building sector was underscored at a seminar launching the ‘ICC’s Green Economy Roadmap: implications for Qatar’. At the seminar Dr. Alex Amato, Head of Sustainability at QGBC, moderated a panel discussion during the seminar in which

work with ICC Qatar to introduce the concept of green economy to its stakeholders, the decision-makers and the public in Qatar in order to create necessary policies and to raise awareness of green business and green economy in the country,” said Dr Amato. “At QGBC, academics, innovators, researchers,

ment and implementation of policies and actions towards a green economy and to build a platform for future action and collaboration.” The roadmap aims to share existing best practice and initiate new collaborative activities. Launched during Rio+20 as an initiative to promote a more common understanding of the green economy, the roadmap outlines 10 conditions and related policy recommendations as a framework to discuss a range of inter-linked policies and actions to transform into a green economy. These conditions include social, environment and economic innovation; collaboration between all sectors; integrated governance; balancing short-and long-term strategies and multilateralism. An ‘integrated governance approach’ where that organization focusses on a strategic approach to sustainability and not so much the level of LEED, BREEAM or GSAS certification it can achieve is more responsible and more easily maintained in the long term, said Al Shamari. He further explained how QF understood sustainability. At QF sustainable practices not only applied to saving water and energy, it applies to all aspects of a project; from responsible sourcing, facility management, maintenance and even

representatives of the Qatari business community and Governmental organizations from different sectors – including oil and gas, construction and technology – shared initiatives and challenges in order to create a comprehensive overview of Qatar’s current sustainability status. “As an overarching organization in the sustainability and green building industries in Qatar, QGBC is delighted to

activists and the public, work together to collectively further the Qatar National Vision 2030. We do this through safeguarding Qatar’s green movement and sustainability in general.” According to Remy Rowhani, Director General of Qatar Chamber and Secretary General of ICC Qatar, “The ICC Green Economy Roadmap represents a comprehensive effort to assist in the develop-

finance. Shamari was upbeat about the progress and work of QGBC and said that he wanted the public to see it as the ‘go to’ place for everything about ‘green technology’ and sustainability. He hoped the ‘Green Directory’ would assist with providing advice and technical support to the construction sector. To learn more, please visit www.qatargbc.org.


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Construction

SITES

Legal

Prescriptive Periods in Qatar: Don’t get caught out

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tatutory time limits for bringing legal claims in Qatar are called ‘prescriptive periods’, and are equivalent in concept to ‘limitation periods’ which apply to claims brought in the UK. Prescriptive periods are important for contractors and construction professionals, as they define the length of time in which claims can be made in relation to the work undertaken or advice given. However, these periods can vary in length depending on the type of claim, and can potentially be extended by certain conduct or by implication, so care is needed when managing the statutory expiry of liabilities. This article explores the main prescriptive periods which apply to contractors and professional consultants in Qatar, how these differ from jurisdictions such as the UK, and how they can be managed so that these periods are not unintentionally extended. All Qatari Laws (save for those issued by, eg. the QFC to regulate its own business), are issued in Arabic and there are no official translations, therefore for the purposes of drafting this article Clyde & Co has used its own translation and interpreted the same in the context of Qatari laws, regulation and current market practice. Relevant prescriptive periods The most wide ranging statutory prescriptive period is for ‘personal rights’ (Article 403 of the Qatar Civil Code). These personal rights are similar to com-

mon law ‘torts’, and include claims for monetary damages arising from most breaches of contract. The prescriptive period for these personal rights is 15 years from the date of the breach of contract or other cause of action, as set out in Article 403 of the Civil Code (and unless altered by another law). This means that most claims between individuals or companies cannot be made, and effectively expire, after 15 years. Another important prescriptive period applies to the services provided by architects, engineers and other experts. Article 405 of the Civil Code provides that the prescriptive period in these circumstances is reduced to five years, and the time runs from the actual performance of the services, rather than the invoice date. The prescriptive period relating to decennial liability is set out in Article 711 of the Civil Code and, as its name suggests, applies for a period of ten years, commencing on the handover of the project. Decennial liability applies to contractors, architects and engineers, and makes them jointly and severally liable for any serious structural defect or collapse of the building or structure, even if they are not at fault. As is clear from the above, these prescriptive periods differ greatly to the ‘common law’ standard six years for breaches of contract or non-contractual damages, and the 12 year period for claims arising from a contract made as a deed, which some international contractors

Laura Warren Laura Warren is a partner of the International Law firm, Clyde & Co LLP, in Doha. Laura has a wide ranging contentious and non contentious construction practice involving projects in Qatar as well as in the UAE, Oman, Bahrain, Libya, Egypt and Tunisia Laura is Co-ordinator for the Society of Construction Law (Gulf) in Qatar.

might be more used to applying. Reducing prescriptive periods In contrast to common law jurisdictions such as the UK, prescriptive periods cannot be reduced by agreement or by contract. Article 418 of the Civil Code is very clear on this point, and any contractual provision which attempts to do so will be invalid and unenforceable. This raises an interesting issue relating to claims for, say, an extension of time or additional preliminaries. Such claims are often required to be made by the contractor within a certain number of days or weeks from the underlying event. A common argument from the contractor is that a breach of such a provision (i.e. the giving of a late delay notice) often leads to no actual financial loss to the employer, and therefore the strict time limit can be difficult to enforce. However, if that time limit is drafted as a strict ‘condition precedent’, which specifically bars the contractor’s entitle-

ment to a claim if it is made late, then these are usually considered enforceable. Certainly, an employer would have no problems relying upon such a provision in the UK, provided the drafting was sufficiently clear. However, in Qatar, such provisions could be interpreted as denying the contractor, ahead of the expiry of the relevant prescriptive period, the right to claim the appropriate extension of time or additional preliminaries. Such conditions precedent therefore sit very uneasily with Article 418 of the Qatar Civil Code, which invalidates contractual provisions which seek to reduce prescriptive periods. Such questions will always come down to the specific wording of the clause, and the facts of the matter. It is also often argued that condition precedent wording is a waiver by the contractor of its underlying rights, rather than denying it the opportunity to actually claim those rights, although such distinctions are somewhat artificial. Extending prescriptive periods Just as the parties to a contact cannot agree to truncate or shorten prescriptive periods, Article 418(1) of the Civil Code also prevents these periods from being extended by agreement. However, that is not to say that they are always set in stone.

A prescriptive period can be reset in certain circumstances, thus effectively lengthening the underlying period (Article 418(2)). For example, this could occur when a debtor acts in a way which demonstrates he is placing no reliance on the prescriptive period, and the technical defence that it would give him. An example of this might be a waiver of the prescriptive period, or the making of a partial payment to the creditor. Notes of caution Prescriptive periods can provide valuable protection to contractors and professional consultants operating in Qatar, and awareness of the length of time for which project risk might apply can be essential for accurate risk management and tender pricing. As a corollary, false reliance should not be placed on contracts which purport to reduce or otherwise adjust the periods of potential liability, albeit that such clauses are commonly included in certain well-used international forms of contract. To make it more complicated, the Qatar Civil Code and the Qatar Commercial Code contain many more prescriptive periods than those mentioned above, and care should be taken to ascertain exactly which prescriptive periods will apply to any particular work or professional service. Should you have any questions in connection with

Alexander Whyatt Associate Alexander is an associate in Clyde & Co’s construction team in Doha, and is a solicitor of the Court of England and Wales. He is experienced with the legal and commercial issues affecting construction professionals, having practiced in Qatar, Dubai and London, as well as within the legal team of an international contractor. Alexander regularly acts for building contractors, professional consultants and property developers, although he is also experienced at assisting institutional investors with construction issues and supporting corporate transactions. He frequently advises on the drafting and interpretation of project documentation and local legislation, and has acted for clients in mediations, court proceedings and arbitrations.

this article or the legal issues it covers, please contact Laura Warren, Partner of Clyde & Co LLP at laura. warren@clydeco.com.qa or Alexander Whyatt, Associate of Clyde & Co LLP at alexander.whyatt@clydeco. com.qa

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6

Construction

SITES

Conference

HVAC - Plumbing & Drainage - Fire Fighting - Electrical & ELV Energy Centers - Street Lighting - Maintenance - Facility Management

ENGINEERING

Established in 1974, TRAGS Engineering is recognized as the leading Grade-1 MEP Services, District Cooling and Facility Management Contractor in the State of Qatar. The scope of activities covers all aspects of building services including design, procurement, installation, testing and commissioning of multi-service installations. In addition, the company offers 24/7 Facility Management Services to government buildings, corporations, educational, healthcare, industrial, commercial and residential sectors.

www.tragsengineering.com

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Qatar COVERTECH set to showcase floor and wall covering innovations

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n line with the global trend of trade fairs being more specialized, the Ibhar International Exhibitions Group is organizing Qatar COVERTECH - 2015, the first expo in the Middle East and the Gulf Co-operation Council (GCC) that is fully dedicated to the wall and floor covering sector. Qatar COVERTECH will be held from February 4 to 6, 2015, at Doha Exhibition Centre. Qatar COVERTECH comes in response to market research which has confirmed the need for exhibitors to find more specialized (B2B) events to meet the demands of targeted visitors, says IBHAR CEO Dr Moyasser Saddiq. “Events like these enable exhibitors to have a deeper understanding of visitor’s needs, while giving an opportunity to inform them about the latest products and to discuss their advantages,” he says. The exhibition is held under the auspices of the Qatar Chamber of Commerce and Industry and the Gulf Organization for Industrial Consulting (GOIC). The sponsors’ list includes a number of prominent names in the GCC market: Nabina, Tadmur, La Bella Villa, Mundo bello, Doha Extraco and Hajar Enterprises. The exhibitor profile covers: *Internal and external floor-

Dr Moyasser Saddiq: IBHAR CEO.

covering materials: marble, stone, ceramics, wood and parquet, PVC, tiles, carpet & rugs, landscape and sport facilities flooring; *Internal and external wallcovering materials: painting and coating, wall paper curtains, glass, PVC, aluminum, cladding, partition systems, gypsum boards, doors and windows. Leading exhibitors from Italy, Turkey, Ukraine, China, Spain, Malaysia and Egypt will showcase innovations in floor and wall covering, both interior and

exterior. Dr Saddiq says that Ibhar is working in co-ordination with a number of business organizations in Qatar and the Gulf region to ensure that a huge number of trade visitors, including consulting engineers, architects, interior designers, real estate developers, hotels and facility managers and senior officials representing governments, municipalities, banks and financial institutions will be among those attending the exhibition.

Strategies to minimize water use

Ashghal has developed and is implementing a nationwide program that includes the development of roads, drainage and new infrastructure in all areas of Qatar as part of its Local Roads and Drainage Program (LR&DP). Dr Neil Kirkpatrick, Sustainability Manager at Ashghal, explained at a recent presentation that population growth, leakage, investment in new infrastructure and assets and behavior change were some of the main challenges facing water usage in Qatar. Kirkpatrick said there were a variety of technical solutions aimed at minimizing water use in buildings, public realm and infrastructure. In the buildings sector, solutions include change of behavior, using fixtures and fittings of low or adjustable flow rates, using condensate collection, metering and leak detection and grey water recycling. In the public realm and irrigation, water consumption minimization options include balance between hardscape and softscape, rethinking plant palette, delivery systems and flow rates. Besides the usage of timer switches, sensors, water retention aids in soils and closing the loop. In infrastructure, metering and leak detection also play a role. Storm water management, efficiency of capture systems and sustainable urban drainage systems are equally important. He explained that team work

was essential to deliver sustainable solutions. He added that the use of “charrettes”’ helped to give ownership to design options that satisfied sustainability – and commercial - objectives. Kirkpatrick concluded the presentation with an overview on what the future holds. Taking into account the expected increase in population, policy and regulation changes and the new Qatar construction specifications and building code, the future holds the possibility to choose from various options: • Reduced leakage (liability? fines? targets?) • Introduction of water charges? • Greater linkage between

• • • 1. 2. 3. 4. • • • • •

water use and other environmental / sustainability considerations – e.g. climate change? National water model? Central database with automatic updating? Introduction of ‘new’ technologies like: Reverse osmosis Solar desalination Water retention aids in soils Incentivisation / subsidies? Minimum performance levels linked to planning and permitting? More awareness campaigns to reduce water use at source Improved Governance? ‘Water security’


Technology

Construction

SITES

7

Key role for manufacturers and suppliers in BIM

BIM is not yet mandatory in Qatar, though it is a necessary tool and the local construction industry is mature enough to embrace the technology Qatar’s construction industry is increasingly adopting Building Information Modeling (BIM) as standard practice. The key advantage of BIM is closer collaboration among owners, designers, contractors and suppliers so that each party could provide relevant data to construction projects. BIM opens up huge opportunities for the product inclusion within the projects. It allows product suppliers and manufacturers to supply detailed “virtual products” to architects, engineers and specifiers as easily as they traditionally provided data or 2D CAD details with all the consequent benefits of relationship building and product loyalty in specification. Being able to offer 3D ready content is a major plus point for any manufacturer and supplier going forward with the innovations. It could also be an important factor for deciding who is awarded a contract during the tendering process as more and

more contractors and construction companies would prefer to work with suppliers that provide BIM ready data. Some marketing executives claim that the customers say that they won’t be using manufacturers that don’t provide BIM ready objects. The challenges for manufacturers are many. How to efficiently produce the necessary data for a large number of products in the right format, when there are so many available, and at the right time and with the right level of detail? There is a common pattern with manufacturers’ focus on products quality rather than process and technology which guarantee long-term view of research and development. Manufacturers that provide BIM content certainly benefit by having their CAD files, product performance parameters, dimensional options, specification details, material properties (colors and finishes), branding,

links and other important specification information converted in easy to use 3D components. So the specifiers can easily use in their projects real products from the real manufacturers available regionally or locally instead of using generic components. It will also allow specifier to manage building materials logistics and to check the availability of the product from the supplier and then create a photo-realistic renders and finalize the project with the confidence that the product is available on the local market and complies with the project’s specifications. There are number of BIM components suppliers available on the market that offer BIM content creation for manufacturers. BIMobject is one of the innovative BIM libraries that offers downloadable content of real manufacturers’ products and produces intelligent 3D content in a variety of formats. With a mission to assist product manufacturers in the AEC field, to be visible and get selected by creating high quality easy accessible objects for the BIM process, the company provides software tools, web solutions and services for the creation, conversion and publishing of BIM objects on the web and hence creates a direct path to users of any BIM software.

This approach enabling the manufacturers’ products to be selected directly from the BIM processes. BIMobject continuously strengthens its technology portfolio with intelligent cloud solutions and a web-based infrastructure for interior design and construction products. Its product portal, which was launched in early 2012, reached more than 1,400,000 downloads, with more than 65,000 professional BIM users. “It is amazing to see so many users on the BIMobject Portal and to see demands fulfilled. We are constantly developing the Portal and increasing the number of published manufacturers - working hard to make sure that the BIMobject Portal will be the obvious choice for architects and design professionals. “With our large and growing user base the BIMobject Portal now represents a very efficient marketing channel for our customers, says Stefan Larsson, founder and CEO at BIMobject.” Global market players continue to launch their products as BIM objects in the BIMobject Product portal. The influx of users remains solid and such companies as Knauf Insulation, Offecct and Pressalit Care, Hilti are among them. The company has also several strategic partnerships in the GCC.

BIMobject has signed an agreement with BIMES (BIM Engineering Solution) to support the growing demand for manufacturer specific content in the form of BIM objects. The collaboration between regional BIM solution provider and BIMobject leverages a possibility for manufacturers in the architectural, construction and interior industry to be placed into a virtual version of the project using BIM processes and software. BIM objects, according to industry experts, will be a needed component to get better control of construct-ability, costs, visualizations, communications and simulations. BIM objects is also considered as a vehicle to use for new local manufacturers as well as for international manufacturers that wish to tender and market themselves into a dynamic market and secure future growth on

the regional markets. BIM isn’t yet mandatory in Qatar, though it is a necessary tool and the local construction industry is mature enough to embrace the technology. As today’s designed and built projects are very complex and require collaboration between AEC firms involved in design and construction process of the project. It also requires collaboration with building products manufacturers and fabricators. This collaboration starts early in the process and is maintained throughout a project’s lifecycle. The projects are becoming systems of systems, with this approach often demanding the integration of products from multiple manufacturers that are customized to meet specific in-field requirements for the projects to be delivered faster, at a lower cost and with higher quality.


8

Construction

SITES

Technology

Architecture and acoustic design: art of constructing sound green buildings

Acoustics Tech Qatar, (Doha on 10 and 11 December 2014 ) covered various issues related to acoustics from environmental risks, sound reduction in design, balancing building and performance requirements for acoustic design

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eople spend an average of 90% or more of their time indoors, according to research studies. Research also maintains that indoor comfort is quite important and it is based on a combination of environmental quality, visual, thermal and acoustic comfort, says Dr Martha Katafygiotou, a top expert in green building. This clearly demonstrates the close links among green building technology, acoustics and comfort. Sustainability is one of the driving forces in construction. However, the acoustical environment is typically given little or no consideration during the design stage, said Dr Katafygiotou during her keynote address at the recent Acoustics Tech Qatar. Dr Katafygiotou discussed the acoustical challenges in green buildings in her address. Acoustics Tech Qatar, held in Doha on December 10and 11 covered various issues related to acoustics from environmental risks, sound reduction in design, balancing building and performance requirements for acoustic design to acoustics in natural ventilation. There was also a case study presentation of the acoustic

design at the temporary venues of London 2012 Olympics and Paralympic Games by Dr Konca Saher, from the Kadir Has University in Turkey. The lack of adequate speech privacy and control of noise levels has been a major complaint, especially in office environments. This could be attributed to the “Contrary to what one might people not understanding the think, a Berkeley University difference between music and study found that, ‘If you looked at the last surveys you’d find that, respondents’ acoustics satisfaction was slightly lower in green buildings than in regular The outer beauty buildings.’ A good example of of a structure is why this could be is to look at recognized by how it the acoustic comfort in an open looks…but the inner, plan office design building.” more lasting beauty Surveys show that 65% of open plan occupants are “often disof the structure tracted”. The design dilemma between providing acoustic priis truly known by its comfort and its vacy for quiet work and openness for team interaction is a sounds… factor. Therefore private offices are recommended for most workers because it is hard to work without distractions in an open plan office. noise. Architecture and acoustic “Music is the art of arranging design and combining sounds to cre- Problem 1: Green strategies ate a harmonious melody while may compromise acoustic denoise can obstruct and con- sign; discover which have the fuse,” said Dr Katafygiotou. most impact and how to address

them. Solution 1: Open spaces – open plan environments with adequate daylighting can be productive workspaces as long as acoustics are not forgotten. To accommodate daylighting and natural ventilation in green buildings often features a very high percentage of open-plan spaces, which eliminates key acoustical control methods (physical barriers). Problem 2: Daylighting – Spaces are designed to allow natural sunlight into the interior and reduce energy use but many of the strategies used for good daylighting results in an inferior acoustical environment. The overall geometry of the spaces tends to be long and narrow to ensure that no spot is too far away from a window. But long narrow spaces provide a bowling alley effect for sound because it bounces between the two exterior walls.

Solution 2: A more traditional, square floor plan allows sound to decay before it hits an outside wall and bounces back into space. Problem 3: Passive heating and cooling systems. Solution 3: Non-traditional heating and cooling, such as radiant floor heating or the use of thermal mass, requires exposed concrete surfaces. Using thermal slabs eliminates the sound deadening capabilities of carpet underfoot and the absorption overhead that acoustical ceiling tile typically provides. Problem 4: Hard surfaces and materials. Solution 4: The right surface materials will function acoustically by absorbing noise and blocking the transmission of sound from one space to the next. In green spaces, architects tend to specify harder materials, since they give the impression of being easier to maintain and offer a longer lifespan, however, they also limit sound absorption. While these conflicts were significant, said Dr Katafygiotou, there were strategies that could help enable sustainable design and good acoustics to coexist harmoniously. She assured industry experts

and practitioners present that green strategies did and could enhance acoustics. Bearing in mind that the challenges mentioned were significant, she added that designers could specify transparent, sound-limiting barriers in the workspace. Certain dividers could be strategically lowered while other partitions remained on high in order to preserve sightlines while providing acoustical separation. And while some lighter surfaces did reflect sound, there were also products which absorbed sound, and thereby accomplishing the dual purpose of supporting natural light while controlling sound, she added. Another aspect that can enhance acoustics is underfloor air distribution. This is a sustainable strategy that can actually decrease background sound. The white noise of the conventional HVAC systems also helps to mask conversations. “HVAC is being delivered utilizing lower fan speed and horsepower through raised floor plenums. These systems are much quieter than traditional ducted systems, allowing conversations to carry through the workspace”, said Dr Katafygiotou.


Solutions for your formwork needs Versatile Systems: The complex geometry of the Abutments with inclined counter fort, complete with massive reinforced concrete structures, required the use of flexible, versatile formwork systems – and continuous on-site support. That’s why we successfully used ACROW H20 & Soldier System. ACROW H20 & Soldier system is a multipurpose system, where it can be used in different applications. The elements are easily and quickly assembled by connecting the H20 timber beams to the soldier by the means of H20 connection. Moreover, elements dismantling are done as easily as system erection. In addition, this system proved to be one of the most economical alternatives compared with steel frame formwork panel system, where it comes to both complicated designs and numerous non-typical applications.”

Qatar Address: Salwa Road, Doha , Qatar , PO Box : 15104 Tel.: (+974) 44582357 Fax.: (+974) 44582376 E-mail: acrowqatar@acrow.co, website: www.acrow.co

Main Office: Wady Houf, Helwan, Egypt. Tel.: (+202) 23690616 Fax: (+202) 23695290

Qatar . Kuwait . Oman . Saudi Arabia . UAE . Algeria . Morocco . Libya


10

Construction

SITES

Construction

Construction Noise: A Necessary Evil?

As with every project, the key to success is in careful planning of the construction process. Construction noise management plans present an indispensable tool when it comes to noise mitigation. Being disturbed by noise emitted from nearby construction sites and moreover being unable to sleep is a part of Doha’s everyday life; attributed to ongoing construction and the high pace of development. As the construction noise is often perceived as a necessary evil and beyond anyone’s influence, all related discussions usually end with a sense of helplessness and displeasure. However, when correctly managed the annoyance of construction noise can be reduced significantly so that the overall quality of our lives can be improved. Construction itself is a very complex process, involving numerous concerned parties and activities. By so, it is unavoidably noisy and presents a substantial impact to the environment, affecting wellbeing of both humans and animals. Construction noise is a common term used to describe noise pollution originating from various activities related to the construction process; such as noise due to transport and unload of materials, demolition, piling, excavation, power generation, etc. Generally, it can be categorized into a noise from open construction sites or interior works (renovation, fit-out, etc.). The effect of noise on humans is well documented and the World Health Organization (WHO) ac-

knowledges noise as one of the key factors related to our health. Exposure to excessive noise, either at home or workplace, has a severe impact on our health; causing chronic fatigue, depression, loss of energy, lack of concentration, high levels of stress, etc. Excessive noise perceived at workplace severely diminishes employees’ concentration and it’s considered as one of the main components causing workers’ dissatisfaction; having a major effect on reduced productivity. Construction noise is an everpresent problem whose effects are frequently amplified in the countries with a high rate of development. In the case of Qatar, a country with an unprecedented pace of construction; combined with a lack of suitable legislation, the problem of construction noise is reaching almost epidemic proportions, where construction is often being carried out around the clock, with sites operating 24 hours a day. In Doha, a city often described as an immense construction site, there is virtually no area where construction can’t be seen or heard. Apart from the direct influences of construction activity; indirect ones such as the chronic problem of heavy vehicles in regular traffic, shouldn’t be disregarded. It is not well known that Qatar

has an Environmental Law in place, defining noise limits which shouldn’t be exceeded during day and night time. However, the law is not detailed enough, as it doesn’t distinguish between various types of noise (traffic, construction, events, building services, etc.) and in general, it is disregarded. Until Qatar implements a dedicated law addressing construction noise; it should be the contractor’s responsibility to consider potential noise control measures and reduce noise pollution as much as possible. Although it should not be expected that contractors will put any control measure in place if it’s not enforced by the authorities. To encourage the latter, authorities have to form a certain body that can receive and process complaints from the public. As for this moment, it is virtually impossible to file any complaint if you’re bothered by excessive noise of a nearby construction site. How is construction noise controlled? As with every project, the key to success is in careful planning of the construction process. Construction noise management plans present an indispensable tool when it comes to noise mitigation. Internationally, such plans are part of mandatory documentation required to obtain a building permit. The purpose of these plans is to

predict specific construction activities and the related noise impacts; then define suitable noise mitigating treatments. Construction noise can be mitigated in various ways. Some of the common means of noise mitigation are: • Noise barriers • Acoustic enclosures • Using excavated soil as embankments • Conduction on noisy activities during the daytime The least that any contractor can do; is to list all the noisy activities foreseen and plan their execution during the daytime if the construction site is located in a heavily populated area. Apart from these; another important measure of contained

in any noise management plan is to encourage positive community relations. Accepting the residents of nearby buildings as partners rather than disturbing factors, can make everyone’s life easier. Informing residents, disturbed by noise, about scheduled noisy activities and keeping them up to date with noise control measures undertaken, builds strong community relations and aids in avoiding frequent complaints or even law suits. Psychologically, tenants tend to tolerate construction noise for a longer period of time, if aware of timings and expected start-end dates of noisy activities. Everyone’s sleeping hours should be found valuable and

the comfort of people should be of primary importance and not placed second in importance to the project. It is possible to significantly reduce construction noise if there is coordination between the contractor and the acoustic consultant, for the duration of a project. In the near future, those construction sites not implementing noise management policies will be closed by the authorities. Despite the typically short deadlines and a highly stressful environment, that characterises the construction industry, the best engineering practices related to noise control should be implemented and become an integral part of every project, starting from the building permit process.


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Are we serious about GREEN?

Qatar has succeeded in placing itself as one of the first amongst the greatest advocates of “sustainability” worldwide since the introduction of Qatar National Vision (QNV2030) By Diaa El-Masry It seems that everyone is suddenly interested in “GREEN” to the extent that the word “GREEN” has started to lose its meaning! Today, ‘Green’ is the easiest word to express your interest in achieving “sustainability” goals, if any. It has become a magic word to promote anything and everything, from cosmetics to aircrafts and from hospitality to heavy industries. Nobody denies that Qatar has succeeded in placing itself first amongst the greatest advocates of “sustainability” worldwide since the introduction of Qatar National Vision (QNV2030) in the year 2010. The “green” concept has now emerged in the construction industry, like in other sectors as well. Green building technology and sustainable construction became a trend in the market after the adoption of different green building rating systems (LEED/QSAS/GSAS). The trend has taken form and gained momentum through the subsequent initiatives that were taken by different stakeholders. From government agencies to businesses and from research houses to NGO’s, we have witnessed an unprecedented number of efforts and initiatives, all aimed at promoting “green” or “sustainability”. However, I can admit that after 5 years we have achieved very little of what we dreamed of in 2010! Nevertheless, this is better than nothing anyway. This raises important questions: What went wrong? Moreover, how to get better results? From my point of view, I think we have all had good intentions in our efforts. However, most of these efforts lacked “seriousness”. I do not believe in the proverb “The road to hell is paved with good intentions”, as I am sure good intentions always lead to a better world as long as they are “serious” intentions. First things first: Before being “serious” about Green, let us agree that we still have a large “integration” gap as well as a large “knowledge” gap in the construction market. I believe that those two gaps are preventing us from making steady gains in our progress towards a sustainable community; in the very least it is slowing down this progress. There are many un-coordinated efforts that result in missing opportunities to realize our goals. For me, it looks

like starting the construction of a high-rise building from the second floor! It simply won’t work because foundations must be constructed first. Becoming “Green” requires preparation and coordination at all organizational levels. There must be sort of “green infrastructure” or “green base” from which we can unify and launch all our efforts and ensure hitting the targets. We need to fill the knowledge gap first by more education and awareness of all aspects of sustainability, and then join forces together to fill the integration gap by more coordination & collaboration. First, there is our ecosystem, which includes us together with other living and nonliving things. This is simply the environment within which we live, work and grow. Then, there is our society as a subsystem, where we interact and assist each other in all facets of life. As a result of our social interactions, the economic system exists as a subsystem to our community. This specific hierarchy requires wise thinking and a high level of human collaboration to control and prevent a subsystem from adversely affecting or destroying the system of which it is part. Sustainability, in its essence, is to be responsible and “seriously” take part in this wise thinking (knowledge) and human collaboration (integration). In the first part of this article, we will focus on establishing a level of “knowledge” about “green” and more specifically “green building”. This will prepare the scene for the second part, which will focus on the “integration” of the missing parts of the puzzle. Areas of Confusion: You may be keen to participate in the “green” movement, whether seeking your own business benefits or willing to advocate sustainability. In both cases, you need to clear your understanding of some areas that came as a result of the “green” movement.The following are some areas of confusion related to the Green Building concept, which if not clarified may deviate your goal: Product Certification/Endorsement: “To differentiate your product or service as environmentally sound, you may want to obtain certification from an independent, third-party so that you can include their logo or “ecolabel” on your product’s label and other

marketing materials. Ecolabeling is important way to market your product to green consumers.” (Source: U.S. Small Businesses Administration) Most importantly, you need to know that green building rating systems are not the right place to seek your product certification. LEED or GSAS, for example, never endorse or approve manufacturers, products, systems or materials. They are intended to guide the project teams to utilize the best practices in order to ensure a better performance of the building as a whole. However, by understanding how those assessment tools work and what they require, you will be able to align your products/services with their requirements. I have seen many suppliers and manufacturers who were very interested to get their product or service “green certified”. They were ready to do whatever it takes them to be listed as preferred manufacturers or suppliers for LEED or GSAS rating systems. Later, they got to know that the only way to do that is through certain third-party organizations which have no existence in Qatar or GCC. Here, we may raise another important question, is there any plans for the GCC (as a consistent united entity) to have regional organizations that can provide such thirdparty certification? The following question should be: when? Building Certification: Not like product certification, a building certification process is a holistic approach to measure and assess a whole building performance against different impact categories and performancecriteria. “Knowledge” is essential in understanding the implications of this process to the design and construction of the building. “Integration” becomes the next magic word in achieving the certification goal. According to the Green Building Alliance (GBA), thirdparty certification is a great way to add credibility to any green building.The process of achieving certification also adds a layer of accountability and integrity for the building project teams. While a building can certainly be green and high-performing if it is not certified, there are several tangible and intangible benefits that accompany certification that cannot be as easily attained without it. Benefits include:

• Higher rental or resale value • Higher occupant satisfaction • Higher demand • Lower operating costs Third-party certification is not the only way to achieve a healthy and high-performance space, but it is certainly one of the most efficient ways to guarantee you get it done. Every project, team, and budget will consider a variety of different delivery and verification methods for their highperformance place; however, anyone working on a green building project should review the following certification options, benefits, costs, considerations, and requirements: QSAS/GSAS:

GSAS, Global Sustainability Assessment System (formerly known as QSAS) is developedby GORD (Gulf Organization for Research & Development) through several years of intense collaboration with theTC Chan Centre at the University of Pennsylvania, and Schoolof Architecture at the Georgia Institute of Technology, USA andother reputed houses of expertise.GSAS was developed by drawing best practices adopted from40 different rating systems known regionally and internationally. GSAS is the Middle East’s first integrated and performance-based sustainability assessment system for the built environment. The systematic assessment method is applied seamlesslyfrom the macro to a micro scales encompassing urban design,infrastructure and buildings levels. LEED

LEED, or Leadership in Energy & Environmental Design, is transforming the way we think about how our buildings and communities are designed, constructed, maintained and operated across the globe. LEED is a green

building certification program that recognizes best-inclass building strategies and practices. To receive LEED certification, building projects satisfy prerequisites and earn points to achieve different levels of certification. Prerequisites and credits differ for each rating system, and teams choose the best fit for their project. Although GSAS and LEED are being recognized very well in Qatar and the region, many other forms of green building rating systems are available mainly in the U.S. and Europe. “Knowing” a bit about some of those systems will help you understand the different aspects of building certification and start thinking how to “integrate” your efforts to achieve better goals (Source: Green Building Alliance): ENERGY STAR for Buildings Program ENERY STAR was originally developed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) as a voluntary labeling program to promote energyefficient products and reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Home Energy Rating System The Home Energy Rating System (HERS) is an evaluation of energy efficiency and forecasted energy costs within a home. Green Globes The Green Globes system was based on the Building Research Establishment’s Environmental Assessment Method (BREEAM) by the Canadian Standards Association. Living Building Challenge The Living Building Challenge (LBC), administered by the International Living Future Institute (ILFI), is a philosophy, advocacy platform, and certification program that promotes a high standard for buildings. National Green Building Standard The National Association of Home Builders (NAHB) and the International Code Council (ICC) partnered to establish a nationally recognized standard definition of green building for homes. Net-Zero Energy Building The International Living Future Institute (ILFI) provides a certification option for aNet Zero Energy Building (NZEB) under its umbrella of the holistic Living Building Challenge (LBC) certification. Passive House The Passivhaus standard was developed in Germany in the early 1990s and the first

DIAA EL-MASRY: is the General Manager and cofounder of QATAR GREEN LEADERS, a specialized company in Green Building Certification Management & Training. With more than 20 Years of experience in Architectural Design as a Senior Architect & Design Manager, Mr. El-Masry grew a keen interest towards encouraging and accelerating global adoption of green building and sustainable development practices. He has strong experience as a mentor of Green Building Concepts, LEED programmes, Design Management and public awareness. He is a pioneer in providing Green Building training to various clients & organizations in Qatar & GCC.

dwellings to be completed to the Passivhaus Standard were constructed in Darmstadt in 1991. ENERGY STAR for Homes ENERGY STAR certification was first offered for homes in 1995. Initially focused on windows, air sealing, and HVAC, the label has since been updated to apply to more components of the home including lighting, insulation, and appliances. Class-G Class-G is an online platform designed to track the ongoing sustainability measures enacted in existing buildings. Structured around a yes/no checklist, the system allows companies to self-certify and compare their various locations. WELL Building Standard Currently in its pilot phase, the WELL Building Standard focuses on the health and wellness impacts that buildings have on occupants. Areas of concentration are air, water, nourishment, light, fitness, comfort, and mind. BOMA 360 Performance Program The BOMA 360 Performance Program, sponsored by Building Owners and Managers Association International, awards buildings that meet industry best practices in building management and operations. Professional Accreditation Let us put it in this way: buildings are “certified”, while professionals are “accredited”. Accreditation is an essential part in filling the gap of “knowledge”. You cannot expect success


13 as a “Green” professional without testing your level of understanding and proving your capabilities through a formal accreditation exam. With new jobs specifying the need for expertise in LEED and/or GSAS, you can earn LEED/GSAS professional credentials to demonstrate your leadership in the field and in-depth knowledge of the rating systems and green building strategies. You may have heard about the following degrees of “green” accreditation: LEED GA Credential

LEED Green Associates have a documented, up-to-date understanding of the most current green building principles and practices, and are committed to their professional future. This level of accreditation is considered as the first tier of a 2-tier exam towards becoming fully accredited as LEED AP (Accredited Professional). LEED AP Credential The LEED AP credential arms

you with advanced knowledge in green building as well as expertise in a particular LEED rating system. There are five specialties of the exam including: • LEED AP (BD+C): Building Design & Construction • LEED AP (ID+C): Interior Design & Construction • LEED AP (EBOM): Existing Building Operation & Maintenance • LEED AP (ND): Neighborhood Development • LEED AP (Home): LEED for Homes Read more about LEED Accreditation here: www.usgbc. org GSAS CGP Credential GORD Academy, a leading high-quality training provider center of excellence, offers a wide range of memberships and accreditations. These programs are designed to meet the skill enhancement needs of the professionals working in the constructionindustry. To manage a project for certification, the GSAS Project Manager must be a GSASCGP, which means GSASCertified Green Professional.

This credential is the starting level for candidates who wish to apply for all other credentialing schemes in the future.This title is conferred to those candidates who have earned the GSAS-CGP certification’s full requirements and by demonstrating a well-rounded understanding and knowledge of the GSAS projectmanagement through participation in the GSAS 3-day training workshop and passing the GSAS exam. Read more about GSAS Accreditation here: www.gord.qa Corporate Sustainability According to Dow Jones Sustainability Indices, Corporate Sustainability is a business approach that creates longterm shareholder value by embracing opportunities and managing risks deriving from economic, environmental and social develop-

ments.Sustainability-related megatrends are changing our world and are having a measurable impact on companies’ top and bottom lines. Long-term challenges such as resource scarcity, demographic shifts and climate change are redefining societal expectations, public policies, regulatory frameworks, and hence business environments and investment outcomes. The quality of a company’s strategy and management and its performance in dealing with opportunities and risks deriving from economic, environmental and social developments can be quantified and used to identify and select leading companies for investment purposes. For this reason, Corporate Sustainability Assessment systems have been developed in order to help identify those

companies that are best equipped to recognize and respond to emerging opportunities and risks resulting from global sustainability trends. Seemingly, the corporate sustainability is related to the attitude of a company and is used as a measure of the behavior of its business activities in terms of Environmental, Social and Economic aspects. This has nothing to do with Green Building certification, although both are addressing sustainability. Greenwashing According to the Greenwashing Index, greenwashing happens when a company or organization spends more time and money claiming to be “green” through advertising and marketing than actually implementing business practices that minimize environmental impact. Evidence that an organization is greenwashing often comes from pointing out the spending differences: when significantly more money or time has been spent advertising being “green” (that is, operating with consideration for the environment), than is actually spent on environmentally sound practices. Greenwashing efforts can range from changing the name or label of a product to evoke the natural environment on a product that contains harm-

ful chemicals to multimillion dollar advertising campaigns portraying highly polluting energy companies as ecofriendly We are in a continually changing world! Things are becoming more sophisticated and complicated than ever before. The impacts of human activities are proven to be of tremendous effects on our ecosystem. This leaves us with only one option, to take sustainability to a “serious” level to achieve our national vision QNV2030. In a knowledge-based economy like the case of Qatar, knowledge become essential for everybody which mandates self-learning and sharing of knowledge and experience. On the other hand, our diversified initiatives and efforts should be unified and “integrated” to achieve real progress. In the next article, we will examine the missing components of the green building sector in Qatar, and how to integrate them. The article reflects the personal perspective of the author whose aim is to improve the sustainability practices for a better and more ‘green’ Qatar. Please, keep the discussion going by contacting the author: diaa@qatargreenleaders. com


14

Demand for green building materials in Qatar is set to soar

New government initiatives as well as greater awareness on environment present ample business opportunities for green building material suppliers and manufacturers The green building materials market in Qatar is poised for continued growth as the government not only encourages sustainability approach in construction projects but also in retrofitting existing buildings. Sustainability is an essential part of the construction industry and Qatar has already proved its commitment to the move by being ranked the sixth in the world in green buildings. New government initiatives as well as greater awareness on environment and health offer ample business opportunities for green building material sup-

pliers and manufacturers. “Globally, the importance of green building is on the rise and the Qatar government is keen on encouraging such buildings,” HE the Minister of Business and Trade Sheikh Ahmed Bin Jassim Al Thani stressed during the GCC and Yemen Building Materials Manufacturers Forum recently. Qatar remains one of the top countries for investment given its booming population and pace of infrastructure expansion. “There is an international trend towards green buildings. Thus,

increasing attention is being given to eco-friendly materials, offering incentives to produce these materials and use them in the construction of new buildings in GCC countries in order to achieve sustainability and protect the environment,” said the Minister. Local authorities have developed a range of investment opportunities that address the green building materials sector. The GOIC (Gulf Organisation for Industrial Consulting) is promoting partnership and cooperation among manufacturers and consultants, contractors, investors and decision-makers to encourage investment in the green buildings materials sector. “It is well-known that the new worldwide trend is towards green buildings, the production and use of eco-friendly materials and energy-efficiency within facilities,” said GOIC Secretary General Abdulaziz Bin Hamad Al Ageel. “This movement resulted in the creation of new and unconventional building materials that are in line with the new building specifications requiring the

use of green materials and offering incentives to manufacture these materials in order to achieve the highest levels of sustainability. “In this regard, several green building projects are taking place throughout GCC countries. These are innovative projects in terms of implementing the best worldwide specifications.” As Qatar strives to embrace a sustainable tomorrow, green buildings are unavoidable part of it. Industry leader agree that more focus has to be made on green building materials and the need to provide the local construction industry with sufficient supply of these materials to Qatar, so that the shortage won’t consequently increase the cost of green buildings. “The supply of basic construction materials in the region fulfills the needs,” said Abdul Rahman Abdulla Al Ansari, CEO of Qatar Industrial Manufacturing Company (QIMC). “But there is a quality shortage especially when it comes to green construction materials.” He urged governments to partner with the private sector in

order to invest in this sector. The green building materials market in GCC is estimated to reach $22.97 billion in 2016, according to analysis from Frost and Sullivan. The major green materials in demand in the region are concrete, insulation, paints and flooring. According to the report, the current and future market players have to consider many aspects of green materials used across the GCC, such as evaluation criteria for these products, overall market opportunities in volumes and values, demand in key countries, competition analysis, future potential, growth rates, pries and imminent trends to be successful in this market. “GCC is the fastest developing region in terms of infrastructure and the rising emphasis on sustainable construction practices, lower carbon footprint, and reduced wastage has fuelled the use of green construction materials,” said Frost & Sullivan Chemicals and Materials Analyst. While existing suppliers have nurtured robust customer relationships with governments

Healing gardens for patients Qatari Sources

H

ealthcare is undergoing vast changes. In the last two decades, gardens with therapeutic qualities have begun to appear in many healthcare facilities around the globe. “Healing gardens” are now increasingly being designed to support the treatment of patients with specific conditions. In a presentation about the healing landscape environment, architect Amr Metwally, Head of the Architecture Division, PMC, Hamad Medical Corporation, pointed out that therapeutic gardens were being planned for cancer patients, veterans, children, people with dementia, hospice care and mental health facilities, among others. He said that numerous studies had confirmed that the experience and exposure to nature within the outdoor environment provided a potentially positive distraction that could facilitate stress reduction and increase comfort. Metwally said that there were various types of therapeutic

gardens: rehabilitative, healing, restorative, enabling and meditative. Rehabilitative garden With a primary focus on physical outcome, this kind of garden is programmed to parallel treatment protocols of the patient group. This garden type has measurable outcome in the form of physical improvements. Restorative This garden type focuses primarily on the emotional and psychological outcome. The program is aimed to facilitate a return to balance and homeostasis. This is most appropriate for user groups that have recently experienced stressful or traumatic events. Meditative Focusing primarily on spiritual and psychological outcome, this garden type is designed to allow for individual or small group programs that focus on inward and facilitate reflection. Healing This garden type is a combination of the rehabilitative, restorative, and meditative

typologies, focusing primarily on spiritual, psychological and physical outcomes. The program elements of a healing garden allow for both passive and active opportunities to facilitate individual needs for restoration, rehabilitation, and meditation. Enabling The primary focus is on the physiological outcomes of the primary user group. This garden type is programmed to both maintain and enhance the physical condition of the targeted users. Program elements provide opportunity for users to engage in activities that will improve cardiac performance, gross and fine motor skills, muscle strength, range of motion and co-ordination. Metwally explained that considerations like comfort, access and furnishings, social Interaction and involvement, sensory stimulations and aspects like management and maintenance were taken into account when designing various types of healing spaces.

GRP SECTIONAL WATER TANKS FIRE SECTIONAL WATER TANKS STEEL STRUCTURES PPR PIPES & FITTINGS LEED & GREEN BUILDING SOLUTIONS

e-mail: mohdzeli@gmail.com

and large clients, the untapped private and small real-estate construction segments widen the prospects of market entrants and offer added avenues for revenue generation. Therefore, green material providers need to distinguish themselves in terms of quality and pricing to gain market share, particularly in less competitive segments such as flooring and insulation. Joint ventures with local companies will provide quick access to consumers, reducing the time required to build a brand. “Companies must look to comply with the requirements of local green body councils and design products specific to the rating system for maximum sustainability points,” advised the Analyst. “Since regional governments are the largest investors in construction, producing solutions suited to their needs will ensure profitability.” Improving end-user and consumer awareness on the economic, social and environmental benefits of green materials will sustain market growth in the long run, according to the report.

Tel: +974 4487 3850 Mobile: +974 55141030 Fax: +974 4487 3826 P.O.Box 17175 Doha-Qatar


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The Future is Green

The path to sustainability for the concrete ready-mix industry is going to be through the use of advanced technology.

F

alcon Ready Mix is the first Ready Mix Company in Qatar to be NRMCA Sustainable Concrete Plant certified. With its Silver Level certification, Falcon Ready Mix is supporting sustainability in Qatar’s construction industry and balancing its business aims between economic prosperity and social responsibility. A Subsidiary of Investment Holding Group – AlHodaifi Group, the company has cemented its name in the market as one of the fastest growing ready mix concrete companies in Qatar. Established in 2011, Falcon Ready Mix today tops the lists of the world’s sustainable batching plants. With the first cubic meter of ready mix produced on the 1st of March 2011, Falcon Ready Mix has given the first and major priority to produce a superior quality ready mix thus has gained the reputation of the company that combines excellence in services, delivery of superior quality products, using the most advanced technologies, coupled with the company’s commitments to sustainability. Committed and adhering to Qatar’s sustainable development practices, the General Manager of Falcon Ready Mix, Mr. Assad Nasser shared his thoughts on the current construction market situation and his forecast for the coming period. Optimistic about the market in general, Nasser sees the long awaited boom in the construction sector beginning in 2015. Doha is rapidly expanding and in a few

I foresee a high demand for concrete in the future. The ready mix concrete sector needs to focus on adopting the advanced technologies available in the market, especially, in regard to the use of recycled materials

years’ time there will be no typical desert areas. There are still lots of works to be done on Qatar’s infrastructure. The city is in need of hotels, water tanks, roads, sewer system and water reservoirs. Five new water reservoirs are planned and are part of the critical deliverables as water is a scarce resource in the region that must be considered in protecting and recycling. He predicts that more ports will be built, maybe not as large as the New Doha Port currently being completed but smaller ports servicing local needs. Construc-

tion Sites chatted to Nasser about the concrete business, his thoughts on the construction sector and his aspirations for greening the ready mix sector. How would you describe the concrete ready mix sector in Qatar? Concrete has changed the world and it is the main ingredient in the construction process. No building project can be executed without the use of concrete ready mix. Yes, steel is widely used in Qatar, in fact overused sometimes, but con-

crete has proved its strength. In Europe, now steel is losing its popularity. Building contractors have found that they can get the same strength and durability by improving and increasing the strength of the concrete, than by adding more steel to the structure. This decreases the cost of the building as well as increasing its green rating. In addition to material technology is improving, thus, leaving greater options for contractors to use wide range of materials to meet the structure and sustainability requirements. The materials do

not have to be always the most expensive ones. In Qatar and in the region, Project Managers and Technical experts tend to over specify the strength of concrete. Qatar projects tend to design high concrete specifications which are not required in all cases. The market in Qatar is at a stage where it needs to adjust to this new thinking, especially with the scarcity of raw materials and the challenge of logistics. Technology is the key to creating strength in concrete, not more steel. Falcon Ready Mix has a Green Star from the NRMCA. What are your views on the Recycling Concrete? Sustainability is not only about recycling concrete. We are able to do this as we have the machinery but according to the QCS it has not yet been allowed for us to use the recycled aggregate and sand. I am sure that in the next issue of QCS, use of recycle materials will be allowed with a certain percentages for specific usages. Using recycling technology is not only of commercial benefits, it also will help us to save scarce resources and to preserve the environment. Falcon Ready Mix is committed to the sustainable production of concrete and will work with necessary Ministries to promote Green Technology within the sector. I do not recommend that we use recycled materials in main building structures but it can be used in a number of secondary products. I am most excited by the idea of using it to manufacture street furniture. Can you imagine if all the parks and recreation areas in Qatar has outdoor furniture made of recycled materials? Even the decorative flower pots and lamp posts that we see along the roads and in front of hotels and malls can be made of recycled concrete, reuse means less shortage of raw materials. It will save money, trucks and equip-

ment and time spent procuring and sourcing raw materials. When we spoke to you in July 2014, you mentioned that the construction industry is facing an acute shortage of raw materials. Is this still the case? Yes, there is still a shortage of aggregates including washed sand. The shortage was due to standardization by the QCS (Qatar Construction Standards) to ensure that the materials are of good quality. QPMC is making sure that Qatar receives only the best quality of raw building materials, like, gabbro, sand and other aggregates. Unfortunately, no more licences are being issued to agencies to excavate for more sand and to find new sources for washed sand. According to the QCS dune sand cannot be used, probably for environmental reasons, and this is a good thing. However, the demand for ready mix concrete will increase in this year and may put additional pressure on the supply chain. Another way to ease the pressure may be to look at allowing the use of recycled sand. I think that the way forward in the read mix concrete industry is technology. Qatar has to be more open to adopting more advanced technologies to source raw materials and chemicals, also, to look at using synthetic materials in the preparation of concrete. In the past few years great progress has been made in Europe and in USA with regards to how concrete is prepared and its applications and uses. We cannot continue to consider the ready mix concrete business being low in technology. Ready Mix concrete companies need to make sure that they recruit the best qualified technical experts who can advise on how to mix the concrete but also which machines to buy and to identify global trends, like recycling and the use of synthetic materials for scarce resources. Have your secured any new projects other than those acquired last year? Yes, we have secured some projects and several other projects are in the pipeline. What is going to be your message going forward? I think that going forward, the authorities should ease the pressure on the supply of raw materials. I foresee a high demand for concrete in the future. The ready-mix concrete sector needs to focus on adopting the advanced technologies available in the market, especially, with regard to the use of recycled materials. This is my wish for us; not only to save money but to work together to save the environment. We need to be a part of developing the sector. We can all do something to help the environment and the community. We are committed to help build Qatar and support this country in achieving its dreams.


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Qatar Green Building Council Offers training programme in sustainability

Programme by Qatar Foundation includes professional courses led by seasoned experts Qatar Green Building Council (QGBC) has launched a comprehensive professional training programme aimed at enhancing the quality of green building and sustainability education in Qatar and the region.

As a member of Qatar Foundation for Education, Science and Community Development (QF), QGBC aligns itself with QF’s mission to foster a progressive society through education, and seeks to support the Qatar Na-

tional Vision 2030 (QNV2030) to create a sustainability culture in industry and within the community. The comprehensive training programme aimed at construction, green building and sus-

QGBC_Professional_Training

QGBC will conduct a series of training sessions for professionals on various sustainability-related topics Title

Date

LEEDv4 Core Concepts for LEED Green Associate, Exam preparation

12 January 2015

Green material: The designers guide to Green sustainable material

3 February 2015

LEED v4 Building design & Construction for LEED AP BD+C, Exam preparation

16 – 17 February 2015

LEED v$ Interior Design & Construction for LEED AP ID+C, Exam preparation

9 – 10 March 2015

For more information & Registration Shireen Obeidat sobeidat@qf.org.qa Tel. (+974) 4454 1781

Executive Masters Program in Energy and Resources now available in Qatar

Hamad bin Khalifa University (HBKU), a member of Qatar Foundation for Education, Science, and Community Development (QF), has launched a program that is specially designed to create an in-depth understanding of the role of energy and resources in modern life – including their influence upon global politics, the balance between satisfying our energy needs and protecting our natural environment, and their capacity to drive international markets. HBUK’s Executive Master in Energy and Resources program is specifically designed for highpotential managers and executives working in areas where the production, consumption, or environmental impact of energy and natural resources are likely to significantly affect profits or policy. “This program will give participants a complete and integrated understanding which will prepare them to be better leaders and decision-makers,” says the Academic Coordinator of the program, Prof Antoine Hyafil. “Energy and resources are the foundation of development in this and other regions, and their importance directs political and economic strategy throughout the world,” points out Prof Hyafil. “It is vital that leaders and future leaders and major organizations appreciate the complexity and interconnectedness

of this area,” he adds. Dr David Prior, Executive Vice President and Provost of HBKU, sees the new Executive Master in Energy and Resources as “a good illustration of how HBKU is building upon its rich array of partnerships to offer programs that are uniquely suited to the needs of Qatar and the region”. “I look forward to the launch of further teaching and research programs at graduate level which will enhance our impact, especially by exploring areas at the interface of traditional disciplines,” Dr Prior says. “Our unique collaborations, clearly reflected in continuously evolving, innovative academic programs, will present many exciting opportunities.” HBKU offers the interdisciplinary program in partnership with Georgetown University, Texas A&M University and HEC Paris, each of which provides diverse but complementary perspec-

tives on this vitally important area. Graduates will receive an Executive Master’s degree from HBKU, and will be eligible to receive certificates of completion from HBKU’s partner universities: Georgetown University, HEC Paris, and Texas A&M University, in accordance with the requirements of each of the partner universities. “Hamad bin Khalifa University was established as a center of academic excellence and to lead the evolution in Qatar of a knowledge-based society,” says HBKU President Sheikh Abdulla bin Ali Al Thani, Ph.D. “This program will prepare leaders across many sectors who will build our shared future. It will serve our country, as well as the organizations and individuals who participate.” HBKU offers a dynamic learning environment based on inquiry and discovery, where collaborations with some of the finest universities in the world are resulting in a growing range of high-quality advanced educational opportunities. Source: http://www.hbku.edu. qa/ExecutiveMasterE&R

tainability practitioners, is one way to help achieve this. “QGBC strives to raise awareness about green building and environmental sustainability by offering standardised educational courses as we continue to work with our partners, in Qatar and around the world, to ensure that QGBC provides material that is on par with international standards,” said Engineer Meshal Al Shamari, QGBC Director. “The training programme caters to construction, green building and sustainability practitioners who seek to engage in interactive, debate-like development sessions with QGBC’s leading

Together, Lets build a Sustainable tomorrow

experts,” he added. Meanwhile, since Qatar continues to undergo massive infrastructural development in preparation for 2022 FIFA World Cup, adherence to in-

ternational sustainability standards and green building best practices remains at the top of national agenda. QGBC’s professional development training courses, offered as part of the programme, will provide participants with Continuing Education (CE) hours associated with several international educational partners. The upcoming training programme will feature various modules including, Building Energy Modelling; LEED training and exam preparation course as LEED V4 Core Concepts for LEED Green Associates; the Designers Guide to Green Sustainable Material; LEED V4 Building Design and Construction for LEED accredited professional “AP” BD+C; and

LEED V4 Interior Design and Construction for LEED AP ID+C, in addition to tailor made sector focused courses such as sustainability in facility management. QGBC is a non-profit, membership-driven organisation dedicated to advocating green building solutions, leading industry research, and promoting sustainable practice in the community. QGBC offers membership opportunities to organisations, individuals and students who demonstrate support for the QNV 2030 and showcase passion for environmental sustainability. For more information about the upcoming courses, log onto: www.qatargbc.org.


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Hempel upgrades its Topaz Range

Global coating supplier Hempel Paints have launched an upgraded version of their Topaz range of decorative paints. The prestigious Topaz range has been refined further resulting in a highly superior performance than a normal decorative coating. The TOPAZ range is a selected series of decorative paints, which offer superior performance in a variety of product types, with various finishes and textures. The products include a wide range of emulsions, enamels and texture paints, all of which come in a broad spectrum of colours and finishes to suit every taste, bringing to life to every decorating idea. The TOPAZ range

offers decorative coating solutions for interior and exterior surfaces of a building and aims to create a healthy indoor environment automatically becoming the perfect choice for those who appreciate a touch of art and sophistication. The TOPAZ emulsions are of superior quality, possessing high scrub resistance, low VOC content both of which helps to restrain flame spreading

in case of fire. The upgraded emulsions possess industry leading opacity, whiteness and colour retention properties, and the texture range is equally good for interior and exterior use, being available in four variants i.e. multi, fine, medium and coarse textures. The TOPAZ enamel range is available in matt, gloss and semi-gloss finishes, all of which require very low maintenance whilst exhibiting superior whiteness and colour retention properties. All the products within the TOPAZ range can be applied through normal application techniques using widely available application tools such as brush and roller. Hempel supports the principle and cause of sustainable development and offers Zero VOC green coatings within the TOPAZ range. TOPAZ Zero is the new green generation of paints that totally redefines environmental friendliness, combining high-performing coatings with VOC free and Formaldehyde free technology. TOPAZ Zero offers anti-mould and anti-bacterial properties,

making this product family ideal for kitchens, hospitals, schools and any other environment where there are strict hygiene regulations. In conclusion, the performance levels of the upgraded TOPAZ range have improved considerably, which a result of extensive R & D and product testing. Hempel continues to work hard to provide better coating solutions to its valued customers as part of its relationship management programs.


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Rubberized asphalt can help reduce noise pollution on roads

Having climatic conditions identical to Qatar, the US states of Arizona, Florida, California and Texas have successfully implemented a rubberized asphalt road program for over 40 years Qatar is undertaking massive infrastructure development programs, with more roads and highways being built, renovated or expanded to better accommodate the surge in traffic as the country’s population continues its steady increase. In December last year, a contract was signed for the construction and development of Lejmailya, Al Otouriyah and Al Shahhaniya, under the Expressway Program. Last year also saw the signing of the contract for the fourth phase of construction of the New Orbital Road and Truck Route, with a value of QR 3. 348 billion. As new roads and highways are being constructed across the country, residential and commercial buildings are mushrooming on both sides of the roads. The new establishments are an inevitable part of the country’s development. However, this creates challenges as well. As more traffic hits the roads, street noise is becoming a bigger issue. Studies have shown that noise levels due to road traffic have reached intolerable high levels in and around many urban areas all over the world. The noise produced from the interaction between the rolling tyre and road surface is one of the most important contributions in the overall traffic noise. This has led researchers and industry experts to look for alternative road materials that would reduce noise pollution on roads. One such material is the recycled waste tyres which have been an economically viable product in widespread use for nearly 40 years in many countries. Having climatic conditions identical to Qatar, the US states of Arizona, Florida, California and Texas have successfully implemented a rubberized asphalt road program for over 40 years. The earliest use of rubberized asphalt was by Phoenix, Arizona, in 1964 when it was incorporated into the “chip seal” program for city streets. A rubberized asphalt chip seal - using a mixture of rubberized asphalt and gravel - was applied as a temporary measure. However, it performed so well that the street was not reconstructed until 20 years later. During the 1990s, Phoenix resurfaced more than 200 miles of streets with 450,000 tons of rubberized asphalt, which used about 1.1 million waste tyres. The city reported that rubberized asphalt performed without maintenance for 14 years and had an estimate life span of up to 18 years. In Qatar, Al-Hodaifi Recycling established Qatar’s largest and only AASHTO/ATSM compliant waste tyre recycling facility.

During a company presentation, Al-Hodaifi stated that recycled rubber was a proven, environmental and economically viable win-win solution to the waste tyre predicament. “No trees die in creation of recycled rubber and society benefits from innovative products with a positive and sustainable environmental impact,” the company said. The company argues that rubberized asphalt can reduce road noise significantly. Reduction equals two times distance from the sound source. It can also reduce urban heat island effect by reducing temperature by more than three degrees at night. It also provides better skid resistance, reduced spray, clearer road markings, thus improving safety of roads. On the operational side, rubberized asphalt has a minimum of 40% more lifetime than conventional roads, less cracking and rutting and has a reduced initial and maintenance costs. The rubberized asphalt produced by the company is the Crumb Rubber-Polymer Modified Bitumen (CR-PMB), which is a blend of crumb rubber from scrap tyres, asphalt cement and properly graded, sound aggregates in specified proportions. The presentation highlighted three different production methods for it: Wet process: the crumb rubber is blended and interacted with the hot asphalt cement prior to adding the asphalt rubber binder to the aggregates. Dry process: the crumb rubber blended with the hot aggregates prior to the addition of the hot asphalt. Refinery process: a patented process that digests the crumb rubber into the asphalt cement

at the refinery. This method uses about half the crumb rubber modifier and the advantage of this process is that the asphalt rubber binder can be shipped to the plant in the same manner as the asphalt cement is delivered. The use of super performing asphalt pavements (SUPERPAVE) will provide a significant performance improvement to all Qatari roads with additional environmental and lifestyle benefits to the Qatari population. Additionally, this technology should be introduced in the repair of existing road pavements. Some of the other applications of recycled waste tyres in Qatar include: FIFA and Olympic committee approved rubber granule infill for artificial grass, playgrounds with improved safety and hygiene and waterproofing with heat reflective properties. Another application is the porous pipe irrigation system made from recycled vehicle tyres. The pipe is tough yet flexible using up to 70% less water than conventional watering and irrigation methods. Completely porous along its entire length, the pipe seeps water precisely where it is needed most - at the base and roots of the plants. It can be installed at the ground level or below mulch or underground. It minimizes loss of water to evaporation from the sun and wind. It can run along a line of trees and plants in a nursery or garden. Moreover, it’s economical and easy to install, run, and maintain. It has no moving parts and few joints so is quick and simple to install. There are no sprinkler heads to become clogged, so it’s easy to maintain. Since the porous pipe works on low pressure, it avoids the need for expensive, heavy duty

pumps. It can also be run using the head of water in storage tanks or mainline water pressure. Another Al-Hodaifi product that is made in Qatar from Qatari

waste tyres is the rubber crumb. The rubber crumb is predominantly used in the high wear areas around the goal-mouths and center circles of pitches. Application of rubber crumb

The International Chamber Of Commerce Qatar (ICC Qatar) has launched the ICC Green Economy Roadmap and Energy and Environment Commission during a seminar jointly hosted by ICC Qatar and Qatar Green Building Council (QGBC). More than 60 professionals and project managers gathered at the Qatar Chamber for the “ICC’s Green Economy Roadmap: implications for Qatar” seminar to learn about ICC’s flagship guide, which provides guidance to business, policy makers and society in the development and implementation of policies and actions towards a “green economy”. Remy Rowhani, Director General Qatar Chamber and ICC Qatar Secretary General, welcomed delegates to the seminar and shared the roadmap’s benefits. He said: “As part of our efforts to serve our business community, we are working very closely with the ICC International Secretariat in implementing initiatives of public benefit. “The ICC Green Economy Roadmap represents a comprehensive effort to assist in the development and implementation of policies and actions towards a green economy and to build a platform for future action and collaboration.” Launched during Rio+20 as an initiative to promote a more common understanding of a green economy, the roadmap

outlines 10 conditions and related policy recommendations as a framework to discuss a range of inter-linked policies and actions to transform into a green economy. These conditions include social, environment and economic innovation; collaboration between all sectors; integrated governance; balancing shortand long-term strategies and multilateralism. The roadmap also exists to share existing best practice and initiate new collaborative activities. QGBC was launched in 2009 by Qatar Foundation for Education, Science and Community Development, to promote and equip a sustainable building industry for Qatar. Collaborating with ICC Qatar to host the seminar was a natural progression as both organizations continue to call for sustainable development and environmental protection. Dr Alex Amato, Head of Sustainability at QGBC, moderated a panel discussion during representatives of the Qatari business community and governmental organizations from different sectors including oil and gas, construction and technology shared initiatives and challenges in order to create a comprehensive overview of Qatar’s current sustainability status. “As an overarching organization in the sustainability and green building industries in Qatar,

ICC Qatar launches green economy roadmap

gives several benefits: • the grass drains rapidly. • the soil is more aerated. • the lower density of the rubber compared to soil means that the roots of the grass can grow more densely. This increases the surface stability of the turf. • rubber is less abrasive than sand (the traditional medium for soil aeration), hence there is less microscopic damage to the root structure. • rubber on the surface acts as a cushion for the crown of the grass (the base of the growing plant). Although the rubber crumb does not protect the grass leaves from damage, the crown should re-establish green leaves once the field is allowed to rest. • the ultimate outcome of this treatment is a better playing surface. The higher root density makes a harder wearing surface more able to withstand the stresses of the sport and the grass will recover faster due to its improved root network and reduced crown damage.

QGBC is delighted to work with ICC Qatar to introduce the concept of a green economy to key stakeholders, decision makers and the public in Qatar to create necessary policies, raise awareness about green business and a green economy in the country,” said Dr Amato. “At QGBC, academics, innovators, researchers, activists and the public work together to collectively further the cause of the Qatar National Vision 2030. We do this through safeguarding Qatar’s green movement and sustainability in general.” Andrea Bacher, ICC Policy Manager for the Energy and Environment Commission, who delivered the seminar’s keynote introduction, said: “The role of ICC in Energy and Environment issues is vital for Qatar as its roadmap provides a comprehensive and multidisciplinary effort to clarify and frame the concept of a ‘green economy’ as well as to promote a more common understanding among the country’s residents.” A number of presentations were delivered during the seminar, including from AECOM’s Steven Humphrey, who spoke about the economic impact of adopting sustainable solutions. Others included Anthony Pryde, Exxon Mobil Qatar’s Technical & Engineering Manager; Mohammed KhaledFakhroo, Senior Energy Policy Analyst at QP; and Nauman Gul, General Manager at Technomight Qatar.


23

Apps for greener construction

As local construction industry professionals become more tech-savvy, the tablet scenario is rapidly becoming a standard approach to designing, constructing and managing of buildings. The construction apps are developed to make the job of the construction professional easier and the project more cost-, and time-efficient, but also help to achieve required sustainability level for the projects. CS looks into construction apps developed for green building professionals and sustainable construction.

The Green Pro

The Green Pro App is a utility application developed to assist architects, engineers, owners, and contractors understand and work with the USGBC LEED guidelines for New Construction and Major Renovations. This is basically a simple implementation of the USGBC LEED 2009 for New Construction and Major Renovations worksheet. The home screen is a division of the major sections of the worksheet that the user can

tap on to drill down into the respective Prerequisites and Credits. Once a user taps on the desired Prerequisite or Credit of interest, the App takes the user to a page that lists the Credit “Title”, the “Intent” of the Credit as given in the documentation, and the “Potential Technologies and Strategies” as given in the documentation. When the user determines that the criteria is met, the user can then indicate that the Credit or Credits have been achieved and the App will keep a running total displayed on the home screen. As particular milestones are achieved, such as Gold or Platinum Certification, they are displayed in the banner of the home screen. Features to be added soon are multi-project capability, the ability to customize ID and RP Credits, and additional LEED worksheets for various other types of construction.

Site and Landscape, Energy, Water, Indoor Environment, Materials, Waste, Owner and Public Education. Sustainability Assessment Simple techniques can be applied to site planning to reduce the environmental impact and development costs. This app easily customizable and can be modified to meet This is designed to assist project developers, project your projects needs. managers, and local planning authorities in assessing the sustainability of a community. It is the starting point for creating a plan to make your projLEED project checklist ect sustainable.   This app can be tailored to meet the needs of the project. The creator of the app is Team operations & maintenance Canvas

mobile app: This is a tool for building owners and operators to identify and implement practical and measurable green building design, construction, operations and maintenance solutions. LEED certification provides independent, third-party verification that a building, home or community was designed and built using strategies aimed at achieving high performance in key areas of Sustainable Building Techniques Checklist human and environmental health: sustainable site development, water savings, enerThe Sustainable Building gy efficiency, materials selecTechniques Checklist is di- tion and indoor environmental vided into eight categories: quality.

Growing opportunities in GCC’s green building sector

D

emand may outstrip the supply of vital sustainable materials to meet green building regulations in the GCC, according to a new report. There are enormous opportunities in the region for suppliers of energy-saving and green products, including lighting, kitchen and bathroom fittings and natural stone fittings, says the report by Ventures Middle East commissioned by The Big 5 construction exhibition in Dubai. “Green buildings witnessed a slow take-off in the GCC,” it says, adding that governments, however, had acted swiftly in the past three years to embrace sustainability through education and legislation. Developers have also recognised that buildings have to demonstrate sustainability to be marketable. The “GCC Focus on Sustainability in Construction” report says: “The rise in green buildings has resulted in an increased demand for green building materials. It has also resulted in the creation of new and unconventional building materials, which are in line with new building specifications.” The report was prepared in the run-up to the two-day Sustainable Design and Construction Conference in Dubai, which takes place during The Big 5 exhibition at the World Trade

Centre in Dubai. Green ratings systems have been introduced in all GCC countries: LEED, from the USA, and the UK’s BREEAM are used by many developers and each country is adopting its own standards. There were 1,236 LEED-rated projects in the GCC in 2013 and the UAE accounts to 67% of them. Qatar has 190 projects (16 %), Saudi Arabia has 158 projects (13%), and Bahrain, Kuwait and Oman have 51 LEED-rated projects between them accounting for around 4%. “The UAE is considered a leader in green building practices,” says the report. In addition to

being one of the LEED pioneers, Abu Dhabi has introduced its own system Estidama, a green building integrated program, which assesses sustainability across the life of the building. “In some requirements, Estidama is more stringent than LEED and other standards,” says the report. While the new report establishes that most developers now recognise the commercial benefits of a sustainable building, it also points out that some contractors are “reluctant to procure technologies which are perceived to be more expensive and are unsure of any tangible benefit”.

Green building

Learn about green buildings near you and around the world using this free mobile app. View project images, read case studies and listen to audio tours. Search for buildings or companies and rating systems like LEED, Living Building Challenge (LBC), Passive House, BOMA BESt with beautiful results displayed on an

interactive map. A project of the Open Green Building Society with support from the City of Vancouver, and the Canada and Cascadia Green Building Councils. The app isn’t yet available in Qatar, though with the interest in green buildings, the app will certainly gain in popularity in the state also.

Energy saver

This is an ultimate bargain that pays for itself over and over in savings. EnergySaver is a powerful and accurate analytical tool yet it is quick, simple, and efficient to use. EnergySaver provides highresolution visual results specifically maximizing the advantages of the Retina Display if available as in iPod touch 4, iPhone 4, iPhone 4S, and The new iPad (iPad 3), etc. EnergySaver allows to analyze the current and estimate the future energy consumption instead of just analyzing or tracking past energy consumption. EnergySaver also enables you to customize and analyze

each appliance’s energy consumption instead of just the overall consumption. By analyzing each appliance’s current energy consumption, you can make real changes in the energy-efficiency of the building. The app is good for end-users and facility management.

ECO FLASH

EcoFlash Homes is a flashcard application that is targeted at helping construction professionals prepare for the LEED AP+ Homes exam. With over 550 cards, the application in meant to be a primary resource for exam preparation. EcoFlash offers flash cards for the LEED Green Associate and AP exams. While the full app retails for $19.99, EcoFlash offers “Lite” versions of the Green Associate and LEED AP BD+C apps for free to try them out before committing. Other versions available for 5 exams: LEED Green Associate, LEED AP+ BD+C, LEED AP+ ID+C, LEED AP+ O+M, and now LEED AP+ Homes.

Qatar looks into recycling of construction waste

The latest trends in infrastructure and construction technologies and their role in supporting Qatar’s building sector were highlighted at the sixth international Future Concrete conference, held at the Grand Hyatt Hotel in Doha last month. The conference was organized by Advanced Construction and Technology Services (ACTS), a leading consulting organization in the field of construction materials and geo-technical engineering. Dr Khaled Hassan, Regional Manager at TRL, said at the event that there were 80 million tons of construction waste in Qatar that could be used in building materials and in new construction. He said that Qatar had already started recycling excavation waste and concrete debris to reuse in the ongoing massive construction sector projects. “Currently it is expecting to recycle about 20% of the concrete waste, which may eventually be increased to up to 50%,” said Dr Hassan. He pointed to various challenges facing construction in Gulf countries, especially Qatar, due to material shortage. He added that these challenges required total co-operation among all government institutions and construction companies. Delivering a keynote address on behalf of Ministry of Environment Undersecretary and Qatar Standards Chairman Dr

Mohammad Saif Al Kuwari, Hassan said that Qatar, given its extreme heat, humidity, and saline conditions, had been conducting extensive research to address construction industry-related challenges and improving building standards for durability and sustainability of various projects. “Qatar is also working to find alternatives to sand, gabbro and other raw materials to reduce its dependence on imports,” he added. He said that his company had identified the quantities and types of waste and how to use it to reduce dependency on import of construction materials. He explained they started benefiting from this waste in construction of experimental roads and buildings. Dr Alessandro P Fantilli, Professor at Politecnico di Torino in Italy, spoke about recycled concrete and health monitoring systems of concrete structures. He said that recycling was important for Qatar, specifically since some buildings were being destroyed for reconstruction and innovation. “In this case it’s important to recycle the old concrete and reuse it.” Engineer Khaled Awad talked about his expectations pointing out that “Qatar’s infrastructure projects will reach $70 billion in the coming seven years. This requires special care for quality and quality control to achieve the highest levels of building durability”.

He added that most buildings executed in Qatar currently followed tight timelines and technology could play a role in accomplishing projects in time and with high quality. Dr Noureddin Daas, researcher and expert in laboratory and standards affairs at Ashghal, talked about Qatar Construction Specifications 2015 and the importance of committing to construction standards which became a necessity for the society to preserve the health of humans. He explained that the standards and specifications achieved the highest quality and safety in buildings, roads and infrastructure, as it ensures the improvement of performance and functionality, energy efficiency and preserving the environment through the green building systems. He stressed the importance of defining the technical specifications of construction concrete that achieved sustainability requirements, besides seismic resistance of buildings. Co-sponsored by the American Concrete Institute, ASTM and the Public Works Authority (Ashghal), the conference also dealt with structural health monitoring; innovative practices in repair, evaluation and protection of structures; concrete quality in fast-track projects; and the intelligent use of construction materials in large-scale projects.


24

Construction

SITES

Technology

Qatar eyes solar outdoor cooling The move towards solar energy in the Gulf region is not incidental or sudden. Qatar has recognized the importance of producing solar power, like its neighbors, Abu Dhabi and Saudi Arabia, as an alternative to the use of fossil fuels. According to a report on thegreenprophet.com, the Qatar Solar company in 2013 purchased a stake in SolarWorld AG, a German firm dedicated to the manufacture and marketing photovoltaic products worldwide. SolarWorld AG, distinguishes itself from its competitors by integrating all components of the solar value chain, from feedstock to module production, from trade with solar panels to the promotion and construction of turn-key solar power plants. Dubbed the BMW of solar panel producers, the SolarWorld AG is competing with China’s flood of cheap, generic photovoltaic panels. Salah Nezar, Corporate Sustainability Director at the Doha-based Qatar Project Management (QPM) company, says the practical applications of harnessing solar energy in the Gulf region are massive and lucrative. “There are just a few days in the region when direct sunlight is low. Therefore, the practical applications of harnessing solar energy in the region are massive and much more lucrative in terms of sustainability factors than anywhere else in the world. This solution can drive the massive demand growth for cooling in our expanding cities,” adds Nezar. A research paper by QPM explains how the sun can be an innovative and sustainable answer to a scalable and affordable outdoor cooling solution in Qatar. The research, being presented by QPM, is co-authored by Nezar on behalf of QPM in partnership with Dirk Krüger and Jürgen Dersch from the German Aerospace Center, which is headquartered in Cologne. The ground-breaking solution aims at rebranding the outdoor environment in Qatar during the summer, so it is comfortable and more appealing for people to experience open-air activities rather than staying inside a confined environment. The outcome of this synergistics study shows the viability of the proposed outdoor cooling solution with the use of solar energy up to 90% of the cooling demand. There are few days only when the direct radiation is low; the output of the proposed solution can’t fully meet the cooling demand and another source of energy might be considered for these days. As the cooling load peaks late in the day due to high humidity level, an optimized thermal storage between the solar field and chiller has been introduced in the region to provide for uninterrupted system performance. The economic segment of the study has demonstrated the viability of the proposed solution as the estimated cooling cost is around € 0.20 (approximately QR0.87) per kWh of the cooling demand. Furthermore, investigations showed a potential cost reduction if another source of heat demand is available to absorb the surplus of energy produced by the solar field when not needed. “Now we need to move forward on the application itself. We have the blueprint; we need to find partners to develop a prototype. We also need to find a mechanism for the implementation. Lusail, Katara, Souq Waqif have all expressed interest. We do not have a prototype yet,” Nezar said in a conversation on the sidelines of the last Middle East District Cooling Summit in Doha. “Solar energy is the future. The technology might be expensive now but in the future when fossil fuels have run out, all we will have is the sun. So tracking the strategic path of developing this technology as an alternative resource is very important.”

Construction demand creates need for smarter concrete production in GCC

Several of the world’s largest construction and concrete companies gathered in Dubai last month to discuss solutions to ensure a consistent supply of the world’s most-used building material – concrete. With infrastructure project awards across the region forecast to exceed $86 billion in 2014, according to construction intelligence firm Ventures Onsite, demand for concrete is set to rise significantly in the GCC, which already accounts for over 40% of the Middle East concrete consumption. Previous construction booms have seen the supply of concrete unable to meet demand, leading to spiraling prices and delayed projects. “Developers in the GCC have implemented the latest and most advanced technologies of ready-mixed concrete in the construction of high-rise buildings and iconic structures,” said Ihab Bassiouni, UAE Country Manager for Grey Matters Consultancy, and advisory board member for Middle East Concrete. “High performance concrete has been used with emphasis on concrete placeability, strength and durability,” he said. “More attention shall be paid to the impact of concrete on the environment where new sustainable solutions, in terms

of concrete materials and production facilities, shall be adopted in order to cope with the rising trend towards sustainable developments in the region,” said Bassiouni. Construction leaders are debating the capacity available for these methods, as new concrete technologies such as “Shotcrete” super highstrength concrete have not yet been introduced into the region. Talking about the burgeoning concrete market in the region, Adel Taybah, Plants and Works Manager for Ready Mix Beton and advisory board member for Middle East Concrete, commented: “The growing concrete industry in the region continues to stay ahead of the trends, aiming at ensuring energy and cost efficiency, as well as contributing to sustainable structures by adopting green technologies.”

Taybah added: “Though cement markets faced tough times recently amid the slowdown, the demand has well and truly returned, along with demand for more advanced concrete technology to support the region’s megaprojects.” With sustainability a key issue for cement production given its high pollution output, one of the main panels at the event reviewed the latest low carbonemitting concrete innovations. In line with the constant demand for concrete in the region, Middle East Concrete included CPD-certified workshops and technical seminars on concrete methods, as well as live demonstrations and panel discussions focusing on the latest concrete technologies and innovations. Middle East Concrete took place in November at the Dubai World Trade Centre.

KnowCrete by Concrete and climate change: How does concrete stack up against other building materials? By Lionel Lemay, PE, SE, LEED AP, Senior VP, Sustainable Development, NRMCA and Colin Lobo, PE, PhD, Senior VP, Engineering, NRMCA Energy consumption and carbon dioxide emissions, both measures of environmental impact, are important parameters in the discussion of life cycle assessment (LCA.) LCA attempts to quantify the environmental impacts, including energy consumption and carbon emissions, of a product, process or service. LCA is sometimes used to measure the environmental impact of structures throughout their entire life cycle. Generally, a building or building product life cycle can be divided into five life cycle phases: material acquisition, manufacturing, construction, operational phase, and demolition, reuse or recycling. The operational phase is typically the longest and most critical phase of the life cycle since this includes the actual use of the product in a building or roadway. Impacts from heating and cooling buildings, roadway traffic, maintenance and repair typically far outweigh the impacts during the other four life cycle phases. There are few published works that take into account all five phases when conducting a comparative LCA of concrete and other building materials. The research studies referenced in this paper are mainly partial LCAs for several different phases of the life cycle. CO2 from Cement Manufacturing As with all industrial processes, cement manufacturing requires energy and the subsequent generation of CO2. According to the US Department of Energy, cement production accounts for 1.8% of energy consumed in the U.S. This level is relatively low in comparison with other industries, such as petroleum refining at 31.4%, steel production at 4.9% and wood production at 2.1%. For the most part, CO2 is generated from two different sources during the cement manufacturing process: 1. use of fossil fuels in the burning process, and 2. calcination, when calcium carbonate is heated and broken down to calcium oxide with the release of CO2. Calcium oxide is approximately 60% of the raw material required for the manufacture of cement. Limestone is the primary naturally occurring source of calcium oxide used in the manufacture of cement.

*Concrete Sustainability Report CSR02 – June 2010; National Ready Mixed Concrete Association info@greymatters.ws www.greymatters.ws


Construction

Qatar

SITES

25

Roads and infrastructure in Industrial Area progressing

Ashghal says it will provide roads and infrastructure implemented according to the highest standards Qatar’s Public Works Authority (Ashghal) has vowed to continue its efforts to accelerate the implementation of local roads and drainage works. The programme includes projects for comprehensive rehabilitation and development of infrastructure and other projects to create an integrated infrastructure in some undeveloped areas. This was revealed during a media meeting, organized by Ashghal for the Doha Industrial Area project last month. During the meeting, Saoud Al Tamimi Manager of Roads Projects Department in Ashghal, and Ahmed Al Obaidly, the project engineer responsible for roads in Qatar, south gave the media an introduction to the project and the latest progress so far. A site visit followed the meeting where journalists got more details about the works taking place on site and spoke to the project engineers. The development of roads and infrastructure in Doha Industrial Area is one of the major projects under Ashghal’s program as it aims to make a comprehensive improvement to this vital area known for high traffic density and large number of businesses. To facilitate the implementation process, the project has been divided into several phases.

The first package commenced at the beginning of this year in January, and it extends over an area of approximately 480 hectares. This phase of the project consists of works to redesign and upgrade the existing road network and associated utilities. It also includes the construction and rehabilitation of roads with a total length of more than 38km. These include 18km of local roads, 7km of collector roads, and 14km of arterial roads in addition to 19 intersections to organise and manage traffic, and significantly improve the existing transportation system. The project will include the protection, relocation and upgrading of the existing utilities, such as potable water lines, electrical cables and substations, telecommunication networks for telephone and security systems, as well as the construction of treated sewage effluent network for irrigation of the soft landscaping and public gardens. The project will include the construction of a large tank to collect storm water that will accommodate a very large amount of rain even after heavy and continuous rainfall, as well developing and upgrading the drainage and sewerage systems, including micro tunneling works.

In addition, the project will establish an updated street lighting system incorporating most advanced technologies, and replace the old boundary walls separating the existing facilities and streets with new walls. When complete, the new and advanced drainage systems will eliminate the problems of sewage overflow and surface and ground water collection and the need for trucks or tankers to extract water. The new system will meet all the requirements of industrial and commercial business owners, and will ensure efficient water drainage, in addition to protecting the area from any potential hazard resulting from unforeseen weather conditions, and enhancing the general view of the area. The Public Works Authority reiterated that it would provide roads and infrastructure implemented according to the highest standards. This will include upgrade of existing roads, establishment of traffic signalised intersections, multi-level intersections and pedestrians and cyclists paths, in addition to the installation of lighting systems, and beautification and landscaping works. The works will result in various benefits, reflected in a developed, safer road network, a smoother traffic flow, reduced pollution and a better environ-

ment. The estimated cost of the first package is approximately QR1.4 billion. The project will develop an area that serves more than 580 land plots allocated for commercial projects and have a positive impact on commercial and industrial business owners. The project will enhance the position of Doha Industrial Area and the overall public opinion. Ashghal has made good progress in the implementation of the project works. It is working on the excavation of trenches, construction of concrete examination and maintenance rooms (inspection rooms), installation of pipes for surface and ground water drainage systems on the West Industrial, Al Barradat,

and Al Binaa streets. The removal of asphalt layer of the existing roads and excavation to the formation level in West Industrial and Al Manager Streets are in progress. This is in addition to implementation of dewatering works in all trenches, and treatment before drainage to the authorised region. Micro tunnel shafts at Road 15 are being constructed in order to connect to the drainage network. Excavation in some areas has also started in preparation for the construction of a new boundary wall. The construction contract of package one was awarded at the beginning of last January to Qatari Trading & Contracting

Group & MSF Engenharia, SA, joint venture (JV) and it is expected to be completed in the second quarter of 2016. As part of its keenness to communicate effectively with the local community and commercial and industrial businesses owners in the Doha Industrial Area, the authority distributed brochures to all residents, including information about the project components and benefits. The authority responds to all inquiries, suggestions and complaints through its social media networks and contact center which operates around the clock seven days a week, as well as providing the SMS updates service through online registering on Ashghal’s website.


26

Construction

SITES

News

Ashghal signs infrastructure contracts worth over QR5 billion

The total value of contracts Ashghal awarded from January 2014 until now exceeded QR26 billion Qatar’s Public Works Authority (Ashghal) has announced the signing of 12 infrastructure contracts with an estimated value of QR5. 53 billion. These included seven construction contracts under the local roads and drainage program, one under the expressway program and four for sewage stations. With the signing of these contracts, the total value of contracts Ashghal awarded from January 2014 until now exceeded QR26 billion. These included infrastructure contracts worth QR22. 628 billion and building projects contracts worth QR2. 543billion,

By signing these new contracts, the total amount of contracts awarded by the Public Works Authority as of January 2014 and until this day has exceeded QR26 billion.

in addition to contracts for the operation and maintenance of roads and sewerage networks worth QR762 million. Ashghal President Nasser Bin Ali Al Mawlawi signed the 12 new contracts with the representatives of companies, which won the bids. The contracts signed under the local roads and drainage program included: the construction and development of East Aziziya, as well as of the roads and infrastructure of the north part of New Slata (Zone 40), the West of Al Wakrah (Package 1, Phase - 2,), Rawdat Abal Heeran (Package 2), the North of Bani Hajer (Phase - 2, Package 7) and preparatory works and building walls in Al Khor

industrial Area “Abal Grarees” (Package 5). These are in addition to a flow diversion scheme in Al Wajbah and New Al Rayyan to the North Doha treatment station. Under the expressway program, one contract was signed for the construction and development of Lejmailya, Al Otouriyah and Al Shahhaniya. In 2014, the fourth phase of construction of the New Orbital Road and Truck Route was signed with a value of QR3. 348 billion. As for the sewerage projects contracts, those included: the design, construction, operation and maintenance of Al Shamal Sewage Treatment Works (STW), the design and construction of the second phase expansion to the industrial area’s Sewage Treatment Facility (STF), the design, build, operation and maintenance of Al Dhakhira Sewage Treatment Works (STW), transfer pumping station and associated pipelines, and the design and build of Doha West Sewage Treatment Works (DWSTW) extension number 5. Local roads and drainage contracts 1. The construction and development of East Aziziya: This QR217,073,527 contract has been awarded to Leighton Contracting Qatar. The project, which started in the fourth quarter of 2014, is due to be completed by the fourth quarter of 2016. The project will include the development of the East Aziziya area - which covers 720,000 square meters and include 740 residential plots - by constructing storm water drainage, sewage networks, and treated sewage effluent networks as well as the construction of road entrance and exits, parking lots, artscape and landscape features. 2. The construction and development of the roads and infrastructure of the North Part of New Slata

(Zone 40): This QR289,749,729 contract has been awarded to a joint venture between Al Mohanna Trading & Contracting and Pu-

These projects include infrastructure contracts totaling QR22,543,000,000 and buildings contracts worth QR2,543,000,000

entes Y Calzadas Infraestructuras. The project, which started the third quarter of 2014, is due to be completed by the third quarter of 2016. The project is located in the north part of New Salata within the Doha Municipality (Zone 40). The project area is estimated at about 270,000 square meters and will benefit around 696 plots of land. The project will cover the development of roads and infrastructure to provide storm wa-

Officials shaking hands after signing the deals at the contract award ceremony.

ter drainage, sewage networks, and treated sewage effluent networks for irrigation. It will also include the development of internal roads 24km long, with a width between 12 and 30 meters, in addition to street lighting, parking lots, pedestrian paths and cycleways, and artscape and landscape features. 3. The construction and development of the roads and infrastructure West of Al Wakrah (Package 1, Phase - 2): This QR490,240,090 contract has been awarded to a joint venture between Lane Mideast Qatar, Solid General Construction, and Tadmur Contracting. The project started in the third quarter of 2014 and is due to be completed by the third quarter of 2016. The project is located in Zone 90, on the western outskirts of the existing Wakrah City, and is bound by the Wukair Road to the north, the Wakrah Bypass to the west and south, and existing residential areas to the east. The project area is initially being developed as a residential area with commercial, government, entertainment and sup-

porting facilities. As part of this project, roads and infrastructure will be developed in West Wakrah over three packages, the first of which covers an area of 1.80 million square meters. The project will include the development of roads and infrastructure to provide storm water drainage, sewage networks, and treated sewage effluent networks for irrigation. In addition, the project will include the development of internal roads, street lighting, parking lots, road entrance and exits, a network of pedestrian paths and cycleways and artscape and landscape features. 4. The construction and development of the roads and infrastructure in Rawdat Abal Heeran (Package 2): This QR544,991,076 contract has been awarded to a joint venture between Teyseer Contracting Company and Consolidated Contractors Group (Offshore) . The project will start in the fourth quarter of 2014 and is due to be completed by the corresponding period in 2016. Rawdat Abal Heeran (Package 2) covers 2,180,000,000 square meters over a vast area of open desert in the western outskirts of Doha (Zone 53). The project will consist of the development of roads and infrastructure to provide water drainage, sewage networks, and treated sewage effluent networks for irrigation as well as the development of internal roads, road entrance and exits, street lighting, parking lots, pedestrian paths and cycleways

The coming year (2015) will also witness the execution of a different set of infrastructure projects within the local roads and drainage program and the development and improvement of facilities

and artscape and landscape features. 5. The construction and development of the roads and infrastructure in the North of Bani Hajer (Phase - 02, Package 7): This QR322,700,000 contract has been awarded to a joint venture between Teyseer Contracting Co. and Consolidated Contractors Group S.A.L (Offshore).

The project will start in the first quarter of 2015 and is due to be completed by the fourth quarter of 2016. The project will include the development of local roads and infrastructure in the Bani Hajer area, north of Doha which is part of Al-Rayyan municipality and located approximately 10km west of Doha’s central region. The project covers around 1,350,000,000 square meters and the major infrastructure improvements being implemented as part of the project include the construction of linking roads and paved roads granting access to existing and future housing units that will be built at the project site. It will also include the construction of secondary roads linking between the local roads and neighbouring main and secondary roads network, in addition to developing pedestrian paths, road signs, street lighting, and the installation of fences, street signals, and traffic control systems. Furthermore, the project will consist of the development of storm water drainage, sewage networks, and treated sewage effluent networks for irrigation as well as and artscape and landscape features alongside the roads. 6. Preliminary works contract and construction of boundary wall in Al-Khor industrial Area, Abal Grarees (Package 5): This QR61,320,947 contract has been awarded to ALCAT Contracting Company. The project will start in Q1 2015, and is due to be completed by Q4 2015. The project which consists of five packages will include the development of roads and infrastructure of Al Khor industrial area. Package 05 is the first package of the project and includes installing a boundary wall in Al Khor’s new industrial area. The boundary wall is made of pre-cast concrete and is 2.6m high over a length of approximately 9km. The flow diversion schemes in Al-Wajbah and New AlRayyan, north of Doha: This QR118,250,500 contract has been awarded to Bin Omran Trading & Contracting Company. The project started in the third quarter of 2014 and is due to be completed by the corresponding period in 2015. The project is located north of Muaither area which is part of Al-Rayyan Municipality and includes the construction of a deep sewage tunnel which is 6.3km long and a depth of 6 to 21m. This is one of several projects throughout Doha to replace pumping stations with gravity drainage systems.


News

Construction

SITES

27

Design, build, operation and maintenance of Al Dhakhira Sewage Treatment Works (STW)

Doha BIM Users start online networking group for those involved in Building Information Modeling (BIM) This QR1,510,955,000 contract has been awarded to a joint venture between Hyundai Rotem and Aqualia Mace. The project will start in Q1 2015 and is due to be completed by Q3 2018. The project will include the design and building of a Sewage Treatment Facility (STF) with a capacity of 56,200 cubic meters per day to treat effluents generated from the Al Khor and Al Dhakhira areas. The facility will use the latest in high-tech electrical and mechanical equipment to improve the quality of treated effluent in such a way to ensure constancy of the required quality. The sewage treatment will involve many stages and the treated effluent will be used for irrigation and landscaping. The sewage sludge resulting from sewage treatment will also be processed and used as backfill material and compost. The project also includes the modification of the existing pumping station in Al Khor in order to handle the sewage generated from residential and service projects planned for the region, the construction of a sewage pumping station to pump sewage form the existing treating facility in Al Dhakhira and Al Khor to the new Sewage Treatment Facility in Al Dhakhira. Additionally, the project includes the operation and maintenance of the entire plant for 10 years from the date of the completion of the design and construction works. 1. The design and build of Doha West Sewage Treatment Works (DWSTW): This QR797,000,000 contract has been awarded to a joint venture between DeAshghal Upcoming Contracts: Expressway Programme Contract gremont SA and Marubeni Corporation. This QR 668,930,214 contract has been awarded to Qatar Building Company (QBC). The project will start in Q1 2015, and is due to be completed by Q3 2017. The project will start in Q1/2015 and is due to be completed by Q4/2016. This project will include the expansion of Doha West Sewage Treatment Works in The project, stretching from the center of the State Doha to the North West, will inorder to increase the capacity of the station by 104,500 cubic meters per day so clude the development of the existing Al-Shahhaniyah-Al-Jemailiya road passing by that the total capacity reaches 280,000 cubic meters per day. the Al Otouriyah over a length of 28.7km. works include the expansion of secondary and tertiary treatment and processIt will include the construction of a two-lane road in each direction separated by ing and drying sludge, in addition to the development of a new system for steriliza median island, with the possibility of adding a third lane in each direction in the ing treated effluent. The project also includes the construction of a pump station future. for effluent treatment plant. The project is distinguished by its pedestrian paths and cycleways along the side of 2. The design, build, operation and maintenance of Al-Shamal Sewthe road. age Treatment Works (STW): In addition, the project will include the construction of four main intersections, This QR238,515,309 contract has been awarded to a joint venture between namely: Al-Jemailya Road with the roundabout leading to the camel race track, AlLarsen & Toubro Limited and Waterleau Group (consortium). Jemailya Road with the Al-Kharib, Al-Jemailya Road with the roundabout leading to The project will start in Q1 2015 and is due to be completed by Q1 2017. Al-Otouriyah and Al-Jemailiya Road with the roundabout leading to Al-Ghuwairyah. The project will include the design and construction of wastewater treatment The road is designed to accommodate about 1,000 vehicles per day. plant in the north. The facility will use the latest in high-tech advanced electrical The project comprises the development of services and infrastructure facilities to and mechanical equipment to improve the quality of treated effluent and to operinclude rainwater drainage, and smart transport systems. Additionally, the project will include the operation, installation and maintenance of ate the station with the minimal manpower in such a way to ensure constancy of electrical sub-stations. It is also worth mentioning that camel underpasses will also the required quality. be developed to facilitate their access to the camel race track located within the The amount of generated sewage flow for this project can reach up to 7,500 project area. cubic meters/day. Additionally, it will include the operation and maintenance of the entire plant for 10 years from the date of the end of the design and construction works. 3. The design and construction of the second phase expansion to the industrial area’s Sewage Treatment Facility (STF): This QR237,521,221 contract has been awarded to Six Construct. The project will start in Q1 2015 and is due to be completed by Q1 2017. The project will increase the capacity of the industrial area treatment plant from 30,000 to 60,000 cubic meters per day. The facility will use the latest in high-tech advanced electrical and mechanical equipment to improve the quality of treated effluent and to operate the station with the minimal manpower in such a way to ensure constancy of the required quality.

The Construction and Development of Al-Jemailya, Al-Otouriyah, and Al-Shahhaniyah:


28

Construction

SITES

Tenders

ASHGHAL TENDERS AND AWARDED TENDERS Companies Eligible to Tender: (1) Qatari Companies Only (2) Joint Venture (JV) Companies, which includes a Qatari Company having a minimum of 51%, share holding of the JV (3) Non-Qatari Companies (4) Not Applicable * All financial values are in QAR

Tender No.

Type

Tender Title

Participants

Issuing Date

Closing Date

Category

PWA/STC/036/1415

STC

Supply of General Electrical Items for Pumping Stations (AA-D/14-15/OM/1657-1.05/S)

Qatari Companies Only

24-Dec-14

29-Jan-15

Drainage

PWA/STC/030/1415

STC

Supply of ABS Submersible Pump Spares for Pumping Stations (AA/DOM/14-15/M/1658-2.05/S)

Qatari Companies Only

3-Dec-14

22-Jan-15

Drainage

PWA/GTC/066/1415

GTC

Three Years On-Call Supply of Miscellaneous Hoses for Drainage Networks O& M Dept. (AA/DOM/14-15/M/1677/G)

Qatari Companies Only

3-Dec-14

20-Jan-15

Drainage

PWA/GTC/064/1415

GTC

Construction, Completion & Maintenance of Proposed Administrative Offices, Garage & Labor Accommodation at Wadi Al Mazroua Zone ( Jarie Al Samar) BA/13-14/C/087/G

3-Dec-14

20-Jan-15

Building

Qatari Companies Only - Joint

Venture General Conditions of Tenders - Full Documents for the Tender Doha and Rayyan Sewerage Scheme Miscellacan be obtained from Contracts neous Sewer Eextension Works on Call Contract Department (CD) against a Non– PWA/ITC/033/14-15 ITC Qatari Companies Only 24-Dec-14 18-Jan-15 Drainage 24/2014 refundable fee paid to PWA Ac(IA/D-HC/14-15/C/094/I) count No. (0013-001813-052), Doha and Rayyan Sewerage Scheme Sewer ExtenQatar National Bank together with PWA/STC/037/14GTC sion Works in Musheireb Road Qatari Companies Only 24-Dec-14 15-Jan-15 Drainage 15 (IA-HC/14-15/C/089/S) a copy of the Company Registration and a Company Authorization PWA/STC/035/14Supply of Submersible Pumps Spare Parts for STC Pumping Stations and PTP's Qatari Companies Only 24-Dec-14 15-Jan-15 Drainage letter. 15 (AA/DOM/14-15/M/1675/S) - Project document may be examPre-Contract Professional Consultancy Services for ined at Al-Faisal Tower(1), Ground PWA/STC/032/14STC 5 New Masjids at Various Locations Consultants 17-Dec-14 15-Jan-15 Consultancy 15 Floor, Al Corniche before purchas(Package 5) BA/14-15/D/031/S ing from PWA. Supply & Work Contract for Modification of Existing - Each Tender must be accompa- PWA/STC/031/14Portable GSM Starter Panels for Incorporation of STC Qatari Companies Only 17-Dec-14 15-Jan-15 Drainage 15 Remote Level Monitoring System nied by a Tender Bond, either in (AA/D/14-15/OM/1659/S) the form of a “Certified Check” or Provision and Maintenance of Safety Barriers a “Tender Bond’’ issued by a Bank PWA/GTC/069/14GTC Throughout Qatar, Contract - 5 Qatari Companies Only 17-Dec-14 13-Jan-15 Roads acceptable to the PWA” in the 15 (AA/ROM/14-15/056/C3/G) amount mentioned above valid for Provision and Maintenance of Safety Barriers (120 days). Any Tender received PWA/GTC/068/14GTC Throughout Qatar, Contract - 4 Qatari Companies Only 17-Dec-14 13-Jan-15 Roads 15 without the proper guarantee will (AA/ROM/14-15/056/C2/G) not be considered. Motor Control Centre (MCC) Spares 2014- Supply/ - The Tender shall be submitted in PWA/STC/034/14STC Installation Qatari Companies Only 17-Dec-14 8-Jan-15 Drainage 15 (AA/DOM/14-15/M/1674/S) two separate sealed envelopes (technical and financial offer) and both envelopes must be enclosed in a third sealed envelope which shall bear the tender number, subject and closing date. - All Tenders shall be submitted in original and one copy or they will not be acceptance. Tenders shall be delivered at or sent to arrive not later than 1.00pm local Doha time on the closing date and deposited in the relevant Tender Box of concerned Tenders Committee’s Chairman at PWA. - The successful Tenderer shall provide a Performance Bond in amount of ten (10%) percent of the Contract Price endorsed by an approved local bank in Qatar. - For further queries about any of the tenders, please communicate in writing to the Contracts Department by Fax.: (+974) 44950777

TENDERS

Please note that any information mentioned on this table are as per the listed companies’ tender advertisements, without any responsibility of the magazine.

Tender Number

Type

Subject

Entity

Close Date

Value

Envelopes System

Tender Fees (QRs)

6 /2014-2015

Local Tenders

Supply,installation and upgrading of data network at SCJ with maintenance for three years

Supreme Council for Judiciary

4/1/15

39000 Q.R

TWO ENVELOPES

150 150

67 /2014-2015

Local Tenders

Infrastructure upgrading of HP servers for QFMA Data

Qatar Financial Markets authority

4/1/15

30000 Q.R

TWO ENVELOPES

525 /2014-2015

Central Tenders

Marketing plan for sole window customs system Al Ndadeeb for one year

General Administration of Customs

5/1/15

170000 Q.R

TWO ENVELOPES

300

527 /2014-2015

Central Tenders

Maintenance works for mosque No. 490 and extensions at Al Wakkrah area

Ministry of Endowment & Islamic Affairs

5/1/15

180000 Q.R

TWO ENVELOPES

300

69 /2014-2015

Local Tenders

Renting of Nos. (10) light rehicles for two years

Council of Ministries

11/1/15

30000 Q.R

TWO ENVELOPES

150

70 /2014-2015

Local Tenders

Maintenance works for mosque No.882 at Muaizer

Ministry of Endowment & Islamic Affairs

11/1/15

30000 Q.R

TWO ENVELOPES

150

Cleaning works for Nos. 44 Mosques group 11

Ministry of Endowment & Islamic Affairs

12/1/15

200000 Q.R

TWO ENVELOPES

300

528 /2014-2015

Central Tenders

Ministry of Endowment & Islamic

TWO ENVELOPES Cleaning works for Nos. 50 mosques group 9 529 /2014-2015 Central Tenders 12/1/15 200000 Q.R 300 Tenders Conditions: Affairs - You can get a copy of the TWO ENVELOPES Implementation of facilities works for Losail Intl. Karting Circuit QMMF 524 /2014-2015 Central Tenders 12/1/15 1600000 Q.R 300 documents of this tender / Ministry of Endowment & Islamic TWO ENVELOPES Cleaning works for Nos.95 mosques group 1 531 /2014-2015 Central Tenders 19/01/2015 450000 Q.R 300 Affairs tenders of the Central TenMinistry of Endowment & Islamic ders Committee during ofTWO ENVELOPES Cleaning works for Nos.64 mosques group 10 530 /2014-2015 Central Tenders 19/01/2015 270000 Q.R 300 Affairs ficial hours, against payment of the tender documents witch you can retrieve it. - Must be accompanied with the tender a letter of guarantee bank / certified check from a bank operating in the State of Qatar, as indicated above for a period of temporary deposit on 120. - The offer must be valid for a period of ninety days from the date of the opening of envelopes. - Will be the last date for submission of tenders is twelve o’clock on the morning of the closure, and will not pay attention to any tender received after the deadline. - Tenders deposited in the box of the Central Tenders Committee, located in Muntazah - Rawabi Street, to be inside the stamped and sealed envelopes and addressed to the Chairman of the Tenders Committee competent (central / local) showing the number, type of the tender and the subject. - The Central Tenders Committee invites bidders or their representatives to attend the opening of the envelopes and read the price on the day following the date of the closure during the office hours. - To obtain tender / tenders documents highlight above must be to mentioned authorization letter from the company / institution. - For inquiries, please contact Tel: 44378192 /225 /143 /149. - For more information about the Central Tenders Committee ,tenders and auctions are being posed by the Committee You can visit the site on the Internet www.ctc.gov.qa

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Events

2014 -2015 Offshore Middle East Organizer: PennWell events Event date (s): 26 – 28 January Venue: Qatar National Convention Center (QNCC) Location: Doha, Qatar Tel: +44 (0) 1992 656 658 Website: www.offshoremiddleeast.com Major Projects and Infrastructure Qatar Organizer: C5 Event date (s): 27 – 28 January Venue: InterContinental – The City Hotel Location: Doha, Qatar Tel: + 44(0) 207 878 6928 Email: B.Nanavati@C5-Online.com Website: www.c5-online.com/2015/525/major-projectsand-infrastructure-qatar/overview Drainage and Sewerage Middle East Organizer: IQPC Event date (s): 1 – 4 February Venue: InterContinental Hotel Location: Doha, Qatar Tel: +971 4 364 2975 Email: enquiry@iqpc.ae Website: www.drainageandsewerageme.com The 8th Middle East Artificial Lift Forum (MEALF) Organizer: MCI Middle East LLC Event date (s): 3 – 5 February Venue: The Ritz-Carlton Location: Doha, Qatar Tel: +971 4 3116300 Email: info@mealf.com Website: www.mealf.com Qatar Covertech 2015 The International Exhibition for Wall and Floor Covering Technologies Organizer: Ibhar for Conferences & Exhibitions Event date (s): 4 – 6 February Venue: Qatar National Convention Centre (QNCC) Location: Doha, Qatar Tel: +974 44175230 Fax: +974 44175266

CALENDAR

Construction

SITES

OF EXHIBITIONS & EVENTS

Email: expo@ibharqatar.com Website: www.qatarcovertech.com

3rd Middle East Turbomachinery Symposium Organizer: Qatar Petroleum Event date (s): 15 – 18 February Venue: Sheraton Doha Resort & Convention Hotel Location: Doha, Qatar Tel: +1-979-458-8878 Email: info@turbo-lab.tamu.edu Website: http://mets.tamu.edu/ 7th Annual Facade Design & engineering Organizer: IQPC Event date (s): 22 – 25 February Venue: InterContinental Hotel Location: Doha, Qatar Tel: +971 4 364 2975 Email: enquiry@iqpc.ae Website: http://www.facadedesignmena.com Qatar Projects 2015 Organizer: MEED Event date (s): 10–11 March Venue: Grand Hyatt Hotel Location: Doha, Qatar Tel: +9714 818 0217 Email: meedevents@meed.com Website: www.meed.com/events/qatar-projects-conference-2015 The Energy Efficiency and Conservation Forum Organizer: Fleming Gulf Event date (s): 24 – 25 March Venue: TBA Location: Doha, Qatar Tel: +91 9164989507 Fax: +91 80 49005100 Email: sobia.jameel@fleminggulf.com Website: http://energy.fleminggulf.com/energy-efficiency-conservation-forum 3rd Qatar Pool and SPA (QPS) Exhibition Organizer: Heights Exhibitions and Conferences Event date (s): 24 – 25 March Venue: TBA Location: Doha, Qatar

Tel: +974 4016 4184 Fax: +974 4016 4182 Email: qps@htsxpo.com Website: www.htsxpo.com/qps.aspx

Organizer: QS Asia & Qatar University Event date (s): 5 – 7 May Venue: Marriott Hotel Location: Doha, Qatar Tel: +65 9338 0322 Email: ashwin@qs.com Website:www.qsmaple.org

Cityscape Qatar Organizer: Informa Exhibitions Event date (s): 24 – 26 March Venue: Qatar National Convention Centre (QNCC) Location: Doha, Qatar Tel: +971 4 336 5161 Email: infoex@iirme.com Website: www.cityscapeqatar.com

11th Trans Middle East Doha 2015 Organizer: Transport Events Event date (s): 6 – 7 May Venue: Intercontinental Doha Location: Doha, Qatar Tel: +60 87 426 022 Fax: +60 87 426 223 Email: enquiries@transportevents.com Website: www.transportevents.com

The Outdoor Design & Build Show 2015 Organizer: Streamline Marketing Group Event date (s): 13 – 15 April Venue: Dubai World Trade Centre Location: Dubai, United Arab Emirates Tel: +971 4 4475357 Fax: +971 4 4475334 Email: odbs@theoutdoorshow.ae Website: www.theoutdoorshow.ae

Future BIM Implementation Organizer: Advanced Conferences & Meetings FZ-LLC Event date (s): 6 – 7 May Venue: Qatar National Convention Centre (QNCC) Location: Doha, Qatar Tel: +971 4 361 4001 Fax: +971 4 361 4554 Email:opportunities@acm-events.com Website:www.futurebimqatar.com

Project Qatar 2015 Organizer: IFP Qatar Event date (s): 4 – 7 May Venue: Qatar National Convention Centre (QNCC) Location: Doha, Qatar Tel: +974 44329900 Fax: +974 44432891 Email: info@ifpqatar.com Website:www.projectqatar.com

World Stadium Congress Organizer: IQPC Event date (s): 18 – 21 May Venue: St. Regis Hotel Location: Doha, Qatar Tel: +971 4 364 2975 Email: enquiry@iqpc.ae Website: www.worldstadiumcongress.com

Qatar StoneTech Organizer: IFP Qatar Event date (s): 4 – 7 May Venue: Qatar National Convention Centre (QNCC) Location: Doha, Qatar Tel: +974 44329900 Fax: +974 44432891 Email: info@ifpqatar.com Website:www.qatarstone-tech.com

4th Annual Underground Infrastructure and Deep Foundations Organizer: IQPC Event date (s): 7 – 10 June Venue: InterContinental Hotel Location: Doha, Qatar Tel: +971 4 364 2975 Email: enquiry@iqpc.ae Website: www.undergroundfoundations.com

5th QS - MAPLE Middle East and North Africa Professional Leaders in Education

w w w. w a r r i o r s a f e t y. c o m QATAR WORLD ATLAS TRADING Tel: +974 44981666 Fax: + 974 44981333 info-qtr@warriorsafety.com

UAE EMIRATES GATE BM & SAFETY Tel: +971 4299 7555 Fax: +971 42997070 emigate@emirates.net.ae

29

H I G H

P E R F O R M A N C E

USA

United Globe Trading Co. 2611 W. Woodland Drive., Anaheim, Ca 92801 T: 1-714-527-0300 F: 1-714-527-0310 M: 1-559-241-4881 ugtc.usa@gmail.com

LIBYA

S A F E T Y

HOME OF TOOLS Tel: 218 6190 82212 BENGHAZI-LIBYA info@homeoftools.com

P R O D U C T S

IRAQ

AL-USOOL GENERAL TRADING COMPANY LTSD Tel: + 964 7198 741 BAGHDAD- IRAQ info@usoolgroup.com


30

Construction

SITES

Project Focus

NOTE: Whilst we take pride in keeping our Consultants Database with the most up-to-date information, please note that the above information is provided by the Consultants mentioned in the list; therefore QCS in not responsible for any incorrect data.

Consultant

Project Title

Twin Towers

Client

Main Contractor

Value Range (QR) Million

Project Status

Type of Project

M/s. Commercial Development

M/s. Arabtec

500-750

Piling & Shoring

Hotel and Office Buildings

Audit Bureau Towers

M/s. Al Attiya Group Trading Co.

Not Appointed

400-600

Tender Stage

Offices / Residential Towers

Al Waab Mall

M/s. Qatar Industrial Services

Man Enterprize, Qatar

300-400

Under Construction

Mall

Q-Tel

Not Appointed

250-350

Tender Stage

Technical

Mr. Mohamed Abdel Ghani Al Mansouri

Not Appointed

200-300

Under Design

Shopping Mall & Office Tower

Ghanem Al Hodaifi

Not Appointed

600-800

Detail Stage

Office Building

CBQ

HBK

N/A

Under Construction

Commercial, Bank, Office Plaza

Qatar Islamic Bank

AFQCO & REDCO - Al Mana

1.2-1.4 bn

Under Construction

Residential Towers

Business Trading Company

IDC

400-500

Under Construction

Shopping Mall

Al Malki Real Estate Investments

Satal Qatar Contracting

N/A

Under Construction

Hotel

Ghanem Al Thani Holding

Ramco

N/A

Under Construction

Office Building

Mesiemer Manarat Lusail Al Hodaifi Tower II CBQ Boulevard Five Residential Towers at Viva Bahriya at the Pear (project management)

Gulf Mall at Gharrafa

Doha Centro Hotel at Bin Mahmoud Ghanem Office Building at Salwa Road Marsa Malaz Hotel at the Pear Qatar (Main Works) Qatar Sidra Village Project

Qatar Airways Crew Accommodation Al Rabban Suites Hotel Apartments (3B+G+M+50Floors) Office Buildings (3B+G+22) at Lusail Marina District

Office Tower (3B+G+14Floors)

Al Baker Executive Towers Al Nour Tower Al Nasr Showroom

Alfardan Properties Co.

CDC

N/A

Under Construction

Hotel

Mazaya Qatar Real Extate Development QSC

Sinohydro Group Limited

N/A

Under Construction

Residential

Qatar Airways

Redco International

N/A

Under Construction

Residential Building

Al Sarh Real Estate WLL

CRC

N/A

Under Construction

Residential

Sh. Hamad Bin Faisal Al Thani

REDCO – Al Mana

N/A

Under Construction

Office Building

Mr. Abdullah Abu Salah

Shannon Engineering

N/A

Under Construction

Office Tower

Ahmed Abed El Aziz Al Baker

Construction and Reconstruction Co.

675

Under Construction

Office Building

Private Investor

Orientals Enterprises

N/A

Under Construction

Residential

Shiekh Abdullah Bin Naser Al Thani

Construction and Reconstruction Co.

85

Under Construction

Commercial

MOI

Hassanesco Co.

N/A

Under Construction

Mixed Use

Shk/Abdullah Bin Nasser Al Thani

Construction and Reconstruction Co.

205

Under Construction

Commercial / Residential

Tricon International

Atlantic Contracting Co.

150

Under Construction

Hotels

Al Hodaifi Group

Not appointed

30-40 Million

Design stage

Office Building

El Eida

Not appointed

5-10 Million

Design stage

Villa

Doha Education Centre

Not appointed

30-50 Million

Design stage

Education

Step 1 International Academy

Step 1 International Academy

Not appointed

20-40 Million

Design stage

School

5 Hotel Towers adjacent to City Center Marriott Rensance, Marriott Courtyard, Shangri La, Rotana & Merweb

Al Rayyan Holding Company

Al Habtour

3.5 Billion

Marriott Rensance & Marriott Courtyard in handing over and the other 3 Hotels are under construction

Hotels

Real Estate Services Group

SEG

800

Construction Stage

Mixed Use Towers

Al Shereef Enterprises

Dorra Contracting

350

Construction Stage

Mixed Use Towers

PWA

Tag Engineering & Contracting

120

Under Construction

Media Complex

Al Mana Real Estate

N/A

100-200

Tender Stage

Mixed Use Tower

Qatar Navigation

N/A

300

Developed Design Stage

Mixed Use

Sonesta 5 Star Hotel

Al Madaen Real Estate

A'yaan Ash'sharq

120

Construction Stage

Hotel

Smash Tennis Academy

Qatar Olympic Committee

HBK Contracting & Trading

65 Million

Construction Stage

Sports Amenities

MOI

Not Appointed

N/A

Design Stage

Educational Complex

Health Care Centers (Pacakge 4 & 5)

PWA

ITC/UCE

600

Under Construction

Medical Centers

Construction of Head Quarters Bldg. for Ministry of Interior

MOI

WCT

N/A

Under Construction

Administrative and Office Building

Police Training Institute Panasonic Showroom & Residential Al Sadd Hotel

Al Hodaifi Group HQ Al Eida Villa Doha Education Centre

Shemoukh Mixed-Use Twin Tower, Al Saad

Al Jasrah Twin Tower Lusail Qatar Radio and Television Complex Markaz Almana Ford Showroom & Commercial Offices

Ain Khaled Development

Police College Academy

Alaqaria

Arcon

169

Under Construction

Mixed Use

Logistic City

Qatar Navigation

Not Appointed

N/A

Design Stage

Warehouses

Headquarter of General Directorate of Borders, Passports & Travel Document Department

Ministry of Interior

Not Appointed

N/A

Design Stage

Administrative and Office Bldg.

PWA

ITCC / Al Sraiya

350

Under Construction

Educational Buildings

IBA GROUP

Not Appointed

400

Design Stage

Commercial / Offices Towers

Mr. Saeed Ben Zayed El-Khayareen

Al-Huda

200-250

Under Construction

Office Building

Fahd Suite - Apartment Hotel

FBA GROUP

Not Appointed

200

Detail Stage

Shopping Mall & Office Tower

IBA Hotel

IBA GROUP

Not Appointed

200

Under Construction

Hotel

Tameer Real Estate

Al Seal Trading

160

Under Construction

Residential Building

Flight Simulator

Qatar Airways

Redco

40 Million

On Going

Special or Laboratory

El Doha Tower

Mr. Mohamed Ben Zayed El-Khayareen

Al-Huda

100-120

Completed

Office Building

Al Meera

Not Appointed

N/A

Full Design Package from concept to preparation of tender documents included interior design

Mall

Equestrian Club

Not Appointed

N/A

On Going

Farm

ALYSJ

ALYSJ

106 million

under construction

Labor Accomodation

Al Aween Fit out

Alaween

B5

N/A

under construction

fit out

Hotel Ramada

Noor Ali Mohamed

Not Appointed

N/A

DC-2 Stage

Hotel

QNB

Not Appointed

20 million

under construction

Bank

Sheikh Badr Khalifa Al Thani

Al Batra

80 million

under construction

Residential Building

MOFA

Not Appointed

N/A

Design Stage

Government Building

QDS

Not Appointed

600

Permit Stage

Driving Academy

Gulf Pearls Company

Gulf Pearl

40 Million

Design Stage

Residential Building

ACES

Not Appointed

20 Million

Tender Stage

Industrial Building

Sh. Ahmad bin Hamad Al Thani

NA

54,000,000.00

Service Design

Commercial

Regency Group

NA

38,000,000.00

Design

Offices

Abdulla AL Darwish

Al Gefton

QAR 658,000.00

Testing and Commissioning

Commercial Apratment

M. Al Ansari

Redco

28,800,000.00

Mobilisation

Commercial

C5 Apartment

Rabban Group

NA

121,000,000.00

Design

Commercial Apratment

FV7 Multi Purpose Hall/ Art Centre

Regency Group

N/A

67,500,000.00

Design

Commercial

MIC Business & Recreation Complex

Construction of 6 Nos. New Schools Al Emadi Twin Towers City Tower

Al Attiya Compound

Al Meera Hazm Al Markhiya Mall

Supervision of Breeding Farm near Zubara Village Golden Line Metro Project Labor Accomodation

Qatar National Bank Branches Sheikh Badr Residential Building

Qatar Embassy and Diplomat Villas in Mogadishu, Somalia

Qatar Driving School Gulf Pearl Office Building

ACES (Arab Centre for Engineers Studies)

Al Ahli Club FV9 Al Asmakh Head Office in Lusail

Al Mansoora Building Office Building / D Ring


Construction

SITES

31

AL MANA & ASSOCIATES Acoustic Consultancy Services

• Noise and Vibration Control

• Noise and Vibration Monitoring • Sound Insulation • Interior Acoustics (Halls, Mosques, Auditoriums)

• Commissioning Measurement and Testing Al Mana Business Centre, Al Amir Road, P.O.B. 2255, Doha, Qatar Tel: (+974) 44684482 E-mail: admin@amaqatar.com www.amaqatar.com

Dutest Qatar W.L.L.

CRANE AND  LIFTING  EQUIPMENT  ENGINEERS   GENERAL  MECHANICAL  WORKS  

OUR SCOPE   AND  SERVICES   INCLUDE:  

WIRE ROPES, SLINGS, HEIGHT SAFETY, INSPECTION AND TESTING, RENTALS, CRANE HIRE

4458 5480; 4469 4569; 5581 5641; 7748 7432

Email: opera,ons@dutestqatar.com,  sales@dutestqatar.com  


SITES C o n s t r u c t i o n

Monthly construction news, tenders, project focus, and forthcoming exhibitions in Qatar Tel.: +974 4469 3280 - Fax: +974 4451 0428

Rania Queen St. Amman- Jordan Tel: +9626 5356616 - Fax: +9626 535 6606 - P.O.Box: 622 - Aljbeha: 11941 watan_newspaper@yahoo.com

Issue No. (90) January 2015, Doha - Qatar

GOIC highlights investment opportunities for private sector

“Widespread political reforms are needed to guarantee a vital business environment”

The Gulf Organization for Industrial Consulting (GOIC) held a session that was dedicated to discuss and diagnose investment opportunities for attracting the private sector to transform applied research into industrial products or pilot projects. Dr Laila Diab Shrair, Strategic Planning Consultant at GOIC Secretary General Office, delivered a paper, entitled “The Importance of Innovation in Transforming Applied Research into Competitive Industrial Products”, at the session, held at the at the headquarters of the Amman Chamber of Industry in the Jordanian capital on December 15 and 16 last year. The session was arranged by the Arab Organization for Industrial Development and Mining, the Amman Chamber of Industry and the ESCWA Technology Center under the patronage of Prince El Hassan bin Talal.

Dr Shrair stressed the importance of innovation and research centers in the development of industrial institutions and in industrial development. They, she said, contributed in empowering industrial institutions to meet new requirements in the midst of changing global environment. She saw innovation and creativity in production as catalysts of industrial competitiveness. They also helped adopting adequate mechanisms according to practical frameworks to develop and promote innovation capacities of industrial institutions. Dr Shrair opined that innovation helped guaranteeing the future of industrial institutions and improving their performance and competitiveness in the market. “In fact innovation and creativity are the key factors behind the development of products and production processes. They contribute in the shift toward knowledge-based industries, as knowledge is one of the key aspects of today’s productivity,” she said. According to her, examining the

status of research centers and scientific research environment revealed the increasing interest of governments in scientific research in GCC countries over the last five years. The GCC countries stressed the importance of scientific research in economic diversification and in development in their national visions, development strategies and sector strategies. Dr Shrair said spending on scientific research and development in most GCC countries was modest, with the exception of the State of Qatar that had allocated 2.8% of its GDP in 2009 to scientific research and development. Developed countries allotted around 2.5% of their GDP to research and development activities for which the private sector paid around 80% of their total cost. Nevertheless, only 0.2% of the GDP was spent on research and development in GCC countries according to Unesco’s 2010 report (some of its figures are approximate) with a quasiabsence of the private sector.

Spending on scientific research in GCC countries was low compared with the 3.5% of the GDP spent in Finland, 3.11% in Japan and 3.7% in Sweden. Dr Shrair reiterated that GOIC’s role in the area of investment opportunities attracting the private sector in GCC countries was to support industrial development projects in these countries. “To do so, GOIC develops industrial and economic databases, prepares an annual report on the readiness of GCC countries to move to knowledge-based industries, implements several knowledge industry projects in member states like Bahrain and Kuwait in collaboration with the World Bank and introduces numerous industrial investment opportunities in targeted public and private sectors.” She offered a number of opportunities that could be adopted by big, medium and small companies of the private sector such as: ultrafine particles in the steel industry, the water sector, addition of nanoparticles to concrete in the construction industry, bio-stim-

ulation in petrochemical and chemical industries, solar energy techniques enhanced with nano-particles, sensors for environmental and chemical applications, nano-particle-based smart glass in the automotive and construction industries, biopolymer-based food delivery systems, personal care products for GCC countries, medical care diagnosis point and carbon nano-tubes for energy storage technologies. At the end of her presentation, Dr Shrair stated that GCC countries needed to improve their performance according to the Competitive Industrial Performance Index (CIP) to identify new industrial scenarios. “The ultimate objective is to achieve fast and deep technological change. In fact, globalization has affected production systems of every industry with the emergence of new competitors. “Thus, a completely new context has emerged to sustain industrial development and it is particularly challenging for countries that did not realize their industrial potential yet.”

In conclusion, Dr Shrair highlighted a number of recommendations, notably that governments and industrial investors should remember that knowledge-based industry strategies were based on competitive advantage in the countries. “Therefore, these industries are extensive and benefit from proven competencies. In addition to that, widespread political reforms are needed to guarantee a vital business environment that reduces bureaucratic barriers, facilitates access to financing and reinforces legal and regulatory frameworks. “Moreover, education reform is the first step toward finding a solution to the pressing need for human capital. “In addition, governments’ role should be promoted to provide knowledge networks and public private partnerships need to be encouraged to enhance initiatives targeting knowledgebased industries market. “In this regard, supporting SMEs needs to be a priority to encourage them to move toward knowledge-based industries.”

Construction Sites | January Issue no. 90  

The last few years have been a major challenge for Qatar’s construction sector, due to the unavailability of efficient systems and environme...

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