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R E A L E S TAT E & CONSTRUCTION REVIEW Texas Edition TEAM MEMBERS

www.buildingofamerica.com

volume 11

2010

The Resource for Real Estate & Construction Decision Makers


letter Jamie Rawcliffe, photo courtesy of Dale-Murrary.com

from the editor

Despite tough economic times, the landscape around us is changing. Every day new construction projects are taking shape, infusing life into our communities in the form of new schools, multifamily residential developments, lifestyle centers and more. Additionally, renovation and adaptive reuse projects are revitalizing our urban centers. We at Construction Communications pride ourselves on honoring these projects for the contributions they make to their respective communities. Working with owners, architects, construction managers/general contractors and other project team members, we tell the story of each project, highlighting what makes it unique. In addition, we have partnered with several associations to provide you with important industry information that can help you with decision making on your future projects. In this edition, you can hear from the Construction Owners Association of America (COAA), the Construction Management Association of America (CMAA), CoreNet Global and the U.S. Green Building Council. This edition features nearly 70 new construction and renovation projects completed throughout Texas, in market sectors from arts and entertainment to commercial development, education and health care, including three projects that received the Building of America gold medal award. Below is a small sampling of the unique and innovative projects you will read about in the following pages. Walnut Bend Elementary School was built as a replacement elementary school as part of a multimillion-dollar bond issue to rebuild and upgrade many facilities within the Houston Independent School District. The new two-story school was designed to meet Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED®) guidelines and is serving as a case study for the district on implementing LEED® principles into the district’s future school projects. The new Whole Foods Market in Sugar Land features a unique and sustainable design and is a host of firsts for the retailer. To begin with, the new store serves as an experiment to further the development of Whole Foods Market stores in other suburban markets, while many of the previous stores in Texas, Louisiana, Oklahoma and Arkansas are located in urban locations. Additionally, the store features a “market-hall” type concept with floor-to-ceiling windows, a “boulevard” with real trees to identity the main artery through the store, a volcano-shaped waterfall fountain at the entrance that provides irrigation to the landscaped areas around the store, and an indoor/outdoor supervised kids’ play area. We encourage you to read through the pages of the publication and “experience” more of the region’s landscape-changing, and ultimately community-changing, projects.

Sincerely, Jamie Rawcliffe Editor

TEXAS ­EDITION Construction Communications (877) 945-4700 CEO Dale Jaslove

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President Lance Kamin

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Manager of Operations Stacey Nathanson

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Senior Editors Amy Pagett Jamie Rawcliffe Managing Editor Mella Barnes Art Director Chris Schramm Account Executives Shelly Byarski Dawn DeAngelo Susan Hunsinger Sheila Kamin Project Coordinator Julie Zulch

ext. 129­­­­ ext. 113 ext. 112 586-329-3243 586-218-7139 228-522-0400 ext. 143 ext. 115

Contributing Writers Amy Bell, Marilyn Campbell, Brian Louwers, Stacey Nathanson Administrative Staff Lori Bagley ext. 142 Janet Bankey ext. 121 Jennifer Barth Wendi Schlacht ext. 108 Anne Seebaldt­ ext. 130 Joan Mallires ext. 110 Publishing Construction Communications 24445 Northwestern Highway, Suite 218 Southfield, MI 48075 Phone: 248-945-4700 Fax: 248-945-4701 www.buildingofamerica.com email: editorial@constructionreviews.com The Real Estate & Construction Review is designed to provide accurate and authoritative information in regard to the subject matter covered. The publishers have taken all reasonable steps to verify the accuracy and completeness of information contained in the Real Estate & Construction Review. The publishers may not, however, be held responsible for any inaccuracies or omission of information in any article appearing in the Real Estate & Construction Review. Entire contents copyright 2010 b­­­­­y Construction Communications. All rights re­served. Reproduction or use of editorial content in any manner without written permission is strictly prohibited.


www.BuildingofAmerica.com Each regional edition of the Real Estate & Construction Review, including the ShortList, can now be viewed online at our website. Our online editions allow users to view any or all of a particular magazine. Referred companies that participate in the magazine not only benefit from increased visibility, they also have direct links from our website to theirs. This allows readers to access the top companies in the nation with a simple touch of a button. Because the companies listed in the Real Estate & Construction Review and the ShortList were referred for their The Southern California Edition of The Real Estate & Construction Review world-class work, our readers can feel confident using this tool. Users also have access to a comprehensive database of the nation’s top subcontractors, vendors and suppliers. Shared by approximately 15,000 cost estimators, project managers and building owners in more than 40 states across the country, this tool features each region’s most qualified and reliable subcontractors and vendors as submitted by the general contractors and construction managers that worked with them. Only companies that have been qualified by a project manager and worked on a top 50 new construction or renovation project in their region may post a pre-qualification form on our website.


table of contents CMAA: Leading the Surge in Sustainable and “Green” Building . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 COAA: If Builders Build and Designers Design, What do Owners do? . . . 14

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Part Two: Commercial Development Beltway 8 Corporate Centre #4 . . . . . . . . . . 26 A sustainable office building provides space for insurance company Allstate

CoreNet Global Recognizes Innovation in Disaster Response . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15

Corgan Associates, Inc. Corporate Headquarters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28

U.S. Green Building Council . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16

Corgan’s new headquarters shows its commitment to Dallas’ historic west end district

Part One: Arts, Entertainment, Sports, Recreation & Hospitality

Dieste Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 New office space boasts a wealth of exceptional features

Sheraton Fort Worth Hotel and Spa . . . . . . . 18

1890 Ranch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30

This project boasts large hotel rooms, a full-service spa, a restaurant and public spaces

The rustic architecture of this retail center reflects the site’s former life as a cattle ranch

Kenichi Restaurant . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20

Wilcox Center at 190 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32

A new contemporary Asian cuisine restaurant combines great food with great ambiance

A prototype office building receives LEED® certification

The House of Blues . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 A century-old building becomes the new House of Blues with the best acoustics and sound available

The Joule Hotel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 A circa 1927 bank is remodeled into a luxury hotel

Shangri La Botanical Gardens and Nature Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 The first LEED platinum project in Texas provides education and recreation in a beautiful setting ®

James Avery Craftsman Store at The Village at Stone Oaks . . . . . . . . . . . . 33 A custom store is built for a custom jewelry company

Pinto Ranch Dallas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34

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A new western-themed, upscale retail store pays tribute to the great ranches of the American West

Whole Foods Market . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36 A new retail location for Whole Foods in Sugar Land has several “firsts” for the company

Energy Center Phase I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38 The first phase of an office development provides environmentally friendly, class A office space in Houston’s Energy Corridor

One Victory Park . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40 The first office building constructed in the Victory Park District is on the leading edge of sustainable design

Part Three: Mixed-use Developments & Multiunit Residential Arlington Highlands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42 Sited on 80 acres, this mixed-use development provides a wide variety of tenants to suit any taste

Bridges on the Park . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44 Situated on the banks of Lady Bird Lake, this project offers condominiums and retail space in a spectacular location

Cityville at Southwestern Medical District . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46 This exciting development brings new life to a derelict industrial area in Dallas

The Dakota in The Village . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48 A new apartment and townhome community offers 29 different floor plans to suit every taste

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continued on page 10…


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texas edition Comanche Springs Elementary School and Prairie Vista Middle School . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75 Located on the same 33-acre site, these two schools provide plenty of educational space for a rapidly growing school district

George E. Hopper, Jr. Middle School . . . . . . 76 A new school accommodates rapid population growth and features a unique, compact design

Kingwood Park High School . . . . . . . . . . . . 77 A ninth-grade campus is converted into a full four-year high school

The John Cooper School Performing Arts Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78 A K-12 campus gets a brand-new performing arts center to support a variety of programs and uses

Klein Independent School District Network Operations Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80

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A new building houses the IT Department and Community Alumni Center while paying tribute to the area’s history

Leander Elementary School #21 . . . . . . . . . 81 The Beat . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50 New condominiums feature spectacular views of downtown Dallas

Bayou Place Phase II Renovation . . . . . . . . 51 This phase of the project helps create the renaissance of Houston’s central business district

Gables 6464 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52 A four-story residential property is the first new multifamily facility developed in the area in 10 years

Part Four: Religious Facilities

A new school is built to accommodate one of the fastest growing school districts in Texas

Central Baptist Church Addition – Education Building . . . . . . . . . . . 63

Liberty High School . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82

Situated between two existing buildings, this project is part of a larger vision for future expansion

Chase Oaks Church . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67 A welcoming new facility provides much-needed space for the church’s growing ministries

The fourth high school for Frisco Independent School District accommodates a variety of elective classes and a smaller number of students per class

Mabank High School . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83 A new high school is built on a prominent highway and is highly visible within the community

Gables Republic Tower . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53

St. Peter the Apostle Catholic Church Family Life Center & Master Plan . . . . . . . . 68

A famous, historic tower is converted into luxury apartments

A new multiuse facility for a historic church provides much-needed space for the congregation

A pre-K through eighth-grade school is the first new school in the district since the late 1960s

The Heights at Park Lane . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54

Watermark Community Church, Phase II . . 69

A new mixed-use facility provides many lifestyle options for residents and the community

A cost-effective yet unique look is provided for a church through artistic use of simple materials

Patrick F. Flores Residence Hall at the Assumption Seminary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85

The Metropolitan Condominiums . . . . . . . . . 56 One of the largest residential renovation projects in Dallas produces new condominiums

Pearland Town Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58 A mixed-use urban center features a well-planned integration of uses and an inviting character

Vista Verde Apartment Homes Renovation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60 A 35-year-old facility receives a complete renovation and new amenities

Woodland Investments Office . . . . . . . . . . . 61 A mixed-use office facility is designed to be environmentally friendly and protect surrounding trees

Part Five: Educational Facilities Baylor University Brooks Village . . . . . . . . . 71 Providing housing for approximately 700 students, this project helps create a truly residential campus

Arthur L. Davila Middle School . . . . . . . . . . 72 A new middle school serves both as an educational facility and a gateway that welcomes visitors to the city of Bryan

Celia Hays Elementary School . . . . . . . . . . . 74 This school was named after a former teacher who committed her life to serving the Rockwall community

Mission Academy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84

A recent influx in the priesthood leads to the first new building in 53 years for the Assumption Seminary

Percy W. Neblett Elementary School . . . . . . 86 A new elementary school focuses on daylighting to save costs and the environment

Southwest Educational Development Laboratory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 87 A nonprofit organization that solves educational problems gets a new headquarters building

Stephen F. Austin State University Student Recreation Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88 A new recreation facility is built in an area that is well known for its beautiful pine trees


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table of contents Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center/ Physicians Medical Pavilion . . . . . . . . . . . 111 A new facility consolidates all clinical care into one patient-friendly building

The Village at Gleannloch Farms . . . . . . . . 112 An undeveloped parcel of land provides a great setting for a new continuing care retirement community

The Texas Clinic at Prestonwood . . . . . . . 113 A new medical building provides premium diagnostic and treatment services in one location

Peterson Regional Medical Center . . . . . . 114

96 Texas A&M University McFerrin Athletic Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 89

Johnson County Courthouse Restoration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100

A massive and highly specialized project provides students with a quality sports and recreation center

A courthouse from 1912 is renovated to blend historic design with new amenities

Texas Christian University – Brown Lupton University Union . . . . . . . . . . 90

North Richland Hills Library . . . . . . . . . . . . 101

A new union building provides a new bell tower as the university’s landmark

University of North Texas Honors and Legends Residence Halls . . . . . . . . . . . 91 Student population growth necessitates two new residence halls for additional on-campus housing

University of Houston Shea Street Building and Vine Street Garage . . . . . . . . . 92 A new academic building and parking structure provide new space for students while minimizing impacts on the environment

Walnut Bend Elementary School . . . . . . . . . 94 Replacement elementary school serves as a case study for the school district in implementing LEED® principles into future construction projects

An older library is replaced with a new library featuring extra amenities

South Central Police Substation . . . . . . . . 102 A state-of-the-art police station provides security while protecting the environment

QuikTrip Park at Grand Prairie . . . . . . . . . . 104 A new independent league ballpark features a design inspired by the area’s history

Part Seven: Healthcare Facilities

A new athletic facility provides a variety of recreational opportunities for students and the community

Renovation and expansion was carefully phased to ensure the medical center could remain fully functional

The first facility ever built in the City of Bryan for the specific purpose of housing a police department and municipal court, this new center will serve the city for years to come

General Instruction Building, Fort Sam Houston . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99 A training facility ensures proper healthcare services for American soldiers overseas

121 129 160 162

Corporate Profiles

Containment Solutions, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45 BWM Group Planning | Landscape Architecture | Architecture . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64

Gold Medal Award-winning Project Team Members

Jarreau & Associates, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . Landtech Consultants, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . RONPARCO – Ronzani, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tri-Tech Building Products, LLC . . . . . . . . .

117 118 119 120

New surgical tower was built to meet the area’s increasing healthcare needs

Baylor University Medical Center at Dallas Emergency Department Renovation & Expansion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 107

Bryan Justice Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 98

Network Sourcebook . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ShortList . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Advertisers’ Index . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Index . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Texas Health Arlington Memorial Hospital Tom Vandergriff Surgical Tower . . . . . . . . 106

University of Texas – Pan American Wellness and Recreational Sports Center . . . . . . . . . . 96

Part Six: Government

A 59-year-old hospital is replaced with a new facility that incorporates environmentally friendly design concepts

Holly Hall . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 108 Houston’s first retirement community receives an upgrade

Kozmetsky Center for Child Protection . . . 109 A facility for abused children provides comfort and protection to children and their families

The Legacy at Willow Bend . . . . . . . . . . . . 110 A continuing care retirement community features a variety of amenities and living units

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contributing associations


LEADING THE SURGE IN SUSTAINABLE AND “GREEN” BUILDING Sustainable or “green” building is one of the

Those are enormous impacts. Both social

biggest movements to hit the construction industry

responsibility and self-interest are driving owners

in many years. Owners both public and private are

toward more sustainable construction. Their

demanding that their new buildings be sustainable,

contractors, subcontractors, and most of all their

as well as planning renovations with an emphasis on

construction managers (CMs), must be part of this

improving sustainability.

movement.

Some are embracing the formal and highly

Many owners continue to perceive responding

rigorous process of building certification through

to this demand as an added cost and burden on

the Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design

their projects.

Bruce D’Agostino, President, CMAA

(LEED ) program. Others are simply paying more

However, many are also recognizing the benefits

attention to the life-cycle cost of their buildings,

they can realize in terms of lower operating costs,

Once embarked on this path, most owners

including the significant savings that can be achieved

improved productivity and higher value. Indeed,

will find the certification process extraordinarily

through attention to smart energy usage, indoor air

most of the 69 available LEED “credits” represent

complex, and will need to rely on a champion

quality, recycling and other strategies.

items that can yield life-cycle savings.

within the project team. That champion, in turn,

®

®

It’s natural that buildings come in for this scrutiny.

This focus on the long-term success of a

must rely on productive collaboration and timely

According to data compiled by the U.S. Green

project in meeting the owner’s needs is central

information sharing among all project participants.

Building Council (USGBC), buildings account for:

to the CM’s mission. The professional CM can help

Document control, cost management and schedule

• 30 percent of all greenhouse gas emissions.

an owner plan for success from the earliest stages

maintenance all require close attention.

• 70 percent of electricity consumption.

of a project.

• 39 percent of U.S. primary energy use, including fuel input for production.

Promoting this kind of collaboration is another

Owners who opt to pursue LEED certification ®

key mission of good construction management.

are taking on a complex task. A building must meet

It’s important to remember that for all the publicity

• More than 12 percent of all potable water use.

LEED criteria for 26 out of the available 69 points

it has received, this emphasis on sustainability and

• 40 percent of raw materials consumed

in order to be certified. An owner seeking silver,

green building is still relatively new, and will be

gold or platinum certification must pass even higher

unfamiliar to many owners. Many owners who

tests. These points measure how you handle matters

don’t want the complexities of LEED certification

related to the building site, design, materials,

nevertheless do want the improved performance

energy and water use, and indoor air quality. The

and ongoing cost savings that can come with

LEED system gives owners the flexibility to choose

sustainability.

globally. • 136 million tons of construction and demolition debris.

CMAA is North America’s only organization dedicated exclusively to the interests of the professional construction and program management industry. On behalf of its 25 regional chapters and more than 4,500 public and private firms and individuals throughout the nation, CMAA promotes the construction management industry and provides professional resources, advocacy, professional development, certification, and business opportunities to its members. CMAA’s national headquarters is located in McLean, Virginia, and the association’s website is www.cmaanet.org.

®

®

which certification points to pursue.

®

This is where the professional construction

A key early decision, then, is how many LEED

or program manager can deliver real value to

“credits” to pursue, and which ones. In just about

owners. At CMAA, we see the demand for this

any project, some of these credits will be more

service reflected in several ways. More and more

achievable than others — or they can be earned

professionals now boast the combination of our

at a cost the owner can accept within the overall

own Certified Construction Manager credential with

context of the project and generate benefits of

USGBC’s LEED -accredited professional. We’ve

greater value to the owner.

gotten strong turnouts for LEED -related sessions at

®

®

®

It’s a natural role for the CM to counsel the

our conferences, and our members report they are

owner in developing a strategy for choosing which

spending more and more time counseling clients on

credits to go after and how. And it’s vital for the

issues related to sustainability and green building.

whole project team to know this strategy from the beginning.

This is a vital development, both for our industry and for our world.

7926 Jones Branch Drive, Suite 800 McLean, VA 22102


If Builders Build and Designers Design, What do Owners do? Everything else! We teach students, practice medicine, manufacture products, offer entertainment and hospitality, provide the services of government, and much more. We need buildings to enable us to do what we do! As owners, we deal with design and construction to support our mission. Our core missions may differ, but our responsibilities in the design and construction of our buildings are similar. We define our program needs; choose the building sites; select architects, engineers and contractors; arrange financing; and manage the design and construction processes.

M. Teresa Cook, President of COAA

And the issues we face as owners are also similar — we have to find ways to deliver projects more quickly, keep projects within budget despite escalating material and labor costs in a global economy, as well as manage and resolve conflicts throughout the life of the project.

We are COAA, the Construction Owners Association of America. Since 1994, COAA has been supporting owners in achieving success on their projects. COAA works to improve the design and construction process for all. COAA offers its members a variety of services, including: •T  wo National Educational Conferences offered per year, which provide superb opportunities for continuing education and direct networking with other owners. • Members Only ListServe on the COAA website where members can reach owners across the country for feedback on any question within a matter of minutes. The recent ListServe discussions have included a variety of topics from waterless urinals, incentives for construction managers, and identification of “experts” for a variety of situations such as leaking windows and accountability for cost estimates. • Project Management training specifically developed for an owner’s staff. • A Project Information Directory in which COAA members can check on a particular type of project and identify other owners with such projects and the final project costs. This directory contains more than $8 billion of projects nationwide. COAA was also asked to participate in the development of new contract documents. COAA just completed a three-year collaboration led by the Association of General Contractors (AGC) with 20 other industry associations in the development of new contract documents — ConsensusDOCS. For the first time, we have contract documents available to owners that were developed on a collaborative basis with many of our partners in the industry. And COAA provided comments on the new contract documents to be issued by the American Institute of Architects (AIA). COAA was established to provide a forum for owners to meet, share and learn in order to enhance their project success. As owners, we need to have appropriate expectations of our designers and contractors, convey these expectations to them, and then hold them to these standards. And we need to do our part in achieving project success — successful for the owner, designer and contractor! As owners, we are on the cusp of some exciting changes in the construction industry with technologies such as Building Information Modeling (BIM), which will change the way buildings are designed, and the Extensible Markup Language (XML), which may facilitate communications among various software applications. Owners can reap benefits from these technologies for years to come. Sustainability is a major consideration for all owners in their project design and construction, as well as the operations of their buildings — and we now have a track record on “green” buildings and lessons learned that we can share. We invite you to join your fellow owners by becoming a COAA member — just log in at www.coaa. org! COAA is the only association in the industry established specifically for owners.

www.coaa.org • 800-994-2622


CoreNet Global Recognizes Innovation in Disaster Response Shell Oil Takes Quick Action in Immediate Aftermath of Katrina

Shell Real Estate’s team is pictured with Hans Gant (center) of the Metro Atlanta Chamber and consisted of (from left) Mike Napier, John Greene, Jeri Ballard and Jimmy Hunter.

August 24, 2006 marked the one-year anniversary of Hurricane Katrina — the worst natural disaster in United States history. Its horrific impact on the residents of the Gulf of Mexico shore region, especially on New Orleans, is only made worse by appreciable setbacks to business and commerce. There are many compelling stories of how companies based in the Gulf region responded, but one of them in particular stands out. “It’s a great story,” says Mike Napier, Head of Corporate Real Estate (CRE) for Shell Oil, in introducing the company’s disaster response case to the senior corporate real estate executives judging the CoreNet Global Innovator’s Award. “It’s a real-time innovation under great pressure.” What makes the story compelling is Shell’s quick action to directly assist the 500 employees whose homes and residences were destroyed, in addition to its successful effort to return 1,400 employees who suddenly had no place to work to One Shell Square in downtown New Orleans. From a real estate management viewpoint, however, there’s more. Simply put, the Shell CRE team redefined the company’s global chain of command, at the same time rising to the top of that chain as chief advisor and frequent decision maker. As a result, it is now playing an enterprise-wide leadership role, having won the respect at the senior management table for its well-orchestrated response to an impossible situation. “Eighty percent of New Orleans was flooded,” Napier recounts. “Like everyone, Shell was severely impacted.” Nearly three-fourths of Shell’s total output is based in the Gulf, so part of the challenge was to restore MARS, the Gulf’s largest oil drilling platform, which Katrina

had mangled almost beyond recognition. Shell’s ability to bring it back on line within 10 months isn’t really the main point of the story, yet it’s indicative of the company’s ability to move quickly and effectively from a continuity standpoint. That agility stood out more on the human side. To illustrate the case, the United Kingdom-based Napier introduced his stateside Shell Real Estate colleagues from New Orleans and Houston who told the rest of the story: Regional Manager, Americas, Jeri Ballard; Real Estate Manager, John Greene; and Asset Manager, Jimmy Hunter. Shell has the right governance structure in place before Katrina, with real estate being part of every crisis team within the company. But the magnitude of the problem was not anticipated, according to the group. The existing risk-response and business continuity structure incorporated crisis management, points of authority, and teamwork balanced against safety and security. Yet, because of the nature of the disaster, “we were in for a role reversal in many channels,” the group recalls. Employees in and around New Orleans “knew if they could just get to Shell, we would take care of them.” That “we” turned into the Shell Real Estate, which first accounted for all area Shell employees by September 9, 2005 (approximately two weeks after the storm) with thankfully no fatalities. The team then turned to housing, transferring or transporting some employees and their families to Houston, where the team had secured 350 apartments.

CoreNet Global Business Continuity Tip: Hurricane Katrina posed one of the worst cases ever for business continuity and risk management. Disaster response was overwhelmingly the focus of Shell’s case to return its New Orleans workforce to safety and productivity. But continuity comes in other forms such having redundant facilities; securing lobby, HVAC and telecom areas; and setting up emergency communication protocols and channels.

The team simultaneously turned its attention to the New Orleans headquarters, where by September 1, 2006 it began the extraction of equipment from the building to start clean up and security procedures. The team also reopened an older hotel that before the storm was about to be “moth-balled.” This provided relief from the pressing demand for immediate emergency housing for the scores of employees remaining in New Orleans who Shell would soon need back on the job. In the meantime, on February 20, 20045, Shell began reoccupancy of One Shell Square, changing its post-Katrina local motto from “Shell is Coming Home” to “Shell is Home.” “It all came down to the real estate team,” Napier says. “We did it all. Necessity is the mother of invention, there’s no better example.” — By Richard Kadzis, senior contributing editor for Corporate Real Estate Leader magazine, a publication of CoreNet Global.


arts, entertainment, sports, recreation & hospitality

view our editions online at www.buildingofamerica.com


Facts & Figures Owner: An affiliate of the Presidio Companies Type of Project: A new hotel and spa in an existing building Size: 329,262 square feet Cost: $25 million (construction costs) Construction Time: April 2007 - June 2008 The Need: To transform an existing unbranded hotel into a Sheraton Hotel and Spa The Challenge: Staying on schedule

TEAM MEMBERS

Gideon Toal Architect Key Construction Texas, LLC General Contractor Ponce Contractors, Inc. Asbestos Abatement Sun Stone, Inc. Marble & Granite Countertop & Tile Manufacturer

Fort Worth, Texas

Sheraton Fort Worth Hotel and Spa The Sheraton Fort Worth Hotel and Spa provides well-appointed accommodations in the downtown area. The new hotel and spa is located in what was previously an unbranded hotel. “The project consisted of interior and exterior renovation of a 329,262-square-foot, 440-room dual 10-story and 12-story hotel tower complex, including a full-service spa, restaurant and public space,” said Steve Whitcraft, executive vice president and general manager of Key Construction Texas, LLC, the project’s general contractor. Photo courtesy of Key Construction

According to Whitcraft, the exterior was balloon framed with metal studs, DensGlass™ gypsum sheathing and stucco. “The balconies were framed and enclosed to increase the square footage of each room, creating the largest hotel room[s] in Fort Worth,” he added. Egyptian travertine; carpeting; and new mechanical, electrical and plumbing (MEP) systems helped improve the interior. The team worked hard to complete the project on time. Whitcraft said, “We set a challenging schedule, extensively coordinated with the subcontractors and worked extra shifts to complete the construction in 14 months without a lost-time accident.” n — Amy Pagett

Photo courtesy of Key Construction

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arts, entertainment, sports, recreation & hospitality


Mostly, we build

Relationships.

Whether in the office or on the jobsite, we are the team to work with.

www.keyconstruction.com Photo courtesy of Shawn O’Connell

Photo courtesy of Key Construction

Photo courtesy of Key Construction

www.buildingofamerica.com

Photo courtesy of Shawn O’Connell

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Facts & Figures Owners: Kenichi Restaurants (Billy Rieger & Scott Brasington) Type of Project: A new restaurant Size: 7,200 square feet Cost: $3.5 million Construction Time: May 2006 - February 2007 The Need: A new Asian cuisine restaurant in Dallas The Challenge: Fitting a large amount of specialty products with elaborate detailing into a relatively small space

TEAM MEMBERS

Dick Clark Architecture Architect

Dallas, Texas

Hillwood Development Construction Manager

Kenichi Restaurant

ICI Construction, Inc. General Contractor Brockette • Davis • Drake, Inc. Structural Engineering The Einsohn Group, Inc. Furniture Manufacturer Reyes Contractors Concrete Contractors Stonesmith, Inc. Countertops Teck’s Window Tinting Window Tinting & Shading

Kenichi Restaurant is a new, contemporary Asian cuisine restaurant and sushi bar that is designed to be upscale, modern and youthful. “The two-story sushi restaurant functions equally well as an eatery, a lounge, and the club it transforms into late in the evening,” said Billy Rieger, Kenichi Restaurants’ founder/owner and Scott Brasington, COO/owner. The 7,200-square-foot facility is packed with specialty materials and elaborate detailing. This was a challenge for the project team when fitting so many unique elements into a relatively small space. However, the team managed to include many original, contemporary items. Special features include a custom fiber-optic chandelier, a curved exterior glass wall, VIP booths with curtain enclosures, a Saki display and design staircase piece made of Brazilian wood, a slate bar, unique lighting, and a natural pebble mosaic grouted to the walls. The menu at Kenichi Restaurant includes both traditional and original sushi preparations as well as a variety of entrees, appetizers, Saki and wine. The facility offers an upbeat and unique experience and the project team is proud of the results. S.M. “Deen” Rilauddeen, senior project manager/superintendent of ICI Construction, Inc., the project’s general contractor, said, “The pictures really don’t do this project justice. You really have to see it to appreciate it.” n — Mella Barnes Photos courtesy of Doug Handel Photography

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arts, entertainment, sports, recreation & hospitality


Facts & Figures Owner: Hillwood Development Corporation Type of Project: Renovation and adaptive reuse of a historic building Size: 90,000 square feet Cost: $14 million Construction Time: Completed in June 2007 The Need: An update of an aging historic building The Challenge: Complete redesign of half of the building while temporarily supporting the existing brick facade on two sides

Dallas, Texas

The House of Blues TEAM MEMBERS

Corgan Associates, Inc. Core & Shell Architect Gensler Interior Architect The Beck Group General Contractor Blum Consulting Engineers, Inc. MEP/FP Engineering Design Brockette • Davis • Drake, Inc. Structural Engineering Buyers Barricades, Inc. Traffic Control Devices United Mechanical, Inc. Mechanical Contractor/Plumbing Contractor

A 100-year-old building that was formerly the White

music hall are some of the best available and support

Swan coffee processing plant has been renovated into

the club’s multiple acts that appear during the week and

The House of Blues. This adaptive reuse project involved

on weekends. The venue features unique artwork, and

turning a 90,000-square-foot facility into an exciting,

in keeping with tradition, a metal box containing mud

southern-style venue.

from the Delta Mississippi sits underneath the stage.

Construction included a complete redesign of half of

Providing a great place for dining, entertainment and

the building, while temporarily supporting the existing

southern-ambiance, The House of Blues is a necessity for

brick facade on two sides. This was a challenge for the

fans of blues music and great food. n

project team. This challenge was overcome through

— Mella Barnes

diligence, taking care to ensure that the historical nature of the building remained a focal point of the design while ensuring that the building met all of its new requirements. The facility includes two restaurants, seven bars, and a music hall with a capacity of 1,800. The acoustics in the

Photos courtesy of Roger Mastroianni

www.buildingofamerica.com

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Facts & Figures Owner: Dunhill 1530 Main, L.P. Type of Project: An adaptive reuse of an existing building Size: 83,940 square feet (renovation); 47,853 square feet (addition) Cost: $42 million Construction Time: May 2005 - March 2008 The Need: A new hotel in Dallas The Challenge: Accurately restoring the historic building and working around nearby open buildings

TEAM MEMBERS

Architexas – Architecture, Planning and Historic Preservation, Inc. Architect Juno Development Construction Manager Balfour Beatty Construction General Contractor Brockette • Davis • Drake, Inc. Structural Engineering

Dallas, Texas

CT&S, Inc. Specialty Contractors

The Joule Hotel

Reynolds Polymer Technology, Inc. Glass & Glazing

Originally built in 1927 as the

construction, and the project team

on a just-in-time basis to limit dis-

Dallas National Bank, the 1530

had to complete construction with-

ruption to local businesses and the

Main Street building was renovated

out causing too much disruption to

public,” said Click.

and made into The Joule Hotel. The

them and other nearby buildings.

The Joule Hotel contains 130

project included complete historical

Safety of the surrounding public

rooms with a top-floor penthouse.

renovation of the existing building

areas was also a concern. A covered

The original Tennessee Pink Marble

and demolition of the abandoned

walkway with lighting along the

floor, the main entry stone archway

adjacent building with a new 10-

building was built to ensure safe

and gothic exterior accents give this

story structure built in its place.

passage for pedestrians. “All major

new hotel a historical twist. n

Several challenges arose on this

project deliveries were scheduled

— Mella Barnes

project. “The main goal of the renovation was to accurately restore this historical gem to its original glory,” said Jerret Click Sr., project manager for Balfour Beatty Construction, the project’s general contractor. This challenge was solved by using mock-ups, which reduced the risk of miscommunication and revealed opportunities for value engineering and alternative materials. Two

adjoining

buildings

remained operational throughout Photo courtesy of Eric Laignel

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arts, entertainment, sports, recreation & hospitality


Photo courtesy of Justin Terveen

www.buildingofamerica.com

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Orange, Texas

Facts & Figures Owner: Nelda C. and H.J. Lutcher

Shangri La Botanical Gardens and Nature Center

Stark Foundation Type of Project: A new nature center and botanical garden Size: 30,000 square feet (covered area on 252 acres) Construction Time: August 2005 (paused due to Hurricane Rita

Shangri La Botanical Gardens and Nature Center

in September 2005); restarted

is the first U.S. Green Building Council’s (USGBC)

January 2006 - March 2008

Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design

The Need: A new recreational attraction and wildlife conservatory

(LEED®) platinum-certified project in Texas. “The proj-

The Challenge: Working around

ect is a unique project that was constructed for the sole

migration of local bird populations

benefit of the community,” said Paul Solberg, project manager for The Beck Group, the project’s general contractor. All masonry was recycled off of an old Arkansas warehouse, and all doors and siding were made from logs that sank 100 years ago in the local Sabine River. “What a pretty wood,” Solberg said. The facility spans 252 acres and includes the botanical gardens with

TEAM MEMBERS

Boyken International, Inc. Project Manager Lake | Flato Architects Architect Jeffrey Carbo Landscape Architects Landscape Architect MESA Landscape Architecture Landscape Architect

more than 300 species of plants; a nature center with a swamp; outdoor classrooms; a laboratory; and more. According to Solberg, the greatest challenge was in working around the migration of the local bird population. The team had to be mindful of the birds’ nesting habits and work around them, sometimes stopping construction for weeks or months at a time. By plan-

The Beck Group General Contractor

ning certain construction activities around the birds,

Raymond L. Goodson Jr., Inc. Civil Engineers

disturbing the migration patterns.

the team was able to complete the project without Other LEED® elements in the project include soybean-based spray foam insulation and a geothermal energy system. The total amount of recycled plastic used in the project would total 1.1 million milk jugs or 3.6 million plastic bags. n — Mella Barnes

Photos courtesy of The Beck Group

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arts, entertainment, sports, recreation & hospitality


commercial & retail development

view our editions online at www.buildingofamerica.com


Facts & Figures

Houston, Texas

Owner/Developer: Panattoni Development Company Type of Project: A new office building

Beltway 8 Corporate Centre #4

Size: 134,700 square feet Cost: $8.7 million Construction Time: September 2006 - July 2007 The Need: Sustainable office space The Challenge: Meeting an aggressive schedule and budget

Completed in April 2007, Beltway 8 Corporate Centre #4 provides 134,700 square feet of office space for its tenants, including 100,000 square feet of space for insurance company Allstate. According to Scott Wilkinson, AIA, executive vice president of Kirksey Architecture, the project’s architect, the project was unique for several reasons. “The quick design and construction schedule to meet the move-in requirements of the lead tenant demanded exceptional teamwork among the [owner/] developer, the contractor, the subcontractors and the design team,” he said. “Once the lead tenant was identified, a decision was made to design and build the project to obtain

TEAM MEMBERS

Kirksey Architecture Architect Panattoni Construction, Inc. General Contractor Lone Star Millwork Group, Inc. Performance Electric LP Electrical Contractors Raven Mechanical, LP Plumbing Contractor TAS Commercial Concrete Construction, LLC Concrete Contractors

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LEED® [Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design] certification with the goal of meeting the predetermined schedule and construction budget during a period of rapidly escalating construction costs.” Ultimately, the project earned silver LEED® certification and was completed under budget. Photo courtesy of Keith Cronin Photography

commercial & retail development


The building features a tilt-up

agressive schedule of completing

rain delays on the project, but the

expedite the schedule and turn the

concrete skin with punched glass

the building site, shell and tenant

structural steel delivery date was

completed building over to Allstate

openings. “Limited areas of cur-

buildout for Allstate within a six-

delayed by one and a half months,

on their original delivery date. Being

tain wall were used to highlight

month period," said Dave Boyack,

effectively shortening the overall

able to overcome this obstacle and

building entries and provide design

LEED AP, senior project manager

duration for this project to four

provide Allstate with a quality sus-

interest,” added Wilkinson.

for Panattoni Construction, Inc.,

and a half months. Working closely

tainable product, which they enjoy,

"The biggest challenge that I had

the project's general contractor.

with our team of subcontractors

was highly rewarding." n

on the project was related to the

"Not only were we impacted by

on a daily basis, we were able to

— Amy Pagett

Photos courtesy of Keith Cronin Photography

www.buildingofamerica.com

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27


Facts & Figures Owner/Architect: Corgan Associates, Inc. Type of Project: A new headquarters building Size: 58,800 square feet Construction Time: February 2006 - February 2007 The Need: An environmentally friendly and efficient corporate headquarters facility The Challenge: Discovering multiple unforeseen underground conditions

Photo courtesy of DV Design Group

TEAM MEMBERS

Dallas, Texas

Turner Construction Company General Contractor

Corgan Associates, Inc. Corporate Headquarters

Supreme Roofing Systems Roofing Contractors

After occupying an inefficient

The site’s history of housing

and resulted in schedule delays.

renovated warehouse in Dallas’

a railroad yard and a coal-fired

Close coordination between Corgan

historic west end district for 20

generation plant created chal-

Associates and Turner Construction

years, Corgan Associates, Inc. decid-

lenges for the team. According

Company,

ed it was time for a new corporate

to Corgan Associates, the team dis-

eral contractor, was necessary to

headquarters that would better suit

covered multiple unforeseen under-

ensure the project was completed

its needs.

ground conditions that required

on time. n

Located on a former brown-

several foundation modifications

the

project’s

gen-

— Amy Pagett

field site in Dallas’ central business district, the efficient new 58,800square-foot building features studio spaces flooded with natural light, private offices, conference spaces, and support functions. The exposed structure’s honest, straightforward design reflects the company’s culture and philosophy, according to Corgan Associates, and special care was taken to ensure the building also connects to the west end’s historic fabric. The team was dedicated to ensuring the project was environmentally friendly. To that end, everyone went above and beyond the basic requirements in order to earn the project Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED®) silver certification. Photo courtesy of Charles Davis Smith

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commercial & retail development


Facts & Figures Owner: Dieste Inc. Type of Project: New office space Size: Approximately 38,200 usable square feet Cost: $2.6 million Construction Time: Completed in December 2007 The Need: A unique new space for a prestigious advertising agency

Dallas, Texas

TEAM MEMBERS

Rees Associates Architect

Dieste Inc.

Highland Builders General Contractor Brockette • Davis • Drake, Inc. Structural Engineering

Dieste Inc., a prestigious advertising agency in Dallas that spe-

CT&S, Inc. Specialty Contractors

cializes in accessing the American

Dallas Glass & Door Company, Ltd. Glass & Glazing

office space that reflects its busi-

Latino markets, now has a unique ness and corporate culture, according to Rees Associates, the project’s architect. Prior to the project, Dieste had its offices in the Centrum Building for approximately 10 years. Rees Associates also designed that space for the company. The new two-floor, approximately 38,200-usable-square-foot office space boasts a number of unique features. One of its most interesting features is a two-story lobby space that references the archetypal Latin architectural form of a courtyard with its high-tech “virtual” water feature that also doubles as a presentation tool during

meetings

with

clients,

according to Rees Associates. Two state-of-the-art video presentation rooms, a gallery of pre-Columbian art and several other technological features are also part of the space. With its one-of-a-kind features, Dieste Inc.’s new office space perfectly suits the prominent advertising agency. n — Amy Pagett Photos courtesy of Craig D. Blackmon, FAIA

www.buildingofamerica.com

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29


Facts & Figures Owner: Endeavor Real Estate Group Type of Project: A new retail center Size: 850,000 square feet Cost: $110 million (total) Construction Time: November 2006 - spring 2009 The Need: A one-stop retail center with a wide variety of offerings The Challenge: Balancing the team’s tree preservation and reforestation efforts with the project’s retail tenants

TEAM MEMBERS

Enviroplan Architects | Planners Architect EMJ Corporation General Contractor BWM Group Planning | Landscape Architecture│| Architecture Landscape Architects Sign Tech International, a division of Facility Solutions Group Signage & Lighting

Cedar Park, Texas

1890 Ranch Cedar Park’s 1890 Ranch offers a

plan focused on creating comfortable

she said. According to Hertl, BWM

one-stop retail center complete with

spaces for shoppers, including pedes-

Group coordinated with civil and

a variety of shops, restaurants and

trian walks that incorporate mature

architecture consultants in order to

entertainment options. A 170,000-

shade trees. “From BWM Group’s

preserve as many trees as possible,

square-foot

store

perspective, the greatest challenge of

resulting in an inviting and attractive

anchors the 850,000-square-foot

this retail site was to balance the tree

shopping center that is a great addi-

shopping center.

preservation and reforestation efforts

tion to the community. n

Super

Target

The project’s design takes its cue

with its end users, the retail tenants,”

— Amy Pagett

from the site, which was originally a cattle ranch. “The rustic architecture and modern elements of the development create an aesthetic that is contemporary but also historic, drawing visual inspiration from the elements associated with the original use,” said Jeff Lahr, development associate for Endeavor Real Estate Group, the project’s owner. According to Amanda Hertl, ASLA, associate for BWM Group, the project’s landscape architect, the site Photo courtesy of Diva Imaging

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commercial & retail development


Photos courtesy of Diva Imaging

www.buildingofamerica.com

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Plano, Texas

Facts & Figures Owner: WDS Developer: Wilcox Construction Services

Wilcox Center at 190

Type of Project: A new office building Size: 185,000 square feet Cost: $12.3 million Construction Time: January 2007 - November 2007 The Need: New office space in Plano The Challenge: Obtaining firsttime LEED® certification

TEAM MEMBERS

Omniplan, Inc. Architect Spring Valley Construction Company General Contractor L.A. Fuess Partners Inc. Structural Engineers LandPatterns, Inc. Landscape Architecture & Construction Thompson Landscape Architects Landscape Architects

Photo courtesy of Spring Valley Construction Company

The Wilcox Center at 190 is a new, 185,000-square-foot, three-story office building available for lease to multiple tenants. The building is the first U.S. Green Building Council’s (USGBC) Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED®)-certified building in Plano, and the first LEED® project for developer Wilcox Construction Services. According to Kenneth Reese, chief green officer for Wilcox, obtaining first-time LEED® certification was the project’s biggest challenge. “We think that LEED® guidelines will become code in the next five to seven years and we wanted to be ahead of the codes,” he said. This challenge was solved in several environmentally conscious ways. All of the structural steel used in the project was fabricated from recycled cars. Fly-ash, a byproduct of coal combustion in power plants, was incorporated into the concrete. Paneling in the lobby wall is made of renewable bamboo. Bathroom countertops are made of Paperstone™, a solid surface composed of recycled paper and resin from cashew shells. LEED® certification was also made simpler by the fact that the rest of the project team had worked on LEED® certified projects before. “Because the team was together at the beginning of the project, they all benefited from knowing what the goals of the project were and working towards them,” Reese said. Wilcox Construction plans to use the Wilcox Center at 190 as a prototype for the company’s future development projects. n — Mella Barnes Photo courtesy of Peter A. Calvin

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commercial & retail development


San Antonio, Texas

Facts & Figures Owner: James Avery

James Avery Craftsman Store at The Village at Stone Oaks

Craftsman, Inc. Type of Project: A new retail store Size: 2,800 square feet Cost: $373,372 (construction costs) Construction Time: August 2007

James Avery Craftsman, Inc., a jewelry company

Acquiring so many different materials was a chal-

The Need: A new retail location for

specializing in unique and spiritually based designs,

lenge for the project team, including finding the right

James Avery Craftsman, Inc.

recently opened a new location at The Village

workers for each material. This challenge was solved

at Stone Oaks, a contemporary shopping center in

by finding the right suppliers and subcontractors. “We

San Antonio.

had a great bunch of subcontractors and suppliers

- November 2007

The Challenge: Acquiring the specialized materials and workers

TEAM MEMBERS

Paddle Creek Design Architect E I B Contractors, Inc General Contractor

“An efficient design helps minimize wait times

that came together to get the project done with great

and ensure customers are pleased with their shop-

quality and it was finished on time and in budget,”

ping experience,” said Thomas H. Oppelt, architect

said Dale Culbertson, president of E I B Contractors,

with Paddle Creek Design, the project’s architect. In

Inc, the project’s general contractor.

addition to a sensible layout, the store’s design also

Robert Schultz, director of facilities operations for

includes many unique and specialized building materi-

James Avery Craftsman, Inc., thinks the end result is a

als. Vertical-grain Douglas Fir, White Oak and Yellow

success. “The overall construction and design process

Cypress wood were used throughout the store; Texas

of our stores is built on the same principles of atten-

Hill Country Cordova Cream Stone was used on stone

tion to detail and careful craftsmanship that is seen in

columns, walls and arches; and the sales area floor is

our jewelry,” he said. n

made of slate flooring.

— Mella Barnes

Fry Roofing, Inc. Roofing Contractors

Photos courtesy of Damian Cox

www.buildingofamerica.com

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Facts & Figures Owner: Pinto Western Retail Holdings, L.P. Type of Project: A new retail store Size: 9,000 square feet Cost: $1.4 million Construction Time: March 2007 - November 2007 The Need: A new retail store for western apparel and accessories The Challenge: Completing construction inside of an open and operational mall

TEAM MEMBERS

Brand + Allen Architects, Inc. Architect Tribble & Stephens Construction, Ltd. General Contractor Rocky Creek Ltd. Interior Design Structural Wood Components Heavy Timber Trusses

Dallas, Texas

Pinto Ranch Dallas Located in an area that is well-known for its horse population, the Pinto Ranch Dallas retail store in NorthPark Center is a western-themed, upscale retail store that caters to horse lovers. The 9,000-square-foot store is located on the mall’s second level and pays tribute to the great ranches of the American West. “We wanted to create a lifestyle environment, not just a retail store,” said John L. Allen, AIA, CEO of Brand + Allen Architects, Inc., the project’s architect. The biggest challenge was in adding the store to an already open and running mall. From an architectural standpoint, the project needed to coincide with the rest of the mall’s aesthetics. Therefore, the architectural team matched the rustic qualities of the store’s design with the mall’s modern design, allowing it to both blend in and stand out. “Natural cypress log structures were used in the interior finish and wood floor to represent the western theme,” added Tim Baker, project director for Tribble & Stephens Construction, Ltd., the project’s general contractor. Baker said that the construction challenges were solved with daily coordination and communication to complete construction without too much disruption to mall shoppers. Pinto Ranch Dallas is one of the nation’s largest collections of westernthemed apparel and accessories. Denton County, north of the mall, has the highest horse population in the state, and the town of Aubrey calls itself the quarter horse capital of the world. With neighbors like these, Pinto Ranch Dallas fulfills a prominent need for the community. n — Mella Barnes Photo courtesy of Pinto Ranch/John Bernhard

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texas edition

commercial & retail development


S

C

STRUCTURAL WOOD COMPONENTS A K-TEX Industries, LLC Company

custom heavy timber trusses solid timbers & engineered beams commercial & residential three-acre manufacturing facility on-site 40-foot sawmill external & hidden plate construction in-house plasma cutter CAD design shipped to over 36 states

15 YEARS OF TRUSS-BUILDING EXPERIENCE 38203 FM 1774 • Magnolia, TX 77355 • 281-259-0668 www.structuralwoodcomponents.com

Photos courtesy of Pinto Ranch/John Bernhard

www.buildingofamerica.com

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35


Facts & Figures Owner: Whole Foods Market Properties, Inc. Developer: Planned Community Developers Type of Project: A new market Size: 49,500 square feet Construction Time: February 2007 - December 2007 The Need: A Whole Foods Market in the Sugar Land area The Challenge: Keeping the design concept simple, and staying on budget and on schedule

Photo courtesy of George Craig Photography

Sugar Land, Texas

Whole Foods Market

TEAM MEMBERS

STG Design, Inc. Architect (Conceptual Design) Hermes Architects Architect (Shell & Exterior Plazas) CTA Architects/Engineers Architect (Tenant Improvement/ Interior) EMJ Corporation General Contractor RONPARCO – Ronzani, Inc. Plastering/Exterior Wall Cladding/EIFS Tri-Tech Building Products, LLC Doors/Frames/Hardware

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texas edition

While most Whole Foods Market

by creating two shaded exterior

structure roof and a raised and tilted

stores in Texas, Louisiana, Oklahoma

plazas — one at the front of the

roof area with clerestory windows

and Arkansas have urban locations,

store and the other at the west side

in the center of the building.” The

the new Sugar Land store serves as

of the store.

shape of the glass roof structure is a

an experiment to further the devel-

According to Jeff Ervin, designer

leaf, which reflects the Whole Foods

opment of Whole Foods Market

and associate for STG Design, Inc.,

logo and symbolizes the company’s

stores in other suburban markets.

the conceptual design architect for

commitment to the environment.

selected

the project, the greatest challenge

There are many unique features

because it is considered to be the

The

property

was

to the design was to keep the con-

of the facility, according to Louie

crossroads for main traffic com-

cept simple. ‘“The food is the archi-

DeVillier, construction project man-

ing into and out of the city. As

tecture’ was used as a verbal parti to

ager on the project for Whole Foods

many as 300,000 cars per day travel

weigh decisions,” he said. “Whole

Market Properties, Inc. “A massive,

through the site’s intersections of

Foods Market offers exciting and

25-foot by 25-foot, square-shaped

U.S. Highway 59 and State Highway

interesting product around every

vestibule was designed to highlight

6, which are major arteries into and

corner — the design of the store

a ‘market hall’-type concept with

out of downtown Houston, the sur-

had to reinforce the product as

floor-to-ceiling windows separating

rounding southwest Houston sub-

opposed to competing with it.”

the outside/inside transition and

urbs, and the booming Fort Bend

“The owner wished to have a

providing a maximum emphasis on

County area. Additionally, the Sugar

unique building with an openness

colorful fresh floral and produce

Land location enabled Whole Foods

and inviting appeal to the public,”

products,” he said. A “boulevard”

Market to adhere to its commitment

added Marc Boucher, AIA, architect

concept with real trees and contem-

to providing public spaces in and

and designer for Hermes Architects,

porary street light poles was also

around its stores for guests to dine,

the architect for the building’s shell

implemented to identify the main

lounge and host community events

and the exterior plazas. “The build-

artery through the store, simulating

in natural and comfortable settings

ing was designed with an open-

a public street and allowing visual

commercial & retail development


access to several departments from

prep and storage areas, reducing

one vantage point.

the need for artificial lighting and

A

decorative

volcano-shaped

unnecessary energy consumption.

waterfall fountain with a 2,000-

Additionally, six portable, prewired

gallon underground cistern flows

remote refrigeration racks were

continuously and serves as a deco-

installed atop the walk-in coolers.

rative focal point at the entrance to

This saved considerable amounts of

the store. The water stored in the

copper piping, additional electrical

cistern is equipped with a pump,

wiring and panel boxes, and roof

which provides irrigation to the

deck work, which would have been

landscaped areas around the store

required otherwise.

in lieu of using city water. After reviewing the area’s demo-

An aggressive schedule and budget

constraints

were

the

graphics, Whole Foods Market real-

greatest challenges faced by EMJ

ized a large portion of the popu-

Corporation, the project’s general

lation was young children. “This

contractor, according to Larry Davis,

necessitated another ‘first’ for cater-

executive vice president of EMJ. All

ing to the area, which was the inclu-

parties involved worked together

sion of a 500-square-foot indoor/

tirelessly to stay on schedule. “This

outdoor supervised kids’ play area

challenge was overcome by holding

called Sweet Peas,” said DeVillier.

weekly meetings with the architects,

Retail projects commonly go

engineers, contractors and Whole

through many revisions during the

Foods in order to bring everyone

design process and/or the construc-

onto the same page and minimize

tion phases, leading to major proj-

field issues, which could jeopardize

ect interruptions that cost valuable

the schedule and the budget.”

time and money. In order to pre-

According to DeVillier, the weath-

vent this from happening, Whole

er also posed a challenge. “We

(and our landlord’s portion of the

Whole Foods Market’s mission

Foods Market spent ample time

had to deal with one of the wet-

work) on the critical paths of the

is to be a leader in sustainable

on development, reducing revisions

test winter and spring seasons in

shell construction, which were the

food as well as an example of

and obtaining signoffs on the floor

recent Texas history,” he said. “We

pad and parking lot, underground

good stewardship in the develop-

plan before interior construction

did not plan for 48 days of rain-

utilities, slab pours, and masonry/

ment of its structures, according

documents began. “This cost Whole

outs! The work schedules had to

steel erection.”

to

Foods Market considerably more on

be accelerated in order to still meet

Despite the challenges, the proj-

[architectural and engineering] fees,

the store-opening window. The rain

ect was completed successfully in a

but the benefits were outstanding,”

and mud really slowed us down

little less than a year.

Ervin.

This

project

is

a

definite demonstration of that mission. n — Stacey Nathanson

said DeVillier. “We only made minor equipment and fixture changes, but no physical changes were ever made to the departments or the building structure.” One way costs were reduced on the project was by not extending the sheetrock walls of the soffits all the way up to the roof deck, thus saving on extensive drywall and painting costs while allowing an almost unobstructed view to the exterior perimeter walls of the building. Instead, clerestory windows were installed throughout the tops of the exterior walls to reflect natural light through the back room Photo courtesy of George Craig Photography

www.buildingofamerica.com

texas edition

37


Houston, Texas

Energy Center Phase I Completed in February 2008, Energy Center Phase I is a groundbreaking, environmentally friendly office Facts & Figures

development

located

in

Houston’s Energy Corridor. The 13-

Owners: Trammell Crow Company;

story, 332,000-square-foot building

Principal Real Estate Investors

is the first phase of the two-phase

Type of Project: An office building

Energy Center project — a joint

with an attached parking garage Size: 332,000 square feet

venture between Trammell Crow

Construction Time: October 2006

Company and Principal Real Estate

- February 2008

Investors.

The Need: Class A office space in

“The purpose of this project

the Energy Corridor The Challenge: Working during

was to provide class A office core/

a very rainy season, and

shell space in the Energy Corridor

overcoming issues related to deciding to pursue LEED® certification late in the process

along Interstate 10 in suburban west Houston,” said A.J. Restum, vice president of development and investment for Trammell Crow Company. The entire Phase I tower has been leased by the fast-growing Foster Wheeler USA Corporation, one of the four operating units that

TEAM MEMBERS

make up the U.S. engineering and construction arm of publicly traded

HOK Architect

Foster Wheeler Inc. of New Jersey. Showcasing a brilliant design,

Manhattan Construction Company General Contractor

the Energy Center makes an eye-

Ready Cable, Inc.

catching statement along Houston’s

offs and access to structured parking

attracting future clients and poten-

Energy Corridor with architectural

garages are also provided from this

tial employees. Companies are now

precast panels and blue-tinted insu-

court.”

recognizing that architecture begins

lating glass. “The office building is

The project boasts gorgeous land-

a concrete frame with architectural

scaping, as well. “They tied in the

precast, including strip windows

landscaping with the Houston park

While the Energy Center’s unique

with curtain walls at the south-

system and will have jogging trails,

architecture and functional office

west and northeast corners,” said

which tie into the nearby parks,”

space certainly appeal to tenants,

Mitchell Davis, project manager for

said Davis.

there’s another major advantage to

Manhattan Construction Company,

texas edition

to influence employee workplace satisfaction and employee retention.”

The project team’s goal was to

this building: its desirable location in

create a building that includes arrest-

the Energy Corridor, a booming dis-

Adjacent to the Energy Center’s

ing design details as well as truly

trict. The Energy Corridor is quickly

Phase I tower sits the Phase II tower,

functional office space. Felder noted

growing into the Central Business

a

the project’s general contractor.

38

Photo courtesy of Trammell Crow Company

300,000-square-foot

that the building’s stunning architec-

District of greater west Houston,

office building. Each building is

12-story,

ture is much more than just aestheti-

spurring residential and retail growth

attached to its own eight-story park-

cally pleasing — he believes it may

in the area. “Trammell Crow pur-

ing garage. “The two office towers

actually inspire the building’s tenants

chased this site several years ago

focus on an entry court, featuring a

to be more productive in their work.

anticipating growth and develop-

water feature and garden allée link-

“The idea of a company’s image

ment in the west Houston Energy

ing the two building lobbies,” said

is now affected through its archi-

Corridor submarket,” Restum said.

Dallas Felder, former senior project

tecture, promoting it as a forward

“The location is a restricted busi-

designer for Phase I with HOK, the

thinking and progressive enterprise,”

ness park zoned for class A offices

project’s architect. “Building drop-

he explained. “This works well in

only and provides significant nearby

commercial & retail development


energy — making it ideal to capture

As a member of the USGBC and as

“Inclement weather was of signifi-

“During this project, we learned to

the West Energy Corridor growth

an ENERGY STAR partner, Principal

cant concern in Houston in 2007,”

never give up the prospect to make

demand.”

Real Estate Investors is committed

agreed Restum. However, the team

the project better,” Restum said.

Not only is the Energy Center

to implementing responsible build-

pulled together and managed to

“We made significant design chang-

visually striking, functional and con-

ing and operating practices that are

overcome the weather obstacles.

es into the construction process

veniently located — it is also sus-

environmentally sustainable and eco-

“The contractor and design con-

to improve the efficiency and func-

tainable. “The Energy Center Phase

nomically feasible,” said Wanninger.

struction administration person-

tionality of the building. This result-

I project was exciting for all of us

the

nel maintained flexibility in project

ed in upgrades, including higher

here at Principal Real Estate Investors

knowledge that the commitment

scheduling to compensate for the

efficiency chillers, reduced water

as it was our organization’s first

to sustainability is not something

lost time and completed the project

consumption,

LEED® pre-certified speculative office

that has to be a financial burden to

on schedule.”

construction

development. Upon completion, the

development,” said Felder. “In fact,

The project’s second major chal-

project attained LEED® silver cer-

it is now a competitive advantage

lenge was related to the building’s

source control, and electromagnetic

tification from the USGBC,” said

relative to other available proper-

LEED® certification. The decision

water treatment.”

Joe Wanninger, investment director-

ties. In today’s development climate,

to make Energy Center Phase I a

Despite the challenges, the project

asset management for Principal Real

these measures are marketable assets

sustainable building was not made

team agreed that the Energy Center

Estate Investors.

and prerequisites to reaching a class

until after construction had begun

Phase I building was a major success.

A rating.”

— a move that created some major

“The building work space provides a

“Since then, Principal Real Estate

“This

project

reinforced

indoor

separating waste,

chemical

our

advanced

and

pollutant

Investors has received the 2008

As with any major construction

challenges for the project team.

comfortable, environmentally friend-

Green Giant of the Year award from

project, the team faced some dif-

“One of the lessons we learned from

ly atmosphere that should enhance

Real Estate Finance & Investment

ficult challenges. For one, the local

this project is to determine LEED®

productivity,” said Restum.

magazine. We have 72 candidate

weather during the construction

certification early in the process,”

buildings in our LEED® existing build-

phase caused some major difficulties.

Davis said.

ing pipeline totaling 11.7 million

“The schedule was affected because

Nonetheless, the project team

amount of credit for their profes-

square feet, and 18 projects totaling

2007 was the fourth wettest year

members overcame these obstacles

sional execution at every step of the

5.8 million square feet in our LEED®

since the 1900s, with more than 70

and fully dedicated themselves to

process,” said Wanninger. n

core and shell development pipeline.

days of rain,” Davis explained.

creating a sustainable building.

“Our local partner, Trammell Crow Company, deserves a great

— Amy Bell

Photo courtesy of Trammell Crow Company

www.buildingofamerica.com

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39


Plano, Texas

Facts & Figures Owner/Developer: Hines Interest

One Victory Park

Type of Project: A new office building in a mixed-use urban center Size: 468,000 square feet Cost: $72 million Construction Time: Completed in

One Victory Park is the first office building constructed in the

September 2008

Victory Park District, a 65-acre

The Need: A new office building in

mixed-use urban center. This new

the Victory Park District

facility is also one of the first

The Challenge: Working on the site’s tight configuration

high-rise office buildings in the country that utilizes an underfloor air system to improve indoor air quality and cut costs for temperature control. The 468,000-square-foot, 16story building includes a sevenlevel

TEAM MEMBERS

BOKA Powell, LLC Project Manager/Architect Austin Commercial, LP General Contractor Brockette • Davis • Drake, Inc. Structural Engineering

parking

Interest

garage.

Hines

wanted the project

to be on the leading edge of sustainable

design.

materials

such

as

formance

glass

and

Durable high-perglazing

were used, and the project is anticipating Building

the

U.S.

Council’s

Leadership

in

Green

(USGBC)

Energy

and

Environmental Design (LEED®) silver certification. “The site’s tight configuration offered the greatest challenge,” said Barry A. Beazley, project manager of BOKA Powell, LLC, the project manager/architect.

The

Transit retaining

Dallas

(DART)

Area rail

walls

Rapid

with

enclosed

its the

building on the west, and a large concrete, below-grade box culvert

extends

across

the

western third of the site. The project team solved this challenge by building the garage structure across the culvert and on piers between the culvert and the DART retaining walls. With convenient transportation located nearby, valet parking, WiFi throughout the district, and fitness and spa facilities, One Victory Park offers its tenants the ultimate business setting that cares for the local environment. n — Mella Barnes Photos courtesy of BOKA Powell, LLC

40

texas edition

commercial & retail development


mixed-use developments & multiunit residential

view our editions online at www.buildingofamerica.com


Facts & Figures

Arlington, Texas

Owner: Arlington Highlands, Ltd. (a partnership between The

Arlington Highlands

Retail Connection | Connected Development Services and Cheney & Mathes Properties) Type of Project: A new mixed-use

Inspired by a town square,

The Retail Connection | Connected

box retailers.” In addition to its many

Size: 820,000 square feet

Arlington Highlands provides a wide

Development Services, the project’s

shops, Arlington Heights includes

Cost: $155 million (total)

variety of options in an inviting

owner in partnership with Cheney &

a hotel that is set to open in 2010,

Construction Time: December

environment.

development

Mathes Properties. “It is an 80-acre

more than 25 restaurants, entertain-

“The project is a hybrid lifestyle/

outdoor village that includes high-

ment venues, and office space.

lifestyle/power center in Arlington

power center that is filling a need

fashion clothing and jewelry bou-

The development features shop-

The Challenge: Dealing with the

within a super-regional retail trade

tiques, home furnishing and design

lined walkways, historic architecture,

area,” said David Wilson, president of

stores, personal services, and junior

fountains, creeks and parks. Building

2005 - October 2008 The Need: A unique hybrid

enormous scale of the project; communicating the different combinations of building materials and sizes/shapes of these elements to the contractors; and coping with each tenant’s unique branding, appearance and practical requirements

TEAM MEMBERS

Good Fulton & Farrell Architects Architect Spring Valley Construction Company General Contractor CalHar Construction, Inc. JBI Electrical Systems Inc. Electrical Contractors Mycoskie+McInnis+Associates Landscape Architects

Photos courtesy of Good Fulton & Farrell Architects

42

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mixed-used developments & multiunit residential


materials include many hues of brick,

designer for Good Fulton & Farrell

elements to the contractors; and

said, “This project was put togeth-

stone, exterior insulation finish sys-

Architects, the project’s architect,

coping with each tenant’s unique

er by a team of professionals who

tem (EIFS) and cast stone.

the team encountered a few chal-

branding, appearance and practical

have worked together on multiple

According to Donald R. Kubala,

lenges, including the enormous scale

requirements.

and highly successful retail develop-

AIA, associate principal and proj-

of the project; communicating the

The team worked together to

ect architect, and David Michael

different combinations of building

overcome these issues, completing

Farrell, AIA, principal and project

materials and sizes/shapes of these

the project in October 2008. Wilson

ment projects for more than two decades.” n — Amy Pagett

Photos courtesy of Good Fulton & Farrell Architects

www.buildingofamerica.com

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43


Austin, Texas

Facts & Figures Developer: CLB Partners Type of Project: A new mixed-use building

Bridges on the Park

Size: 136,915 square feet (residential space); 9,000 square feet (retail space) Cost: $30 million Construction Time: March 2006 - December 2008 The Need: Condominiums and retail space in a once-in-a-lifetime location The Challenge: Maximizing the interior ceiling heights and increasing usable living space while accommodating the exhaust systems

TEAM MEMBERS

Rhode: Hurt Architect Tribble & Stephens Construction, Ltd. General Contractor Containment Solutions Manufacturer Fuel Tex Fuel Contractors/ Installation of UST/ASI L.S. Decker, Inc. Waterproofing Contractors Torre Crane L.P. Crane Rental Services Photo courtesy of Tribble & Stephens Construction

Austin’s Bridges on the Park is

ances, designer-selected interior

The owner’s desire to maximize

situated in a particularly impres-

finishes and colors, and granite

interior ceiling heights was com-

sive part of the city. “Bridges

countertops. A community area

plicated by its desire to increase

on the Park is set in a once-in-

features a swimming pool, a spa,

usable living space in the fact that

a-lifetime location on the banks

an outdoor fireplace and more.

all exhaust from the restrooms,

of Lady Bird Lake, across from

According to Tribble & Stephens

kitchen and laundry would be

the [James D.] Pfluger Pedestrian

Construction, Ltd., the project’s

routed horizontally and exhausted

[and Bicycle] Bridge in downtown

general contractor, the project

at each unit’s balcony, accord-

Austin,” said Ron Cibulka, senior

uses rainwater harvesting. Due

ing to Tribble & Stephens. This

developer for CLB Partners, the

to limited space constraints, a

routing would eliminate the need

project’s developer. “The spec-

detention pond was not feasible,

for a mechanical chase in each

tacular residential setting offers

according to Tribble & Stephens.

unit, thereby increasing the liv-

buyers 104 condominium homes

Holding tanks were placed around

ing space. Extensive coordination

and 9,000 square feet of retail in

the site to act as both deten-

between mechanical, electrical

the six-story mid-rise building.”

tion and as a source for irrigation

and plumbing (MEP) and other

Two levels of underground park-

water.

various trades was required to

ing were also part of the project.

44

texas edition

The team was challenged by

Amenities of the residential

the building’s ceiling heights,

units include stainless steel appli-

which are less than 10 feet tall.

efficiently route all overhead services. n — Amy Pagett

mixed-used developments & multiunit residential


Containment Solutions, Inc.

Setting Unsurpassed Storage Standards Since 1965

leaking fluids such as ground water.

ground water storage tanks fulfill a number

CSI offers the most extensive selection

of LEED® categories.

and highest quality sumps. We have

CSI remains competitive by nimbly

done significant research and testing to

meeting new challenges. “Most of our

supply the top-of-the-line sump equipment

current projects are so customized that

to the industry.”

we can no longer rely on mere commod-

The equipment is welcomed in the field

ity tanks,” Heiman reports. “Instead, we

because it is so easy to assemble. “We

custom design a tank to fit the project,

have put a lot of resources into the design

which is a strategy many companies

to ensure that the tank accessories are

cannot duplicate.”

easy for contractors to put together,” Heiman confirms.

Containment Solutions, Inc. (CSI) has

State-of-the-art technology

Recent projects include the award-winning Bridges at the Park in Dallas/Ft. Worth

Dependability is the hallmark of this

and the Railyard Park in Santa Fe, N.M.,

company; indeed, reliability, along with

a municipality with stringent construction

innovation, has contributed to CSI’s industry

requirements. CSI installed five 15,000-gal-

prominence and longevity. Service features

lon tanks at the Railyard Park for rainwater

include a response time within 48 hours.

harvesting.

All field service is performed by OSHA-

Furthermore, CSI has taken customer

led the industry since its inception in 1965.

Unlike some businesses of its vintage,

trained professionals operating out of fully

relations to a fun new level with a contractor

Back then, as the special products divi-

CSI is unafraid of change. It not only wel-

equipped field service vehicles with on-

t-shirt program. It has created a program in

sion of Owens Corning, it pioneered a

comes new technologies but leads the way.

board compressors. CSI prides itself on

which it provides contractors with t-shirts in

technology to manufacture the first fiber-

It has expanded its offerings and is forging

complete after-sale support, including job-

OSHA-approved colors, allowing contractors

glass petroleum storage tank. Now an

a path to green building.

site repair, tank modifications and emer-

to pay a nominal overprint charge to put

gency tank repairs.

their company logos on the front. It’s just

independent company with headquarters in

Marketing Communications Manager

Conroe, Texas, and manufacturing facilities

David Heiman, says, “Originally, our tanks

in Conroe; Bakersfield, Calif.; and Mt. Union,

were designed for safe storage of petroleum

Pa., CSI is the largest U.S. fiberglass tank

and other combustible materials. Our design

As a member of the U.S. Green Building

manufacturer. The company has additional

work resulted in the UL 1316 standard

Council, CSI recognizes that sustainable

service support sites in Greenville, S.C.;

that governs fiberglass tank manufacturing

design in both commercial and residen-

Lakeland, Fla.; and Valparaiso, Ind.

one more way in which CSI suits its clients’

Green to a “T”

needs to a “t.”

for petroleum tanks. More than 40 years

tial projects is an increasingly important

Across the nation, entities from gas

and 300,000 tank installations later, we

focus of new construction. Heiman relates,

stations to airports to municipal buildings

continue to improve upon those processes,

“CSI has been committed to environmen-

rely on CSI to provide safe and cost-effec-

utilizing today’s automation to develop new

tally friendly products, from water storage

tive storage and handling of hazardous

applications and products.”

tanks to fiberglass manholes to alternative

and non-hazardous, flammable, and com-

CSI’s manufacturing process is one of

fuel storage tanks and accessories. We

bustible materials. Its products are utilized

a kind. Computer-driven carriages traverse

design and manufacture innovative water

in an array of private industries and public

over a rotating steel mold that provides

and wastewater technologies for customers

municipalities where petroleum-based flu-

a solid surface for the even application

around the world. We believe in green build-

ids are required.

and compaction of fiberglass reinforced

ing and the lasting effects that environmen-

plastic (FRP). The final tank laminate is

tally conscientious builders provide.”

consistent in thickness and composition

CSI’s Flowtite® water storage tanks

and fabricated with an inner surface that

may qualify for several points under the

is not air-inhibited. The resulting tank

Leadership in Energy and Environmental

can safely store petroleum and biofuel

Design (LEED®) credit system. Water man-

products, including ethanol blends, up to

agement is a significant LEED® component.

100 percent.

Depending on the application(s), under-

— Corporate Profile

Building upon its successes, CSI expanded its product line to include handling of lubrication oils, water, wastewater and alternative biofuels such as ethanol and biodiesel. Heiman notes, “We separate ourselves through our tank sump product line. Sumps guard and protect piping components from corrosion and

5150 Jefferson Chemical Rd.

Conroe, Texas 77301

800-537-4730

www.containmentsolutions.com


Facts & Figures

Dallas, Texas

Developer/General Contractor: Inland American Communities Group, Inc. Type of Project: A new mixed-use

Cityville at Southwestern Medical District

development Size: 265 housing units; 15

Cityville at Southwestern Medical

lounge with a fully equipped kitchen,

development is truly walkable, pro-

feet (retail)

District represents the first phase of

an Internet café, a courtyard with a

viding a true neighborhood feeling.

Construction Time: September

a multiphase urban renewal proj-

fireplace, a modern fitness center,

2005 - August 2007

ect in Dallas. The project consists of

and a swimming pool.

townhomes; 40,000 square

The Need: The first phase of

Completed

in

August

2007,

Cityville at Southwestern Medical

265 housing units, 15 townhomes

Designed to encourage smart

District revitalizes a blighted area,

The Challenge: Working on a

and 40,000 square feet of neigh-

growth in the community, Cityville

creating a vibrant community for liv-

brownfield site

borhood retail space, according to

combines sustainable principles with

ing, working and playing. n

Michael Arbour, AIA, architect for

a welcoming pedestrian scale. The

a multiphase urban renewal project

— Amy Pagett

JHP Architecture / Urban Design, the project’s architect. The development revitalizes a derelict industrial area, creating an anchor for future phases. A challenge TEAM MEMBERS

the project team faced was working on a brownfield site. By removing

JHP Architecture / Urban Design Architect American Interlock & Modular Construction Co. Hardscape Specialists Aquatek Systems, Inc. Gold Landscape, Inc. Landscape Contractors ista North America Utility Management Longhorn Mechanical Mechanical Contractors

unnecessary structures and cleaning up the brownfield, the project team overcame the challenge and transformed an unfavorable location into a vital part of the city. Located adjacent to Parkland Hospital and within close proximity to downtown Dallas, the project integrates multifamily housing of several types for young professionals. Shared

Stazon Roofing

amenities include a community

Photos courtesy of Steve Hinds, Inc.

46

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mixed-used developments & multiunit residential


Facts & Figures Owner: PC Village Apartments Dallas, LP Developer: Lincoln Property Company Type of Project: A new apartment and townhome community Size: 470,713 square feet Construction Time: August 2006 - February 2008 The Need: To replace aging apartment buildings with highquality apartments and townhomes The Challenge: Adding unique arhchitectural elements while staying within the budget

Dallas, Texas

TEAM MEMBERS

Meeks + Partners Architect & Land Planning LPC Contractors General Contractor Brockette • Davis • Drake, Inc. Structural Engineering JORDAN & SKALA ENGINEERS, INC. Consulting Engineers Sawyer Design Associates Interior Designers Striping by Mr. V LLC Parking Lot Striping

The Dakota in The Village The Dakota in the Village replaces 40-year-old apartment buildings with a striking new 496-unit apartment and townhome community. “In building The Dakota, the developer and architect’s goal was to reflect the lifestyle of today’s high-end, more sophisticated renter by focusing on product variety, convenience and state-of-the-art amenities, larger apartments with better floor plans, and extraordinary architecture,” said Jeff Courtwright, executive vice president – southwest of Lincoln Property Company, the project’s developer.

Photos courtesy of Steve Hinds Photography

48

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mixed-used developments & multiunit residential


Located on 18.5 acres, the community features 29 different floor plans, including one-, two- and three-bedroom apartments and two-bedroom townhomes with two and a half bathrooms. The units range in size from 709 square feet to 1,407 square feet. “Residents enjoy access to the village’s exclusive restaurant and bar, organized softball and flag football leagues, concierge service, tennis courts and tennis pro shop, two-mile jogging trail with fitness stations, two landscaped lakes with sitting areas, and a multitude of entertainment and community activities and events,” added Courtwright. A challenge on the project was in adding unique architectural elements on a budget. A few of those elements include various porch pillars that break up the linear space along the building elevations, and building details such as fascades and railings made of wood. Thanks to the team’s hard work and cooperation, the project was successfully completed in February 2008. “The project’s tenured construction and management team [was] enthusiastic and goal oriented,” said Courtwright. “Having extensive knowledge of the surrounding marketplace, each segment of the team offered valuable information with regards to the trends in the submarket.” n — Amy Pagett

Photos courtesy of Steve Hinds Photography

www.buildingofamerica.com

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49


Facts & Figures Owners: Matthews Southwest; CDK Realty Advisors Type of Project: A new condominium building Size: 11 stories Cost: $14.3 million Construction Time: March 2007 - June 2008 The Need: Inviting, exciting condominiums in downtown Dallas The Challenge: Working on a tight site that is adjacent to a DART stop and has power lines overhead

Dallas, Texas

TEAM MEMBERS

The Beat

Corgan Associates, Inc. Architect Key Construction Texas, LLC General Contractor Advanced Diversified Services, Inc. Structural Steel Fabricators & Erectors

Situated across from the Dallas Police Headquarters

lines overhead. According to Key Construction Texas,

and a Dallas Area Rapid Transit (DART) stop, The Beat

LLC, the project’s general contractor, the team imple-

condominiums boast a convenient and exciting location

mented detailed logistics planning to ensure the work

Blum Consulting Engineers, Inc. MEP/FP Engineering Design

in downtown Dallas.

progressed expeditiously while maintaining safe work-

Comprised of a concrete frame with a stucco and

ing conditions. Key even worked closely with the power

Greater Metroplex Interiors, Inc. Framing/Gypsum Contractors

glass exterior, the 11-story building features 72 inviting

company to construct support arms for the power lines

condominium units and a two-level parking structure for

to ensure the lines were moved far enough from the

120 vehicles. Each unit features a large private balcony,

building to allow construction to proceed safely.

S & K Plumbing of Fort Worth, Inc. Plumbing Contractors

allowing residents to enjoy unobstructed views of the

Thanks to this team effort, The Beat condominiums

downtown area. The building also includes a swimming

were completed in June 2008, providing spectacular

pool, an amenities deck and full security.

living space for those who want access to all Dallas has

The project’s challenges included working on a tight site that is adjacent to the DART stop and has power

to offer. n — Amy Pagett

Photos courtesy of Shawn O’Connell

50

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mixed-used developments & multiunit residential


Facts & Figures Owner: 500 Texas Avenue Limited Partnership Type of Project: A new mixed-use facility in a converted convention center Size: 135,000 square feet (office space); 5,000 square feet (retail space); parking for more than 100 vehicles Cost: $4 million Construction Time: Opened in March 2007 The Need: New loft office, retail and parking space in Houston’s downtown theater district The Challenge: Creating a public face on what was once the back of a historic convention center

TEAM MEMBERS

Powers Brown Architecture Architect Camarata & Perry Commercial LLC General Contractor V.S.F., Inc. The Troubleshooters Structural & Miscellaneous Steel

Houston, Texas

Bayou Place Phase II Renovation Located in Houston’s downtown theater district, the Bayou Place Phase II renovation project provides 135,000 square feet of loft office space, 5,000 square feet of retail space and parking for more than 100 vehicles in a converted convention center. “Prior renovation of Phase I emphasized entertainment and retail use that was one of the catalysts for the ‘renaissance’ of the central business district (CBD) of Houston,” added Jeffrey Brown, AIA, design principal for Powers Brown Architecture, the project’s architect. The project included extensive renovation and rehabilitation of both the interior and exterior spaces. Special care was taken to ensure the improvements fit into the surrounding downtown area and green spaces. Finishes include Venetian plaster, travertine and stained concrete. “Challenges were created during exterior and interior renovations to create a public face on what was once the back of the historic convention center,” said Brown. “The design had to be specific enough to complement the entertainment emphasis on the Phase I renovation and also be general and flexible enough to facilitate multiple future tenants.” A creative, collaborative approach helped the team achieve this goal. Thanks to this second phase of renovations, Bayou Place is filling a need in the CBD for attractive and efficient loft office space. n — Amy Pagett Photos courtesy of Powers Brown Architecture

www.buildingofamerica.com

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51


Houston, Texas

Facts & Figures Owner/Developer/General

Gables 6464

Contractor: Gables Residential Type of Project: A new apartment complex Size: 178,639 square feet Construction Time: February 2006 - December 2007 The Need: New apartments in Houston The Challenge: Deciding on a location for parking

TEAM MEMBERS

Meeks + Partners Architect & Land Planning Warehouse Frames ‘n Gallery, Ltd. Framed Mirrors

Gables 6464 is the first new

architect/land planner. According

ect team built a multilevel parking

multifamily property developed

to Helena P. Finley, project man-

structure hidden from street view.

in 15 years in one of Houston’s

ager for Gables Residential, the

Gables 6464 offers 163 one- or

most desirable neighborhoods. The

project’s owner/developer/general

two-bedroom units in a unique mix

four-story apartment complex was

contractor, a large mature oak tree

of flats and lofts, which range from

designed to meet a rental housing

was protected during construction

720 square feet to 1,613 square

need for professional couples and

and serves as a focal point of the

feet. Amenities include wood floor-

singles.

central courtyard.

ing, granite countertops, 10-foot

“The building’s shape and align-

Due to the high-profile nature of

ceilings, and some units feature

ment were designed with great

the site, careful attention needed to

stone fireplaces. Residents of Gables

emphasis to incorporate magnifi-

be paid to the parking solution. The

6464 can enjoy a wide variety of

cent oak trees on site,” said Keith

site was tight and oddly shaped,

luxury living options in a desirable

Malone, AIA, associate partner for

which further added to the parking

area of town. n

Meeks + Partners, the project’s

challenge. As a result, the proj-

— Mella Barnes

Photos courtesy of Bruce Glass Photography

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mixed-used developments & multiunit residential


Facts & Figures Owner: Gables Residential Type of Project: An adaptive reuse of an old office tower into new residences Size: 320,000 gross square feet Cost: $44.85 million Construction Time: December 2005 - June 2007 The Need: New residential space in Dallas The Challenge: Redevelopment of a building listed on the National Register of Historic Places

Dallas, Texas TEAM MEMBERS

RTKL Associates, Inc. Architect Gables Construction Construction Manager Andres Construction Services, LLC General Contractor S & J Electric Electrical Contractor

Gables Republic Tower Once the tallest building west

so famously over-engineered that

rise apartment units, known as the

of the Mississippi, this circa-1954

the blueprints themselves weighed

Gables Republic Tower.

building served as the headquarters

7,000 pounds. Today, it has been

This adaptive reuse project includ-

for Republic National Bank and was

converted into 229 luxury high-

ed interior renovations in which low- and mid-rise elevators were removed for additional floor space,

TAS Commercial Concrete Construction, LLC Concrete Contractors

and high-rise elevators were reused with replacement of operators and cab finishes. New amenities include a fitness center and a rooftop pool and sundeck. According to Tom Bakewell, regional vice president of Gables Residential, the project’s owner, the project was listed on the National Register of Historic Places, which presented a challenge when renovations were underway. Special attention to design and finish detail was required to preserve the architectural history of the building. The project team solved the challenge by taking the extra steps to submit all finishes and plans to both the Texas Historic Commission and the National Park Service for approval. Steeped in local history, the Gables Republic Tower provides state-of-the-art, modern amenities in a historically restored setting to provide the best of both worlds to its residents. n — Mella Barnes Photos courtesy of Bruce Glass Photography

www.buildingofamerica.com

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53


Facts & Figures Owners: PM Realty Group & an institutional investor Type of Project: A new mixeduse facility Size: 855,512 square feet Construction Time: December 2006 - February 2009 The Need: A new mixed-use facility in the Park Lane development The Challenge: Establishing separate identities for the three price levels of units

TEAM MEMBERS

Gromatzky Dupree & Associates Architect Cadence McShane General Contractor Brockette • Davis • Drake, Inc. Structural Engineering Faulkner Design Group

Dallas, Texas

The Heights at Park Lane The Park Lane development, a $500 million, two-million-square foot mixed-use project in Dallas, now includes The Heights at Park Lane, a new mixed-use residential and retail facility. This new project combines street-level retail with a three-building residential facility containing 325 living units and a multilevel parking garage. There are 49 different unit types in this C-shaped facility.

Photos courtesy of Steve Hinds, Inc.

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mixed-used developments & multiunit residential


“The uniqueness of The Heights

three different buildings contain

at Park Lane lies in the variety and

600-square-foot to 3,500-square-

quantity of unit styles, along with

foot units in price levels according

the quality of upscale amenities,”

to amenities and options.

said Bryant Nail, senior develop-

The 20-story residential building

ment officer of PM Realty Group,

has 62 units, the 15-story building

the project’s owner in a joint ven-

has 218 units, and the four-story

ture with an institutional investor.

building has 45 units, all with dif-

According to Jeffery F. Smith, AIA,

principal,

and

ferent levels of customization. “The

Charlie

Heights at Park Lane will give many

Richmond, AIA, senior associ-

lifestyle options and amenities to

ate with Gromatzky Dupree &

the residents, as well as immediate

Associates, the project’s architect,

proximity to high-end shopping,

the greatest challenge was in

and a casual, trendy urban life-

establishing a separate identity for

style,” said Nail. n

three price levels of units. Thus, the

— Mella Barnes

Photos courtesy of Steve Hinds, Inc.

www.buildingofamerica.com

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Dallas, Texas

Facts & Figures Owner: Rockwood Realty Associates Type of Project: A new high-rise

The Metropolitan Condominiums

condominium complex

A 25-story office building from

One of the largest residential

rior was enhanced with the addi-

the 1970s was renovated and

renovation projects in downtown

tion of balconies, a new private

- May 2007

converted into a new, 26-story

Dallas, this project consisted of

entrance drive canopy and land-

The Need: New condominium

condominium complex called The

selective demolition, elevator mod-

scaping,” said Matt McDonald,

living space in Dallas

Metropolitan Condominiums. The

ernizations, site improvements,

AIA, project architect, and Brian

new facility contains 283 condos

utility upgrades and construction

George, AIA, principal in charge

and a new 329-space, 220,000-

of new individual condo units.

for Corgan Associates, Inc., the

square-foot parking garage.

“The existing, somewhat pale exte-

project’s architect.

Size: 428,408 square feet Cost: $40 million Construction Time: May 2006

The Challenge: Installing balconies into an existing wall

TEAM MEMBERS

Corgan Associates, Inc. Architect Turner Condominium Construction, LLC General Contractor City Wide Mechanical, Inc. HVAC & Plumbing Contractor/ Mechanical Contractor L.A. Fuess Partners Inc. Structural Engineers LVI Facility Services Inc. Specialty Contractors

Photo courtesy of Selso Garcia, Corgan Associates, Inc.

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mixed-used developments & multiunit residential


Photo courtesy of Somerset Associates/Garrison Partners

Although the balconies added to the building’s quality, they also

With amenities including granite counters, optional wood floors, stain-

provided the biggest challenge during construction. Incorporating

less steel appliances, storage areas, a fitness center and a rooftop pool

exterior balconies into an existing 30-year curtain wall was a

garden, The Metropolitan Condominiums offer convenient downtown

challenge, but the team insisted that balconies for any multifamily

living in a unique environment. “The overlying theme that was constant

development in Texas were a must. Once completed, the balconies pro-

throughout this project’s development was respecting the building’s past

vided natural light and views to each of the residences and added to the

while embracing its new future,” said McDonald and George. n

exterior facade.

— Mella Barnes

Photo courtesy of Selso Garcia, Corgan Associates, Inc.

www.buildingofamerica.com

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Facts & Figures Owner: CBL & Associates Properties, Inc. Type of Project: A new mixed-use urban center Size: 1.3 million square feet Construction Time: January 2007 - July 2008 The Need: New mixed-use space to fill a void in retail demand The Challenge: Staying on schedule to meet an aggressive opening date

TEAM MEMBERS

Omniplan, Inc. Architect for Retail/Office Spaces Mayse & Associates Architect for Hotel Spaces BGO Architects Architect for Residential Spaces EMJ Corporation General Contractor for Retail/Office Spaces EBCO Contractors General Contractor for Hotel Spaces WaterMark Construction General Contractor for Residential Spaces Classic Paint & Wallcovering Services, Inc. Paint & Wallcovering LRE Royal Electrical Contractors, Inc. Electrical Contractors L.S. Decker, Inc. Waterproofing Contractors Southeastern Interior Systems, Inc. Flooring Tri-Tech Building Products, LLC Doors/Frames/Hardware Xencom Energy Management, LLC Energy Management

Photo courtesy of Brad King Photography

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mixed-used developments & multiunit residential


Photo courtesy of Brad King Photography

Pearland, Texas

Pearland Town Center Pearland Town Center is a 1.3-million-square-foot, mixed-use facility containing retail, residential, office, hospitality and community spaces. Utilizing a design inspired by Texas regional history, culture and climate, the center includes a restaurant-focused entertainment zone; a community space with a multiuse pavilion; retail streets; residential space; office space; hotel space and more. All hotel, office and residential areas are located above the ground-level retail spaces. The site is easily accessible from freeways and provides guests with a year-round venue for living, working, and entertainment. Maintaining the schedule while looking toward an aggressive opening date proved challenging for the project team. Intensive coordination was required to stay on schedule. The challenge was also solved by employing a different architectural and general contracting firm for each aspect of the project. “It is the well-planned integration of retail, office, residential, hotel and public space that creates Pearland Town Center’s unique and inviting character,” said Ken Wittler, project manager for CBL & Associates Properties, Inc., the project’s owner. Scott Hall, project designer with Omniplan, Inc., the project’s architect for retail and office spaces, said, “This ‘live, work, play’ community is the new heart of the city.” n — Mella Barnes Photo courtesy of Brad King Photography, CBL & Associates Properties, LLC

www.buildingofamerica.com

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San Antonio, Texas

Facts & Figures Owner: Housing and Community Services, Inc. Type of Project: Renovation of an

Vista Verde Apartment Homes Renovation

existing apartment complex Size: 145,393 square feet Cost: $6.9 million Construction Time: June 2006 - November 2007 The Need: Upgrades to an aging apartment facility The Challenge: Working through inclement weather

TEAM MEMBERS

Gonzalez Newell Bender Architects Architect Galaxy Builders, Ltd. General Contractor Mangold Roofing Roofing Contractors Sigma Air Heating & Cooling HVAC Systems

Photo courtesy of Gonzalez Newell Bender Architects

Located in the inner city area west of the central business dis-

under the buildings and repaired or replaced sanitary sewer lines.

trict in San Antonio, Vista Verde

60

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The project team encountered challenge

when

inclement

Additions to the facility include a new clubhouse, an amenity center and a pool. Gutters

Apartment Homes offered resi-

a

and exterior shutter detail were

dents low-income housing in 96

weather filled tunnels and pier

also

living units.

holes with water. The challenge

mechanical

added

along

with

systems,

new

cabine-

The 35-year-old facility was not

was solved by constantly stay-

try, kitchens and baths. These

aging well and needed extensive

ing on top of the problem. “We

upgrades

updates. Thus, the interior and

were constantly pumping and

changed the quality of living for

exterior were completely reno-

de-mucking to keep the produc-

residents. According to Galaxy

vated by mitigating and abating

tion on schedule,” said Patrick

Builders, it is actually now a better

the old buildings. Foundations

Kemmy, project manager for

product than some market-rate

were leveled in 17 of the 18 build-

Galaxy Builders, Ltd., the project’s

new units. n

ings. The project team tunneled

general contractor.

have

drastically

— Mella Barnes

mixed-used developments & multiunit residential


Facts & Figures Owner: Woodland Investments Type of Project: A new mixed-use building Size: 30,000 square feet Construction Time: Completed in December 2007 The Need: A place to live and conduct business for Woodland Investments The Challenge: Keeping as many trees as possible on a densely wooded site

Grapevine, Texas

TEAM MEMBERS

Woodland Investments Office

Curtis Group Architect Key Construction Texas, LLC General Contractor Finley Termite & Pest Control, Inc. Termite Control

Woodland Investments Office uses environmentally friendly building materials in a design that is sensitive to the environment.

seam, highly insulated roof and carefully placed windows that maximize the use of natural lighting throughout. A major challenge on the project was minimizing the

This 30,000-square-foot mixed-use project was built

number of existing trees that needed to be removed

for the private investment firm Woodland Investments

in the wooded area. This challenge was solved by

and includes office, garage and residential quarters.

strategically placing the building, driveways and parking

Mark Hummert, facilities manager with Key Construction

areas so that the least amount of trees needed to be

Texas, LLC, the project’s general contractor, said that the

cut down.

facility is built on a heavily wooded site with high-qual-

With the usage of environmentally friendly materials

ity materials and innovative features that help reduce

and a dedication to harmonizing with nature, Woodland

energy usage.

Investments Office is a combination of sensibility and

One particularly unique feature is the water well for landscaping irrigation. Other features include a standing

sensitivity. n — Mella Barnes

Photos courtesy of Curtis Group Architects, LTD.

www.buildingofamerica.com

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61


religious facilities

view our editions online at www.buildingofamerica.com


Round Rock, Texas

Facts & Figures Owner: Central Baptist Church Type of Project: An addition to a church Size: 36,000 square feet Cost: $4.2 million Construction Time: June 2006 - September 2007 The Need: A clean, safe and

Central Baptist Church Addition – Education Building Central Baptist Church, which

secure space for religious

operates an accredited school dur-

education

ing the week for pre-kindergarten

The Challenge: Fitting the new building in between two existing buildings

through 12th grade, needed a new education building as part of a larger vision for future expansion. “The building was constructed between two existing buildings in an unusual L-shaped design,” said Jim Rowan, church business administrator. Built to provide a clean, safe and secure space for religious education,

TEAM MEMBERS

the three-story, 36,000-square-foot

McM Architects Architect

facility contains classrooms, offices

Raymond Construction Co., Inc. General Contractor

features three-coat stucco plaster

BWM Group Planning│| Landscape Architecture│| Architecture Landscape Architects FHI Civil & Structural Engineering Civil Engineering/Structural Engineering Texas Roofing Co. Roofing Contractors

and more. The building’s exterior with masonry accents, clear anodized aluminum storefront systems and standing seam metal roofing. “The greatest challenge with the design of the project was fitting the new three-story struccontinued on page 66

Photos courtesy of Shands Photographics

www.buildingofamerica.com

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63


Sometimes, it pays to go with a gut feeling. For the Round Rock, Texas-based BWM Group, it’s been paying off for 10 years.

“We worked with HKS Sports out of Dallas on that project and we got some attention,” says Bargainer. “We addressed a lot of key issues. For example, there were some ancient live oaks in the parking lot, so we did tree preservation in the landscape architecture to incorporate them.” The business flourishes With a growing name, BWM Group’s early successes led to even more high-profile jobs. “After the Dell Diamond we contracted with Williamson County, Texas, to do the plan and design for its regional conservation corridor,” says Bargainer. “That’s a regional trail system, like a ‘hike-and-bike trail.’ We did the planning and coordination with five cities, two municipal utility districts (MUDs) and two counties to get a cohesive set of standards for the development.” BWM Group’s landscape architects and planners worked on the preliminary route of an eightmile trail along what would become the Brushy Creek Regional Hike and Bike Trails System. They were tasked with developing trail standards and wayfinding for the project’s entire trail concept. Not only did BWM Group assist Williamson County with its development of the project, but it aided in the county’s application for a regional parks initiative pilot grant through the Texas

Roots “We were just a couple of guys living in the Round Rock community outside of Austin,” says Tim Bargainer, president and a founding partner of the award-winning planning and landscape architectural firm. “We thought we could get some jobs, and we did. We’re celebrating our 10-year anniversary this year.” When opportunity knocked for a job at the Austin-Bergstrom International Airport (ABIA) during BWM Group’s first year in business, the firm was ready to answer. It partnered with J. Robert Anderson Landscape Architects to provide landscape architectural design for the ABIA’s main entrance and terminal access roadways. Bargainer says the unique project was designed to reflect Austin’s biodiversity, with plantings native to Texas’ Hill Country and its blackland prairie regions augmenting large-scale waterfalls and areas set aside for outdoor wildlife sculptures. And the firm’s efforts on the 1999 project didn’t go unnoticed. BWM Group took home an honor award from the American Society of Landscape Architects ­(ASLA) for its planning and analysis on the job. “That kind of launched us,” Bargainer says. “We coordinated a winning team.” In 2000, BWM Group consulted with HKS, Inc. to calculate the maximum site development potential for a new 7,500-seat professional baseball stadium in Round Rock. The new home of the Round Rock Express included 13,000 square feet of convention space, a 4,500-square-foot restaurant, a swimming pool, a multiuse basketball court and, of course, the necessary parking. BWM Group also provided the landscape architectural services that were necessary to assist in the determination of the stadium’s final details. Bargainer says BWM Group’s involvement began with a gentleman’s dare. It ended with another home run for the company as Bargainer sold his company’s services to Reid Ryan — the son of Major League Baseball pitching legend Nolan Ryan and a managing partner of the Round Rock Express — and eventually landed the landscape design contract for what would become the Dell Diamond.

Parks and Wildlife Department. Additionally, the


high-demand. The public loves these projects,” he says. “We rarely end up in contentious situations with communities. We work on projects people love.” But it’s not just the people who enjoy the finished projects adorned with BWM Group’s vision and expertise. Bargainer says the company’s ability to perform to the complete satisfaction of its customers is rooted in its own diverse capabilities. “The greatest strength of our firm is that we balance 50 percent of our work in the public sector and 50 percent is private-sector work,” he explains. “During awkward economic times, we have the ability to shift our focus one way or the other to capture profit or maintain stability. We have the depth and the knowledge and the expertise to do that. We’re a known entity in the marketplace.” Admittedly, things could have been different for Bargainer and his partners, Philip Wanke, principal, and Brian Binkowski, associate principal. But together with the staff in Round Rock — one Bargainer says is second to none in its professionalism and creativity — the decision to go with that gut feeling has left no regrets. What it has left is a list of satisfied clients, exemplary projects, and a company poised for growth and added successes in a world where developers, and their neighbors, are concerned about a project’s look and fit within the community, as well as the bottom line. “Landscape architecture is what BWM Group does,” adds Bargainer. “Whenever we come in on a project, we’re the ones wearing the white hats. That’s how we’re seen. Then, we green things up.” — Corporate Profile

company also provided construction drawings and bidding and construction administration for the trail’s first 2.5 miles, funded by the grant. In addition to earning the firm another ASLA award, BWM Group’s work on Phase I at Brushy Creek earned it a National Trails Planning and Design Award in 2004 through the National Park Service (NPS). The NPS has also bestowed National Recreational Trail status on the Brushy Creek system. Bargainer says the projects were funded in part by the first regional grant offered through the Texas Department of Parks and Wildlife. “They offered a new grant for the first phase in 2003 when we were doing the trail. Over time it’s become a very in-demand grant,” he says. “We applied for that grant and scored almost a perfect score, beating out cities like El Paso.” In 2008, BWM Group continued its role on the Brushy Creek project by offering its expertise on the project’s two-mile, $2 million third phase. BWM Group’s portfolio also includes the Berry Springs County Park and Preserve in Williamson County; the Texas X-Park in Leander, north of Austin; and the Garey Park Master Plan in Georgetown, Texas. Offering clients experience and balance Despite the scope and variety of the firm’s work, Bargainer says there are a few common themes. “The projects we work on are typically

102 E. Main, Ste. 200 Round Rock, TX 78664 512-238-8912 www.bwmgrp.com


continued from page 63

ture in between two existing buildings, leaving

between the two existing structures.” McM

added, “The experience of the team allowed

some space between one existing building and

worked closely with Raymond Construction Co.,

for the building to be constructed between two

tying into the other,” said Susan McFarland,

Inc., the project’s general contractor, to work

freestanding structures in the middle of a cam-

AIA, principal, and John S. Moman, AIA,

out the proper measurements to determine the

pus during the school year in the midst of more

principal for McM Architects, the project’s archi-

building’s width.

than 400 students and teachers with no acci-

tect. “The new structure needed to be as wide

According to Raymond Construction, the final

as possible, but there was a fixed distance

appearance of the facility is first class. Rowan

dents or injuries.” n — Amy Pagett

Photos courtesy of Shands Photographics

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religious facilities


Facts & Figures Owner: Chase Oaks Church Type of Project: A new church facility Size: 73,000 square feet (main church building); 18,000 square feet (youth building) Cost: $16.368 million Construction Time: Completed in December 2007 The Need: A new facility to serve the church’s growing ministries The Challenge: Integrating the facility’s structure and MEP with the audiovisual, theatrical lighting, acoustical and stage set theme concepts of the church

Plano, Texas

TEAM MEMBERS

Chase Oaks Church

F&S Partners Incorporated Architect MEDCO Construction, L.L.C. General Contractor Blum Consulting Engineers, Inc. MEP/FP Engineering Design Brockette • Davis • Drake, Inc. Structural Engineering CalHar Construction, Inc. Crist Industries, Inc. Structural Steel Fabricators & Erectors/Structural & Miscellaneous Steel

Photos courtesy of Shands Photographics

Chase Oaks Church, formerly known as Fellowship Bible Church North, has a welcoming new facility that provides much-needed space for its growing ministries.

to de Leon. Despite the project’s successful result, the team encountered a few challenges along the way. “[The

The project included a 73,000-square-foot main

project’s greatest challenge was] the integration of

church building and an 18,000-square-foot youth

structure and MEP [mechanical, electrical and plumb-

building. “The buildings reflect the dynamic, outward-

ing] with the audiovisual, theatrical lighting, acoustical

reaching image of the church…in the colors and dispa-

and stage set theme concepts of the church,” said de

rate forms of the spaces and elements, yet unified in the

Leon.

vision of worship,” said Roland de Leon, AIA, associate for F&S Partners Incorporated, the project’s architect. The facility features highly polished concrete floors, unpainted concrete columns, a galvanized roof deck

www.buildingofamerica.com

and galvanized steel pipe column elements, according

Completed in December 2007, Chase Oaks Church provides a single location for church members to give back to the community for years to come. n — Amy Pagett

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67


Boerne, Texas

Facts & Figures Owner: St. Peter the Apostle

St. Peter the Apostle Catholic Church Family Life Center & Master Plan

Catholic Church Type of Project: A new multiuse building Size: 56,000 square feet Cost: $8 million Construction Time: June 2007 - October 2008

St. Peter the Apostle Catholic

tuary

addition

in

1999,

also

Church recently added a new

for St. Peter the Apostle Catholic

56,000-square-foot, multiuse facil-

The steep grade of the site pre-

Jr., AIA, LEED AP, project archi-

ity to its location. Positioned at

sented a challenge to meeting

tect for SA Partnership, LLP, the

the highest elevation of the site,

Texas state accessibility standards.

project’s architect. The courtyard

the new Family Life Center build-

The design team was able to solve

and covered patio functions as an

ing includes classrooms, confer-

this challenge by building the facil-

ideal spot for meeting and also

ence rooms, banquet halls, a full

ity right into the hillside, creating a

negates the need to develop on

kitchen, outdoor plazas and space

split-level effect. An exterior eleva-

green space.

for future expansion.

tor tower was built to provide verti-

Church The Challenge: Working with the steep grade of the site’s hill

The

Family

Life

Center

is

built of limestone and blends TEAM MEMBERS

SA Partnership, LLP Architect

of limestone.

Frank Valadez, AIA, IIDA, princi-

The Need: New multiuse space

cal circulation for the site.

pal architect, and Eluterio Tenorio

The new Family Life Center provides parishioners with a great

“One of the driving forces for

place to meet and conduct church

church

the design was the need for a cen-

business and also provides fantastic

structure, which was originally

tral gathering space for parishio-

views of the Texas hill country. n

built in 1860 with a new sanc-

ners before and after services,” said

with

the

existing

— Mella Barnes

J.C. Stoddard Construction General Contractor D&B Lath & Plaster, LLC Plastering

Photo courtesy of Eluterio Tenorio Jr.

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religious facilities


Facts & Figures Owner: Watermark Community Church Type of Project: An adaptive reuse of an old structure for a new church Size: 70,000 square feet Cost: $43 million Construction Time: August 2006 - September 2007 The Need: A new worship center The Challenge: Giving the building a unique look without going over budget

TEAM MEMBERS

Omniplan, Inc. Architect Rogers-O’Brien Construction Ltd. General Contractor Blum Consulting Engineers, Inc. MEP/FP Engineering Design

Dallas, Texas

Bonded Lightning Protection Systems, Ltd. Lightning Protection

Watermark Community Church, Phase II

M.B. Parker & Company, Inc. Foodservice Design Supreme Roofing Systems Roofing Contractors

Providing a cost-effective, yet unique look to Watermark Community Church in Dallas was a challenge for the project team. With amenities such as wireless Internet and a Starbucks coffee shop, the project needed to cut costs elsewhere while keeping the same high-end aesthetic throughout. This challenge was solved by using raw, unfinished materials in artistic ways. Sheets of plywood were hung as “clouds” in the sanctuary for simple, inexpensive but unique sound deflection. Cast-in-place concrete columns and exposed ceilings helped complete the modern, edgy look that the project team desired. The adaptive reuse of an existing structure was the second phase of the project, which was linked to the tower built in Phase I via a new sky bridge. Phase III will complete the campus masterplan and include a 3,500-seat worship building, a chapel, a multipurpose room and a 30,000-square-foot Town Center lobby. According to Brian Duplechin, project manager, and Charley Campbell, superintendent for Rogers-O’Brien Construction Ltd., the project’s general contractor, the most unique feature of the project is the 30,000-gallon baptismal pond, surrounded by Oklahoma Sandstone steps and a stone waterfall. Located outside the building, the pond has a pool filter that cleans and filters the water and underwater lighting that enhances the pond’s appearance at night. Using innovative, yet simple materials, Watermark Community Church provides its congregation with a captivating worship experience. n — Mella Barnes Photos courtesy of Peter A. Calvin

www.buildingofamerica.com

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69


educational facilities

view our editions online at www.buildingofamerica.com


Facts & Figures Owner: Baylor University Type of Project: Two new residence halls

Waco, Texas

Baylor University Brooks Village

Size: 252,000 square feet Cost: $51 million Construction Time: Completed in August 2007 The Need: Residential space to allow more students to live on campus The Challenge: Demolishing the existing residence hall

Built to help create a truly residential campus, Baylor University’s Brooks Village provides two new residence halls with space for approximately 700 students. The project commenced with the demolition and abatement of an existing residence hall before construction began on the two halls, Brooks College and Brooks Flats. Brooks College is a traditional residential college that accommodates approximately 400 students. Brooks Flats features residential flats for approximately 300 upperclassmen. In addition to residential space, Brooks Village includes a chapel, a dining hall, a full-service kitchen, classrooms, and library and faculty space. An approximately 800-car parking garage was also part

TEAM MEMBERS

Hanbury Evans Wright Vlattas + Company Architect The Whiting-Turner Contracting Company Design-builder Brockette • Davis • Drake, Inc. Structural Engineering Hart, Gaugler & Associates, Inc. Structural Engineers Johnson Roofing Roofing Contractor Lochridge-Priest, Inc. Mechanical Contractors pin Architectural Millwork/ Casework/Woodwork

of the project. According to Jane Cady Wright, FAIA, LEED AP, design principal, CEO and president of Hanbury Evans Wright Vlattas + Company, the project’s architect, one of the project’s challenges stemmed from the demolition of the beloved existing residence hall, Samuel Palmer Brooks Hall, which was named after a Baylor president who was responsible for the university’s first residence hall in 1907. “Architectural artifacts from the earlier hall, including a bust of President Brooks, were incorporated into the new construction, respecting the history of the site,” she said. “Symbolism important to the Baylor tradition was incorporated into the coat of arms for the community.” With its nod to the university’s history and its focus on the future, Brooks Village is certain to keep students and faculty happy for years to come. n — Amy Pagett

Photos courtesy of Joe Griffin Photography

www.buildingofamerica.com

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Facts & Figures Owner: Bryan Independent School District Type of Project: A new middle

Bryan, Texas

Arthur L. Davila Middle School

school Size: 144,000 square feet Cost: $17 million Construction Time: Completed in May 2008 The Need: A new middle school to act as a gateway to the city of Bryan The Challenge: Connecting the new athletic spaces with the existing ones at Bryan Recreational and Athletic Center

TEAM MEMBERS

Bay Architects Architect Collier Construction General Contractor Har-Con Mechanical Contractors, LLC Installation & Design of HVAC & Plumbing Systems

Photo courtesy of Shreve Imaging

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educational facilities


Photo courtesy of Jud Haggard Photography

Situated on a hilly 30-acre site, Arthur L. Davila Middle School serves both as an educational facility and a gateway that welcomes visitors to the city of Bryan. In keeping with the region’s flavor, the school features native Texas limestone on its exterior and has space for 760 sixth-through-eighthgrade students. “Davila’s 144,000-square-foot plan and elevations work together to highlight the school’s major areas,” said Brad Hughes, AIA, senior associate for Bay Architects, the project’s architect. “The main entrance is accentuated with a high volume area and leads into the main corridor or ‘main street’ for clear orientation. This interior corridor reflects the same design features as the entrance canopy, which helps express the exterior of the building into the interior. ‘Main street’ connects to the sixth-, seventh- and eighth-grade classroom pods and acts as a divider with the quieter academic areas on one side of the ‘street’ and the noisy spaces of electives, athletics and the cafetorium on the opposite side.” According to Hughes, the site was previously home to playing fields owned by Bryan Recreational and Athletic Center (BRAC). However, the project is a win-win situation for everyone since it adds a new football field, a running track and tennis courts for both the school and BRAC. “A challenge posed was the need to connect the new school’s athletic areas to those of BRAC so the community could take advantage of these shared spaces,” said Hughes. “The City of Bryan, Bryan ISD [Independent School District, the project’s owner] and the design team worked together throughout the project to keep these areas compatible and connected to each other.” n — Amy Pagett

www.buildingofamerica.com

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Facts & Figures Owner: Rockwall Independent School District Type of Project: A new elementary school Size: 91,489 square feet Cost: $15.049710 million (construction costs) Construction Time: August 2006 - July 2007 The Need: A new school to meet the needs of Rockwall’s elementary school students The Challenge: Making convenient, simple drop-off areas

TEAM MEMBERS

SHW Group LLP Architect Pogue Construction General Contractor Lindsay Glass Glass & Glazing Rice Drywall, Inc. Drywall Contractor

Rockwall, Texas

Celia Hays Elementary School

Southwest Lath and Plaster Plastering

Rockwall Independent School District’s Celia Hays Elementary School is dedicated to exceeding the needs of its pre-kindergarten-through-sixthgrade students. The school was named after Celia Hays, a former teacher who served the Rockwall area community for 42 years before retiring and working as a librarian for the Rockwall County Library and a volunteer for Lake Pointe Medical Center. Set on 9.78 acres, the 91,489-square-foot school is one of the new prototype elementary schools for the Rockwall Independent School District, according to SHW Group, Inc., the project’s architect. Some of the school’s special features include a television studio, a green screen wall and special stage lighting. Creating convenient drop-off spaces was a challenge for the project team. The areas needed to be easy to locate and safe. The project team addressed these issues by making three seperate drop-off zones to seperate students by age and distinguish parent traffic from school bus traffic. In addition, large canopies cover the drop-off areas, protecting students from the elements. The pre-kindergarten has administrative offices, an activity center, a gathering space and an indoor play area. In addition, the pre-kindergarten entrance and spaces are appropriately scaled for younger students, according to SHW Group. Completed in July 2007, Celia Hays Elementary School carries on the work of its namesake — one student at a time. n — Amy Pagett Photos courtesy of Mark Trew

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educational facilities


Fort Worth, Texas

Facts & Figures Owner: Eagle Mountain-Saginaw

Comanche Springs Elementary School and Prairie Vista Middle School

Independent School District Type of Project: A new elementary school and a new middle school Size: 90,722 square feet (Comanche Springs Elementary School); 151,417 square feet

Sharing the same 33-acre site,

introduces natural light into the

one of the greatest challenges

Cost: $10.46 million (total for

Comanche Springs Elementary

school, but at the same time

faced on the project. Despite this

Comanche Springs Elementary

School

reduces energy costs.”

obstacle, the team was able to

(Prairie Vista Middle School)

School); $21.5 million (total for

and

Prairie

Vista

Middle School provide much-

According to Wallis, managing

complete both schools in time for

Construction Time: March 2006

needed space for a rapidly grow-

and addressing acoustical noise

their openings in August 2007. n

- July 2007

ing school district in northwest

from nearby railroad traffic was

— Amy Pagett

Prairie Vista Middle School)

The Need: To provide two new schools for a growing school district

Tarrant County. According to Jim Schiele, assis-

The Challenge: Managing and

tant superintendent of business

addressing acoustical noise from

and auxiliary services for Eagle

nearby railroad traffic

Mountain-Saginaw Independent School

District,

the

project’s

owner, the elementary school offers 39 general classrooms, two computer laboratories, a library, a gymnasium, a cafetorium, administrative offices, a science courtTEAM MEMBERS

VLK Architects, Inc. Architect

yard and state-of-the-art technology integrated into all the rooms. “The [middle school] features 47

Ratcliff Constructors, L.P. General Contractor

general classrooms, three com-

Accurate Services, Inc. Surveying Contractors

art room, life skills, academic

Aguilar Forming Rebar Construction, Inc. Concrete Formwork Contractor L.A. Fuess Partners Inc. Structural Engineers Teague Nall and Perkins, Inc. Civil Engineering

puter labs, a technology lab, an assistance, content mastery, [a] library and [a] cafeteria,” he said. “The building also features specifically designed band, choir and athletics areas.” To create a unified feel on the compact site, the team used a two-story design with similar materials for both schools. “Sustainability was also a factor in the design of the campus,” said John B. Wallis, AIA, PE, principal for VLK Architects, Inc., the project’s architect. “At both schools, the two-story design allows windows in every classroom, introducing natural light into the learning environment. The schools also are the first schools in the district to employ a geothermal heating and cooling system. The exterior of the building includes the use of sunscreens and solar shading around the perimeter of the building, which Photos courtesy of Chad M. Davis, AIA

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Cypress, Texas

Facts & Figures Owner: Cypress-Fairbanks Independent School District Type of Project: A new middle

George E. Hopper, Jr. Middle School

school Size: 221,922 square feet Cost: $24.4 million (construction costs)

In order to accommodate rapid student growth in the Cypress-Fairbanks Independent School District, the

Construction Time: March 2006

George E. Hopper, Jr. Middle School was built. The new

- August 2007

two-story school houses 1,450 students.

The Need: A new middle school for the Cypress-Fairbanks Independent School District

An accelerated construction timeline proved challenging for the project team. “The district decided that due

The Challenge: Dealing with

to growth this campus needed to open a year earlier

weather delays during a fast-paced

than originally planned,” said Mark French, AIA, REFP,

schedule

LEED AP, senior principal for Bay Architects, the project’s architect. Inclement weather added to the challenge. “A six-day work week helped overcome significant weather delays, enabling the project to open one year ahead of schedule,” said Roy J. Sprague, AIA, assistant superintendent of facilities and construction, and John Posch, project manager for the school district.

TEAM MEMBERS

Bay Architects Architect

“This project is designed to have a timeless classic architectural image that will not be ‘dated’ 20 years

Purcell Construction General Contractor

from now,” said French. Exterior materials were chosen to complement the adjacent high school but still

Pool Custom Iron Works, Inc. Ornamental Metals

provide the middle school with its own identity. The

Sturdisteel Company Bleachers & Grandstands

Administration and the cafeteria are located on the first

TAS Commercial Concrete Construction, LLC Concrete Contractors

school’s compact layout keeps student traffic minimized. floor while the library is located on the second floor. The cafeteria is surrounded by two interior courtyards to provide ample natural daylight for students. George E. Hopper, Jr. Middle School is a prototype school that serves the district well. n — Mella Barnes

Photos courtesy of Jud Haggard Photography

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educational facilities


Facts & Figures Owner: Humble Independent School District Type of Project: A renovation and addition to an existing high school Size: 179,403 square feet (addition); 207,929 square feet (renovations) Cost: $33.6 million Construction Time: August 2005 - September 2007 The Need: New and renovated space for Kingwood Park High School The Challenge: Completing construction while the school remained open

Kingwood, Texas

Kingwood Park High School TEAM MEMBERS

SBWV Architects, Inc. Architect

Kingwood Park High School, previously a campus serving ninth-grade

Durotech LP General Contractor

students, was renovated and convert-

TAS Commercial Concrete Construction, LLC Concrete Contractors

The school sits on a 52-acre site and

Water Technology, Inc. Aquatic Consultants

space and 207,929 square feet of

ed into a full four-year high school. contains 179,403 square feet of new renovated space. Since the school remained operational throughout the course of construction, the project team had to comply with safety requirements while completing construction in a timely manner. “Planning and being flexible with the planning was the

four small learning communities of

Completed in September 2007,

key,” said Tim Garison, senior proj-

400 students. The school is equipped

Kingwood Park High School will

ect manager for Durotech LP, the

with well-developed, state-of-the-art

serve the district well into the

project’s general contractor. The

technology and is also designed to be

future. n

school staff also had to be flexi-

energy efficient and sustainable.

— Mella Barnes

ble to help solve the challenge. “Administrative

staff

temporarily

relocated to other areas until their new offices were built,” said Mark Krueger,

assistant

superinten-

dent-support services for Humble Independent School District. “It is unique in it is truly a high school designed for the future,” said Gerald P. Stuyck, AIA, principal in charge, project architect, and Jim McSherry, LEED AP, project manager for SBWV Architects, Inc., the project’s architect. The school layout creates Photos courtesy of Jud Haggard Photography

www.buildingofamerica.com

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Facts & Figures Owner: The John Cooper School Type of Project: A new performing arts center Size: 38,000 square feet Cost: $14.6 million Construction Time: February 2007 - August 2008 The Need: A new performing arts building for The John Cooper School The Challenge: Deciding where to put the new structure

TEAM MEMBERS

Morris Architects Architect Brookstone, L.P. Construction Manager/General Contractor HFP Acoustical Consultants Inc. Acoustical Consultants TAS Commercial Concrete Construction, LLC Concrete Contractors

Photo courtesy of Morris Architects

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educational facilities


The Woodlands, Texas

The John Cooper School Performing Arts Center The John Cooper School, a nonprofit college prep private school for pre-K through 12th-grade students, recently added a new performing arts building. The John Cooper School Performing Arts Center (PAC) is a 38,000-square-foot facility that can house a variety of functions for the school. Included in the facility are classrooms, set and costume shops, dressing rooms, a dance studio, a 125-seat black box theater, and a 515-seat main stage theater. “The aesthetics and acoustics of the PAC are amazing, and yet the facility fits in and coordinates nicely with the much smaller and less expensive campus buildings that surround it,” said Michael F. Maher, head of school. Finding an ideal location for the new building was a challenge for the project team. “The property’s topography, combined with the number of trees, meant that there were actually few buildable sites remaining,” said Robine Hendricks, project manager for Morris Architects, the project’s architect. A strategic reuse of existing square footage helped solve the challenge, and the new building was made the central access for school. This comprehensive new building allows students to take a more active role in performing arts. “The building exemplifies The John Cooper School’s attention and dedication to the arts as part of a well rounded curriculum,” said Hendricks. n — Mella Barnes Photos courtesy of Morris Architects

www.buildingofamerica.com

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79


Klein, Texas

Facts & Figures Owner: Klein Independent

Klein Independent School District Network Operations Center

School District Type of Project: A new operations center facility Size: 12,000 square feet Cost: $7.5 million Construction Time: March 2007

The old high school in the Klein Independent School

The new Network Operations Center honors the histo-

The Need: A new building for the

District was demolished to make a new building for

ry of the Klein Independent School District, while ensur-

Klein Independent School District

the IT Department and Community Alumni Center.

ing safety and communication for future students. n

- January 2008

IT Department and Community Alumni Center The Challenge: Bringing new technology into a historically sensitive building

The building houses the network systems for the entire

— Mella Barnes

school district. Structurally, the building is designed to withstand a Category 5 hurricane and winds from a Category 4 tornado. This will allow the district to maintain communication in the event of such a disaster. The building is durable enough to withstand 150-mph winds. A challenge for the project team was in adding stateof-the-art technology to the building while addressing the sensitive history of the former school building. “We

TEAM MEMBERS

found that marrying these two key concepts of the project not only generated the greatest challenge, but also

Powers Brown Architecture Joint Venture Architect Corgan Associates, Inc. Joint Venture Architect

invited the opportunity for an interesting design,” said Jeffrey Brown, AIA, design principal of Powers Brown Architecture, the project’s architect in a joint venture

Durotech LP General Contractor

with Corgan Associates, Inc.

LECS Electrical Contractors

Neoclassical design of the old high school. Floorboards

Pinnacle Structural Engineers Structural Engineers TAS Commercial Concrete Construction, LLC Concrete Contractors

The building’s architecture pays tribute to the from the old high school gymnasium were incorporated into the new flooring. The scoreboard, basketball backboard and hoop from the 1930s were mounted on the wall in the Community Alumni Center.

Photos courtesy of Powers Brown Architecture

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educational facilities


Facts & Figures Owner: Leander Independent School District Type of Project: A new elementary school Size: 108,000 square feet Cost: $19 million Construction Time: September 2007 - August 2008 The Need: A new elementary school for Leander Independent School District The Challenge: Working on a fast-track schedule

TEAM MEMBERS

O’Connell Robertson and Associates Architect American Constructors Construction Manager at Risk PBS&J Civil Engineers Pickett, Kelm & Associates, Inc. Structural Engineers

Cedar Park, Texas

Leander Elementary School #21 Leander Independent School

The programming phase was

bers, district staff and focus group

District is one of the fastest growing

completed in five weeks. “However

members reviewed design details

school districts in Texas, opening

atypical, this was a critical step in

and allowed the project to remain

an average of two new elementary

the process for this project in order

on time.

schools in 2008 and 2009. Due to

to ensure success for the future facil-

Leander Elementary School #21

the urgent need for new educa-

ities to be designed based on this

is a pre-K through fifth-grade school

tional space yearly, the project

prototype,” said Chris Narendorf,

with spaces designed around flex-

team was challenged with this fast-

associate with O’Connell Robertson

ibility. Each class can gather in

track schedule of building Leander

and

project’s

traditional arrangements as well

Elementary School #21. In order

architect. Upon approval of the

as small and multiclass groups.

to solve this challenge, the project

programming concept from the

The finished school establishes a

team divided the design document

school board, the design half of

prototype for all future schools in

delivery schedule into two halves:

the process began. A team con-

the district. n

programming and design.

sisting of the project team mem-

Associates,

the

— Mella Barnes

Photos courtesy of Chris Cooper Photography

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81


Facts & Figures Owner: Frisco Independent School District Type of Project: A new high school Size: 336,956 square feet Cost: Approximately $50.6 million Construction Time: August 2005 - June 2007 The Need: A new high school for Frisco Independent School District The Challenge: Working around a protected wetlands area

TEAM MEMBERS

SHW Group, Inc. Architect Charter Builders, LTD. Construction Manager Century Mechanical Contractors Inc. Mechanical (HVAC & Plumbing) Master Audio Visuals, Inc. Audiovisual Sturdisteel Company Bleachers & Grandstands

Frisco, Texas

Liberty High School

Supreme Roofing Systems Roofing Contractors

Liberty High School is the fourth high school for the Frisco Independent School District and was built to relieve growth on the east side of the district. The project includes a new main academic building, an outdoor athletics building, and a concession and restroom building for field sports venues. The project uses geothermal heating and cooling for cost-efficient and environmentally friendly temperature control. The facility is designed around a “neighborhood school concept,” which involves a smaller number of students per class and a wide variety of elective classes. When the project team began working on the football field and track, they encountered a protected wetlands area. “From day one we started coordination with our civil engineering consultant and the Corps of Engineers to figure out what steps needed to take place to free the land for construction,” said Kristie Hester, marketing coordinator for Charter Builders, LTD., the project’s construction manager. A field specialist came to survey the land and set requirements for certain areas, including a “no mow” area and provision of bird houses. When the requirements were met, the construction on the track began. “The competition field and track were quickly completed and made ready for the upcoming year,” Hester said. Liberty High School provides a flexible learning environment and an environmentally conscious design that will benefit students for years to come. n — Mella Barnes Photos courtesy of Mark Trew

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educational facilities


Facts & Figures Owner: Mabank Independent School District Type of Project: A new high school Size: 209,000 square feet Cost: $34 million Construction Time: September 2005 - July 2007 The Need: A new high school for Mabank Independent School District The Challenge: Building two new entrances for the school

TEAM MEMBERS

Claycomb Associates Architect Charter Builders, LTD. General Contractor Claymark Construction Excavating Contractor

Mabank, Texas

Mabank High School The new Mabank High School was built adjacent to

adjacent to the old school and was close to the high-

Hart, Gaugler & Associates, Inc. Structural Engineers

the old high school and athletic facility. “The new facility

way, the entrances would have to be carefully placed.

Lochridge-Priest, Inc. Mechanical Contractors

was designed to accommodate overcrowding from the

According to Kristie Hester, marketing coordinator for

old high school as well as new growth,” said Dr. Russell

Charter Builders, LTD., the project’s general contrac-

Marshall, superintendent of Mabank Independent School

tor, the existing drive was demolished and a new entry

District, the project’s owner. The former high school is

was reinstalled on the south of the building, while the

being remodeled into a middle school for the district.

north drive was relocated to the east side due to the

Located on a prominent highway, the school is highly

highway proximity and the cost of work. Due to careful

visible to the community. “The building opens up to the

planning, the entrances were well placed and the chal-

public with a glass entry, which is inviting to the visitor

lenge was solved.

and allows natural light to flood the commons,” said

Hester attributed the project’s success to the cohe-

Kevin M. Smith, AIA, project manager with Claycomb

siveness of the project team. “The team demonstrated

Associates, the project’s architect. The commons area

the characteristics of professionalism and also that of a

hosts night events such as theater and public meetings.

friendship, which in turn led to many of the great aspects

Building two new entrances for the school was a challenge for the project team. Because the new school was

throughout this enormous project,” she said. n — Mella Barnes

Photos courtesy of Claycomb Associates

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83


San Antonio, Texas

Facts & Figures Owner: San Antonio Independent School District Type of Project: A new pre-K

Mission Academy

through eighth-grade school Size: 140,000 square feet

Mission Academy is the first

can also accommodate a soccer

roofs, deeply shaded overhangs

(building); 19.5 acres (site)

new school for the San Antonio

field, an area for a baseball field,

and covered walkways. According

Construction Time: June 2006

Independent School District since

a tennis court, and a parking

to Mike McGlone, AIA, principal of

- August 2008

the late 1960s. The school is the

area, the school accommodates

Alamo Architects, the project’s archi-

The Need: A new school

first of its kind in the area, host-

750-900 students.

tect, challenges stemmed from the

Cost: $25 million

The Challenge: Working on a tight site that was a former agricultural pasture

ing pre-K through eighth-grade

The school’s design uses stone,

site being a former agricultural pas-

students. With a football field that

patterned concrete block, metal

ture with many trees that required mitigation. Although the site was big for the district at 19.5 acres, the removal of trees was necessary to place the school with enough room for the adjacent residential subdivision and local highways. McGlone said that in the end, the “challeng-

TEAM MEMBERS

Alamo Architects Architect GW Mitchell & Sons General Contractor Sturdisteel Company Bleachers & Grandstands Wilborn Steel Co., Ltd. Steel Fabricator

es” were merely “opportunities” to explore new concepts for one of the oldest school districts in the state. The building program and concept design were developed with a committee of administrators, staff and teachers. The school will function as a “hub” for other nearby schools’ extracurricular activities, as other schools may not have the space or available programs. Mission Academy provides a multitude of educational and recreational facilities to students of many age levels, providing a sense of community among young students. n — Mella Barnes

Photos courtesy of Alamo Architects

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educational facilities


San Antonio, Texas

Facts & Figures Owner: Most Reverend José

Patrick F. Flores Residence Hall at the Assumption Seminary

H. Gomez S.T.D. Archbishop of San Antonio, Archdiocese of San Antonio Type of Project: A new seminary building Size: 50,000 square feet Cost: $9 million Construction Time: July 2006 - November 2007 The Need: A new residence hall for the Assumption Seminary The Challenge: Adapting the site to provide a functional, yet private and religious atmosphere

TEAM MEMBERS

Morkovsky + Associates, Inc. Architect J.C. Stoddard Construction General Contractor D&B Lath & Plaster, LLC Plastering

Photo courtesy of J.C. Stoddard Construction

Due to a recent influx in priest-

www.buildingofamerica.com

According

to

Robert

E.

future renovations of existing build-

hood vocations, the Assumption

Morkovsky, chairman of the board

ings. In addition to the many new

Seminary needed a new residence

for Morkovsky + Associates, Inc., the

amenities the facility includes, inte-

hall. Thus, the Patrick F. Flores

project’s architect, the biggest chal-

rior ramps made the entire facility

Residence Hall was built. The facil-

lenges for the project team were in

handicapped accessible.

ity is the first new building in 53

adapting the site and providing

Vocations in priesthood had

years for the seminary.

a private, religious and functional

been declining over the past few

The 50,000-square-foot, two-

atmosphere for seminary students.

decades, negating the need for

story structure includes a chapel,

“The existing campus was a mix

new construction on many semi-

five lounges, four laundry rooms,

of building designs,” he said. The

nary campuses. Thanks to a recent

80 private rooms with baths,

project team handled the challenge

growth in interest, the new Patrick

four faculty suites, and two large

by providing a fresh approach to

F. Flores Residence Hall will accom-

interior courtyards that provide

the exterior design with materials

modate student growth now and

natural daylight to every occupi-

such as painted stucco wall fin-

in the future. n

able space.

ishes that can be incorporated in

— Mella Barnes

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85


Sherman, Texas

Facts & Figures Owner: Sherman Independent School District Type of Project: A new

Percy W. Neblett Elementary School

elementary school

Named after late longtime educator and commu-

identical in all of the classrooms, whether on the north

nity activist, Percy W. Neblett Elementary School is an

or south side of the corridors,” said Terry Hoyle, AIA,

- August 2007

81,310-square-foot facility on 25 acres. The school has

LEED AP, principal of SHW Group, Inc., the project’s

The Need: A new

a capacity of 700 and is designed to create a sense of

architect. This challenge was solved by building mock-

elementary school for the

community for its students.

ups to study the design options. Study models of the

Size: 81,310 square feet Cost: $12.2 million Construction Time: May 2006

Sherman Independent School District

The Sherman Independent School District wanted to

school were created to experiment with different light

The Challenge: Maximizing the

minimize the school’s impact on the environment and

use of natural daylight for students

teach students to care about the ecosystem. The project

In the end, the use of daylighting minimized opera-

team decided to maximize natural daylight in the school

tional costs with reduced energy use from lighting

in order to reduce lighting costs and provide a more

and air conditioning. “The result was a building that

natural setting for students. This resulted in a challenge

enhanced the learning environment by providing com-

when the team had to decide how to effectively harvest

fortable spaces that connected people to the environ-

daylight for the school. “The use of daylighting required

ment around them,” said Hoyle. n

the amount and the quality of the natural light to be

levels and degrees of window tinting.

— Mella Barnes

TEAM MEMBERS

SHW Group, Inc. Architect Plyler Construction Construction Manager at Risk Quality Sound and Communications Communications Contractors Sherman Door & Hardware Doors/Frames/Hardware

Photos courtesy of Mark Trew

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educational facilities


Facts & Figures Owner: Southwest Educational Development Laboratory Type of Project: A new research and development facility Size: 49,700 square feet Cost: $9.026 million Construction Time: November 2006 - December 2007 The Need: A new facility for educational research The Challenge: Building necessary facilities without destroying the environment

TEAM MEMBERS

Photo courtesy of Studio 8 Architects, Inc./Photography by Nat Shands

Benz Resource Group Project Manager

Austin, Texas

Studio 8 Architects Architect

Southwest Educational Development Laboratory

Raymond Construction Co., Inc. General Contractor

The Southwest Educational Development Laboratory (SEDL) has a new headquarters building on 1.8 acres. SEDL is a nonprofit organization that works to solve significant education problems. “SEDL provides high-quality research and evaluation, products and services, and professional development — all to improve teaching and learning,” said Dr. Wesley A. Hoover, president and CEO of SEDL. This three-story building includes many common spaces for collaborative work including meeting rooms, a 120person conference center, a science and technology demonstration classroom, an education research library and a large outdoor balcony overlooking an adjacent park area. The building is located on a former municipal airport site in an area that also includes a children’s medical center and pediatric research facility. A challenge on the project’s construction was in building an effectively large research facility while remaining environmentally conscious. The project team solved this challenge by using “green” building materials. The project has received the U.S. Green Building Council’s (USGBC) Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED®) silver certification. SEDL’s new facility will allow the organization to improve education in a functional building that is safe for the environment. n — Mella Barnes Photo courtesy of Studio 8 Architects, Inc./Photography by Lars Frazer

www.buildingofamerica.com

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87


Nacogdoches, Texas

Facts & Figures Owner: Stephen F. Austin State University Type of Project: A new recreation center Size: 153,340 square feet (total indoor and outdoor space)

Stephen F. Austin State University Student Recreation Center

Cost: $24 million Construction Time: January 2006 - September 2007 The Need: New recreational space for Stephen F. Austin State University The Challenge: Coordinating all aspects of construction

TEAM MEMBERS

F&S Partners Incorporated Architect J.E. Kingham Construction Company Construction Manager at Risk The Cabinet Shop Architectural Millwork/Casework/ Woodwork L.S. Decker, Inc. Waterproofing Contractors

Located on a sloping terrain with beautiful pine trees, the Stephen F. Austin State University Student Recreation Center is a state-of-theart recreation facility for students. The facility includes a climbing wall, racquetball courts, a leisure pool, a weight room, an exercise room, an indoor running track, a gym, and much more. The design of the building maximizes views of the surrounding landscape and the area’s signature pine trees. The project team’s primary goal was to save as many of the trees as possible when building the facility. “This project required an extreme amount of integrated construction,” said Jim Kingham, president of J.E. Photos courtesy of Craig D. Blackmon, FAIA

Kingham Construction Company,

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texas edition

the project’s construction manager

ule and weekly coordination meet-

institutions. Jeffrey Ray Huskey,

at risk. Kingham said that this aspect

ings to assure success,” he said.

director of campus recreation for

was especially challenging for the

In addition, the project team

the university, congratulated the

project team and required all mem-

members combined their knowl-

team on its efforts. “Bringing these

bers of the project team to install

edge with several members of the

groups together with their expertise

their work in step with one another

university’s recreational staff, who

allowed for a very successful proj-

to keep the flow of work moving

had been involved with recreation

ect,” he said. n

forward. “We had a precise sched-

center construction projects at other

— Mella Barnes

educational facilities


College Station, Texas

Facts & Figures Owner: Texas A&M University System Type of Project: A new indoor athletic facility Size: 75,520 square feet (football building); 119,560 square feet (track building) Cost: $35.6 million

Texas A&M University McFerrin Athletic Center The Texas A&M University McFerrin Athletic Center

Construction Time: August 2006

comprises two buildings that combine for more than

- November 2008

195,000 square feet of indoor space. The facility

The Need: New athletic space for football and track

includes a regulation-size football field, a track, field

The Challenge: Managing the

event space, and seating and facilities for 5,000 people.

available funding

“All of these functions are housed under one of the largest open-span tensile fabric structures in the world,” said Jason Andrus, project architect for O’Connell Robertson and Associates, the project’s architect. “The project is massive and highly specialized,” said Garett Wheaton, LEED AP, project manager for SpawGlass, the project’s construction manager at risk. The floor space is surfaced with Mondotrack SX, a

TEAM MEMBERS

rubber material that was launched for the Olympics in

Texas A&M University System Facilities Planning & Construction Division Program Manager O’Connell Robertson and Associates Architect SpawGlass Construction Manager at Risk Acuity, Inc. Technology Consultants Doran Steel Inc. Reinforcing Steel Erection/Rebar Fabrication & Installation Har-Con Mechanical Contractors, LLC Installation & Design of HVAC & Plumbing Systems Summit Structures LLC Engineered Fabric Buildings

Beijing. The hydraulic running track allows for the turns to rise up from the floor, making it easier for athletes to navigate the turns at speed. The track is one of only a few in the world and was imported from Italy. Managing the available funding was a challenge for the project team. In order to begin construction as soon as possible, the project was released in six separate packages. SpawGlass provided continuous pricing information for design decision making, and design meetings were held to review options. The careful planning allowed for the football team to occupy the building three months early to practice for the Holiday Bowl in 2007. n — Mella Barnes Photos courtesy of Chris Cooper Photography

www.buildingofamerica.com

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89


Facts & Figures Owner: Texas Christian University Type of Project: A new facility for campus activities Size: 135,000 square feet Cost: $45.7 million Construction Time: January 2006 - July 2008 The Need: New multifunctional space for Texas Christian University The Challenge: Maintaining safety on an active campus through inclement weather

TEAM MEMBERS

Cannon Design Design Architect Linbeck Group, LLC Construction Manager ccrd partners Consulting Engineers

Fort Worth, Texas

Texas Christian University – Brown Lupton University Union Texas Christian University recent-

Harold Hebson, project manager for

ly added the new Brown Lupton

Linbeck Group, LLC, the project’s

University Union to provide a

construction manager, said, “We

multitude of services for students.

overcame these challenges with

According to Patricia Bou, proj-

a disciplined management team,

ect manager for Cannon Design,

which implemented strategic work

the project’s design architect, the

force sequencing and enforced

new facility anchors and unifies the

stringent safety procedures to rein-

university’s Student Commons and

force a safe project environment for

neighboring residence halls.

workers, students and faculty.”

Located on a three-acre site, the

The project team replicated the

135,000-square-foot facility includes

architecture used on the campus

foodservice, retail spaces, a formal

in the early 1900s to ensure that

dining room, conference and meet-

the building would complement its

ing spaces, a 600-seat ballroom,

surroundings. “It appears as if the

an auditorium, office spaces and a

project has always been part of the

350-seat outdoor amphitheater. A

historic campus,” said Hebson.

new 130-foot bell tower serves as the university’s landmark. With the project located in the

In addition to providing a variety of amenities for students, the facility is slated to receive the

center of the open campus, the

U.S.

project team had to make sure

(USGBC) Leadership in Energy and

safety was never compromised.

Environmental Design (LEED®) cer-

Additionally, heavy rainfall dur-

tification. n

ing construction posed difficulties.

Green

Building

Council’s

— Mella Barnes

Photos courtesy of Hedrich Blessing

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educational facilities


Denton, Texas

Facts & Figures Owner: University of North Texas

University of North Texas Honors and Legends Residence Halls

Type of Project: Two new residence halls Size: 73,600 square feet (Honors Hall); 83,300 square feet (Legends Hall) Cost: $9.8 million (Honors Hall); $16.6 million (Legends Hall)

In

order

to

accommodate

Construction Time: February

student

2006 - September 2007 (Honors

the University of North Texas

Hall); completed in December 2007 (Legends Hall)

population

growth,

added two new student housing

The Need: New student housing

facilities. Honors Hall and Legends

for the University of North Texas

Hall provide housing for a total

The Challenge: Working with site constraints and keeping all user groups happy

of 500 students and create an aesthetic border for the fast-growing campus. Each individual dwelling unit includes two private bedrooms, a shared living room and a shared bathroom. Living rooms include a built-in kitchenette. Common areas consist of television rooms,

TEAM MEMBERS

game rooms, computer labs, laun-

PGAL Architect

dry rooms and study rooms.

Austin Commercial, LP General Contractor

on both residence halls. In Legends

DGB Glass Glass & Glazing

Site constraints were a challenge Hall, the game room was built into the slope of the site at the first floor to save space. Long corridors built in Honors Hall contain broken wall planes and natural light to minimize the tunnel effect. Another project challenge was in making all user groups happy. Faculty, administration staff, visiting dignitaries, dormitory staff and students all had different needs and interests that needed attention. According to Cynthia Roth, marketing and PR manager for PGAL, the project’s architect, this challenge was solved by carefully weaving all interests into the project without compromising the others. Both facilities are washed in natural light and are designed to please many different groups within the school. Combining recreational space with study space and using ample natural lighting, Honors Hall and Legends Hall make the most of both community and environment. n — Mella Barnes Photos courtesy of PGAL/Richard Payne, FAIA

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91


Houston, Texas

Facts & Figures Owner: University of Houston System Type of Project: A new academic building and parking structure Size: 189,250 square feet (Shea Street Building); 167,400 square

University of Houston Shea Street Building and Vine Street Garage

feet (Vine Street Garage) Cost: Approximately $31 million Construction Time: January 2006 - August 2007 The Need: A new academic building and parking area for the University of Houston The Challenge: Working on a relatively short development schedule for the building and making the parking garage accessible and safe

TEAM MEMBERS

PGAL Architect Manhattan Construction Company General Contractor TAS Commercial Concrete Construction, LLC Concrete Contractors

The University of Houston’s downtown campus

solution was a schedule that overlapped design and

needed a new building for the School of Business as well

construction activities by 12 months. The parking

as additional parking. Thus, the four-story, 189,250-

garage had to be easily accessible, convenient and safe

square-foot Shea Street Building and 620-space Vine

for commuting students. “It also had to be designed

Street Garage were built for the campus.

not to detract from the focal point of the building,” said

Each project had its own challenge. The academic

Cynthia Roth, marketing and PR manager for PGAL,

building had an 18-month development schedule,

the project’s architect. The garage was positioned at

which was a challenge for a building of that size. The

the rear of the site, which shields it from view but also

Photos courtesy of PGAL/Richard Payne, FAIA – photographer

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makes it convenient and usable to

Shaded exterior walls reduce heat

additional buildings.

gain and energy usage while allow-

The

academic

building

was

ing for a smaller chiller plant.

designed following the U.S. Green

Despite the magnitude of the

Building Council’s (USGBC) sustain-

project, the specific design require-

able principles. A large glass foyer

ments and the tight schedule, the

and surrounding windows allow

facilities opened on time for the fall

natural light to flood the building

semester of 2007. n

and limit the need for artificial light.

— Mella Barnes

Photos courtesy of PGAL/Richard Payne, FAIA – photographer

www.buildingofamerica.com

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93


Facts & Figures Owner: Houston Independent School District Type of Project: A new elementary school Size: 84,553 square feet Cost: $9.5 million (building and site); $12.9 (total project cost) Construction Time: February 2006 - August 2007 The Need: To replace a small, aging school The Challenge: Fulfilling all the school’s requirements while working around the existing site constraints

Houston, Texas

TEAM MEMBERS

Heery International, Inc. Program Manager

Walnut Bend Elementary School

VLK Architects, Inc. Architect Drymalla Construction Company, Ltd. General Contractor Doran Steel Inc. Reinforcing Steel Erection/Rebar Fabrication & Installation Jarreau & Associates, Inc. Landscape Architects & LEED Consultants Landtech Consultants, Inc. Civil Engineers

In 2002, Houston voters approved

In order to achieve the building

Burroughs, general manager — con-

a multimillion-dollar bond issue to

program for a 750-student school

struction services for Houston ISD, is

rebuild and upgrade many facili-

serving pre-kindergarten through

that during its design, the building

ties within the Houston Independent

fifth grade on the existing site, VLK

was selected to be a case study for

School District (ISD), including

responded with a two-story design

utilizing Leadership in Energy and

Walnut Bend Elementary School. The

comprised of a compact floor plan

Environmental Design (LEED®) on

circa 1960 school sat on a five-acre

that is zoned to clearly define and

the district’s future school projects,

site and was slated for renovation.

separate academic areas from the

enabling the school to be used as a

However, once VLK Architects, Inc.

public areas shared by the commu-

teaching tool for students to learn

conducted the initial assessment, the

nity, such as the multipurpose room

about the benefits of sustainability.

company proposed to replace the

and the cafeteria. Each grade level has

According to Burroughs, the school

school altogether.

its own neighborhood while sharing

is very energy efficient — from its

The original school building was

a multi-instructional flex space for

building envelope to its HVAC sys-

not only aging, it was greatly in

either multiple small-group instruc-

tem to its use of natural lighting.

need of more space. The number of

tion or larger team instruction. “The

In addition, the team selected low-

students had outgrown the facility’s

design complements the mission of

emitting adhesives, sealants, car-

capacity — to the point where more

the facility/owner by meeting and

pets and paints for the project, and

classes were being held in portable

exceeding the education specifica-

durable finishes are used through-

buildings than in the original struc-

tions of Houston ISD,” said Kenneth

out high-traffic areas of the school,

ture. There was also no on-site park-

Hutchens, principal for VLK.

reducing maintenance costs. The

ing or designated drop-off zones for students.

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The most important feature of the new facility, according to Willie

school is currently pending LEED® certification.

educational facilities


Photo courtesy of Geoffrey Lyonshade

Furthermore, the integration of environmental practices that stress recycling was innovative, according to Chuck Cordes, project manager for Drymalla Construction Company, Ltd., the project’s general contractor. Recycled materials were an integral part of the school’s design, and recycle bins were installed in the school to be used by staff and students. “To incorporate the building into the curriculum, we developed a theme for the building of the ‘Eagle’s Nest’ using the school’s mascot [an eagle],” added Hutchens. Photo courtesy of Chad M. Davis, AIA

Poems, quotes, facts, maps of native nesting ranges and an eagle’s

coverings in areas throughout the

area for the project. In order to meet

In the end, the project was

nest are embedded in the school’s

building.

the requirement that all the park-

highly successful due to experi-

flooring. Teachers and children

The site itself presented the

ing and student drop-off/pick-up be

enced

are surrounded by information

greatest challenge for the proj-

within the boundary of the site and

were

on eagles, and teachers can take

ect, according to both Hutchens

not on the street as with the previous

think outside the box. Burroughs

the kids out into the halls to do

and Burroughs. The site has a

school, while maintaining as many

said, “All parties, including the

research on eagles. To complement

drainage bayou as well as electri-

of the existing mature trees on the

existing school staff and com-

the nest feeling and bring nature

cal and sanitary sewer easements

site as possible, a smaller building

munity participants, worked well

within, “trees” made of stucco and

running through it, which left

footprint was necessary, resulting in

together.” n

wire mesh were used as column

approximately 4.5 acres of buildable

the school’s two-story design.

www.buildingofamerica.com

team able

to

members

who

collaborate

and

— Stacey Nathanson

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95


Edinburg, Texas

Facts & Figures Owner: University of Texas – Pan American Type of Project: A new fitness and recreation center Size: 93,000 square feet Cost: $26 million (total) Construction Time: June 2006

University of Texas – Pan American Wellness and Recreational Sports Center The University of Texas – Pan

project team solved this challenge

Watson attributed the success of

The Need: A new facility for sports

American previously had only an

during the design and construction

the project to the project team

and recreation at the University of

academic building for fitness and

phases of the project. The open, airy

members. “They were very focused

recreational use. According to Dr.

design allowed for a reduction in

on attention to detail and used

effective method of operating the

Jim Watson, director of wellness and

the amount of staffing necessary to

the best materials possible for an

completed facility

recreational sports for the university,

supervise the facility. The lobby and

elegant and inviting atmosphere,”

the high incidence of health risks

control desk are positioned to view

he said. n

in “the Valley” made the universi-

almost every area within the center.

- August 2007

Texas – Pan American The Challenge: Finding a cost-

— Mella Barnes

ty’s new Wellness and Recreational Sports Center well overdue. The facility will provide an ideal location for recreation and fitness for TEAM MEMBERS

F&S Partners Incorporated Architect D. Wilson Construction Company General Contractor Aguilar Forming Rebar Construction, Inc. Concrete Formwork Contractor Blum Consulting Engineers, Inc. MEP/FP Engineering Design MVP Installations, LP Brick Pavers

students, faculty, staff, alumni and their family and guests. It includes a rock climbing wall, racquetball courts, a track, and weight and fitness space. The center’s open-air design and high ceilings make the facility appear larger than its actual 93,000 square feet. It can also be easily converted from an athletic facility into a convention facility. Finding a cost-effective method of keeping the facility operational was a challenge. One of the most expensive aspects of the project would be the cost of staffing it once it was finished and open. The

Photos courtesy of Craig D. Blackmon, FAIA

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government

view our editions online at www.buildingofamerica.com


Facts & Figures Owner: City of Bryan Type of Project: A new justice center Size: 63,000 square feet Cost: $17.5 million Construction Time: Completed in March 2008 The Need: To replace a justice center that no longer accommodated the city’s growing population The Challenge: Staying on schedule

Bryan, Texas TEAM MEMBERS

Brinkley Sargent Architects Architect

Bryan Justice Center Replacing an old justice center that could no longer

communications equipment to ensure quick responses

Satterfield & Pontikes Construction, Inc. General Contractor

accommodate a growing population, the new Bryan

in critical situations, according to Satterfield & Pontikes

Justice Center on East 29th Street and Texas Avenue

Construction, Inc., the project’s general contractor.

Albo LLC Asbestos Abatement/ Demolition Contractors

provides plenty of room to serve the city for years to

The building features the latest in security measures

come. According to the City of Bryan, this is the first

without sacrificing aesthetic appeal. On the exterior, the

facility ever built in the city for the specific purpose of

center features brick and metal panels, while the interior

housing a police department and municipal court.

includes terrazzo floors, granite and millwork.

The 63,000-square-foot, two-story center houses four

According to Satterfield & Pontikes, staying on

new courtrooms, four holding cells and the city’s police

schedule was a challenge. Teamwork from all parties

headquarters. In addition, it serves as the command

involved ensured the project was successfully completed

center for the city’s police/fire/emergency medical

on time. n

services (EMS) dispatch unit and has state-of-the-art

— Amy Pagett

Photos courtesy of Jud Haggard Photography

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San Antonio, Texas

Facts & Figures Owner/Architect: U.S. Army Corps

General Instruction Building, Fort Sam Houston

of Engineers Type of Project: A new military building Size: 55,000 square feet Cost: $10.77 million Construction Time: Completed in May 2007 The Need: New training space for the U.S. Army The Challenge: Building on unstable ground

TEAM MEMBERS

Satterfield & Pontikes Construction, Inc. General Contractor Tino’s Welding & Fabrication Structural Steel Fabrication & Erection

The new General Instruction Building at Fort Sam Houston is a primary training facility for nurses being dispatched into combat in Iraq and Afghanistan. This two-story, 55,000-square-foot facility includes basic services such as fire protection and alarms, but also includes additional measures required for a military facility. Special amenities include mass notification systems, site anti-terrorism measures, force protection measures and medical gas systems for use in the event of an attack on the facility. The ground on which the building was constructed was not solid, which led to challenges for the project team. This was solved with extensive excavation of expansive fill. The expansive fill was then replaced by structural fill. The building also has a deep foundation support with concrete piers and structural grade beams. The General Instruction Building serves a vital purpose for men and women serving the United States overseas. Nurses trained at this building will provide essential health care to soldiers and ensure that troops remain alive and in good health. The project was completed on time and within budgetary limits. n — Mella Barnes Photos courtesy of Satterfield & Pontikes Construction, Inc.

www.buildingofamerica.com

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Cleburne, Texas

Facts & Figures Owner: Johnson County Type of Project: Restoration of an existing courthouse

Johnson County Courthouse Restoration

Size: 54,520 square feet Cost: $8 million (total including furniture) Construction Time: December 2005 - January 2008 The Need: Restoration of an aging courthouse The Challenge: Updating the infrastructure of an old building

TEAM MEMBERS

Architexas – Architecture, Planning and Historic Preservation, Inc. Architect Harrison, Walker & Harper, LP Construction Manager at Risk Mar-Tek Industries Marble & Granite Contractors

The Johnson County Courthouse

courthouse was driven by respect

site. “In addition to these issues,

had been in constant use since its

for the building’s original design as

at Johnson County the replication

opening in 1912 and was in great

well as meeting current technology

of damaged or missing historic fin-

need of expansions and upgrades.

and infrastructure standards.

ishes was particularly challenging,”

Therefore, an extensive restoration

Craig Melde, RA, principal in

they said. Georgia Creole marble

charge; Jay Firsching, preserva-

was replicated by visiting the origi-

According to Roger Harmon,

tion specialist/associate, project

nal quarry and hand-picking blocks

Johnson County Judge, the county

manager; and Carrie Zaboroski,

suitable for matching the existing

was committed to the long-term

RA, associate, project architect for

marble. Stained glass in the rotunda

restoration of the courthouse, pre-

Architexas – Architecture, Planning

was taken off site to be restored and

serving materials from the 1912

and Historic Preservation, Inc., the

returned for installation.

period that were of significance and

project’s architect, said that the

This five-story, 54,520-square-

removing materials from other peri-

greatest challenge was in careful

foot courthouse brings history and

ods while making the building viable

and sensitive integration of mod-

pride to the local judicial system. n

for current use. The design of the

ern infrastructure into this historic

— Mella Barnes

of the courthouse began in 2005.

Photos courtesy of Harrison, Walker & Harper, LP

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government


North Richland Hills, Texas

Facts & Figures Owner: City of North Richland Hills

North Richland Hills Library

Type of Project: A new library Size: 50,000 square feet Cost: Approximately $7.6 million (construction costs) Construction Time: October 2006 - April 2008 The Need: A new library for North Richland Hills The Challenge: Building through inclement weather

Encompassing 50,000 square feet, the new North Richland Hills Library replaces an existing, smaller facility. The new facility includes a café, a multimedia area and a multipurpose meeting space. The library has the capacity to host numerous activities and organizations such as the North Richland Hills Chess Club, movie nights, a banned books club, a job search class, several computer classes, numerous children’s programs and much more. According to Conan Mathson, project manager for Steele & Freeman, Inc., the project’s general contractor,

TEAM MEMBERS

BRW Architects Architect Barker Rinker Seacat Architects Architect Steele & Freeman, Inc. General Contractor

inclement weather challenged the project team. Out of 127 total weather days, 61 days were claimed. In order to handle this challenge effectively, Steele & Freeman’s site personnel had a weekly meeting with on-site trade contractors to discuss safety concerns, scheduling and coordination. Semi-monthly owner and architect meetings were also held to keep the project moving. With additional shell space to allow for future growth, the library currently serves the community’s many educational and recreational needs. The library is placed in the middle of an urban setting, which includes several parks, schools, shopping areas and restaurants and provides a safe haven for the surrounding community. n — Mella Barnes

Photos courtesy of Chad M. Davis, AIA

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101


Facts & Figures Owner: City of Dallas Type of Project: A new police substation Size: 38,000 square feet Cost: $10.3 million Construction Time: August 2006 - October 2007 The Need: A new police substation in Dallas The Challenge: Obtaining LEED® certification

TEAM MEMBERS

Dallas, Texas

Perkins+Will Architect

South Central Police Substation

Core Construction General Contractor Charles Gojer & Associates, Inc. Structural Engineering

South Central Police Substation is a new, 38,000-square-foot, state-of-the-art facility on 10 acres in downtown Dallas. The station includes

a

community

room,

patrol and investigations, vehicle refueling, and a large covered vehicle sallyport. From the beginning, the project team and the City of Dallas wanted the project to adhere to the U.S. Green Building Council’s (USGBC) Leadership in Energy and Environmental

Design

(LEED ®)

requirements. This presented the project team with the goal of providing a safe and effective building that was also environmentally conscious. In order to solve this challenge, the team decided to rely on the proper positioning of the building on its acreage. “Our design team modeled initial building concepts with special software in order to determine the optimum building orientation (rotated seven degrees north of due east/west) for solar heat gain and loss,” said Phil Callison, AIA, LEED AP, principal of Perkins+Will, the project’s architect. The orientation of the building provides optimal thermal Photos courtesy of Timothy Hursley

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control and the facility received

security for officers and staff. The

LEED gold certification.

use of LEED® guidelines in design

®

and

and construction allows the Dallas

safety, the South Central Police

Combining

efficiency

police force to continue to protect

Substation creates a warm and

the public while protecting the

inviting relationship with the com-

environment. n

munity while providing effective

— Mella Barnes

Photos courtesy of Timothy Hursley

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Facts & Figures Owner: City of Grand Prairie Type of Project: A new baseball stadium and recreation facility Size: 250,000 square feet Cost: $20 million Construction Time: July 2007 - May 2008 The Need: New recreation space in Grand Prairie The Challenge: Completing the project on a fast-track schedule

TEAM MEMBERS

Crafton Tull Sparks Architect & Engineer Hill & Wilkinson General Contractor

Grand Prairie, Texas

QuikTrip Park at Grand Prairie QuikTrip Park at Grand Prairie is a new, independent

A fast-track schedule proved challenging for

league baseball park. The park is owned by the city

the project team. “The owner requested that the

and was driven by a public sales tax vote. According

ballpark be open for opening day of the league

to Deborah Bowden, marketing contact for Hill &

season, only months from the start of the design,”

Wilkinson, the project’s general contractor, the stadium

said Nathan Jacob Koob, AIA, director of sports

was originally planned as a smaller venue, but the city

for Crafton Tull Sparks, the project’s architect and

stepped in to back the project and made it a much

engineer. This challenge was solved through a

larger facility to serve many purposes.

series of deadlines, effective project management

The project includes a bar and restaurant, a play area

and coordination.

for children, a swimming pool, a park, and the baseball

The deadline was met and the project was a

stadium, which hosts a multitude of community events

huge success. “As our project team sat in the stands

in addition to independent league baseball games.

waiting for the first pitch of the sold-out opening-day

The area’s history in aircraft manufacturing inspired

game, we knew that our team had hit a grand slam!”

the building’s design. Hangar-inspired steel trusses and

said Koob. n

flanking “control towers” depict the aviation theme.

— Mella Barnes

Photos courtesy of Crafton Tull Sparks

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healthcare facilities

view our editions online at www.buildingofamerica.com


Facts & Figures Owner: Texas Health Resources Type of Project: A new surgical tower at an existing hospital Size: 208,000 square feet Cost: $53.5 million (construction costs); $76 million (total) Construction Time: January 2006 - December 2007 The Need: More clinical space in order to meet the area’s growing healthcare needs The Challenge: Dealing with site constraints

Arlington, Texas TEAM MEMBERS

HKS, Inc. Architect LBL Architects Architect for Garage, Chiller & Renovations Balfour Beatty Construction General Contractor ccrd partners Consulting Engineers DGB Glass Glass & Glazing Supreme Roofing Systems Roofing Contractors Teague Nall and Perkins, Inc. Civil Engineering

Texas Health Arlington Memorial Hospital Tom Vandergriff Surgical Tower The Tom Vandergriff Surgical

in an existing narrow parking lot

A solid trust of the communication

Tower at Texas Health Arlington

with a footprint of 420 feet long

process was a must, and everyone

Memorial Hospital expands the hos-

by 80 feet wide with more than

took ownership of the process.”

pital in order to meet the increasing

10 different connection points into

Nasser Gittiban, former project

healthcare needs of the growing

the existing hospital,” he explained.

architect for HKS, Inc., one of the

communities around it.

“Access to the entire site was limited

project’s architects, said that the site

“The project consists of 208,000

to 400 feet of frontage on one face

constraints were the project’s great-

square feet of new high-end clinical

of the building only. In order to

est challenge. He said, “Despite the

construction,” said Denton Wilson,

orchestrate a successful project, it

close proximity, the existing facility

director of facilities development for

was necessary for the team to prop-

maintained full functionality while

Texas Health Resources, the proj-

erly identify every step and virtually

the expansion was under construc-

ect’s owner. “Within this new bed

build the project on paper before

tion.” n

tower is 16 state-of-the-art operat-

implementing a plan in the field.

— Amy Pagett

ing suites, 32 PACU [post-anesthesia care unit] rooms, 32 pre/post-op rooms, 48 new patient rooms, a 40,000-square-foot shell floor for future expansion, future vertical expansion capabilities, a new chiller building with one new chiller and reinstallation of three existing chillers, new cooling towers, replacement of two boilers in the existing plant, and the addition of one additional level to the existing parking garage.” According to Wilson, the new tower is within 15 feet of a city street and cantilevers over the existing hospital. “The Vandergriff Surgical Tower was designed to fit Photos courtesy of Blake Marvin — HKS, Inc.

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Dallas, Texas

Facts & Figures Owner: Baylor Health Care System

Baylor University Medical Center at Dallas Emergency Department Renovation & Expansion

Type of Project: Expansion and renovation of an emergency department Size: 78,000 square feet (total completed space) Cost: $47 million Construction Time: Completed in December 2007 The Need: To provide more space to care for patients The Challenge: Ensuring the ED

Baylor University Medical Center at Dallas (Baylor Dallas) recent-

remained fully functional during

ly expanded and renovated its

the renovation and expansion

emergency department (ED). The improvements provide the community with 84 private-bed treatment rooms; four Level 1 trauma rooms; two computerized tomography (CT) areas; four radiology imaging rooms; and a dedicated, fully functioning laboratory, according

TEAM MEMBERS

to MEDCO Construction, L.L.C.,

CB Richard Ellis Owner’s Representative/ Development Manager

the project’s construction man-

FreemanWhite, Inc. Design Architect/Architect of Record t. howard + associates Consulting Architect MEDCO Construction, L.L.C. Construction Manager/General Contractor Door Control Services, Inc. Doors/Frames/Hardware Raymond L. Goodson Jr., Inc. Civil Engineers

ager/general contractor. “This large ED boasts a simple design with care-team pods located in the center of the

According to Howard, the proj-

the compressed construction peri-

treatment

rooms

ect’s greatest challenge was ensur-

od. Other departments that had

perimeter,

which

ing the existing ED remained fully

previously been located in the

facilitates visual and verbal com-

functional during the renovation

ED’s new space were seamlessly

munication and increases staff

and expansion. “Construction was

relocated within the hospital’s

efficiency,” said Todd C. Howard,

carefully phased so as to not dis-

footprint without adversely affect-

AIA, LEED AP, president of t.

rupt the ED’s ability to care for

ing the hospital’s patient load

howard + associates, the project’s

patients, and the ED was able

capability.” n

consulting architect.

to treat 110,000 patients during

facility

and

lining

the

— Amy Pagett

Photos courtesy of Shands Photographics

www.buildingofamerica.com

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107


Houston, Texas

Facts & Figures Owner: Holly Hall

Holly Hall

Type of Project: A renovation of an existing retirement community Cost: $22.3 million Construction Time: 2005 - May 2008 The Need: Renovation of an outdated senior living facility The Challenge: Maintaining operation of the existing facility during construction

TEAM MEMBERS

Kirksey Architecture Architect Tribble & Stephens Construction Ltd. General Contractor ALL PAN Truss Manufacturing Structural Wood Components Heavy Timber Trusses

Holly Hall Christian Retirement Community, the first

construction. “It was important to Holly Hall for their

retirement community in Houston, originally opened in

residents to not be inconvenienced by the ongoing con-

1952. The community is located on 20 wooded acres

struction,” said Justin Harris, project director for Tribble

near the world-renowned Texas Medical Center. An

& Stephens Construction Ltd., the project’s general con-

extensive renovation began in 2005 to bring the aging

tractor. As a result, the construction process was divided

facility up to date.

into three phases. During each phase, residents were

The new and improved Holly Hall now includes 191

temporarily relocated to separate them from construction

new or refurbished residences, including healthcare

activities. The courtyards and gardens were preserved for

private rooms, assisted living units, private suites, apart-

residents’ views and to keep construction areas hidden.

ments and cottages. The site also contains a chapel,

Holly Hall receives no government subsidies and

dining rooms, a library, a salon and activity rooms. The

operates solely on charitable acts. With a dedication to

beautifully landscaped area provides a lush and relaxing

provide medical attention, amenities and a beautiful

setting for residents.

environment, Holly Hall offers its residents a wonderful

A major challenge the project team faced was in maintaining the operation of the existing community during

place to live. n — Mella Barnes

Photos courtesy of Tribble & Stephens Construction Ltd.

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Austin, Texas

Facts & Figures Owner: Center for Child Protection Type of Project: A new child protection facility

Kozmetsky Center for Child Protection

Size: 40,000 square feet Cost: $6.18 million Construction Time: February 2007 - April 2008

The Kozmetsky Center for Child Protection is an accredited chil-

The Need: An updated and

dren’s advocacy center in Travis

improved center for abused

County. The new, 40,000-square-

children

foot facility for abused children

The Challenge: Working with obsolete utilities

combines legal, medical and child welfare departments in one building. The facility consists of executive offices, medical examination rooms, counseling rooms and recordable interview rooms. “Children tell their story only once to reach all professional staff through videotape,” said

TEAM MEMBERS

Graeber, Simmons & Cowan Architect Flynn Construction Inc. General Contractor G&R Surveying, LLC

Tommy N. Cowan, FAIA, principal in charge with Graeber, Simmons & Cowan, the project’s architect. Green building techniques such as waste management and sustainable building materials were used on the facility. The building is designed to be child-friendly and includes a playhouse, leafy trails, textures and colors to soothe children and capture their imaginations. Family members can receive counseling and professional help to overcome negative influences. These services help ensure that children, as well as their families, will have a safe and happy future. According to L. Patrick Flynn Jr., president and CEO of Flynn Construction Inc., the project’s general contractor, 100 percent of the subcontractors working on the project made an in-kind donation to the center. Material manufacturers and corporate clients donated materials such as doors, frames, lighting and hardware. Midway through the project, the team discovered that existing utilities were obsolete and had to be redesigned. This challenge was solved by running new utility services over half of a mile to serve the project. Despite this challenge, the project was completed successfully in April 2008. n — Mella Barnes Photos courtesy of Peter Tata Photography

www.buildingofamerica.com

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Facts & Figures Owner: The Legacy Senior Communities Type of Project: A new retirement community Size: 405,000 square feet Cost: $83 million Construction Time: Completed in June 2008 The Need: A new senior living facility The Challenge: Scheduling for multiple building completions in inclement weather

TEAM MEMBERS

Plano, Texas

DiMella Shaffer Architect

The Legacy at Willow Bend

Andres Construction Services, LLC Construction Manager Lea W. von Kaenel, Inc. dba StudioSIX5 Interior Design

The Legacy at Willow Bend is a continuing care retirement community on 28 beautiful acres. The facility contains more than 220 independent, assisted-living and skilled nursing private suites. In addition to providing multiple levels of care, the facility also includes an art center, a coffee house, a theater, a library, a full-service salon, meditation gardens and three fountains. A wellness center contains a lap lane pool, a whirlpool, a resistance pool, a spa and a fitness room. Lush landscaping and many available recreational activities provide residents with luxurious living. Jeff Kempf, project manager for Andres Construction Services, LLC, the project’s construction manager, said that the project team ran into some difficulty when scheduling simultaneous building completions. “During this period of having seven buildings under construction, the jobsite received 27 inches above average rainfall to further slow the progress,” he said. Having anticipated the wet season, the project team installed the main paving loop early in the project, which kept a continuous flow of deliveries and storage areas through all weather. This in turn helped the team complete the buildings on time. Residents of The Legacy at Willow Bend enjoy an upscale style of living that caters to their specific needs. This new senior living resort is setting the standard for continuing care retirement facilities. n — Mella Barnes Photos courtesy of Charles D. Smith, AIA

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texas edition

healthcare facilities


Facts & Figures Owner: Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center Type of Project: A new medical building and renovation of an existing building Size: 165,000 square feet

Lubbock, Texas

Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center/Physicians Medical Pavilion

(addition); 25,000 square feet (renovation) Cost: $36.5 million Construction Time: November 2004 - November 2007 The Need: A new medical building and renovation to another building at Texas Tech University The Challenge: Integrating the new building seamlessly into the surrounding buildings

TEAM MEMBERS

FKP Architects Architect Lee Lewis Construction General Contractor

A desire to consolidate all clinical care into one

Deerwood Construction, Inc. Utility Contractor

patient-friendly building led to the construction of the new Physicians Medical Pavilion on the Texas Tech

Fanning Fanning & Assoc., Inc. MEP Engineers

University Health Sciences Center campus. This new, four-story building consists of 165,000 square feet of

Lee Lewis

new multispecialty clinics. The existing Health Sciences

Construction, Inc. 

Center also had 25,000 square feet renovated for an ophthalmology clinic. “The [new] building is designed to celebrate the area’s natural beauty,” said R. Wayne Marchland, AIA, ACHA, senior principal for FKP Architects, the project’s architect. Expansive windows and a pair of two-story atriums fill the public areas with natural light. A boldly expressed wall divides the pavilion’s public zones and private clinical areas. Integrating the new building into the existing campus buildings proved to be a challenge. The project team wanted the building to fit in seamlessly and prevent confusion when trying to locate individual buildings. This challenge was solved by redesigning the campus master plan, rerouting vehicular circulation and adding a pedestrian spine to link to other surrounding buildings. “This careful planning and update of the master plan allows for an ordered future growth,” Marchland said. The end result is a functional, aesthetically pleasing building that unifies existing buildings and creates a focal point for the campus. n — Mella Barnes Photos courtesy of FKP Architects

www.buildingofamerica.com

texas edition

111


Facts & Figures Owner: Lutheran Social Services of the South, Inc. Type of Project: A new retirement community Size: 260,000 square feet Cost: Approximately $31 million Construction Time: January 2007 - October 2008 The Need: A new senior living facility in Spring The Challenge: Providing multiple levels of care for residents

TEAM MEMBERS

Three Architecture, Inc. Architect SpawGlass General Contractor Faulkner Design Group L.A. Fuess Partners Inc. Structural Engineers Light Gauge Solutions Inc. Trusses/Wall Panels RF Technologies, Inc. TAS Commercial Concrete Construction, LLC Concrete Contractors

Spring, Texas

The Village at Gleannloch Farms A previously undeveloped 22.6-

memory support and skilled nursing

acre parcel of land has become The

residences. Various healthcare levels,

Village at Gleannloch Farms (VGF),

from general to specific Alzheimer’s

a nonprofit senior living community

care, are located on site. Recreation

that offers many unique levels of ser-

is available for everyone, including an

vices and care.

athletic center, a golf club, an eques-

The challenge was to provide the

trian center and lakes. Also included

many levels of care that senior resi-

in the gated community is a bistro;

dents require within one building.

a formal dining room; a salt water

John Berkely, senior vice president

pool, which Berkely said is easier on

for senior services at Lutheran Social

skin than a chlorinated pool and

Services of the South, Inc., the proj-

provides buoyancy; an arts and crafts

ect’s owner, said that VGF was devel-

room; a hair salon; a chapel; a multi-

oped as a continuing care retirement

purpose community room; a library;

community (CCRC). “As a CCRC,

and a computer room.

VGF provides a full range of services

Lutheran Social Services of the

that allows seniors to age in place

South has been serving seniors in

regardless of the levels of care they

Texas since 1926, and VGF is anoth-

may need,” he said.

er way the organization looks to

The 260,000-square-foot facility consists of 108 living units, including independent living, assisted living,

improve the quality of life for the state’s senior residents. n — Mella Barnes

Photos courtesy of ©2008 Steve Hinds

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healthcare facilities


Facts & Figures Owner: HCRI Prestonwood Medical Facility, LLC Developer/Property Manager:

Plano, Texas

The Texas Clinic at Prestonwood

Caddis Partners

Premium diagnostics, screening and treatment

a patient-friendly ambiance. While going to any

combine in one building to form The Texas Clinic

kind of doctor appointment can be stressful, the dra-

Construction Time: September

at Prestonwood. This prototype outpatient facility is

matic steel and concrete design of the facility provides

2006 - December 2007

designed to showcase the trend of medical services

a contemporary and fun ambiance. The building has

The Need: A new, state-of-the-art

being offered in a warm and inviting environment.

a unique design in which the second floor is rotated

Type of Project: A new medical center and parking garage Size: 62,900 gross square feet

medical facility

The 62,900-gross-square-foot building includes a

five degrees offset from the lower level. Due to this

latest technology and science with

cardiology clinic, a physical therapy suite, a radiation

difference, the exterior walls are constructed 15

a patient-friendly atmosphere

oncology suite, an ophthalmology office, a derma-

degrees from vertical, creating a bold, eye-catch-

tology office, a urology suite, a 12,163-square-foot

ing appearance. In addition, the adjacent 42,000-

ambulatory care center with eight operating rooms,

square-foot parking garage offers convenient and safe

and much more. Almost every kind of medical specialty

parking and helps patients get to their appointments

is located on site. According to Josh Ihde and Jason

on time.

The Challenge: Combining the

TEAM MEMBERS

Jonathan Bailey Design, LLC Architect Spring Valley Construction Company General Contractor

Signor, partners with Caddis Partners, the project’s

The Texas Clinic at Prestonwood is a collaboration of

developer/property manager, consolidation of medical

physicians and surgeons who want to provide the very

services generates a level of confidence with medical

best care to patients. The design of the building com-

referrals and provides an inviting setting for patients.

bined with the convenience of consolidated services

A challenge the project team faced was in combining the most advanced medical technology with

makes this an ideal medical facility. n — Mella Barnes

Dobson Floors Flooring Gold Landscape, Inc. Landscape Contractors United Mechanical, Inc. Mechanical Contractor/Plumbing Contractor

Photo courtesy of Jonathan Bailey Associates

www.buildingofamerica.com

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Facts & Figures Owner: Peterson Regional Medical Center Type of Project: A new medical center Size: 245,168 square feet Cost: $70.3 million Construction Time: March 2006 - April 2008 The Need: A new medical facility The Challenge: Accommodating changes in pharmacy regulations late in construction

TEAM MEMBERS

Sterling Barnett Little, Inc. Architect & Interior Designer Healthcare Construction Management, Inc. Construction Manager Robins & Morton Construction Company Joint Venture General Contractor Huser Construction Joint Venture General Contractor Frank W. Neal & Assoc., Inc. Structural Engineers

Kerrville, Texas

Peterson Regional Medical Center Peterson

Regional

Medical

ize the hospital is what makes it

Center is a replacement for a 59-

unique,” said Jaime Pacilio, market-

year-old hospital that had reached

ing coordinator for Sterling Barnett

its maximum lifespan. The new

Little, Inc., the project’s architect

hospital is designed to accom-

and interior designer.

modate expansion and includes

The facility surrounds patients

amenities such as wireless Internet,

with nature and does its part to pre-

LCD televisions, a garden and a

serve the environment. According

natural, healing environment. “I

to Patrick Murray, FACHE, CEO of

find that the detail that was used

Peterson Regional Medical Center,

in the design to de-institutional-

the building uses a “green” water

Photo courtesy of G. Russ Images

114

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healthcare facilities


recovery system that reclaims more

in the pharmacy area, but were

than one million gallons of air-con-

able to incorporate the changes

ditioning condensation annually.

without extending the construc-

The condensation is then used for

tion schedule,” said Leland Elston,

landscaping irrigation.

project manager with Robins &

One notable challenge for the

Morton Construction Company,

project team was the changing of

the project’s general contrac-

pharmacy regulations. During the

tor in a joint venture with Huser

last five months of construction,

Construction.

the State Pharmacy Board amend-

Peterson

Regional

Medical

ed regulations for pharmacies,

Center is a hospital that focuses on

including modifications to ceilings,

nature to soothe and heal patients.

air handling equipment, casework,

The facility is nestled against a hill-

doors and finishes. Every hospital

side, and “deer can be seen walk-

with a pharmacy was required to

ing along the edge of the property

make the modifications. “We were

at night,” said Elston. n

in the punch phase of construction

— Mella Barnes Photos courtesy of G. Russ Images

www.buildingofamerica.com

texas edition

115


Walnut Bend Elementary School Whole Foods Market


index

networksourcebook


Architects

Meeks + Partners 16000 Memorial Dr., Ste. 100 Houston, TX 77079 281-558-8787 fax: 281-558-3337 cbezman@meekspartners.com www.meekspartners.com Company’s Specialties: Meeks + Partners’ expertise includes luxury high-rise, mid-rise and high-density mixed-use town centers and resorts to multifamily garden and affordable communities, as well as student, independent senior housing and military housing.

Construction Managers/General Contractors

Client References: • Alliance Communities • Camden Property Trust • Gables Residential • Lincoln Property Company • Greystar

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PGAL 5555 San Felipe, #1000 Houston, TX 77056 713-622-1444 fax: 713-968-9333 croth@pgal.com www.pgal.com Company’s Specialties: Architecture, engineering, planning, interior architecture, technology and program management for public and private sector clients Client References: • Harris County • Continental Airlines • Denton County • Hewlett Packard • TxDOT

Perkins+Will 10100 N. Central Expwy., Ste. 300 Dallas, TX 75231 214-283-8700 fax: 214-283-8701 phil.callison@perkinswill.com www.perkinswill.com Company’s Specialties: Perkins+Will creates sustainable, forward-looking buildings that enhance lives and communities. Client References: • City of Dallas • City of Fort Worth • Staubach • DFW Airport • LandPlan

Brookstone, L.P. 3715 Dacoma St. Houston, TX 77092 713-683-8800 fax: 713-680-0088 info@brookstone-tx.com www.brookstone-tx.com

Collier Construction Inc. P.O. Box 1889 Brenham, TX 77834-1889 979-836-4477 fax: 979-836-4970 katie@collierconstruction.com www.collierconstruction.com

D. Wilson Construction Company 1209 E. Pecan P.O. Box 3455 McAllen, TX 78501 956-686-9573 fax: 956-686-3270 timm@dwilsonconstruction.com

Company’s Specialties: General contractor/construction manager providing preconstruction, construction and post-construction services

Company’s Specialties: Collier Construction is a full-service construction management and general contracting firm.

Company’s Specialties: General contractor/construction manager for commercial and institutional projects

Client References: • Continental Airlines • Cy-Fair Cancer Center • DePelchin Children’s Center • The John Cooper School • WoodsEdge Community Church

networksourcebook

Client References: • University of Texas System • University of Texas-Pan American • Brownsville ISD • Boultinghouse Simpson & Associates, Inc. • Gomez Mendez Saenz, Inc.


Construction, Inc. 

Key Construction Texas, LLC 3960 Sandshell Dr. Dallas, TX 76137 817-306-7979 fax: 817-306-7975 stwhitcraft@keyconstruction.com www.keyconstruction.com

Lee Lewis Construction, Inc. 7810 Orlando Ave. Lubbock, TX 79423 806-797-8400 fax: 806-797-8492 contactus@leelewis.com www.leelewis.com

Company’s Specialties: General contractor for retail, distribution facilities, health care, educational and institutional

Company’s Specialties: Commercial general contracting is our specialty… but mostly we build relationships.

Company’s Specialties: Construction manager at risk, competitive sealed proposal, design-build

Client References: • The Beat Condominiums • The Tribute Golf Clubhouse • Gilley’s-Group Sales & Restaurants • The Fort Worth Sheraton Hotel • Airport/Emergency Operations Center, DFW Airport

Client References: • City of Frisco • City of Garland • Frisco ISD • Frenship ISD • UMC Health System

Client References: • David Berndt Interests, Inc. • Direct Development • Lowe’s Companies • Kohl’s • Archon Development

Panattoni Construction, Inc. 5950 Berkshire Ln., #500 Dallas, TX 75225 214-363-0551 fax: 214-363-7501 twoods@panconinc.com www.panconinc.com

HFP Acoustical Consultants Inc. 6001 Savoy Dr., Ste. 115 Houston, TX 77036 713-789-9400 fax: 713-789-5493 omar.longoria@hfpacoustical.com www.hfpacoustical.com

Audiovisual

EMJ Corporation 5525 N. MacArthur Blvd., Ste. 400 Irving, TX 75038 972-580-1210 fax: 972-580-8202 bodom@emjcorp.com www.emjcorp.com

Acoustical Consultants

Construction Managers/General Contractors cont. Construction Managers/General Contractors cont.

Lee Lewis

master | audio visuals

Master Audio Visuals, Inc. 2135 Gilmer Rd. Longview, TX 75604 903-757-4277 fax: 903-757-4279 cliffsmallwood@masterav.com www.masterav.com

Company’s Specialties: Design-build construction of industrial, office, manufacturing and retail projects

Company’s Specialties: Consultants in all areas of acoustics and audiovisual systems design

Company’s Specialties: Educator partner for audiovisual equipment supplies, installation and integration

Client References: • Firestone • Allstate • American Leather • Courtland Development • Kirksey Architecture

Client References: • Gensler • HOK • Morris Architects • Kirksey • The Hanover Company

Client References: • Charter Builders • Cadence McShane Corp. • Ratcliff Constructors, LP • Hisaw & Assoc. • Core Construction

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Company’s Specialties: Civil engineering and land surveying services specializing in site development, transportation, hydrology and utilities

Company’s Specialties: Civil engineering, surveying, landscape architecture, planning

Client References: • Kingwood High School Renovations • Bryan Justice Center • Matagorda County Jail • Alamo Community College District • Hillcrest Medical Center

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Doors/Frames/Hardware

Demolition Contractors

Company’s Specialties: Full and partial demolition and asbestos abatement and/or asbestos transport

Door Control Services, Inc. 512 E. Dallas, Ste. 200 Grapevine, TX 76051 877-351-3667 fax: 817-442-8844 jdg@doorcontrolservices.com www.doorcontrolservices.com

ccrd partners 808 Travis St. Houston, TX 77002 713-237-8900 fax: 713-237-0123 davidd@ccrd.com www.ccrd.com Company’s Specialties: Professional engineering firm providing specialty mechanical and electrical services to the bio-containment community

Client References: • Timber Creek High School • Mansfield Athletic Complex • Saginaw High School • Keller Town Center • Harris Southwest Medical Center

Client References: • LEO A DALY • WHR Architects • Transwestern Commercial Services • Kirksey Architecture • Caldwell Companies

Albo LLC 3888 Dilly Shaw Tap Rd. Bryan, TX 77808 979-450-8088 fax: 979-778-0389 office@albollc.com

Consulting Engineers

Teague Nall and Perkins, Inc. 1100 Macon St. Fort Worth, TX 76102 817-336-5773 fax: 817-336-2813 ftw@tnp-online.com www.tnp-online.com

Client References: • Influenza Research Institute at University Research Park • National Biodefense Analysis & Countermeasure Center • National Institutes of HealthGalveston National Laboratory • New England BioContainment Laboratory • University of Texas

Electrical Contractors

Civil Engineers

Landtech Consultants, Inc. 2525 N. Loop W, Ste. 300 Houston, TX 77008 713-861-7068 fax: 713-861-4131 cdarche@landtech-inc.com www.landtech-inc.com

Performance Electric LP 11302 Windfern Rd. Houston, TX 77064 713-895-7362 fax: 713-895-7855 dross@peco-hou.com

Company’s Specialties: Automatic doors, manual doors, installation, service and hardware

Company’s Specialties: Design and installation of electrical systems for commercial, retail and computer facilities

Client References: • Austin Commercial • MEDCO • Ray Skiles • Spring Valley Construction Company • DFW International Airport

Client References: • Panattoni Construction, Inc. • E.E. Reed Construction • Comanche Contractors • Camden Construction • Corvus

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Interior Designers

Client References: • Omniplan Architects • Corgan & Associates Architects • LEO A DALY • 7th Heaven Restaurants • TPHD Hospitality Design

Company’s Specialties: Cast acrylic sheet, rod and tube manufacturing and fabrication

Sawyer Design Associates 167 Turtle Creek Dallas, TX 75207 214-443-9090 fax: 214-443-9092 info@sawyerdesignassoc.com www.sawyerdesignassoc.com

Company’s Specialties: Dallas-based interior design studio specializing in hospitality and residential commissions

Company’s Specialties: Comprehensive design services including interiors, exteriors, architecture, purchasing and installation Client References: • Fairfield Development • Gables • JLB Partners • Legacy Partners • Lincoln Property Company

Structural Wood Components 38203 FM 1774 Magnolia, TX 77355 281-259-0668 fax: 281-259-6018 ckott@structuralwoodcomponents.com www.structuralwoodcomponents.com Company’s Specialties: Produces custom heavy timber trusses assembled with one-quarter-inch external steel gusset plates

Client References: • Joule Urban Resort Pool • Landry’s Downtown Aquarium • Texas State Aquarium • Dallas World Aquarium • Moody Gardens

Michelle Meredith & Associates 5527 Stanford St., Studio B Dallas, TX 75209 214-358-3703 fax: 214-358-3684 michelle@michellemeredithassociates.com www.michellemeredithassociates.com

Client References: • Trump International Golf and Country Club • Sheraton Frisco • Three Architecture • Pinehurst Resort • Radisson Hotel and Hall Winery

Heavy Timber Trusses

Reynolds Polymer Technology, Inc. 607 Hollingsworth St. Grand Junction, CO 81505 970-241-4700 fax: 970-241-4747 jlfritz@reynoldspolymer.com www.reynoldspolymer.com

Client References: • LA Fitness • Wells Fargo Bank • Resurrection United Methodist Church • Strake Jesuit Chapel Beams • Texas Czech Center

Landscape Architects

Company’s Specialties: Foodservice design of commercial kitchens and bars

Glass & Glazing

Foodservice Design

M.B. Parker & Company, Inc. 1356 Chemical St. Dallas, TX 75207 214-631-0101 fax: 214-631-0148 mbparkerco@yahoo.com

Way Beyond Ordinar y ™

BWM Group Planning | Landscape Architecture | Architecture 102 E. Main St. Round Rock, TX 78664 512-238-8912 fax: 512-238-8913 tbargainer@bwmgrp.com www.bwmgrp.com Company’s Specialties: We create great community places. Client References: • Williamson County, Texas Parks & Recreation • Hutto, Texas Parks & Recreation • City of Cedar Park, Texas Parks & Recreation • City of Round Rock, Texas Parks & Recreation • Kendall County, Texas Parks & Recreation

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Company’s Specialties: Civil engineering, surveying, landscape architecture, planning, construction management

Client References: • Harris County Municipal Utility District No. 71 Gazebo & Footbridge • Houston Community College • Gregory Lincoln Elementary School & Hollibrook Elementary • City of Port Arthur Fire Department • Herod Elementary

Client References: • The Retail Connection • Rubloff Development Group • Hanover Property Company • Trammell Crow Company • D.R. Horton

Blum Consulting Engineers, Inc. 8144 Walnut Hill Ln., Ste. 200 Dallas, TX 75231 214-373-8222 fax: 214-361-2667 ksmith@blumeng.com www.blumeng.com Company’s Specialties: Mechanical, electrical, plumbing and fire protection engineering

Containment Solutions 5150 Jefferson Chemical Rd. Conroe, TX 77301 936-756-7731 fax: 936-756-7766 sales@csiproducts.com www.containmentsolutions.com Company’s Specialties: Manufacture large volume fiberglass tanks for underground storage

Client References: • Fidelity Investments • One Arts Plaza • Victory Plaza Buildings A&B, F&H, J (The House) • Hilton Orlando Resort Hotel • Citigroup-Regent and Las Colinas

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Landscape Architecture & Construction

Company’s Specialties: Planning, construction, maintenance, implementation, regulations, studies and additional services

Signage & Lighting

Mycoskie+McInnis+Associates 200 E. Abrams St. Arlington, TX 76010 817-469-1671 fax: 817-274-8757 mycoskie@mmatexas.com www.mmatexas.com

Manufacturers

Landscape Architects cont. MEP/FP Engineering Design

Jarreau & Associates, Inc. 2111 Lamonte Ln. Houston, TX 77018 713-682-5299 fax: 713-682-8344 joann@jarreauinc.com www.jarreauinc.com

LandPatterns, Inc. 3624 Oak Lawn Ave., Ste. 320 Dallas, TX 75219 214-219-3993 fax: 214-219-7005 info@landpatterns.com www.landpatterns.com Company’s Specialties: Site design, water features, native plant design, project management/construction Client References: • Cencor Realty Services • Carbon Landmark • Sabre Realty Management Co. • Michael F. Twichell, Inc. • Spring Valley Construction Co.

Sign Tech International, a division of Facility Solutions Group 10212 Metric Blvd. Austin, TX 78758 800-327-1104/512-494-0002 fax: 512-494-0003 bob.strobeck@fsgi.com www.stisigns.com/www.fsgi.com Company’s Specialties: National sign and lighting design, manufacturing and service Client References: • Ancor, Inc. • Chelsea Property Group • Cash America International • Opus West Construction Corp. • Goodwill Industries


Structural Engineers cont.

Client References: • 2 Houston Center • KBR Tower • Shell Research Center • KBR • Gilbane

Dallas

Austin

Brockette • Davis • Drake, Inc. 4144 N. Central Expwy., #1100 Dallas, TX 75204 214-824-3647 fax: 214-824-3373 rhill@bddeng.com www.bddeng.com

Frank W. Neal & Assoc., Inc. 1015 W. Broadway Fort Worth, TX 76104 817-332-1944 fax: 817-336-8620 cogilvie@fwna-eng.com www.fwna-eng.com

Company’s Specialties: Consulting engineers — structural and civil and surveying services

Company’s Specialties: Full-service structural engineering, Auto Cad and Revit 2010

Client References: • HKS, Inc. • Billingsley Co. • BOKA Powell • Duda Paine

Client References: • Longview Cancer Center • John Peter Smith Hospital • Sierra Providence Eastside Hospital • Odessa Hospital Medical Center • Peterson Regional Medical Center

L.A. Fuess Partners Inc. 3333 Lee Pkwy., Ste. 300 Dallas, TX 75219 214-871-7010 fax: 214-969-0065 mpeterman@lafp.com www.lafp.com

Pinnacle Structural Engineers 5516 Chaucer, Ste. B Houston, TX 77005 713-807-8911 fax: 713-807-8918 dg@pinnaclestructural.com www.pinnaclestructural.com

Company’s Specialties: Structural design of new buildings and renovated structures

Company’s Specialties: Structural engineering services for commercial and institutional projects

Client References: • DFW Airport Terminal D • Blue Cross Blue Shield of Richardson • Granite-Gables Uptown • Love Field Modernization Plan • Baylor Cancer Center

Client References: • Christ the Redeemer Catholic Church • Village High School • Green Bank • Baker Hughes CCPT • Trinity Lutheran Church

Technology Consultants

Company’s Specialties: Asbestos and lead abatement, demolition, mold remediation, infection control, emergency response

Structural Engineers

Specialty Contractors

LVI Facility Services Inc. 8100 Blankenship Houston, TX 77055 713-991-0480 fax: 713-991-2814 desman@lviservices.com www.lviservices.com

Acuity, Inc. 9390 Research Blvd., Ste. 412 Austin, TX 78759 512-697-9675 fax: 512-498-1515 lhaley@acuityusa.com www.acuityusa.com Company’s Specialties: Technology for network, wireless, voice, data center, security, cable infrastructure Client References: • AMD • Cisco Systems • University of Texas at Austin • Total Petrochemicals • Methodist Hospital System

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Utility Management

ista North America 18352 Dallas Pkwy., Ste. 136-406 Dallas, TX 75287 866-691-ISTA fax: 310-388-5642 jgosslee@ista-na.com www.ista-na.com Company’s Specialties: Utility submetering, convergent billing, utility expense management, heat cost allocation Client References: • AIMCO • AMLI • Archstone-Smith • Avalon Bay

w w w . B u i l d i n g o fA m e r i c a . c o m Each regional edition of the Real Estate & Construction Review, including the The Southern California Edition of The Real Estate & Construction Review

ShortList, can now be viewed online at our website. You can get there by going to BuildingofAmerica.com

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THE TEXAS SHORTLIST All regional ShortLists can be viewed online at www.buildingofamerica.com

SUBCONTRACTORS

TEAM MEMBERS

SUPPLIERS

VENDORS


A high priority on safety

It’s a thankless job, but somebody has to do it. When it’s time to close lanes, block ramps or direct traffic with an inconvenient detour around Texas, that somebody, more often than not, is Buyers Barricades, Inc. “We’re the largest independent barricade company in north Texas,” says President Steve Buyers, who grew the company to its present state of 40 employees and 300 to 500 jobs ongoing at any given time. That’s a lot of orange barrels, barricades and traffic control signs. But it wasn’t always that way. “I was working for a general contractor back in 1984 and needed barricades on a jobsite. I could not get this company to service the job,” Buyers recalls. “They told me to go fly a kite. I opened up the Yellow Pages to find someone else, but learned they were the only game in town. “I had a 1965 Chevrolet pick-up and a 16-foot trailer, and I went down and picked up some lumber. I figured somebody had to give them some competition. The first 12 years it was just me and the dog.” A dozen years into working for himself, business began to boom for Buyers Barricades. In 1998, the company locked up a job in Arlington with Tiseo Paving Co.

“They were rehabbing about three miles of Cooper Street, which is the state highway,” Buyers says. “We did all the traffic control for it. We did the drawings, the designs, provided the units.”

More than just orange barrels In most cases, traffic control is more than just shuffling orange barrels to the jobsite. “To begin with, we design what we’re going to do with the roadway, what we’re going to do with the traffic,” Buyers says. “We design how we’re going to funnel the traffic, keeping the automobiles from running over the workers and still moving down the highway.” When the barrels get smashed, worn and dirty from the elements, Buyers says his company is quick to move with on-site service. After all, he remembers what it was like on the other end of the line 25 years ago. “We take it very personally. If need be, I will personally come out to the jobsite, so you can get one of the owners on the jobsite within minutes, 24 hours a day,” says Buyers, now on the cusp of retirement. “I brought my stepson up in the company. He’s going to take over where I leave off, and continue on.”

For the drivers and passengers who come into contact with his barricades everyday in Texas, Buyers has this to say, “There are guys behind those barricades that are trying to build you a better roadway. Across the state of Texas, there are two men a week who lose their lives working in these work zones.” He adds that’s why his company routinely works with the Texas Department of Transportation to better ensure worker safety. Buyers has also gotten involved in community efforts to demonstrate his company’s commitment to safety. For example, the company donated, delivered and programmed electronic signage for routes leading out of Galveston ahead of 2008’s Hurricane Ike. It’s dedication like this that sets Buyers Barricades apart. — Corporate Profile

3705 E. 1st St. • Fort Worth, TX 76111 817-535-3939 • Toll Free: 888-535-3939 • Fax: 817-831-7171 • www.BuyersBarricades.com


Acoustical Consultants HFP Acoustical Consultants Inc. Omar C. Longoria, PE, Vice President 6001 Savoy Dr., Ste. 115 Houston, TX 77036 713-789-9400 fax: 713-789-5493 omar.longoria@hfpacoustical.com www.hfpacoustical.com

Aluminum & Stainless Steel Railing Systems Custom Components Company & US Railing Jim Ellsworth 13902 Lynmar Blvd. Tampa, FL 33626 800-516-9474 fax: 813-855-3706 sales@usrailing.com www.usrailing.com

Architects Meeks + Partners Catherine Bezman 16000 Memorial Dr., Ste. 100 Houston, TX 77079 281-558-8787 fax: 281-558-3337 cbezman@meekspartners.com www.meekspartners.com

Perkins+Will Phil Callison, AIA, LEED AP 10100 N. Central Expwy., Ste. 300 Dallas, TX 75231 214-283-8700 fax: 214-283-8701 phil.callison@perkinswill.com www.perkinswill.com

PGAL Cynthia Roth 5555 San Felipe, #1000 Houston, TX 77056 713-622-1444 fax: 713-968-9333 croth@pgal.com www.pgal.com

Aquatic Consultants Water Technology, Inc. Melinda Kempfer, Business Development Coordinator 100 Park Ave. Beaver Dam, WI 53916 800-538-8207 fax: 920-887-7999 info@watertechnologyinc.com www.watertechnologyinc.com

Custom Components Company and its subsidiary US Railing specialize in the design and manufacture of aluminum door frame and window components, aluminum railing systems and architectural aluminum building products directed at both the commercial and residential construction markets. Additionally, the Company directs its aluminum and stainless steel architectural railing marketing efforts at the concrete restoration market and its related contractors. The majority of all company sales are fixed amount contracts with door and hardware distributors, general contractors, developers, and property management companies. Installation services are provided through its own company certified technicians and licensed independent subcontractors. The company has been operating for over 25 years within the primary markets throughout the United States. Custom Components Company & US Railing are well positioned regionally to provide door and window frame products, railing and other architectural elements to all areas of the United States. US Railing a div. of Custom Components Company, LLC 13902 Lynmar Blvd. Tampa, FL 33626

WWW.USRAILING.COM Sales@usrailing.com

Toll Free 800-516-9474 Fax 813-855-3706

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Architectural Millwork/Casework/Woodwork The Cabinet Shop Brady Simmons P.O. Box 1292 Luskin, TX 75902 936-632-2305 fax: 936-632-2399 cabinet@consolidated.net

pin Jeff Pray 9015 Sterling St. Irving, TX 75063 972-621-1200 fax: 972-621-2543 pinsales@pinsolutions.net www.pinsolutions.net

Asbestos Abatement Albo LLC Felesia Boegner, President 3888 Dilly Shaw Tap Rd. Bryan, TX 77808 979-450-8088 fax: 979-778-0389 office@albollc.com

Audiovisual Master Audio Visuals, Inc Cliff Smallwood, President 2135 Gilmer Rd. Longview, TX 75604 903-757-4277 fax: 903-757-4279 cliffsmallwood@masterav.com www.masterav.com

imagine it • design it • build it

Designing, Building, and Installing the world’s fixtures.

9015 Sterling St. • Irving, Texas 75063 972-621-1200 • www.pinsolutions.net 132

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Ponce Contractors, Inc. Elizabeth Ponce P.O. Box 155369 Fort Worth, TX 76155 817-496-3700 fax: 817-496-3110 echavez@poncecontractorsinc.com www.poncecontractors.com

Bleachers & Grandstands Sturdisteel Company Johnny Bledsoe 131 Ava Dr. Hewitt, TX 76643 254-666-5155 fax: 254-666-4472 jbledsoe@sturdisteel.net www.sturdisteel.com


Brick Pavers MVP Installations, LP Mike Flores 2909 Mile 9 ½ N Donna, TX 78537 956-464-2579 fax: 956-464-3500 floresmike1@aol.com

Builder Supplies Factory Builder Stores Clay Mitchel 512 E. Dallas Rd., Ste. 500 Grapevine, TX 76051 817-410-8868 fax: 817-408-8807 cmitchel@factorybuilderstores.com www.factorybuilderstores.com

Civil Engineers FHI Civil & Structural Engineering Larry J. Fisher One Chisholm Tr., Ste. 5200 Round Rock, TX 78664 512-244-1546 fax: 512-388-3698 larryf@fhi.eng.pro www.fhi.eng.pro

Raymond L. Goodson Jr., Inc. Stuart Markussen 5445 La Sierra, Ste. 300, LB17 Dallas, TX 75231-4138 214-739-8100 fax: 214-739-6354 info@rlginc.com www.rlginc.com

Landtech Consultants, Inc. Cathy D’Arche 2525 N. Loop W, Ste. 300 Houston, TX 77008 713-861-7068 fax: 713-861-4131 cdarche@landtech-inc.com www.landtech-inc.com

Teague Nall and Perkins, Inc. Tom Rutledge, Principal 1100 Macon St. Fort Worth, TX 76102 817-336-5773 fax: 817-336-2813 ftw@tnp-online.com www.tnp-online.com

PBS&J Cindy Miller 6504 Bridge Point Pkwy., Ste. 200 Austin, TX 78730 512-327-6840 fax: 512-327-2453 clmiller@pbsj.com www.pbsj.com

Factory Builder Stores ...has been serving builders, remodelers, and their customers throughout Texas since 1988. Superior customer service has catapulted us into the largest builder supplier in the state of Texas.

View Us online www.BuildingofAmerica.com

512 E. Dallas Rd., Suite 500 Grapevine, TX 76051

817-410-8868 www.factorybuilderstores.com

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133


Quality Sound and Communications Steve Williams 504 E. North St. Arlington, TX 76011 817-261-0421 fax: 817-860-8407 stevew@qualitysound.com www.qualitysound.com

Concrete Contractors Cat5 Structures, Inc. Desi Arellano 11208 Hutchison Blvd., Ste. 156 Panama City Beach, FL 32407 979-820-0418 fax: 850-588-8252 texasconcretefinishers@hotmail.com Reyes Contractors Patricia Reyes 502 E. Red Bird Ln. Duncanville, TX 75116 972-296-5900 fax: 972-296-5901 reyescontractors@aol.com

TAS Commercial Concrete Construction, LLC Eddie Sanders 19319 Oil Center Blvd. Houston, TX 77073 281-230-7500 fax: 281-230-7664 esanders@tasconcrete.com www.tasconcrete.com (see display ad p. 135)

11208 Hutchison Blvd., Ste. 156 Panama City Beach, FL 32407 979-820-0418

PERCY NEBLETT ELEMENTARY SCHOOL CONGRATULATIONS, PLYLER CONSTRUCTION WE ARE PROUD TO BE A PART OF IT

OUALITY

Cat5 Structures Inc.

Communications Contractors

Commercial Concrete Specialist

SOUND AND COMMUNICATIONS Contractors • Consultants

Education facilities and their contractors demand quality. For 29 years, Quality Sound and Communications has contracted, designed and consulted on more than 450 educational and commercial facilities in Texas. Public Address A/V & Media Management Systems Telecommunications Fire/Security Systems Surveillance Systems Structured Data Cabling Systems Professional Sound and Broadcast Systems IF YOUR PROJECTS DEMAND QUALITY, ITʼS RIGHT AT YOUR FINGERTIPS! Call 1-800-210-8117 or visit our website at: qualitysound.com 504 E. North St. Arlington, TX 76011 INNOVATION-SERVICE-SOLUTIONS

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972-296-5900 Fax 972-296-5901 502 E. Red Bird Lane Duncanville, TX 75116


Concrete Formwork Contractors Aguilar Forming Rebar Construction, Inc. Santos Aguilar Jr. P.O. Box 360086 Dallas, TX 75336 972-286-2948 fax: 972-286-3138 info@aguilarforming.com www.aguilarforming.com

Construction Managers/General Contractors Brookstone, L.P. Steve Dishman 3715 Dacoma St. Houston, TX 77092 713-683-8800 fax: 713-680-0088 info@brookstone-tx.com www.brookstone-tx.com

Key Construction Texas, LLC Steve Whitcraft 3960 Sandshell Dr. Dallas, TX 76137 817-306-7979 fax: 817-306-7975 stwhitcraft@keyconstruction.com www.keyconstruction.com

Collier Construction Inc. Katie Collier Burch P.O. Box 1889 Brenham, TX 77834-1889 979-836-4477 fax: 979-836-4940 katie@collierconstruction.com www.collierconstruction.com

Lee Lewis Construction, Inc. Liz Lonngren, Vice President 7810 Orlando Ave. Lubbock, TX 79423 806-797-8400 fax: 806-797-8492 17111 Preston Rd., Ste. 100 Dallas, TX 75248 972-818-0700 fax: 972-818-0706 contactus@leelewis.com www.leelewis.com

D. Wilson Construction Company Timothy J. Mickunas 1209 E. Pecan P.O. Box 3455 McAllen, TX 78501 956-686-9573 fax: 956-686-3270 timm@dwilsonconstruction.com EMJ Corporation Burt Odom 5525 N. MacArthur Blvd., Ste. 400 Irving, TX 75038 972-580-1210 fax: 972-580-8202 bodom@emjcorp.com www.emjcorp.com

Panattoni Construction, Inc. Tom Woods, General Manager 5950 Berkshire Ln., #500 Dallas, TX 75225 214-363-0551 fax: 214-363-7501 twoods@panconinc.com www.panconinc.com

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135


Consulting Engineers ccrd partners David B. Duthu, PE, Principal 808 Travis St. Houston, TX 77002 713-237-8900 fax: 713-237-0123 davidd@ccrd.com www.ccrd.com

Jordan & Skala Engineers, Inc. Andrew Smith 14240 Midway Rd., Ste 350 Dallas, TX 75244 469-385-1616 fax: 469-385-1615 asmith@jordanskala.com www.jordanskala.com

Countertops Stonesmith, Inc. Eric Killingstad 2122 Country Club Dr., Ste. 240 Carrollton, TX 75006 972-418-5200 fax: 972-418-5201 ekillingstad@stonesmithinc.com www.stonesmithinc.com (see corporate profile p. 136)

Demolition Contractors

|

Torre Crane L.P. Paolo Salvatore 21120 Milsa Dr. San Antonio, TX 78256 210-559-7811 fax: 210-698-9253 paolosalvatore@sbcglobal.net

San Antonio, TX

Complete Tower Crane Services

Billy L. Nabors Wrecking, Inc. George Gomez 2802 N. Hwy. 175 Seagoville, TX 75159 972-287-2287 fax: 972-287-4168 estimating@naborsdemo.com

Crane Rental Services

B i l ly L. N a b o r s

e o r r C r a n e , L . P. 21120 Milsa Dr.

Albo LLC Felesia Boegner, President 3888 Dilly Shaw Tap Rd. Bryan, TX 77808 979-450-8088 fax: 979-778-0389 office@albollc.com

|

78256

|

210-559-7811

W recking S ince 1960

Rental Erection/Dismantle Operators Riggers Hauling Service Technicians

972-287-2287 • 800-539-2287 www .B illy N abors . com

I nsured & B onded

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137


Doors/Frames/Hardware Door Control Services, Inc. Don Gilchrist, President/CEO 512 E. Dallas, Ste. 200 Grapevine, TX 76051 877-351-3667 fax: 817-442-8844 jdg@doorcontrolservices.com www.doorcontrolservices.com

Tri-Tech Building Products, LLC Ron Howard 4301 Founders Way, Ste. C Chattanooga, TN 37416 423-892-7307 fax: 423-622-4736 ron@tritechllc.com

Sherman Door & Hardware Mike Bernard 195 Meyers Dr. Sherman, TX 75092 903-892-3410 fax: 903-868-1501 eric@shermandoor.com

Drywall Contractors Rice Drywall, Inc. Terry Rice 140 Loy Burleson, TX 76028 817-295-0083 fax: 817-295-0178 trice@ricedrywall.com www.ricedrywall.com

LRE

Royal

Contractors

Electrical follows

a

simple premise, to provide quality workmanship and

Sherman Door and Hardware

dependable service. This simple idea has served our clients for 30 years. We believe this is why 75% of our new business is referred to

<< Steel Doors and Hardware >>

us by existing and previous clients. When we work for you, we will be responsible, reasonable, and efficient. From our

<< Architectural Wood Doors >> << Bathroom Partitions and Accessories >>

management team to our craftsmen, LRE Royal Electrical Contractors is determined to give our customers full value for their investment.

<< 195 Meyers Dr. >> << Sherman, Texas 75092 >>

<< 903-892-3410 >> 13008 Lawson Road â&#x20AC;˘ Little Rock, Arkansas 72210

(501) 227-5987 138

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Serving Southeast Texas since 1989

LECS Electrical Contractors

11226 Jones Rd. W Houston, TX 77065

281-897-9775 www.lecs.net

Electrical Contractors JBI Electrical Systems, Inc. Jack Martin 5631 Stratum Dr. Fort Worth, TX 76137 817-589-1545 fax: 817-625-6695 jmartin@jbielectric.com www.jbielectric.com LECS David Marshall, President 11226 Jones Rd. W Houston, TX 77065 281-897-9775 fax: 281-897-8860 dm@lecs.net www.lecs.net

Performance Electric LP David Ross, President 11302 Windfern Rd. Houston, TX 77064 713-895-7362 fax: 713-895-7855 dross@peco-hou.com S & J Electric Larry Garrett/Edith Stanfield P.O. Box 121516 Fort Worth, TX 76121 817-560-0000 fax: 817-560-0555 lgarrett@sj-electric.com www.sj-electric.com (see display ad p. 140)

LRE Royal Electrical Contractors, Inc. Randy Smith, President 13008 Lawson Rd. Little Rock, AR 72210 501-227-5987/800-880-0585 fax: 501-227-8331 rsmith@lreroyal.com www.lreroyal.com (see display ad p. 138)

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139


Energy Management Xencom Energy Management, LLC Bob Cross 1609 Precision Dr., Ste. 3000 Plano, TX 75074 469-429-1111 fax: 469-429-1112 bobc@xen-com.com www.xen-com.com

Engineered Fabric Buildings Summit Structures LLC Simone Clayton 946 N. Van Buren St. Allentown, PA 18109 800-615-4777 info@summitstructures.com www.summitstructures.com (see corporate profiile p. 141)

shop for products that are good for you and good for the environment

Excavating Contractors Claymark Construction W.D. Myre P.O. Box 276 Royse City, TX 75189 972-843-8089 fax: 972-843-8189 danny@claymarktx.com

www.4GreenShopping.com

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From Concept to Completion and Beyond — Summit Structures Has Got You Covered With offices in the United States, Canada and the United Kingdom, Summit Structures is the foremost preengineered fabric-membrane building supplier. The company offers comprehensive design, manufacturing, supply and installation services to clients throughout the world. Summit Structures was founded in 1999 by its parent company, Cover-All Building Systems. “We created Summit Structures to fill a void in the custom-designed preengineered product line,” says Peter Bielefeld, vice president, sales for Summit Structures. “From our inception until today, we’ve worked with a wide range of high-profile clients.” Summit Structures specializes in working with the United States military and government, as well as customers in the sports and recreation, gaming and events, industrial and waste and environmental industries. The company’s client list runs the gamut from independent contractors and smaller companies to major sports teams, including the Cowboys and the Patriots. Built to last Summit Structures offers superior preengineered fabric-membrane buildings that are built tough. Constructed with the finest quality building components, these buildings are designed for endurance. Offering tremendous strength and durability in a massive clear-span space, every Summit Structures building is engineered for use throughout the world in any climate. They are rated for wind and snow loads and maintain structural integrity — even in unbalanced and unpredictable conditions. As a matter of fact, Summit Structures has so much confidence in its heavy-duty building materials, they established both of their fabric-membrane and steel manufacturing plants inside TITAN® buildings — one of its very own products! Custom-designed projects, from stem to stern While Summit Structures offers some of the sturdiest buildings in the industry, it’s the company’s unparalleled service that really separates the company from the pack. Unlike most companies in the industry, Summit Structures provides truly comprehensive design services, from concept to completion and beyond. Offering full design, manufacturing, construction and project management services, Summit Structures takes pride in delivering every project on time and on budget to exact specification. “When we’re talking custom-designed projects, we offer a stem to stern team approach, from the front-end with the sales consultants through the engineering and the project management to installation,” Bielefeld explains. “That’s something the competitors can’t offer.” Additionally, the Summit Structures team goes above and beyond to meet each client’s specific timeline. “We manufacture, engineer, design and do everything all the way through and install the buildings in a shorter amount of time than most of our competitors do.”

800-615-4777 www.summitstructures.com

Project highlight: Texas A&M University Over the past decade, Summit Structures has completed numerous buildings spanning the globe on every type of site and in every climate imaginable. Recently, the company completed a truly impressive project for Texas A&M University. Summit Structures constructed two buildings for Texas A&M. The first is a football practice facility measuring 191 feet wide x 395 feet long. The second building is a 296-foot-wide x 390-foot-long track and field facility, which housed the 2009 NCAA Men’s and Women’s Indoor Track & Field Championships. “These two buildings sit side by side, and you can’t miss them,” says Bielefeld. “They are incredibly large buildings.” Unmatched customer commitment The Summit Structures team is fully committed to offering superior service and top-notch products to each of its customers. The company’s expert staff realizes that a building is a major investment — which is why they take each project very seriously and act as true partners to every client. Offering top-quality products, construction and service from concept to completion and beyond, Summit Structures proves time and again to be a leader in the field. — Corporate Profile


Southeastern Interior Systems 770-499-0051 www.seinteriors.com


Unparalleled Products, Superior Services, Breathtaking Results: SEIS Has You and Your Floors Covered

u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u

Ann Taylor Ashley Furniture Belk Kohl’s Grand National Cabela’s Cinnabon AASU Marshalls Flying J North Park Mall Imperial Valley Mall Fayette Mall Parkdale Mall Coastal Grand Mall Mall del Norte GA Square Mall Eastgate Mall

u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u

Columbia Place Mall Jefferson Mall Haynes Mall Gap and Baby Gap Banana Republic Barnes and Noble Bed, Bath and Beyond Best Buy Bloomingdale’s CarMax Dick’s Sporting Goods JCPenney Macy’s Pottery Barn Regal Theaters Sam’s Club Stein Mart Victoria’s Secret

u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u

Linens ‘n Things DSW TJ Maxx World Market AMC Theaters Wingate Inn Williams-Sonoma Sears PetSmart Nissan Fed-Ex Hampton Inn KB Toys Talbots Sweet Factory Books a Million BMW


Exterior Wall Cladding/EIFS Pillar Construction Inc. Arman Karakaya 5649-S General Washington Dr. Alexandria, VA 22312 703-941-5891 fax: 703-941-5893 info@pillarconstruction.com www.pillarconstruction.com

RONPARCO - Ronzani, Inc. Flavio Ronzani 1107 B S. Airport Cir. Euless, TX 76040 817-354-8217 fax: 817-354-6720 flavio.ronzani@ronparco.com www.ronparco.com

Flooring Custom Interiors, Inc. Carol Ann Scherer, Manager 704 Crestwood Victoria, TX 77901 361-578-2868 fax: 361-572-0447 custominteriorsinc@zamigo.net Dobson Floors Sue Brown 2010 Eastgate Dr. Garland, TX 75041 972-270-8741 fax: 972-681-7798 dobsoncontract@yahoo.com www.dobsonfloors.com

Since 1989, we have established a respected name in the construction marketplace. We are committed to providing the utmost in quality and excellence to each and every one of our valued clients. Our Ingenuity and collective experience qualifies us to deliver only perfection in every task that we perform.

• Exterior Insulation & Finish System (EIFS) • Stucco Treatment • Restoration • Drywall • Interiors

Pillar Construction, Inc. Houston Office 3409 Brinkman Steet Houston, Texas 77018 Tel: (713) 869-4300 • Fax: (713) 869-4323 info@PillarConstruction.com For information regarding other locations, please visit our website at www.pillarconstruction.com

144

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Southeastern Interior Systems, Inc. Mike Jarvis 3401 Novis Pointe Acworth, GA 30101 770-499-0051 fax: 770-499-0608 mjarvis@seinteriors.com www.seinteriors.com (see corporate profiile p. 142-143)


Foodservice Design M.B. Parker & Company, Inc. Mimi Parker 1356 Chemical St. Dallas, TX 75207 214-631-0101 fax: 214-631-0148 mbparkerco@yahoo.com

Framed Mirrors Warehouse Frames â&#x20AC;&#x2122;n Gallery, Ltd. Don Waheed 3815 Fondren Rd. Houston, TX 77063 713-974-6000 fax: 713-974-6006 warehouseframes@sbcglobal.net www.warehouseframes.com

Fuel Contractors/AST/ UST Installation Fuel Tex Randy Holybee 1210 E. Fourth St. Taylor, TX 76574 512-352-6560 fax: 512-352-6163 fueltex@sbcglobal.net

Furniture Manufacturers The Einsohn Group, Inc. Barbara Einsohn 4350 Echo Glen Dallas, TX 75244 972-774-1505 barbara@waterjetworks.com

Framing/Gypsum Contractors Greater Metroplex Interiors, Inc. Jeremy Darden 2020 E. Continental Southlake, TX 76092 817-481-0029 fax: 817-488-5081 jeremydarden@greatermetroint.com www.greatermetroint.com

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145


Glass & Glazing DGB Glass David Griffin 109 Vernon Rd. Aledo, TX 76008 817-441-7168 fax: 817-261-9923 dgriffin@dgbglass.com www.dgbglass.com

Lindsay Glass Jacob Hulsey 901 S. Armstrong Denison, TX 75020 903-465-0557 fax: 903-463-3988 jacob@lindsay-glass.com www.lindsay-glass.com

Dallas Glass & Door Company, Ltd. Dallas Owens P.O. Box 440 Fate, TX 75132 972-772-4915 fax: 972-772-4178 dallas@dallasglassanddoor.com www.dallasglassanddoor.com

Reynolds Polymer Technology, Inc. Joshua Fritz, Marketing Project Leader 607 Hollingsworth St. Grand Junction, CO 81505 970-241-4700 fax: 970-241-4747 jlfritz@reynoldspolymer.com www.reynoldspolymer.com

HVAC Systems City Wide Mechanical, Inc. Brad Baylis, President 3825 Bryan St. Dallas, TX 75204 214-821-8468 fax: 214-821-2699 bradb@citywidemech.com www.citywidemech.com

Sigma Air Heating & Cooling A.J. Imad 5315 Jackwood San Antonio, TX 78238 210-657-4462 fax: 210-657-4464 ajimad@sbcglobal.net

DGB Glass, Inc. 130 years of project management experience serving the Metroplex Contract Glazing and Consulting needs for Curtain Wall, Storefront, Glass and Glazing.

P.O. Box 123470 • Fort Worth, TX 76121 Ph: 817-441-7168 • Fax: 817-261-9923

www.DGBGlass.com

146

shortlist

Dallas Glass Dallas Glass and Door Company, Ltd. Located in Rockwall, Texas PO BOX 440 Fate, TX 75132 Phone) 972-772-4915 Fax) 972-772-4178

www.dallasglassanddoor.com Dallas M. Owens — President


Hardscape Specialists

Heavy Timber Trusses

American Interlock & Modular Construction Co. Randy Miller 4709 Turner Warnell Rd., Ste. D Arlington, TX 76001 817-561-5200 fax: 817-561-5212 rmiller@aimconstruction.net www.aimconstruction.net

Structural Wood Components Charles Kott 38203 FM 1774 Magnolia, TX 77355 281-259-0668 fax: 281-259-6018 ckott@structuralwoodcomponents.com www.structuralwoodcomponents.com

Interior Designers Lea W. von Kaenel, Inc. dba studioSIX5 Lea W. von Kaenel 336 S. Congress Ave., Ste 165 Austin, TX 78704 512-476-6501 fax: 512-476-6502 lea@studiosix5.com www.studiosix5.com

Rocky Creek Ltd. James Virgin 1607 E. Washington St. Stephenville, TX 76401 254-968-0398 fax: 254-968-0675 info@rockycreekltd.com www.rockycreekltd.com Sawyer Design Associates Stacy E. Sawyer, ASID, IIDA, Principal Interior Designer 167 Turtle Creek Dallas, TX 75207 214-443-9090 fax: 214-443-9092 info@sawyerdesignassoc.com www.sawyerdesignassoc.com

Michelle Meredith & Associates Michelle Meredith, President 5527 Stanford St., Studio B Dallas, TX 75209 214-358-3703 fax: 214-358-3684 michelle@michellemeredithassociates.com www.michellemeredithassociates.com

Land Planning Meeks + Partners Catherine Bezman 16000 Memorial Dr., Ste. 100 Houston, TX 77079 281-558-8787 fax: 281-558-3337 cbezman@meekspartners.com www.meekspartners.com

Landscape Architects BWM Group Planning | Landscape Architecture | Architecture Tim Bargainer, Principal 102 E. Main St. Round Rock, TX 78664 512-238-8912 fax: 512-238-8913 tbargainer@bwmgrp.com www.bwmgrp.com Jarreau & Associates, Inc. Jo Ann Jarreau, President 2111 Lamonte Ln. Houston, TX 77018 713-682-5299 fax: 713-682-8344 joann@jarreauinc.com www.jarreauinc.com

Mycoskie+McInnis+Associates Cliff Mycoskie, President 200 E. Abrams St. Arlington, TX 76010 817-469-1671 fax: 817-274-8757 mycoskie@mmatexas.com www.mmatexas.com Thompson Landscape Architects Susi Thompson 408 W. Eighth St., Ste. 103 Dallas, TX 75208 214-948-9256 fax: 214-942-0635 susitla@msn.com

• Pavers • Retaining Walls • Poured Concrete

Rocky Creek Ltd.

ca ri

nter lock & nI M od ar ul

Am e

• Stamped/ Stained Concrete

Commercial design

“We A.I.M. to Please”

an

e Int

k rloc

& Modular Constru ctio n

Construction

C p om

i

le

W

ex

b

al

Fl

ls

any

Ame ric

“We A.I.M. to Please”

In

ter

loc

king Paving & Re

tai

ni

ng

817-561-5200 (817) 561-5200

4709-D Turner Warnell Arlington, TX 76001 www.aimconstruction.net

Fixtures 1607 E. Washington St. • Stephenville, TX 76401 254-968-0398 • www.rockycreekltd.com

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147


Landscape Architecture & Construction LandPatterns, Inc. D. Marc Funderburk, ASLA 3624 Oak Lawn Ave., Ste. 320 Dallas, TX 75219 214-219-3993 fax: 214-219-7005 info@landpatterns.com www.landpatterns.com

LEED速 Consultants Jarreau & Associates, Inc. Jo Ann Jarreau, President 2111 Lamonte Ln. Houston, TX 77018 713-682-5299 fax: 713-682-8344 joann@jarreauinc.com www.jarreauinc.com

Landscape Contractors Gold Landscape, Inc. Cris McKinney 2454 Glenda Ln. Dallas, TX 75229 972-241-7663 fax: 469-522-7388 cris@goldlandscapeinc.com

Lightning Protection Bonded Lightning Protection Systems, Ltd. Heath Howe 122 Leesley Ln. Argyle, TX 76226 800-950-7933 fax: 940-455-2225 sales@bondedlp.com www.bondedlp.com

GOLD LANDSCAPE 2454 Glenda Lane Dallas, Texas 75229 972.241.7663

148

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MEP Engineers Fanning Fanning & Assoc., Inc. John Fanning, PE, Vice President 2555 74th St. Lubbock, TX 79423 806-745-2533 fax: 806-745-3596 jfanning@fanningfanning.com www.fanningfanning.com

MEP/FP Engineering Design Blum Consulting Engineers, Inc. Ken Smith 8144 Walnut Hill Ln., Ste. 200 Dallas, TX 75231 214-373-8222 fax: 214-361-2667 ksmith@blumeng.com www.blumeng.com

Marble & Granite Contractors Mar-Tek Industries Josh Thorn 300 Industrial Dr. Forney, TX 75126 214-350-9401 fax: 214-351-5435 joshthorn@mar-tek.org www.mar-tek.org

Manufacturers Containment Solutions David Heiman, Mkt. Comm. Manager 5150 Jefferson Chemical Rd. Conroe, TX 77301 936-756-7731 fax: 936-756-7766 sales@csiproducts.com www.containmentsolutions.com

Sun Stone, Inc. Phillip A. Harris 1636 240th St. Harbor City, CA 90710 310-257-1665 fax: 310-326-7971 info@sunstoneusa.com www.granitesinktops.com

Har-Con Mechanical Contractors, LLC

551 N. SHEPHERD DR., STE 270 HOUSTON, TX 77007 T: 713-869-8451 F: 713-864-1837/713-864-7422 TX License # TACLA26582E â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Regulated by the TX Dept of Lic. & Registration, P.O. Box 12157, Austin, TX 78711, 1-800-803-9202 TX License # MPL 18934 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Regulated by the TX Dept of Lic. & Registration, P.O. Box 4200, Austin, TX 78785-4200

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149


Mechanical Contractors Century Mechanical Contractors Inc. Rodney Campbell 3008 Wichita Ct. Fort Worth, TX 76140 817-293-3803 fax: 817-551-2948 rcampbell@centurymech.com www.centurymech.com (see display ad p. 149) City Wide Mechanical, Inc. Brad Baylis, President 3825 Bryan St. Dallas, TX 75204 214-821-8468 fax: 214-821-2699 bradb@citywidemech.com www.citywidemech.com (see display ad p. 146) Har-Con Mechanical Contractors, LLC Billy Gelormini 551 N. Shepherd, #270 Houston, TX 77007 713-869-8451 fax: 713-864-7422/713-864-1837 billy@har-con.com (see display ad p. 149)

Lochridge-Priest, Inc. Ronnie Kroll 225 Lake Air Dr. Waco, TX 76711 254-772-0670 fax: 254-772-0484 ronnie@lochridgepriest.com www.lochridgepriest.com Longhorn Mechanical Danny Perez 101 Echoles St. Van Alstyne, TX 75495 214-882-9639 fax: 903-482-9439 longhornmech@aol.com United Mechanical, Inc. Brian Chester 11540 Plano Rd. Dallas, TX 75243 214-341-9300 fax: 214-342-4981 bchester@unitedmechanical.com www.unitedmechanical.com

11540 Plano Road. Dallas, TX 75243 Phone: 214.341.9300 Fax: 214.342.4981 Email: info@unitedmechanical.com Website: www.unitedmechanical.com

Air Conditioning • Heating • Refrigeration • Plumbing

Lochridge-Priest, Inc. TACLA0023214C

M E C H A N I C A L

C O N T R A C T O R

225 Lake Air Drive • P.O. Box 7624 • Waco, Texas 76714-7624 • Fax (254) 772-0484

www.lochridgepriest.com Waco 254/772-0670

150

shortlist

Corscana 903/872-8418

Temple 254/773-0003

Killeen 254/634-3340


Metal Table Legs Bella Hardware Inc. Sven Laudien 8049 Mill Chase Lewisville, NC 27023 336-945-0440 fax: 336-946-1092 sven@bellahardware.com www.tablelegworld.com

Office Storefronts Custom Components Company & US Railing Jim Ellsworth 13902 Lynmar Blvd. Tampa, FL 33626 800-516-9474 fax: 813-855-3706 sales@usrailing.com www.usrailing.com (see display ad p. 131)

Painting & Wallcovering Contractors Classic Paint & Wallcovering Services, Inc. Jerry Jackson 7603 Helmers St. Houston, TX 77022 713-839-9822 fax: 713-839-9616 classicpws@sbcglobal.net

Ornamental Metals

Parking Lot Striping Striping By Mr. V LLC Paul F. Voorheis P.O. Box 485 Josephine, TX 75164 972-843-8040 fax: 972-694-2071 paulstrp@aol.com stripingbymr.v.@att.net

Plastering

Pool Custom Iron Works, Inc. Dusty Adams 923 S. 1st Conroe, TX 77301 P.O. Box 2746 Conroe, TX 77305 936-756-4292 fax: 936-756-4290 dusty@consolidated.net www.pooliron.com

D&B Lath & Plaster, LLC Burt Wagner, CEO 506 General Krueger San Antonio, TX 78213 210-344-5772 fax: 210-344-5944 dblathplaster@sbcglobal.net

Southwest Lath and Plaster Roger L. Burke, CEO 1411 Forest Ln. Garland, TX 75042 972-494-1974 fax: 972-494-1990 roger@southwestlathplaster.com www.southwestlathplaster.com

RONPARCO - Ronzani, Inc. Flavio Ronzani 1107 B S. Airport Cir. Euless, TX 76040 817-354-8217 fax: 817-354-6720 flavio.ronzani@ronparco.com www.ronparco.com

Specializing in Metal Table Legs and Bases Large Inventory and Custom Designs * Stainless Steel * Custom Height * Ship within 48 hours * In Stock * For Granite Table Tops * Make your Custom Leg * Support Counter Tops * Heavy load ratings * USA made and Imports

High quality, cost effective, quick ship! www.tablelegworld.com 877-492-3552

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Plumbing Contractors City Wide Mechanical, Inc. Brad Baylis, President 3825 Bryan St. Dallas, TX 75204 214-821-8468 fax: 214-821-2699 bradb@citywidemech.com www.citywidemech.com (see display ad p. 146) Raven Mechanical, LP Ray Jones 1618 Buschong Houston, TX 77039 281-987-1618 fax: 281-442-4711 ray@ravenmechanical.com www.ravenmechanical.com

Rebar Fabrication & Installation Doran Steel Inc. David Doran 105 Southbelt Industrial Dr. Houston, TX 77047 713-640-2593 fax: 713-640-2096 david@doransteel.com

S & K Plumbing of Fort Worth, Inc. Philip Barron 3912 Broadway Ave. Haltom City, TX 76117 817-222-9930 fax: 817-222-1215 pbarron@skplumbinginc.com www.skplumbinginc.com United Mechanical, Inc. Brian Chester 11540 Plano Rd. Dallas, TX 75243 214-341-9300 fax: 214-342-4980 bchester@unitedmechanical.com www.unitedmechanical.com (see display ad p. 150)

Reinforcing Steel Erection Doran Steel Inc. David Doran 105 Southbelt Industrial Dr. Houston, TX 77047 713-640-2593 fax: 713-640-2096 david@doransteel.com

• • •

phone:817.222.9930 fax: 817.222.1215

• • •

3912 Broadway Ave. Haltom City Texas, 76117

• • •

www.skplumbinginc.com

Stressing teamwork, quality workmanship, timely performance and safety

• Commercial Division (Medical, Educational, Retail) • Multi Family/Hospitality Division • Over 20 years in the Industry

Doran Steel, Inc. Reinforcing Steel Erectors

David Doran President

105 Southbelt Industrial Dr. Houston, Texas 77047

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713-640-2593

Fax 713-640-2096

Mobile 713-253-7290

email david@doransteel.com


Roofing Contractors Fry Roofing, Inc. Chris Fry 4235 Laurie Michelle San Antonio, TX 78261 210-344-1125 fax: 830-980-8105 cfry@fryroofing.com

Supreme Roofing Systems Meshanna Adams 1355 N. Walton Walker Dallas, TX 75211 214-330-8913 fax: 214-330-5435 madams@supremeroofing.com www.sgtsolar.com/ www.supremeroofing.com (see display ad p. 154)

Johnson Roofing Sherri Johnson P.O. Box 11009 Waco, TX 76716 254-662-5571 fax: 254-662-4807 sherri@jroof.com www.jroof.com

Texas Roofing Co. David Nance P.O. Box 80798 Austin, TX 78708 512-252-8920 fax: 512-252-8923 david@texasroofing.com www.texasroofing.com

Mangold Roofing Larry Mangold 3222 Thousand Oaks Dr. San Antonio, TX 78247-3314 210-494-7615 fax: 210-494-1188 kim@mangoldroofing.com www.mangoldroofing.com

MANGOLD Roofing 3222 Thousand Oaks Drive San Antonio, Texas 78247-3314 (210) 494-7615 Fax (210) 494-1188

www.mangoldroofing.com

Fry Roofing, Inc.

4235 Laurie Michelle San Antonio, TX 78261 Specializing in tile and metal roofs

210-344-1125 830-980-8105 Fax

With a history stretching back to the early 1940s, Bill Johnson and his two daughters, Sherri and Shawn, are actively involved with running the business today. And while the Johnson family’s ultimate goal is to be the greatest roofing company in the world, its success pales in comparison to its big heart. In fact, Johnson Roofing was recently honored with the 2008 Baylor University Family Business of the Year Award for Community Service. Johnson Roofing’s ability to handle every type of roofing material as well as adapt to emerging technologies and introduce new products keeps Johnson Roofing ahead of its competition. Truly setting it apart, however, is its sheet metal shop where exceptional works of art are produced for clients wanting a unique look. From your grandmother’s back porch to the tallest skyscraper, we are your roofing company. Toll Free ....................... (800) 765-5571 Houston ...................... (713) 645-4885 Waco ........................... (254) 662-5571 Killeen . ........................ (254) 690-5571 Dallas / Ft. Worth........ (817) 375-0789 Austin .......................... (512) 329-9161

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Signage & Lighting

Steel Fabricators

Sign Tech International, a division of Facility Solutions Group Bob Strobeck, Director of Sales & Marketing 10212 Metric Blvd. Austin, TX 78758 800-327-1104/512-494-0002 fax: 512-494-0003 bob.strobeck@fsgi.com www.stisigns.com www.fsgi.com

Wilborn Steel Co., Ltd. Ernest Wilborn 2315 Dan Ct. San Antonio, TX 78223 210-532-6852 fax: 210-532-8181 wilbornsteel@wilbornsteel.com www.wilbornsteel.com

Specialty Contractors CT&S, Inc. Bruce Witter 1513 Maryland Dr. Irving, TX 75061 972-554-9629 fax: 972-438-9828 bwitter@ctands.com www.ctands.com

LVI Facility Services Inc. David Esman 8100 Blankenship Houston, TX 77055 713-991-0480 fax: 713-991-2814 desman@lviservices.com www.lviservices.com

Wilborn Steel Co., Ltd. Est. 1986

Fabricators of: Structural, Industrial and Misc. Steel

(210) 532-6852 • WilbornSteel.com 2315 Dan Court • San Antonio, TX 78223

Supreme Roofing Systems Inc. Phone: 214-330-8913 • Fax: 214-330-5435 • www.supremeroofing.com 1355 N Walton Walker Blvd., Dallas, Texas 75211 Pat Duffy - Chief Estimator • Rick Lanpher - Sales Manager COMMERCIAL ROOFING and SHEET METAL SERVICES

Established, Qualified, Competitive Safety and Quality since 1987

Construction - Metal

Technology & Steel

Quality Metal Work D/M/WBE

Established - Supreme Roofing is the established expert in commercial roofing with over 250 dedicated professional employees.   Qualified - Approved applicators for ALL major roofing manufacturers with Elite Status for most roofing systems.  • Hundreds of quality based awards and over 25,000 hours of safety training annually. • All workers are permanent employees and covered by workman’s comp.   Competitive - With our state of the art,  50,000 + square foot facility on 5 acres, we offer the best product and services while remaining competitive. • RAMP (Roof Asset Management Program) • Low NCCI experience mod = low insurance rates • 24/7 Emergency Service

◆ 1513 Maryland Dr. We Take The Risk Out Of Your Roofing Decision 1-800-677-ROOF 

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Irving, Texas 75061 ◆

◆ (972) 554-9629 ◆ Fax (972) 438-9828 ◆ ◆ www.ctands.com ◆


Structural Engineers Brockette • Davis • Drake, Inc. Robert E. Hill, President 4144 N. Central Expwy., #1100 Dallas, TX 75204 214-824-3647 fax: 214-824-3373 rhill@bddeng.com www.bddeng.com

Hart, Gaugler & Associates, Inc. Dave Hart 12801 N. Central Expwy., Ste. 1400 Dallas, TX 75243 972-239-5111 fax: 972-239-5055 dhart@hartgaugler.com www.hartgaugler.com

Charles Gojer & Associates, Inc. Charles Gojer 11615 Forest Central Dr., #303 Dallas, TX 75243 214-340-1199 fax: 214-348-8053 cgojer@cgojer.com www.cgojer.com

L.A. Fuess Partners Inc. Mark B. Peterman, PE, Principal/ Vice President 3333 Lee Pkwy., Ste. 300 Dallas, TX 75219 214-871-7010 fax: 214-969-0065 mpeterman@lafp.com www.lafp.com

FHI Civil & Structural Engineering Larry J. Fisher One Chisholm Tr., Ste. 5200 Round Rock, TX 78664 512-244-1546 fax: 512-388-3698 larryf@fhi.eng.pro www.fhi.eng.pro Frank W. Neal & Assoc., Inc. Chuck Ogilvie 1015 W. Broadway Fort Worth, TX 76104 817-332-1944 fax: 817-336-8620 cogilvie@fwna-eng.com www.fwna-eng.com

• Class “A” Structural Steel • Bar Joist, Girders & Decking • Anchor & Erection Bolts • Steel Tube Columns • Gratings & Expanded Metals • Stairs & Landings • Ladders • Handrails, Guardrails, & Wallrails • Canopy Frames • Miscellaneous Steel

Pickett, Kelm & Associates, Inc. D. Gary Pickett, PE 4100 Duval Rd., Bldg. 4, Ste. 103 Austin, TX 78759 512-345-5538 fax: 512-345-4305 speltier@pkainc.com www.pkainc.com Pinnacle Structural Engineers Don Greive, PE, President 5516 Chaucer, Ste. B Houston, TX 77005 713-807-8911 fax: 713-807-8918 dg@pinnaclestructural.com www.pinnaclestructural.com

4525 Saunders Rd. • Houston, TX 77093 713-695-9195 • www.tshooters.net

Each regional edition of the Real Estate & Construction Review, including the ShortList, can now be viewed online at our website.

Structural & Miscellaneous Steel V.S.F., Inc The Troubleshooters Scott Cote 4525 Saunders Rd. Houston, TX 77093 713-695-9195 fax: 713-695-5771 scote@tshooters.net www.tshooters.net

www.buildingofamerica.com

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155


“Our clients trust us for a reason - so can you”

American Voice & Data provides voice

unnecessary time and money “juggling

and data cabling — low-voltage wir-

and coordinating several vendors try-

ing,

structured

ing to get all of their technical systems

cabling and fiber-

installed, maintained and repaired,” says

optic

cabling;

Chamness. “Our attention to detail and

design

the timeliness of our work allowed us to

cabling and

consulting;

business

quickly gain traction and favorability.”

tele-

American Voice & Data often receives

systems;

calls from clients asking if it can solve a

satellite television

particular need, and the answer is always

as

yes. “We can solve any technical problem

phone a

commer-

cial provider for

presented,” says Chamness.

Direct TV and Dish

American Voice & Data is an American-

Network; closed-

owned and -operated company that

circuit television

takes pride in its final product and repu-

and camera sys-

tation. A member in good standing of

tems; overhead

the Building Industry Consulting Service

music and pag-

International (BICSI), American Voice &

ing systems; key-

Data has installed, serviced and man-

less access systems; nurse call systems in

aged cabling projects in the Dallas-Fort

Preston Plaza Granite Park I Granite Park II Granite Park III

medical facilities; and audiovisual systems

Worth area for 10 years. American Voice

for conference rooms, flat-panel televi-

& Data prides itself on using exclusively in-

sions, and projectors. As an installer and

house labor and also providing a lifetime

maintenance provider for satellite televi-

warranty on all indoor voice and data

Terrel State Hospital­­

sion master systems in high-rise buildings,

cabling.

American Voice & Data is familiar with

American Voice & Data’s research has

Legacy Heart Center

working on roofs and vertical riser closets,

shown that most network problems result

W.B. Carrell Clinic

and acting as a liaison between the build-

from poor system wiring, which has been

ing owner and the tenants. “There’s nor-

installed by companies as a secondary

mally an excessive amount of insurance

service. American Voice & Data special-

required to work on these buildings,” says

izes in data cable installation and will settle

K.D. Chamness, President of American

for “nothing less than 100 percent system

Voice & Data, “and we’ve got it!”

integrity from NIC [network interface card]

Granite Properties

Labcorp -

Laboratory Corporation of America

Huffman Builders General Contractors

Celebrating more than a decade in business, American Voice & Data was

to hub, ensuring [a client’s] wiring problems are eliminated,” says Chamness.

Dallas ISD

founded in 1997 in Dallas, Texas. American

With a large client base in the medi-

Voice & Data was initially formed as

cal profession, American Voice & Data is

Trammell Crow

a structured cabling installation com-

skilled at working in medical facilities and

3I Construction

pany, providing computer, telephone,

around patients. All of the technicians

fiber-optic and video coaxial cabling.

at American Voice & Data are knowl-

General Contractors

Eventually, through the requests of its

edgeable in the Federal Health Insurance

Broadcast Towers

clients, American Voice & Data evolved

Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA)

into a full-service technical company.

and work to ensure patients’ rights and

Ampco Safety Tools

This removed its clients’ need to spend

privacy are not violated.

Southwest Securities

(972) 840-6556


Austin Commercial General Contractors

Jewish Federation of Greater Dallas Red Bull USA SPCA Dallas/Collin County American Voice & Data has a longstanding

relationship

with

Granite

Properties, Inc., a company that installs,

Additionally, the company serves as a subcontractor to Austin Commercial, a known

General Contractors

industry leader.

maintains and services the satellite televi-

“Technology is an industry that evolves

sion master systems. American Voice &

faster than any other,” notes Chamness.

Data regularly coordinates with Broadcast

“From Category 6 cabling to high-defini-

Towers, Inc., the site management and

tion television, we maintain qualified and

consulting company to ensure that the

trained technicians to ensure our clients

projects are smoothly implemented with

get quick, affordable, dependable ser-

minimal impact to normal operations,

vice.”

guests and tenants.

Westec

Today, it is nearly impossible to imagine

American Voice & Data has provided

any technical service company that can

services to W.B. Carrell Memorial Clinic in

serve its clients properly by only providing

Dallas, and continues to add and expand

voice and data cabling. The integration

the clinic’s systems as they grow. American

of voice, data and video demands a high

Voice & Data has also provided voice

level of technical knowledge and skill in

and data cabling for the Legacy Heart

order to properly meet the needs of a

Center, Plano; The Jewish Federation of

client. American Voice & Data is exactly

Greater Dallas; and Granite Park II, Plano.

that provider. Its knowledge and skill, com-

PrimaCare

Medical Facilities

Orthopedic Associates of Dallas Israel Bonds Dallas International School

bined with its approachability and desire to truly provide excellent service for its clients are what set it apart from its competitors. Dedication to a quality

end-product

and

Concert Technologies Explore USA RV Legion Advertising

first-class results that satisfy the customer are the marks of a quality company. American Voice

K.E. Andrews

ad valorem tax service

& Data rededicates itself to that quality each and every day. — Corporate Profile

Bacardi USA Clouse Dunn Khoshbin Trial Attorneys


Structural Steel Fabricators & Erectors Advanced Diversified Services, Inc. Keith Shaw 7461 W. Vickery Blvd. Fort Worth, TX 76116 817-763-8223 fax: 817-763-9325 keith@adssteel.com www.adssteel.com

Tinoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Welding & Fabrication Tino Longoria 1414 McCauley Ave. San Antonio, TX 78224 210-923-4454 fax: 210-923-4454 tino@tinoswelding.com www.tinoswelding.com

Surveying Contractors Accurate Services, Inc. Chris Brasch P.O. Box 1295 Keller, TX 76244 817-232-3900 fax: 817-439-2448 cbrasch@sbcglobal.net

Technology Consultants Acuity, Inc. Linda Haley, President 9390 Research Blvd., Ste. 412 Austin, TX 78759 512-697-9675 fax: 512-498-1515 lhaley@acuityusa.com www.acuityusa.com

Termite Control Finley Termite & Pest Control, Inc. Jason Finley 5621 Quail Ln. Arlington, TX 76016 817-457-9897 fax: 817-457-9890 jason@finleypestcontrol.com www.finleypestcontrol.com

Telecommunications American Voice & Data KD Chamness 1912 Ruth Dr. Garland, TX 75042 972-840-6556 fax: 866-519-4901 sales@telecomrx.com www.telecomrx.com (see corporate profile p. 156-157)

Traffic Control Devices Buyers Barricades, Inc. Steve Buyers 3705 E. 1st St. Fort Worth, TX 76111 817-535-3939/888-535-3939 fax: 817-831-7171 steveb@buyersbarricades.com www.buyersbarricades.com (see corporate profile p. 130)

Finley Termite & Pest Control has been in business since 1959 and is family owned and operated. We ADS Steel Services is a full service steel fabrication company specializing in the fabrication and erection of structural and misc. steel. We also fabricate and install monumental stairs and architectural railings. Most of our shop drawings are created in house by three full time detailers using the latest edition of Autocad and 3D modeling software. We have proudly served the DFW Metroplex since 1988.

are a full service company specializing in termite pretreatments for the building industry. Maintain a firm foundation of integrity with your customers. Trust Finley Termite & Pest Control Inc. for the highest and best value in pre-construction soil treatments.

7461 W. Vickery Blvd. Fort Worth, Texas 76116

817-763-8223 www.adssteel.com 158

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817.457.9897 Fax: 817.457.9890

jason@finleypestcontrol.com


Truss Manufacturing ALL PAN Wood Trusses & Light Ga. Cold Formed Steel Trusses Houston, TX 800-547-8684/713-434-8343 bsmith@allpan.com www.allpan.com

Trusses/Wall Panels Light Gauge Solutions Inc Liz Zatopek 1118 W. Harris Rd., Ste. 101 Arlington, TX 76001 682-564-0378 fax: 817-676-9138 lzatopek@lightgaugesolutions.com www.lightgaugesolutions.com

Utility Contractors Deerwood Construction, Inc. Jan Patterson P.O. Box 3009 Lubbock, TX 79452 806-741-1446 fax: 806-741-1448 jpatterson@arn.net www.deerwoodconstruction.com

Utility Management ista North America John Gosslee, Sales Account Executive 18352 Dallas Pkwy., Ste 136-406 Dallas, TX 75287 866-691-ISTA fax: 310-388-5642 jgosslee@ista-na.com www.ista-na.com

Waterproofing Contractors L.S. Decker, Inc. Al Pasek 1706 Seamist Dr., Ste. 590 Houston, TX 77008 713-880-4343 fax: 713-880-1990 al.pasek@lsdecker.com www.lsdecker.com

Window Tinting & Shading Teckâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Window Tinting Brian Tecklenburg 1603 Mallard Cir. Mansfield, TX 76063 817-472-8468 fax: 682-518-0435 tecks@charter.net www.teckswindowtinting.com

shop for products that are good for you and good for the environment

www.4GreenShopping.com

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advertisers’ index Accurate Services, Inc................................................75, 158

D&B Lath & Plaster, LLC.......................................68, 85, 151

Acuity, Inc..........................................................89, 127, 158

DGB Glass..........................................................91, 106, 146

Advanced Diversified Services, Inc.............................50, 158

Dallas Glass & Door Company, Ltd.............................29, 146

Aguilar Forming Rebar Construction, Inc...............75, 96, 135

Deerwood Construction, Inc......................................111, 159

Albo LLC.....................................................98, 124, 132, 137

Dobson Floors..........................................................113, 144

ALL PAN...................................................................108, 159

Door Control Services, Inc................................107, 124, 138

American Interlock & Modular Construction Co...........46, 147

Doran Steel Inc.....................................................89, 94, 152

American Voice & Data.............................................156, 158

EMJ Corporation.................. 30, 31, 36, 37, 58, 59, 123, 135

Aquatek Systems, Inc.........................................................46

The Einsohn Group, Inc...............................................20, 145

BWM Group Planning | Landscape

FHI Civil & Structural Engineering.......................63, 133, 155

Architecture | Architecture..................... 30, 63, 64, 125, 147

Factory Builder Stores......................................................133

Bella Hardware Inc...........................................................151

Fanning Fanning & Assoc., Inc..................................111, 149

Billy L. Nabors Wrecking, Inc............................................137

Faulkner Design Group...............................................54, 112

Blum Consulting Engineers, Inc. 21, 50, 67, 69, 96, 126, 149

Finley Termite & Pest Control, Inc...............................61, 158

Bonded Lightning Protection Systems, Ltd..................69, 148

Frank W. Neal & Assoc., Inc.....................114, 115, 127, 155

Brockette · Davis · Drake, Inc..........................20, 21, 22, 29, 40, 48, 54, 67, 71, 127, 155

Fry Roofing, Inc..........................................................33, 153

Brookstone, L.P........................78, 79, 122, 135, Back Cover

G&R Surveying, LLC..........................................................109

Buyers Barricades, Inc........................................21, 130, 158

Gold Landscape, Inc...........................................46, 113, 148

ccrd partners..............................................90, 106, 124, 137

Greater Metroplex Interiors, Inc..................................50, 145

CT&S, Inc.............................................................22, 29, 154

HFP Acoustical Consultants Inc...........................78, 123, 131

The Cabinet Shop.......................................................88, 132

Har-Con Mechanical Contractors, LLC..........72, 89, 149, 150

CalHar Construction, Inc...............................................42, 67

Hart, Gaugler & Associates, Inc.............................71, 83, 155

Cat5 Structures, Inc..........................................................134

ista North America........................................46, 47, 128, 159

Century Mechanical Contractors Inc...................82, 149, 150

JBI Electrical Systems Inc...........................................42, 139

Charles Gojer & Associates, Inc................................102, 155

Jarreau & Associates, Inc.................. 94, 117, 126, 147, 148

City Wide Mechanical, Inc...........................56, 146, 150, 152

Johnson Roofing.........................................................71, 153

Classic Paint & Wallcovering Services, Inc..................58, 151

JORDAN & SKALA ENGINEERS, INC.............................48, 137

Claymark Construction................................................83, 140

Key Construction Texas, LLC........... 18, 19, 50, 61, 123, 135

Collier Construction......................................72, 73, 122, 135

L.A. Fuess Partners Inc.................. 32, 56, 75, 112, 127, 155

Containment Solutions..................................44, 45, 126, 149

LECS..........................................................................80, 139

Crist Industries, Inc.............................................................67

LRE Royal Electrical Contractors, Inc..................58, 138, 139

Custom Components Company & US Railing.............131, 151

L.S. Decker, Inc..............................................44, 58, 88, 159

Custom Interiors, Inc........................................................144

LVI Facility Services Inc................................56, 57, 127, 154

D. Wilson Construction Co..............................5, 96, 122, 135

LandPatterns, Inc................................................32, 126, 148

160

Fuel Tex.....................................................................44, 145


advertisers’ index Landtech Consultants, Inc...........................94, 118, 124, 133

Rocky Creek Ltd.........................................................34, 147

Lea W. von Kaenel, Inc. dba StudioSIX5....................110, 147

S & J Electric......................................................53, 139, 140

Lee Lewis Construction................................9, 111, 123, 135

S & K Plumbing of Fort Worth, Inc..............................50, 152

Light Gauge Solutions Inc.........................................112, 159

Sawyer Design Associates............................48, 49, 125, 147

Lindsay Glass.............................................................74, 146

Sherman Door & Hardware.........................................86, 138

Lochridge-Priest, Inc............................................71, 83, 150

Sigma Air Heating & Cooling.......................................60, 146

Lone Star Millwork Group, Inc.............................................26 Longhorn Mechanical.................................................46, 150

Sign Tech International, a division of Facility Solutions Group............................30, 31, 126, 154

M.B. Parker & Company, Inc...............................69, 125, 145

Southeastern Interior Systems, Inc.....................58, 142, 144

MVP Installations, LP..................................................96, 133

Southwest Lath and Plaster........................................74, 151

Mangold Roofing........................................................60, 153

Stazon Roofing...................................................................46

Mar-Tek Industries...................................................100, 149

Stonesmith, Inc..................................................20, 136, 137

Master Audio Visuals, Inc....................................82, 123, 132

Striping by Mr. V LLC..................................................48, 151

Meeks + Partners................................ 48, 52, 122, 131, 147

Structural Wood Components.............. 34, 35, 108, 125, 147

Michelle Meredith & Associates................................125, 147

Sturdisteel Company.......................................76, 82, 84, 132

Mycoskie+McInnis+Associates.....................42, 43, 126, 147

Summit Structures LLC.......................................89, 140, 141

PBS&J........................................................................81, 133

Sun Stone, Inc............................................................18, 149

PGAL...............................................IFC, 91, 92, 93, 122, 131

Supreme Roofing Systems............. 28, 69, 82, 106, 153, 154

Panattoni Construction, Inc...........................26, 27, 123, 135

TAS Commercial Concrete Construction, LLC......... 26, 53, 76, 77, 78, 80, 92, 112, 134, 135

Performance Electric LP.....................................26, 124, 139 Perkins+Will..................................... 102, 103, 122, 131, IBC Pickett, Kelm & Associates, Inc...................................81, 155 Pillar Construction Inc.......................................................144 pin..............................................................................71, 132 Pinnacle Structural Engineers.............................80, 127, 155 Ponce Contractors, Inc................................................18, 132 Pool Custom Iron Works, Inc.......................................76, 151 Quality Sound and Communications...........................86, 134 RF Technologies, Inc........................................................112 RONPARCO – Ronzani, Inc..........................36, 119, 144, 151 Raven Mechanical, LP................................................26, 152 Raymond L. Goodson Jr., Inc..............................24, 107, 133 Ready Cable, Inc.................................................................38 Reyes Contractors......................................................20, 134

Teague Nall and Perkins, Inc......................75, 106, 124, 133 Teck’s Window Tinting.....................................................159 Texas Roofing Co........................................................63, 153 Thompson Landscape Architects................................32, 147 Tino’s Welding & Fabrication......................................99, 158 Torre Crane L.P..........................................................44, 137 Treck’s Window Tinting......................................................20 Tri-Tech Building Products, LLC...................36, 58, 120, 138 United Mechanical, Inc...............................21, 113, 150, 152 V.S.F., Inc. The Troubleshooters.................................51, 155 Warehouse Frames ’n Gallery, Ltd..............................52, 145 Water Technology, Inc................................................77, 131 Wilborn Steel Co., Ltd.................................................84, 154 Xencom Energy Management, LLC.............................58, 140

Reynolds Polymer Technology, Inc................22, 23, 125, 146 Rice Drywall, Inc.........................................................74, 138 161


index Owners/Operators/Tenants

Klein Independent School District.......................................80 Leander Independent School District..................................81

500 Texas Avenue Limited Partnership...............................51

The Legacy Senior Communities.......................................110

An affiliate of the Presidio Companies................................18

Lutheran Social Services of the South, Inc........................112

Arlington Highlands, Ltd......................................................42

Mabank Independent School District...................................83

Baylor Health Care System...............................................107

Matthews Southwest..........................................................50

Baylor University.................................................................71

Most Reverend JosĂŠ H. Gomez S.T.D. Archbishop of San

Bryan Independent School District......................................72

Antonio, Archdiocese of San Antonio..................................85

CBL & Associates Properties, Inc........................................58

Nelda C. and H.J. Lutcher Stark Foundation.......................24

CDK Realty Advisors...........................................................50

PC Village Apartments Dallas, LP........................................48

Center for Child Protection................................................109

PM Realty Group.................................................................54

Central Baptist Church........................................................63

Panattoni Development Company.......................................26

Chase Oaks Church............................................................67

Peterson Regional Medical Center....................................114

Cheney & Mathes Properties...............................................42

Pinto Western Retail Holdings, L.P......................................34

City of Bryan.......................................................................98

Principal Real Estate Investors............................................38

City of Dallas....................................................................102 City of Grand Prairie.........................................................104

The Retail Connection | Connected Development Services........................................................42

City of North Richland Hills...............................................101

Rockwall Independent School District.................................74

Corgan Associates, Inc.......................................................28

Rockwood Realty Associates..............................................56

Cypress-Fairbanks Independent School District..................76

San Antonio Independent School District............................84

Dieste Inc...........................................................................29

Sherman Independent School District.................................86

Dunhill 1530 Main, L.P.......................................................22

Southwest Educational Development Laboratory.................87

Eagle Mountain-Saginaw Independent School District........75

St. Peter the Apostle Catholic Church.................................68

Endeavor Real Estate Group................................................30

Stephen F. Austin State University......................................88

Frisco Independent School District......................................82

Texas A&M University System............................................89

Gables Residential........................................................52, 53

Texas Christian University...................................................90

HCRI Prestonwood Medical Facility, LLC...........................113

Texas Health Resources...................................................106

Hillwood Development Corporation.....................................21

Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center..................111

Hines Interest.....................................................................40

Trammell Crow Company...................................................38

Holly Hall..........................................................................108

U.S. Army Corps of Engineers.............................................99

Housing and Community Services, Inc................................60

University of Houston System.............................................92

Houston Independent School District..................................94

University of North Texas....................................................91

Humble Independent School District...................................77

University of Texas â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Pan American....................................96

James Avery Craftsman, Inc...............................................33

WDS...................................................................................32

The John Cooper School.....................................................78

Watermark Community Church...........................................69

Johnson County................................................................100

Whole Foods Market Properties, Inc....................................36

Kenichi Restaurants (Billy Rieger & Scott Brasington).........20

Woodland Investments........................................................61

162


index Owner’s Representatives

Enviroplan Architects | Planners..........................................30 FKP Architects..................................................................111

CB Richard Ellis................................................................107

F&S Partners Incorporated......................................67, 88, 96 FreemanWhite, Inc............................................................107 Gensler...............................................................................21

Developers

Gideon Toal........................................................................18 Gonzalez Newell Bender Architects.....................................60

CLB Partners......................................................................44

Good Fulton & Farrell Architects.........................................42

Caddis Partners................................................................113

Graeber, Simmons & Cowan.............................................109

Gables Residential..............................................................52

Gromatzky Dupree & Associates.........................................54

Hines Interest.....................................................................40

HKS, Inc...........................................................................106

Inland American Communities Group, Inc...........................46

HOK....................................................................................38

Lincoln Property Company..................................................48

Hanbury Evans Wright Vlattas + Company..........................71

Panattoni Development Company.......................................26

Hermes Architects..............................................................36

Planned Community Developers.........................................36

JHP Architecture / Urban Design.........................................46

Wilcox Construction Services..............................................32

Jeffrey Carbo Landscape Architects....................................24 Jonathan Bailey Design, LLC............................................113 Kirksey Architecture...................................................26, 108

Architects/Interior Designers/Engineers

LBL Architects..................................................................106 Lake | Flato Architects........................................................24

Alamo Architects................................................................84

McM Architects..................................................................63

Architexas – Architecture, Planning and Historic

MESA Landscape Architecture............................................24

Preservation, Inc.........................................................22, 100

Mayse & Associates............................................................58

BGO Architects...................................................................58

Meeks + Partners.........................................................48, 52

BOKA Powell, LLC...............................................................40

Morkovsky + Associates, Inc..............................................85

BRW Architects.................................................................101

Morris Architects................................................................78

Barker Rinker Seacat Architects.......................................101

O’Connell Robertson and Associates.............................81, 89

Bay Architects..............................................................72, 76

Omniplan, Inc.........................................................32, 58, 69

Brand + Allen Architects, Inc..............................................34

PGAL............................................................................91, 92

Brinkley Sargent Architects.................................................98

Paddle Creek Design..........................................................33

CTA Architects/Engineers....................................................36

Perkins+Will.....................................................................102

Cannon Design...................................................................90

Powers Brown Architecture..........................................51, 80

Claycomb Associates..........................................................83

RTKL Associates, Inc..........................................................53

Corgan Associates, Inc.............................. 21, 28, 50, 56, 80

Rees Associates.................................................................29

Crafton Tull Sparks...........................................................104

Rhode: Hurt........................................................................44

Curtis Group.......................................................................61

SA Partnership, LLP............................................................68

Dick Clark Architecture.......................................................20

SBWV Architects, Inc..........................................................77

DiMella Shaffer.................................................................110

SHW Group, Inc......................................................74, 82, 86 163


index STG Design, Inc..................................................................36

ICI Construction, Inc............................................................20

Sterling Barnett Little, Inc.................................................114

Inland American Communities Group, Inc...........................46

Studio 8 Architects.............................................................87

J.C. Stoddard Construction...........................................68, 85

t. howard + associates.....................................................107

J.E. Kingham Construction Company..................................88

Three Architecture, Inc.....................................................112

Juno Development..............................................................22

U.S. Army Corps of Engineers.............................................99

Key Construction Texas, LLC..................................18, 50, 61

VLK Architects, Inc........................................................75, 94

LPC Contractors..................................................................48 Lee Lewis Construction....................................................111

Construction Managers/General Contractors

Linbeck Group, LLC............................................................90 MEDCO Construction, L.L.C........................................67, 107

American Constructors.......................................................81

Manhattan Construction Company................................38, 92

Andres Construction Services, LLC.............................53, 110

Panattoni Construction, Inc.................................................26

Austin Commercial, LP.................................................40, 91

Plyler Construction..............................................................86

Balfour Beatty Construction........................................22, 106

Pogue Construction............................................................74

The Beck Group............................................................21, 24

Purcell Construction............................................................76

Brookstone, L.P..................................................................78

Ratcliff Constructors, L.P....................................................75

Cadence McShane ............................................................54

Raymond Construction Co., Inc.....................................63, 87

Camarata & Perry Commercial LLC.....................................51

Robins & Morton Construction Company...........................114

Charter Builders, LTD...................................................82, 83

Rogers-Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Brien Construction Ltd.........................................69

Collier Construction............................................................72

Satterfield & Pontikes Construction, Inc........................98, 99

Core Construction.............................................................102

SpawGlass..................................................................89, 112

D. Wilson Construction Company........................................96

Spring Valley Construction Company....................32, 42, 113

Drymalla Construction Company, Ltd..................................94

Steele & Freeman, Inc......................................................101

Durotech LP..................................................................77, 80

Tribble & Stephens Construction, Ltd....................34, 44, 108

EBCO Contractors...............................................................58

Turner Condominium Construction, LLC..............................56

E I B Contractors, Inc..........................................................33

Turner Construction Company............................................28

EMJ Corporation.....................................................30, 36, 58

WaterMark Construction.....................................................58

Flynn Construction Inc......................................................109

The Whiting-Turner Contracting Company..........................71

GW Mitchell & Sons............................................................84 Gables Construction............................................................53 Gables Residential..............................................................52

Program/Project Managers

Galaxy Builders, Ltd............................................................60 Harrison, Walker & Harper, LP..........................................100

BOKA Powell, LLC...............................................................40

Healthcare Construction Management, Inc........................114

Benz Resource Group.........................................................87

Highland Builders...............................................................29

Boyken International, Inc....................................................24

Hill & Wilkinson................................................................104

Heery International, Inc.......................................................94

Hillwood Development........................................................20

Texas A&M University System Facilities Planning & Construction Division........................................89

Huser Construction...........................................................114 164


Real Estate & Construction Review - Texas 2010  

The Texas Edition 2010 of the Real Estate and Construction Review showcases projects from Texas. The projects showcased are the most importa...

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