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NET ZERO BUILDINGS • The 2018 NZB Product Advances Annual

Companion Issue

Product Advances Annual

Super efficient building systems are key in urban “electrification” goals—the desire to shift HVAC from fossil fuels to those fed by renewables.

NET ZERO BUILDINGS September 2018

NET ZERO BUILDINGS 06

 Volume 7, Number 4

Premier Issue: Jan. 2013

Premier Issue: Jan. 2013

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NZB ROUNDTABLE

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DEEP ENERGY DEEP DIVE

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NET ZERO BUILDINGS

Premier Issue: Jan. 2013

Premier Issue: Jan. 2013

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FORM + FUNCTION.

The Dri-Design Metal Wall panels on the Nordstrom Toronto Eaton Centre feature the Inspire Finish in a Shadow Series panel with varying levels of gloss. This variation gives the individual cassettes distinguishing pattern when viewed both near and far. Utilizing a custom Dri-Design detail, Custom LED light bars were also incorporated into the façade. The detail allows the light bars to be hidden within the horizontal joints.

• No sealants, gaskets or butyl tape means no streaking and no maintenance for owners. • Not laminated or a composite material, so panels will never delaminate. • At Dri-Design, we have a strict policy of recycling and creating products that the world can live with. • Fully tested to exceed ASTM standards and the latest AAMA 508-07. • Available in a variety of materials and colors. • Non-combustible and NFPA-285 compliant. UL Listed. Nordstrom Toronto Eaton Centre | Design Architect: Callison/RTKL

616.355.2970 | dri-design.com

Architect of Record: Queen’s Quay Architects CIRCLE 24

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SEPTEMBER 2018

| TOWARD ZERØ |

VOL. 7, NO. 4

NET ZERO BUILDINGS

NET ZERO BUILDINGS

NET ZERO BUILDINGS

Premier Issue: Jan. 2013

Premier Issue: Jan. 2013

Premier Issue: Jan. 2013

Gary Redmond

Managing Partner Director Publishing Operations gredmond@cbmedia.us.com

Tim Shea

Managing Partner Director Business Development tshea@cbmedia.us.com

Dave Pape

Jim Crockett

Vice President

JIM CROCKETT

Glass Half Full Where Human Factors are Concerned

Editorial Director

NET ZERODirector, BUILDINGS NET ZERO BUILDINGS Art & Production jcrockett@cbmedia.us.com NET ZERO BUILDINGS dpape@cbmedia.us.com Premier Issue: Jan. 2013

Premier Issue: Jan. 2013

Premier Issue: Jan. 2013

EDITORIAL E N VELOP E

DAY LIGH TING

Alan Weis

Barbara Horwitz-Bennett

Contributing Writer

Contributing Writer

POWE R Chuck Ross

Contributing Writer

L I G H TING

WATER

H VAC

Kevin Willmorth

John Mesenbrink

John Mesenbrink

Contributing Writer

Contributing Editor

Contributing Editor

Megan Mazzocco

Senior Editor mmazzocco@cbmedia.us.com

ART + PRODUCTION

Readers of our sister publication Architectural Products, will know from a column earlier this year, that I engaged in some muckraking regarding the ongoing battle between architects and developers over the issue of “leasable real estate.” Specifically, I stumped for the daylighting opportunities that are hurt via the omission of narrower floor plates and even lightwells, in the greed to maximize volume. That said, I have some good news to report in this tug of war, although I guarantee it had nothing to do with

architect had several impacts: First and foremost, the 72-degree tilt is the angle of the summer sun, so passively, these windows not only cut glare, but significantly reduce solar heat gain, meaning AC bills are lower. Conversely, in the winter, when the sun is lower in the sky, the glazing helps absorb heat into the space, mitigating heat loss through the glazing.

LEAPS AND BOUNDS GROWTH The New Buildings Institute, celebrating its 20th anniversary, notes its index of net zero projects is now over 500. Multifamily is the biggest gainer— doubling its 2016 total with 40 new projects. With that in mind, designers can’t ignore human factors that make such projects desirable places to live.

Beyond the Obvious: Admittedly, these angled facets eat into apartment space, but there’s another user benefit: they provide

Dave Pape

Art Director dpape@cbmedia.us.com

“IT’S ALL ABOUT USER COMFORT AND DELIGHT— FACTORS THAT MAY BE MORE IMPORTANT THAN VOLUME IN GETTING A CLIENT TO SIGN A LEASE.”

Lauren Lenkowski

Associate Art Director llenkowski@cbmedia.us.com

me, other than perhaps the emittance of positive vibes into the universe. ADVERTISING SALES Gary Redmond

847 359 6493 gredmond@cbmedia.us.com

Bob Fox

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Tim Shea

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We wish to thank the following authorities for their contributions to this issue: Mitsubishi Electric Cooling & Heating Louisiana Pacific Kingspan Insulation & Panels Vitro Architectural Glass

Net Zero Buildings (NZB), Vol. 7, No. 4. Published five times per year by Construction Business Media. Publication Office: Construction Business Media, 579 First Bank Drive, Suite 220, Palatine, IL 60067; (847) 359-6493; www.nzbmagazine.com. (Copyright © 2018 by Construction Business Media)

What/Where: On Chicago’s South Side, not far from where the Obama Presidential Library will be built, is a 14-story new apartment tower by Jeanne Gang. Dubbed Solstice on the Park, a notable aspect of the project in the Hyde Park neighborhood, is its faceted façade, which includes deeply recessed and tilted glazing on about ¾ of the fenestration on its south elevation. Why it Matters: This decision by the prominent Chicago-based

great views below to the park and nearby Lake Michigan. The angled glass is also more bird-friendly as Gang incorporated markings on the façade’s select balconies to help avert collisions—quick aside, Guardian, at the AIA Expo in New York City earlier this year, debuted a great birdfriendly glazing solution. More on that shortly, as well as another glazing product debut sure to have another major HVAC impact. Anyway, what I’m getting at is that architectural decisions like these, including the incorporation of narrower floor plates or light wells, are a matter of user comfort and delight—factors that

04 

A Publication of Construction Business Media

www.nzbmagazine.com

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JIM CROCKETT

 CONTINUED FROM 03

GLASS HALF FULL WHERE HUMAN FACTORS ARE CONCERNED (CONT.) at rent—places at the edge of a buildings are always the first taken.”

7 St. Thomas, Toronto

She adds it’s a basic instinct to want to look outside, deriving from the basic security need to protect one’s back while being able to see what might be coming. Humans, she adds, until fairly recently on the evolutionary scale, also spent the majority of their time outdoors. A deepimprinted desire for greater human-nature interaction, therefore, is not surprising, and is playing out in today’s office designs, especially the notion of creating more sensory variations. “What we want is that forest path—the variations of light, temperature and color,” says Sturgeon. may ultimately be more important than volume of space in getting clients to sign a lease. As you’ll see in this issue’s main feature—a recap of a “deep energy” roundtable we conducted at AIA—comfort is as critical a consideration as energy savings. A sense of wellbeing is another criteria that must also be factored

into the space equation, as was well documented by Australian author Amanda Sturgeon, who at AIA, addressed “urban interventions” which must occur to bring biophilia to the average city dweller or worker. This phenomenon, notes Sturgeon, author of “Creating Biophilic Buildings,” can’t be discounted. “Look

One must certainly hope things can change. For example, a rather “concrete” developer paradigm that is in the process of change is parking garage construction. Also at AIA, the Philadelphia Inquirer’s architecture critic Inga Saffron, in a session about urban planning, noted the city of Brotherly Love has

been experiencing very notable changes on this front, as four Center City parking garages were recently torn down. “It’s pretty amazing, but the real estate is too valuable.” Furthermore, she reported, a recent 30-story multifamily development went up in the city with no parking period. It’s all part of the urban no-cars/ride-share movement. Saffron doesn’t think we’ll see the end of cars in downtown areas—at least in our lifetime—but we may start seeing movement this way to relieve congestion in dense areas, where parking shifts to outlying areas, perhaps a mile away. On the Product Front Back to my tech teaser, on the floor of the AIA expo, Guardian had some great new products. The first was the release of its vacuum insulated glass line. The debut is important for a couple reasons: First, the glazing, which is also available in 11 × 17 (vs. more typical 8 × 12) sizes, allows for plenty of view to the outside; second, it’s even more efficient (R14) than triple-pane units (R8), and

10× more efficient than single-pane glass, making it a pretty awesome retrofit option. VIG units are actually only double-paned—the secret lies in the vacuuming process. Not surprisingly, the new tech costs about double triple-pane glazing, but when you consider the impact of a better envelope, HVAC costs tumble (be sure to check out the Deep Energy story!). The glazing technology is also opening doors as means to differentiate one glassy tower from another. Yet, such as at the 7 St. Thomas building in Toronto (left), the tech is allowing for unconventional shapes. It’s also great for especially cold climates. Guardian, in fact, has a retrofit pilot project under study at Eastern Michigan University. “It’s a very unique technology,” says Guardian’s Chris Dolan. “We spent a long time working on it.”

ogy with frit patterns to mitigate bird collisions; they also released Bird1st UV coatings, which work with laminated glass to break up the reflectivity allowing the glass to be more visible to birds, but are almost invisible to the human eye. Can’t wait to hit Greenbuild to find products even more innovative than these.

Jim Crockett, Editorial Director jcrockett@cbmedia.us.com

Finally, and this product is definitely “for the birds,” Guardian also debuted SunGuard SNX-L 62/34 HT coated glass, which combines triplesilver low-E technol-

contents 03

Toward Zero

06

NZB Primer

44

A desire for humannature interaction.

A closer look at envelope and HVAC strategies.

DAY L I G H T I N G

LIGHTING

WAT ER

P OW ER

H VAC

12

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24

30

34

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Green Roofs Cladding Barrier Systems Glazing Panels

End Point

   

It’s time to move toward taking action.

By Alan Weis

04 | 09.18 | NET ZERO BUILDINGS

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EN V ELO PE

   

Virtual Reality Vacuum Glazing Skylights Glass Cladding

By Barbara HorwitzBennett

   

Digital Controls Code Compliance LED Systems Downlighting

By Kevin Willmorth

   

Plumbing Fixtures Rainwater Harvest Graywater Pump Technology

By John Mesenbrink

   

Solar Integration Fuel Cell Tech Rooftop PV Solar Shingles

By Chuck Ross

   

VRF Tech Better IAQ Fan Coils Thermal Storage

By John Mesenbrink

www.nzbmagazine.com

9/4/18 10:34 AM


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BARBARA HORWITZ-BENNETT

A panel of high-performance product experts gather at the AIA conference in New York to discuss how their out-ofthe-box technologies interface with net-zero energy goals and facilitate the process in delivering integrated system design.

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| NZB: PRIMER |

On the eve of the annual AIA convention in New York earlier this year, Net Zero Buildings and Architectural Products magazines gathered a panel of industry experts, specifically in the realm of the building envelope and alternative HVAC technology, to offer insights into how those interested in high-performance design might meet a pair of notable trends surfacing in the Big Apple— those being the implementation of passive house strategies, and the “electrification” of buildings— in other words, a desire to shift HVAC from fossil fuel sources to those fed by renewables. Please visit our sister outlet, The Continuing Architect (www.thecontinuingarchitect.com) for an AIA-approved video CEU of this session. Following is a recap of the presentations, as well as a bonus roundtable discussion delving further into these issues.

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NZB ROUNDTABLE

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DEEP ENERGY DEEP DIVE

New York State of Mind Joining moderator and NZB Editorial Director Jim Crockett in the offices of the event’s host MBB Architects, were Brent Trenga, building technology director for Kingspan North America; Andrew Wilson, commercial manager with Kingspan; Emily Dritz, national architectural manager, Vitro Architectural Glass, and Kevin Miskewicz, director, commercial marketing, Mitsubishi Electric Trane HVAC US. Trenga began things, quickly identifying the envelope as the place where teams can make the greatest impact driving energy efficiencies. As an example, he shared a case study of the www.nzbmagazine.com

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Castle Square retrofit, a 7-story, 500-apartment building in Boston that had almost no insulation in the pre-existing structure. As a result, tenants bore not only the brunt of a cold winter, but high energy expenses. Making no small plans, Kingspan helped deliver an R-40 wall finished with 5-in. insulated metal panels; below that surface layer was an inch and a half of mineral fiber as well as an air/water vapor barrier. The IMPs not only improved internal environments, the new panels created a final, more contemporary look for the building as well.

In fact, this new super-insulating wall was so effective that Trenga said, when the HVAC was set to 74°F, “too much heat was actually being retained in the individual units and the tenants needed to open the windows.” As a best practice in the future, he shared that an air conditioner with a heat exchange single system, controlled by the individual tenants, would be an optimal solution. But as far as greater passive house goals, which in New York City’s case is being driven by the desire that its residential structures be able to survive major outages, such as what might have occurred if Super Storm Sandy had taken place in

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CASE STUDY

CASTLE SQUARE Boston, Mass.

A 1960s-era affordable housing project, the retrofit of Castle Square represents a historic milestone toward reducing the carbon footprint of existing buildings through the principles of deep energy retrofit. What makes it different from a standard renovation is the integrated approach and super-insulated metal panelized shell over the original masonry facade, which has led to an R-40 vs. R-3 wall.

 06

the winter, Trenga said solutions abound. The manufacturer at the show, for example, launched its quad-core high insulating panel system, which Trenga said is achieving even better R-values than what they were able to accomplish at Castle Square. Compared to more traditional technologies, he said, it delivers R values of 5 to 7.1, whereas glass fiber averages 3.2 to 4.3, while rock wool/mineral wool comes in at about 3.6 to 4.3. This is also 60% higher than standard polyethylene insulation. A side benefit, he added, is that the product has tested extremely well in terms of limiting smoke development and very high ignition temperatures. Trenga’s colleague, Andy Wilson, presented further performance results in a case study involving the company’s rigid thermoset insulation product, and a prominent Midtown Manhattan tower. In this case, the roof had to be brought up to code to a value of R-30. With regular insulation, he said, the building owner would have needed 5 to 7 inches of insulation, and the job would have taken 9 to 12 months. Instead, they opted for vacuum insulated panels—a move Wilson said saved the client $1.2 million, as the entire retrofit was performed in just a couple of weeks. The product, added Wilson, delivers an R-value of around R-32 per in., which is about five times better than conventional materials. But beyond energy savings, he says more compact rigid thermoset insulation allows for more leasable, rentable 08 | 09.18 | NET ZERO BUILDINGS

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space. For example, on another project, the insulation depth was reduced by 3 in. As a result, for this 80,000-sq.ft. building, the additional 4000 sq. ft. of space amounted to more than $600,000 per year of additional revenue.

High-Performance Glazing Of course, fenestration is another key component in any high-performance envelope. Fenestration is also key to any sustainable project in meeting biophilic and daylighting goals. Glazing and curtainwall systems, however, must also deliver compatible performance. After running through a variety of strategies for boosting U-values in glass, including the incorporation of argon gas, and the addition of even a fourth coating on triple-glazed units, Vitro’s Dritz shared a number of case studies. Among them, Chatham University’s Eden Hall Campus, a net-energy positive complex outside of Pittsburgh (it was featured in the May issue of NZB). A 2017 AIA COTE Top 10 honoree, a number of its buildings included Vitro’s Solarban 70 low-E glass. Another project, PNC Plaza in downtown Pittsburgh, has been dubbed the world’s greenest office tower. The façade of this 33-story LEED Platinum building is covered with Starphire low-iron glass with a Sungate single silver passive low-E coating. “What makes this project unique is that it’s actually a double-curtainwall façade, so there’s actually two insulated glass units held apart approximately 18 in. for the overall skin of the building,” she explains.

NET ZERO DOWN UNDER

Kingspan’s manufacturing facility in Somerton, Australia, which was constructed using its insulation products, features a 750kW solar system, which provides most of its daytime shift energy requirements. It also uses a Kingspan energy saving smart lighting system. In fact, during the day, the facility is almost entirely illuminated by natural light.

www.nzbmagazine.com

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CASE STUDY

CHATHAM UNIVERSITY, EDEN CAMPUS Pittsburgh, Pa.

Constructed on 20 acres, the net-zero campus features extensive water conservation and management elements. Being unrolled in phases, the first portion of the project involved the construction of a residence hall and a handful of academic buildings, as well as Barazzone Hall (left). The latter, to combat glare and solar heat gain, features an extensive overhang, as well as SOLARBAN 70XL low-e glass.

CASE STUDY

PNC PLAZA Pittsburgh, Pa.

Featuring a double skin with external windows that pop open to let in air to the interstitial space, outside air enters each floor through dampers in the inner envelope. The two sets of insulated glass units from Vitro. are held apart approximately 18 in. for the overall skin of the building. “In the winter, both of those insulated glass units close. That way the cavity heats up to passively warm the interior,” said Vitro’s Dritz.

ALOHA DAYLIGHT

Hawaii Preparatory Academy Energy Laboratory, a certified Living Building, is a high school science building dedicated to the study of alternative energy. Its daylighting aspects include an east-west orientation, overhangs as shading devices, skylights, and operable windows. The glazing is Vitro’s SOLARBAN 60 low-e glass.

The façade itself is also unusual in that smaller vertical windows pop out to bring fresh air into the double-wall system, and then further into an interior damper on each floor, which works to draw natural ventilation in through the office spaces and into a central thermal shaft. “In the winter, both of those insulated glass units close. That way the cavity heats up to passively warm the interior.” PNC Plaza is a mostly glass tower. Dritz was asked if high performance can still be delivered with significant amounts of glazing, especially in context of the growing trend toward tighter window-to-wall ratios. She explained that such conversations, including “facade tuning”—where each elevations’ amount of glazing is even considered—must be discussed between the client and the architect, but it is possible. That said, a strategy to consider with the latter, is to use a higher-performing glass on south and west facades where the solar heat gain is most critical. Use of coatings, in turn, can be stepped down on glazing on the north and east, where direct exposure to sunlight is much more limited. Resiliency is another issue that must be factored. As it relates to glass, Dritz explained the key is impact resistance, and where laminated glass needs to be located. “If glass breaks, which side of the building will it fall out of? You must ask then, which then has more maintenance and replacement repercussions.”

www.nzbmagazine.com

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Flowing in the Right HVAC So, with a robust envelope established, theoretically, HVAC loads can be reduced significantly. In the world of net zero projects, it’s being discovered that more alternative and precise HVAC technology may be the way to go. One such alternative is VRF, or variable refrigerated flow technology. Mitsubishi’s Miskewicz described the system as a series of outdoor units connected to indoor units. The former act as condensers, as either heat pumps, or operate in heat recovery, with simultaneous cooling and heating capabilities. Through two refrigerant pipes, they are connected down to a branch-circuit controller which acts as a traffic cop allocating refrigerant where needed. “One of the basics of VRF technology is that you’re moving conditioned refrigerant through a space instead of moving conditioned air,” he explained, thereby eliminating the need for large ductwork. The systems are all electric, which helps promote electrification in lieu of gas and fossil fuels. One of the energy efficiency methods inherent in a variable refrigerant flow system is its inverter-driven compressor, he continued. Describing the technology as a form of “cruise control,” the temperature modulates close to a set point, thereby avoiding “that energy-intensive on and off of the compressor.” 10 

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CASE STUDY

DAVID WHITNEY BUILDING Detroit, Mich.

A 19-story, mixed-use building with residences, a hotel, bar and restaurant, the 100-year-old-building, which included thick limestone walls among its assets, had no air conditioning prior to its renovation. The building was retrofit with more than 600 tons of Mitsubishi Electric VRF units over the course of 2014-15. An additional benefit of VRF, in this case, was the units were able to be housed in three different locations—one in the building, one on the ground level, and one on the roof. Despite multiple locations, the system still easily met project specs.

CASE STUDY

MIAMI UNIVERSITY Oxford, Ohio

For the renovations of Elliott Hall, built in 1825, and Stoddard Hall in 1834, the goal was to incorporate geothermal technology and end on-campus coal burning. Adding water-source VRF helped meet the school’s sustainability goals (saving 61% of energy costs), while VRF’s minimal piping maintained historical, architectural integrity.

 09

As an example of the technology’s efficiencies, Mitsubishi added water-source VRF to two buildings on Miami University’s campus in Oxford, Ohio. After a year of operation, energy consumption was decreased by 61%. From an architecture standpoint, Miskewicz said, VRF enabled the university to preserve the aesthetic and the historical integrity of the buildings.

A New World VRF, like many systems employed within net-zero design/ deep-energy retrofits, is often out of the norm, and can even be labelled “disruptive.” As the session segued into roundtable mode, Miskewicz was asked how an “alternative” technology provider goes about breaching its incorporation in a project. To begin, Miskewicz explained manufacturers need to ask building owners what problems they want to solve. “For example, if the goal is to get to a certain energy usage for the building, VRF can get you so far, but there are other technologies that can get you farther, depending upon the needs of the building.” Trenga concurred, adding it’s critical that system “experts” be brought in as early as possible. Design-assist, he added, is a great option in avoiding the time-consuming process of running through multiple operations of design. Qualifying this, Miskewicz added that it’s important to tap into the expertise of manufacturers in the right order. For 10 | 09.18 | NET ZERO BUILDINGS

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example, he said, “if you’re designing a really tight-envelope building, you don’t want to talk to the HVAC people first, because if we give you a load calculation on your building as it is today, and then we come back when all of the other work is done, it’s going to be drastically reduced.” Because education is key part of the equation, Trenga believes that the entire industry needs to do a better job of pushing out case studies, including projects where things didn’t go as anticipated, so that the design firm or manufacturer, and the industry as a whole, can learn and build upon this useful information for future projects.

“IT’S IMPORTANT TO TAP INTO THE EXPERTISE OF MANUFACTURERS IN THE RIGHT ORDER. IF YOU TALK TO THE HVAC PEOPLE FIRST, AND GET A LOAD CALCULATION AS IT IS TODAY, AND THEN WE COME BACK WHEN ALL OF THE OTHER WORK IS DONE, IT’S GOING TO BE DRASTICALLY REDUCED.”

Bringing the topic back to process, Wilson, on the noted Manhattan tower he presented, said his company conducted a cost analysis with 20 different types of models, and thermal calculations. They then presented a half a dozen options. Because Kingspan was brought in early, he said, the design team was able to choose a full range of viable options. On a similar note, Dritz pointed out that not one manufacturer is going to have the answer, which is why early collaborative conversations should take place. For example, Vitro’s high-performance glass needs to live inside someone else’s frame. “There are going to be other people that need to help contribute to make sure that the full system is working the way that will benefit the project,” she said. www.nzbmagazine.com

8/31/18 12:34 PM


THIN THE WAY TO GO In the steel frame rainscreen assembly below, by using phenolic thermoset insulation vs. standard mineral fiber, roughly 3-in. depth are gained CASE STUDY

RESIDENTIAL TOWER, NEW YORK Midtown, Manhattan

On this roofing retrofit project, which needed to deliver an R-Value of 30, roughly 265 sq. m. of Kingspan Insulation’s super-thin (0.56 in.) optimaR vacuum insulated panels were installed. According to Kingspan’s Andy Wilson, the product’s closed cell nature helps lower thermal conductivity, which can allow for a thinner layer of insulation. Thinner insulation, in turn, can result in thinner external wall construction. Thinner wall construction, he says, can result in greater internal floor area which leads to a better return on investment. In this case, the client, although using a higher premium product (with a layer of XPS over it), saved more than a million dollars and considerable installation time, by not having to alter parapets, door thresholds or other structures.

Continue to Learn and Educate

“CONSIDER YOUR CLIENT: A SCHOOL DISTRICT THAT WANTS A BUILDING TO LAST FOR 50 YEARS WILL PUT MONEY INTO IT, A DEVELOPER FLIPPING A BUILDING WILL NOT.”

Back on the subject of passive house-inspired designs, Miskewicz identified a significant challenge that must not be overlooked is occupant comfort and behavior. While project teams can design and deliver the most efficient building, if occupants are not closing windows when they need to be closed, the building will not perform as designed. “The human element is going to be the biggest to overcome, to change the mindset here, because, frankly, in this country, we’re not concerned about energy like some other countries are,” he said. Another concern to discuss, according to Trenga, is the life and operation of a building. In general practice, once a project is completed, its designers turn over the keys to the building owner and leave—its’ almost like having a child and then leaving it on the doorstep. One way to address this, according to Miskewicz, is to consider performance contracting, where compensation is tied to the long-term operation of the building. But in order to achieve this, he said, the process must start with the realization that no single manufacturer can solve all issues and challenges of the building. Rather, he added, the entire project team must be connected.

the rest of the team members and the collaborative process to follow in sync. If the architect has one goal and the owner has a different one, it’s always going to be the owner that wins because they have the wallet.” In the end, Trenga said it comes back to education. “The construction industry lives by first cost, and the only way to get building teams to consider longer-term options is education,” he said. “I think we all would agree sustainable construction is probably the way we want to steer most people,” added Miskewicz, but society needs to get to “a critical mass of acceptance and understanding.” Again addressing the sharing of information, Trenga explained that there’s standard systems and then there’s optimization. The latter involves collectively sharing information with the community so that optimized systems can be made into a scalable, repeatable model. “For us, at the end of the day, it’s education. We work with architects, owners, engineers, contractors and facility managers–any one of them can make or break a sale. If you educate two, and you miss three, you’ve got a problem,” he related. “So education, while a long, drawn-out process, is what we need, and we have to keep pounding the pavements to make sure we drive that message home.”

Dritz then emphasized the importance of the owner/architect relationship. “That’s the team that has to be in sync for www.nzbmagazine.com

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ENVELOPE

City of Broad Shoulders Supports Green Roofs

ALAN WEIS

City Hall, of Greenbuild host city Chicago, features an expansive vegetated roof. Showing it practices what it preaches, the city hopes it inspires others that such practices are not only possible, but beneficial. According to Amber Ponce, business development manager with LiveRoof Global, that as research on the benefits of human interaction with nature in the built environment grows, they’re seeing green roofs now being very clearly designed with visibility and accessibility in mind.

Weathering the Windy City

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his fall, Greenbuild blows into Chicago, a city that enjoys four seasons: summer, fall, winter and extra winter (aka spring). And windy or not, it is known for its weather extremes, which makes envelope decisions even more critical, including window-to-wall ratio. The good news is that there are plenty of novel products addressing just such concerns. Take Duo-Gard, who certainly hopes to promote daylighting efforts, but understands the need for efficiency, even beauty. According to David M. Miller, the company’s president, manufacturers are offering more daylighting panel options, including some, that while not having a significant impact on performance, do on aesthetics. In polycarbonate systems, where Duo-Gard specializes, matte finishes are being offered on all panels, and new colors are abundant. “My favorite innovation for façades is a line of panels that provides color on the outer walls, while the inner walls remain white. This washes the color out of the light transmission while providing options for the building’s façade,” says Miller.

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When it comes to windows, designers are asking for more from components and systems. “We’re noticing that passive house principles are increasingly part of builders’ plans,” notes Sheldon Kahan, manager, Commercial Program with Deceuninck North America. “High-performance windows are an important element in achieving rigorous energy efficiency with a focus on a tight seal and high thermal values.” Insulated panels also play a part, and Kim Rager, ’s product manager for Insulated Metal Panels, notes that IMPs have been a go-to solution for high-performance enclosures for years. Like fenestration and other components, there is an expectation to up their game. “The sustainable building industry is moving the needle even further toward healthy building materials. We are rethinking not only how our buildings can be more efficient, but also how every product we use can be more sustainable, and manufacturers are beginning to take steps to reduce and eliminate potentially harmful chemical ingredients from their products.” For

example, she says, halogenated flame retardants (HFRs), historically, were added to products to inhibit ignition or spread of flames. “But HFRs are a compound that contain chlorine and bromine, which are classified as Persistent Bioaccumulative Toxins (PBTs). To combat this, our halogen-free foam offering is available on Formawall products.” For green roofs, it’s not just a matter of asking more of components, but also taking full advantage of what’s already there. “In our line of work, we are seeing a shift in green roof design from doing it for mostly singular-goal achievement, such as stormwater code compliance, to optimizing all the benefits that a single green roof can provide,” explains Amber Ponce, business development manager with LiveRoof Global. Green roofs are also being designed with accessibility in mind. “We see more projects with seating and guard rails, and a greater degree of plant diversity to add more height, texture and movement to vegetative roofs,” observes Ponce. www.nzbmagazine.com

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ENVELOPE PEST PROTECTION TERM Barrier System enhances the building envelope by incorporating non-chemical pest barriers into a building’s waterproofing and vapor barriers, drastically minimizing future pesticide needs for your commercial or residential structures. The system includes sealant barriers, particle barriers and flashings and window tapes, along with sill plate barriers and flooring underlayments.

GREENBUILD SESSIONS

THE BUILDING ENVELOPE AS A SYSTEM

Fri., Nov. 16, 8am-9am One fundamental method to achieve deep green buildings is optimizing the envelope with the mechanical and electrical systems. Designers should consider the envelope as a system where heat, light and air flow in both directions, rather than simply as a barrier between the interior and exterior. This presentation will highlight the results of the firm’s exploration through integrated design and parametric analysis the impacts and opportunities associated with the building envelope when pursuing a deep green building. HISTORIC MASONRY RETROFIT

Wed., Nov. 14, 1:30pm-2:30pm Architect and building owner renovated a four-story, fourunit row home in Philadelphia using Passive House principles. The case study highlights issues encountered while renovating the historic property to near-zero energy, including the approvals process and preservation concerns; identifying and solving building science problems; testing, preserving and enhancing failing materials; cost analysis; design and construction decisions and details; lessons learned; and the completed project. VENTILATION AND ENERGY RECOVERY IN HIGH-RISE RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS

CASE STUDY

NET ZERO, VICTORIAN STYLE

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“[TWO-WAY COLOR TRANSLUCENT PANELS] GIVE ARCHITECTS OPTIONS THAT WILL ALLOW THEM TO ACCOMPLISH MORE ARCHITECTURALLY WITH A SINGLE TECHNOLOGY.”

INTEGRITY AND LIGHT Clearspan skylights and skyroofs combine structural integrity with a high quality of daylight. The aluminum box beam framing system, clad with translucent panels from partner company, Kalwall, can be engineered to meet almost any design requirement, with the most popular options being center ridge roofs, hip roofs, sawtooth shed roofs, segmented arches, segmented domes and straight rafter circular skylights.

Stewart and Linda Herman wished to convert their 1907 Victorian in Minneapolis into a net zero home, if possible. Their architect, Marc Sloot, a senior associate at SALA Architects, absolutely thought it could be done. It, however, meant the original cladding would have to be removed so that high-performing insulation (replacing sawdust in some instances) could be added. In fact, SALA ended up raising the roof another 10 in. to achieve an R80 value, and R40 in the walls. In re-cladding the home, Sloot selected LP Building Products’ SmartSide Smooth Texture Lap Siding, Trim and Fascia to maintain the look of the historic structure. LP SmartSide products, jumped out to Sloot, as SALA is always interested in environmentally friendly building materials, and the LP cladding is sustainably sourced from SFI. “This allowed us to embrace and enhance the beauty that was already there,” said Sloot. Herman concurs, “In terms of enhancing the original beauty, we achieved a 100% traditional look,” he says. “It looks like a brand new 1907 house.”

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1229 ABUNDANT DAY  Paul Dunbar High School in Washington D.C. by Perkins Eastman + Moody Nolan incorporates a clearspan skyroof.

Photo: Joseph Romeo

Thurs., Nov. 15, 3pm-4pm Air-to-air energy recovery ventilation (ERV) is rapidly becoming the means to achieve better multi-family residential buildings, and an array of ERV variations is now available to designers, each with different advantages and disadvantages. Four ERV case studies—centralized, in-suite, fan-coil-integrated and exterior-envelope-integrated—will be presented, comparing respective trade-offs of system costs, energy use intensities, high-rise suitability and other characteristics.

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Net Zero Energy by 2020 This is our stated aim for our 100+ manufacturing facilities globally The pursuit of Net Zero Energy is at the heart of what we aim to achieve, both for ourselves and for the built environment as a whole. Our array of products and solutions complete the building envelope and help architects, owners and occupants along their own NZE journeys. Within Kingspan, we aim to use only renewable sources of power through saving, generating and procuring. A global drive which began in 2011 at 0% NZE has now pushed us to achieving 69% NZE in 2017.

Let’s journey together

www.kingspan.us

Insulated Panels

Insulation

Access Floors

Light + Air

Environmental Solutions

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ENVELOPE

GREENBUILD TOURS

Green roofing, solar and natural ventilation examples and discussions abound on this year’s slate of Greenbuild tours. GREEN ROOFS—MAKING FARM-TO-TABLE ACCESSIBLE

Mon., Nov. 12, 1pm-5pm Innovative green roof technologies abound on sites ranging from urban agriculture to beautification using varying plant palettes, depth, design, techniques, irrigation and more. Learn best practices in designing, establishing and maintaining green roofs; how to determine why some roofs fail and others succeed; and how to identify the best qualities of “extensive” and “intensive” green roofs to create best green roof designs. ADAPTIVE REUSE

Mon., Nov. 12, 1 pm-5pm Chicago is rich in history and this tour highlights how adaptive reuse projects have honored that history while building something new. Visit three sites that have transformed underutilized building stock: the Old Chicago Post Office, UI Labs on Goose Island and 1515 Webster on the former Finkl Steel site. Part of the session includes identifying the energy benefits of green roofs.

GREEN TRANSPORT Support for cycling at the University of Vermont has been further strengthened with the addition of a fully enclosed 19-ft by 63-ft bike shelter that can accommodate 176 bikes. The structure was designed by WTW Architects in Pittsburgh, and the internal bike rack was engineered by Duo-Gard Industries.

Fusion of Performance and Style Fusion is a high-performance system for building façades, canopies and other outdoor structures. It integrates 3form translucent polycarbonate glazing panels with Duo-Gard’s engineered structural systems to create advanced aesthetic options in 102 colors, three finishes and three thicknesses: 0.25 in., 0.375 in. and 0.5 in. The system offers multiple options for light levels, diffusion levels and visibility levels with impres-

sive impact resistance, UV stability and proven performance. Duo-Gard Industries www.duo-gard.com CIRCLE 305

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GREENING THE WAY TO SUSTAINABLE URBAN LIVING

Mon., Nov. 12, 1pm-5pm Sustainable residential design is growing in popularity as more people understand the benefits to designing with the environment in mind. The homes on this tour showcase innovative energy strategies, adaptive reuse opportunities, water-efficiency and moisture-management approaches and improved air quality results. Learn how solar can be incorporated into a home design in both direct and passive ways. SENIORS LIVING GREEN

Fri., Nov. 16, 2pm-6pm Come see how today’s seniors are living green with a tour of three Chicago Housing Authority senior living apartments. This tour includes the Pomeroy Apartments and the Kenmore Apartments, both LEED Platinum certified buildings, and the Ella Flag Young building, which is participating in the BIT Building program.

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A NATURAL FIT

The RHEINZINK-prePATINA LINE offers a pre-weathered blue-gray or graphite-gray cladding option that develops a natural patina. 100%- recyclable, it is easy to profile, malleable and bendable.

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TILE SIMULATED  Stronger and lighter than traditional tile options, the S-Tile provides the aesthetic of tile combined with the strength and energy efficiency of steel.

FROM EAVE TO RIDGE The S-Tile system creates a clean, crisp simulated tile appearance with pre-finished metal (24-gauge steel). The continuous, up-to-40-ft. long, eave-to-ridge panels (tile step length is 14 in. and height is 1.5 in.) provide fast installation without endlaps and only weigh 1.2 lbs. per ft., providing a high-end look with minimal weight and installation expense. Berridge Manufacturing Co. www.berridge.com CIRCLE 303

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ENVELOPE

GREEN ROOFS

 EXPANDED HORIZON More projects with seating and guard rails, as well as a greater degree of plant diversity, are adding more height, texture and movement to vegetative roofs.

CASE FOR GREEN ROOFS According to LiveRoof, there are plenty of reasons to install green roofs. Here are a few:  Reduced fire risk  Reduced heat island effect  Positive employee benefits, including better attendance, improved focus and increased output (and reduced psychological stress)  Higher rents for owners  Maximized occupancy (full occupancy is faster than those without green roofs)  Expanded usable space (think rooftop patios and healing gardens)  Reduced cooling costs  Reduced stormwater runoff  Cleaner water  Lower pollution  Increased oxygen  Reduced noise (plants as acoustic isolators)  Green space compliance (in terms of tax credits)  Restored habitats  Energy savings  A better protected roof.

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 HIGH PERFORMING AND FIRE RESILIENT Introduced at AIA, QuadCore technology from Kingspan utilizes a hybrid insulation core with a closed microcell structure to deliver an R-8.0/in. performance in insulated metal panel systems. It also offers fire protection, health benefits, as well as a 30-yr. warranty.

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 CHANGING OUTLOOKS CENTRIA is rethinking not only how buildings can be more efficient, but also how every product they manufacture can be more sustainable. As a result, they’ve eliminated Halogen from their Formawall line.

NO MORE HALOGENS The Formawall line of insulated metal panels has undergone a groundbreaking sustainability enhancement with the elimination of halogens from the product’s insulating foam core. The new foam insulation formula now contains zero halogens, while improving the wall system’s fire performance—and without any additives that may be harmful to people or the environment. This latest iteration enables the architectural community to push the envelope further to create a more sustainable building environment, while delivering unmatched performance and more.

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Fri., Nov. 16, 2 pm-6pm This tour will highlight the remarkable changes made over the past decade at the Loyola lakefront campus, including stormwater, landscaping and streetscaping projects. Tour participants will see several groundbreaking buildings that all address with energy, human comfort and natural ventilation in subtly different ways. One focus is on the different ways natural ventilation can be achieved in Chicago.

Fri., Nov. 16, 2pm-6pm Chiaravalle Montessori School and Galewood Elementary School are unique buildings in unique communities with similar missions, transforming their respective area with exceptional education, inside an exceptional spaces. Chiaravalle transformed an existing 1898 building with an addition and renovation, while Galewood/ UNO created a new landmark in an under-served community. One component of the session involves identifying active and passive sustainable design strategies implemented on the projects like shading and photovoltaic systems.

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LOYOLA UNIVERSITY CHICAGO COMMITS TO SUSTAINABILITY

INNOVATION IN K-12 EDUCATION

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ULTRA-THIN OPTION Kingspan OPTIM-R is a next-generation insulation comprising rigid vacuum insulation panels (VIP) with a microporous core, which is evacuated, encased and sealed in a thin, gas-tight envelope to give outstanding R-values and an ultra-thin insulation solution. The high level of efficiency—up to R-28 on 1 in., and R-57 on 2 in., using calculated edge thermal resistance properties—combined with minimal thickness, provides an ideal solution for applications where a lack of construction space or depth is an issue. The panels are accompanied with rigid thermoset polyisocyanurate (PIR) insulation infill panels which can be cut to fit around problem areas such as skylights or other penetrations. Insulation includes a 30-year warranty.

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Sessions: HUBER ENGINEERED WOOD PRESENTS: DETAILING CONTINUITY IN BUILDING ENCLOSURE SYSTEMS

Wed., Nov. 14, 10am-12pm Continuity is a concern when managing the four primary barriers—water-resistant, air thermal barriers, and vapor retarders. Challenges arise when detailing non-continuous transitions within the building envelope: transitions from one material to another, penetrations, window and door openings, or surface changes (roof/ wall junctions or parapets). Developing complete details within construction drawings will achieve continuity of the building enclosure barriers creating air-tight, weather-resistant enclosures that promote energy efficiency and long-term durability.

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Photo courtesy: Cooper Robertson/Nic Lehoux

DAYLIGHTING

Whitney Museum of American Art—New York City

BARBARA HORWITZ-BENNETT

Cooper Robertson’s daylighting design for the project incorporates glazing on all four sides, enabling curators to change and manipulate daylight in accordance with exhibition programming by adding in a wall, for example. As an alternative to heavy light filtration via shades— which eliminates views out the windows—a freestanding wall can be constructed to separate the glass wall from the main volume of the gallery. This could be used as a breakout space or for point-of-purchase retail, separate from the rest of the gallery circuit. (More on p. 22).

WELL Beyond LEED

w

hile this year’s line-up of Greenbuild sessions, presentations and case studies are focused on the U.S. Green Building Council, notably in regard to talks centered on its various certification programs, the sessions do address plenty of other green certification systems and sustainable programs as well. For example, attendees can learn more about the Living Building Challenge (LBC) with its rigorous performance standards, the SITES v2 rating system for land and development, the WELL Building standard with its focus on health and well being, and Fitwell, also targeting health. In fact, LBC recently launched its second version of the standard after drawing insights garnered from its first 1,000 certified projects. The updated program incorporates fewer preconditions and weighted optimizations; the original seven “petal” concepts have been expanded to 10. For example, the original comfort concept has been broken out into thermal comfort and sound; materials will now

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be addressed in the new air and mind concepts category; “community” is also new concept, addressing equity, social cohesion and engagement.

topics are emerging as the most prominent themes to be addressed this year—among them are health, resilience, water quality and efficiency and biomimicry.

Other green building programs addressed in this year’s sessions include the   , which focuses on , Social Economic and Environmental Design (SEED) Evaluator methodology, and GRESB—the global real estate sustainability benchmark—which uses common metrics to provide investors and portfolio owners tools to manage risk, capitalize on opportunities and engage with investment managers. Being that LEED is the most commonly used rating system, a number of sessions will also help attendees gain insights into some of these other certification programs within the context of seeking LEED certification.

With natural disasters becoming more common, designers are being called upon to incorporate resiliency into their designs. Addressing this issue, one Greenbuild session will cover i, the resiliency standard, recently adopted by Green Business Certification Inc. (), will discuss its resiliency design criteria and credits for emergency preparedness, adaptation and community vitality, as well as how it interfaces with the LEED Resilient Design pilot credits.

Hot Topics Generally speaking, among the many sessions and speakers ready to share their expertise, a number of key

Another session homing in on infrastructure planning looks at host city Chicago’s plans for addressing flooding susceptibility; another will cover hurricane resiliency, and yet another panel will address the role of microgrids in delivering clean power to critical facilities in emergency situations.

www.nzbmagazine.com

8/31/18 1:15 PM


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©2017 Vitro Architectural Glass. All rights reserved. Solarban, Starphire and the Starphire logo are registered trademarks owned by Vitro. Starphire Ultra-Clear is a trademark owned by Vitro. The PPG logo is a registered trademark of PPG Industries Ohio, Inc.

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DAYLIGHTING

GREENBUILD SESSIONS

SKYLIGHT DELIGHT  A key aesthetic aspect of the renovation is the creation of a grand atrium with a series of largescale skylights.

Key Greenbuild Sessions At-A-Glance: HOW TO USE LEEDV4 EQ7 SUCCESSFULLY TO GET MORE POINTS AND BETTER DAYLIGHT DESIGN OUTCOMES

Weds., Nov 14, 4:30 pm LEED’s indoor air quality thermal comfort credit involves complex metrics and calculation tables that make it difficult for many designers to even consider credit. This session seeks to demystify the process, and teach participants how to productively use the EQ7 scorecards to enhance daylight designs and obtain these elusive credits. Kicking things off, Daniel Glazer, PhD, principal and founder of the Boulder, Colo.-based LightStanza, will share lessons learned in progressively earning more EQ7 points with each daylighting project. Derek Felschow, P.E., LEED AP, associate principal, Point Energy Innovations, San Francisco, will walk participants through a calculation of a small portion of the LEED EQ7 scorecard. Tying it all together, Kris Callori, LEED Fellow founder/principal, Verdacity, Albuquerque, N.M. and Ken Hall, manager, sustainable design systems, Gensler, will offer more background and detailed case studies addressing EQ7. THE ECONOMIC VALUE OF DAYLIGHT AND VIEWS

Thurs., Nov. 15, 3:00 pm The panel addresses the lack of hard numbers to make a business case for daylighting by applying the LEED Daylight credit simulation method, and modeling the total potential natural light entering the building and the views offered by more than 10,000 office spaces. Those results will be combined with other real estate factors in an econometric regression model to determine the relationship between the daylight and views in a space and its transacted rent price. By demonstrating that daylighting designs have both architectural and economic value, the goal is to make the case that good design is not just environmentally preferable, but also economically advantageous.

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El Segundo, Calif.

Craig Ellwood Would Approve Updating the original office building designed back in 1968 by the renowned architect Craig Ellwood and occupied by the Xerox Corporation, the SOM-designed Class A multitenant space, 777 Aviation, in El Segundo, Calif., incorporates C.R. Laurence exterior and interior glazing systems that promote daylighting, contemporary aesthetics and transparency. Designed in the style of California modernism where the lines between the inside and outside are blurred and tenants are afforded access to the outdoors on each floor, the glazing systems blend in well with this design goal.

CRL-U.S. Aluminum’s Series 4500SG structural silicone glazed curtainwall comprises the first floor façade and upper level balcony areas. The system’s uninterrupted horizontal glass spans produce streamlined visuals and a seamless transition to the interior. In addition, CRL-U.S. Aluminum’s Entice entrance system with ultra-narrow 1.125-in. vertical stiles, and an overall system depth of just 2.5 in., deliver a distinct all-glass aesthetic. The Entice systems delivers thermally broken framing and cladding for U-factors as low as 0.33, which was key for this project

as both the curtainwall and entrance doors had to meet California Title 24’s stringent thermal performance requirements. “Given the performance criteria for the new fenestration and our goal of having a minimalist aesthetic, there was no other option than the Entice Entrance System we specified,” relates Susan Bartley, AIA, LEED AP, project manager, SOM Architecture, Los Angeles.

OFFICE CONVERSION In converting Craig Ellwood’s 1968 office building into a modern-day space, SOM specified C.R. Laurence curtainwall and entrance doors to deliver a beautiful aesthetic.

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DAYLIGHTING DATAPOINT

AAMA RELEASES LATEST MARKET STUDY

Offering insights into U.S. fenestration market activity, the American Architectural Manufacturers Assn. has released its biannual report, “AAMA 2017/2018 Study of the U.S. Market for Windows, Doors and Skylights.”

CHANGING COLORS The tongue-and-groove matte finish enhances the panel’s ability to pick up ambient colors and take on light.

WELCOMING MATTE Adding matte finish polycarbonate glazing panels to its Series 3500 Translucent Wall System, this latest Duo-Gard offering lends an enhanced aesthetic. “The matte finish enhances the way the panels pick up ambient colors and take on light. They don’t reflect, they absorb, providing diffused colorization,” explains Duo-Gard President David Miller. “We underestimate the design aspect of this polycarbonate that allows it to change color throughout the day, depending on its surroundings.” Available in 40mm and 50mm, the tongue-and-groove matte

finish panels feature lengths up to 50 ft. and spans up to 10 ft. for seamless visual aesthetics with no mullions.

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UNLIKE NATURAL SCENES, WHICH ARE EASY FOR THE BRAIN TO PROCESS, URBAN LANDSCAPES TEND TO FEATURE REPETITIVE PATTERNS.

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Activity related to new construction and major additions to existing structures: Contract awards grew 4% from 2016 to 2017, and expected to grow another 4% in 2018 before flattening out in 2019. WINDOW, DOOR, SKYLIGHT NON-RESIDENTIAL MARKET BREAKDOWN: 54% Storefront applications and site-fabricated commercial windows 23% Shop-fabricated and architectural commercial windows 23% Curtainwall

 CLIP SYSTEM TurnKey quick-assembly glass cladding system’s patented 1.125-in. clip system had no need for adhesives or drilling.

Both categories have shown growth, according the study. The study also reports that non-residential entry doors and commercial unit skylights grew 6% from 2016 to 2017.

NEWS

A TURNKEY SOLUTION Incorporating artisanal mouth-blown art glass, Bendheim’s new TurnKey quick-assembly glass cladding system is ideal for interior wall changes. With its patented 1.125-in. clip system, with no need for adhesives or drilling, the system works with a wide variety of glass options including back-painted, mirrored, etched, textured, decorative laminated, digitally printed and dry-erase glass marker boards.

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CAN BUILDINGS GIVE PEOPLE HEADACHES? In an editorial published by CNN, Dr. Arnold J. Wilkins, professor of psychology at the University of Essex, Colchester, England, explains why the repetitive look of building façades and components can give people headaches. Unlike natural scenes, which are easy for the brain to process, urban landscapes tend to feature repetitive patterns. With the aid of a modeling program, Wilkins evaluated the way nerve cells compute what people see, and measured the amount of oxygen used by the visual part of the brain. Typically, oxygen usage is greater when people look at uncomfortable images; headaches tend to be associated with excess oxygen usage. “Of course, some repetitive patterns are an unavoidable result of modular construction,” he writes. NET ZERO BUILDINGS | 09.18 | 21

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DAYLIGHTING

NEWS

Leveraging the benefits of virtual reality technology, a group of researchers at École polytechnique fédérale de Lausanne’s (EPFL) Laboratory of Integrated Performance in Design in Lausanne, Switzerland, gathered 29 participants to compare their perceptions of daylit spaces in real vs. virtual environments, in a study published in The Journal of the Illuminating Engineering Society. Funded by EPFL and the Velux Stiftung Foundation, the study evaluated five aspects of subjective perception of daylit spaces: the perceived pleasantness, interest, excitement, complexity and satisfaction with the amount of view in the space. The researchers found a high level of perceptual accuracy, demonstrating no significant differences between the real and virtual environments on the studied evaluations, ultimately showing much promise for the use of VR as a daylighting design tool.

Photo courtesy: Cooper Robertson/Nic Lehoux

VR as a Daylighting Design Tool

CHANGING DAYLIGHT Here, the eighth floor gallery, controlled natural light is delivered through clerestory windows with shades. The shading system has two components: solar glare shades that cut down the intensity of light entering the windows; and solar diffusion shades that disperse the light that does manage to seep through.

WHITNEY MUSEUM OF AMERICAN ART, New York City

Cooper Robertson’s design allows displayed works to be shown in a full light spectrum and accentuating the threedimensionality of sculptures. In order to protect the artifacts from UV rays, insulated glass units with warm edge spacers and clear, low-iron glass with neutral coatings, with minimal reflectivity and extortion,

were specified. A color-neutral PVB UV filtration interlayer is sandwiched between the glass, filtering out in excess of 99% of harmful UV radiation. The artwork is protected, the building’s energy efficiency is enhanced, and patrons are afforded a more natural viewing environment. Interior shades, strategically spaced throughout, deliver additional modulation of daylight during bright times of day. The shades are deployed from the

ceiling, covering the windows and doors. Roof-mounted sensors track the sun directly overhead as it moves around the building and adjust the shading accordingly.

 IMPENETRABLE Frits around the window mullions ensure that no light seeps through when the gallery shades are closed.

WELL V2

An update to the WELL Building standard increases the seven original pillars of the program to 10. The original “comfort” concept has been broken out into thermal comfort and sound; “materials” will now be addressed in the new air and mind concepts; while “community” is a new concept, addressing equity, social cohesion and engagement. New categories:  Thermal Comfort  Sound  Air  Mind  Community

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Arup Lends Expertise to African Church Design Tasked with assisting the architect of record John McAslan + Partners in developing the second largest cathedral in Kenya, Arup helped design a central roof skylight running the length of the Sacred Heart Cathedral in Kericho. The majestic arched roof is covered with timber slats and the skylight widens on one end to illuminate the altar in a shaft of light. Because light levels vary considerably in Kenya’s high altitude from intense zenithal sunlight, the daylighting design had to be carefully engineered to provide an even and comfortable lighting environment. A diffusing glass interlayer scatters sunlight, protects the wooden fixtures and fittings inside the building and prevents the brightness from disturbing the worshipers.

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DAYLIGHTING SHOWCASING CUSTOMIZED BLINDS IN ACTION With a focus on sharing stories of real-world solar control requirements and how they were met, Draper plans to showcase examples of custom-designed shading systems in action at Greenbuild this year. Pictured here is Gordon Parks Arts Hall at the University of Chicago Lab School where Draper designed and manufactured a custom motorized shade system with tracks and re-directional rollers to fit the unique angles and breaks in the façade. The solution provided solar control without giving up square footage to shades hanging straight down into the workspace.

CHARCOAL SHADE Mermet E Screen Charcoal/Gray with a 3% openness factor was used at the school.

TRUE TRANSPARENCY Semple Brown desired a product that would allow for views to the exterior without too much tint in the glass. Similarly, the firm wanted activities within the building to be apparent from the exterior.

GLAZING

Draper www.draper.com CIRCLE 296

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MAGIC OF VACUUM GLAZING

WITH TALKS ON THE VARIOUS CERTIFICATION PROGRAMS, THE GREENBUILD SESSIONS ALSO ADDRESS PLENTY OF OTHER GREEN CERTIFICATION SYSTEMS AND SUSTAINABLE PROGRAMS AS WELL.

ENT CENTER FOR THE ARTS, COLORADO SPRINGS Designed by Semple Brown Design, Denver, to encourage and support working relationships with community cultural organizations and to provide direct public access to performances, exhibits and classes, the 92,000-sq.-ft. facility is the first purposebuilt performing and visual arts center on the University of Colorado, Colorado Springs’ campus. To maximize energy efficiency and preserve views of the surrounding Rocky Mountains, the firm specified high-performance Solarban 90 solar control, lowemissivity (low-e) glass by Vitro Architectural Glass for curtainwall system. “We placed a high priority on transparency and neutrality for glazing,” explains Bryan Schmidt of Semple Brown.

Delivering the thermal performance of conventional double glazing in the same thickness as a single glass pane, Pilkington’s Spacia taps into vacuum glazing technology. With its thin profile, the product is a great fit for historic restorations and other applications where the aesthetics of slim glazing is desired. The air between the two panes of glass is extracted creating a vacuum with a space of only 0.2 mm, which is separated by a micro-spacer grid of tiny pillars. In a standard double glazed unit with a low-E coating, the conduction/convection component can create up to 70% of the heat loss. Vacuum glazing significantly reduces this loss, thereby delivering significant energy savings. Pilkington North America

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DAYLIT CLASSROOMS Students complete math tests:

Daylighting + Student Performance

Photo credit: Tom Kessler

Students faster reading tests:

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 GOLD STANDARD High-performance glazing was a key factor in achieving LEED Gold.

Vitro Architectural Glass www.vitroglazings.com CIRCLE 294

Creating an infographic to demonstrate the benefits of good daylighting on student test performance, Perkins Eastman drew data from two studies. The first was performed by researchers at the University of Tulsa, “A Preliminary Study on the Association between Ventilation Rates in Classrooms and Student Performance,” and the second one, “Indoor Environmental Effects on the Performance of School Work by Children,” was published in the ASHRAE Journal. This portion of the infographic was utilized for Perkins Eastman’s “Measuring Up: Using Pre- and PostOccupancy Evaluation to Assess High-Performance School Design” white paper.

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LIGHTING

A Differentiated Office Lighting Concept

KEVIN WILLMORTH

The new offices of Faerber Architekten in Mainz, Germany demonstrate the extent to which good light contributes to a sophisticated, appealing and ergonomic work environment. The contemporary lighting scheme, featuring ERCO LED products and tools, creates maximum visual comfort, supports concentration and communication at the place of work and also brings out the very best of high-quality interior design. For more on the project, see p. 28.

A Disappointing Presence for Lighting at Greenbuild

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or the last few years, we have dedicated a page previewing the presence of lighting at Greenbuild. Lighting is as much a part of the effort to improve building performance as any other aspect, be it HVAC, water treatment or materials use. In fact, lighting loads often exceed that of MEP systems, and the use of light is critical in any effort to fully integrate natural light into occupied space. Lighting control is another discipline that every high-performance building designer needs to consider. A review of the content for 2018 show reveals that the presence of light as a topic there, is at an all time low—it’s so low, dedicating a page to reviewing it is not even possible. Considering the importance of light to humans, a special effort needs to be invested in connecting Greenbuild with the industry and lighting experts. It’s an oversight that begs correction. That being said, here are two important considerations:

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the understanding of how human visual performance factors can be utilized to fine tune and optimize lighting system performance. The connection is simple. Lighting systems that produce high levels of visual acuity, including color recognition and selection light sources matched to the task and illuminance levels designed into spaces, also reduce the demand for energy, when modern light sources are employed. LED technology is delivering the capability of tuning light to specific occupant needs to degrees not possible before. This includes tuning of spectral power to enhance color acuity in low level conditions, matching light energies to the active visual system (Scotopic, Photopic, Mesopic) active for a given space and changing white balance to produce more natural light conditions and enhance human physiological response as the day progresses. Further, tunable light coupled to robust daylight designs can advance the performance of both. This would be a great topic for a panel discussion or workshop at a future Greenbuild. It is not addressed in this year’s conference agenda.

2) Humans are Visually Focused Entities While clean air and water, grand beautiful vistas of well designed architecture and landscapes and temperature management are certainly critical factors in creating a green existence, it is lighting that makes the environment visible. Poor lighting practice coupled to perfect air quality results in occupants breathing well, in an environment that gives them headaches, disturbs their sleep patterns, negatively impacts their feeling of wellbeing, and erodes their visual performance of the tasks the building was built to support in the first place. Lighting has both direct visual impact, and indirect non-visual physiological impact. This does not make lighting the only priority, but it does demand that lighting be considered as a higher priority than it is often given, in the total scheme of performance building design. A green building with human occupants unable to do their work, or that go home feeling poorly, regardless of the cause, is counter to the goal of the green building effort.

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Determined

BY

Nature

Visionary Designed

Committed

BY

BY

Nature

Nature

the intersection of humanity and the built environment

BY

Nature

Nature

Human

Amplified

BY

Essential

Improved

BY

BY

Nature

Nature

Nature Protected

BY

Nature

OW N E D A N D P R O D U C E D BY I N FO R M A E X H I B I T I O N S , U. S . P R E S E N T E D BY T H E U. S . G R E E N B U I L D I N G CO U N C I L

Circle 33

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LIGHTING CASE STUDY

CODES

EASY ON THE EYES Studios are comprised of indirect luminaires with DALI drivers so each studio can be configured to suit teaching and AV setup.

A new automatic lighting shutoff provision further reduces energy consumption and requires the use of occupancy sensors in 12 building space types. Jepsen says, these include classrooms, conference rooms, lunch rooms, private offices and restrooms. Exterior lighting control provisions now require building façade and landscape lighting to be controlled independently of all other site and parking lighting. “It also requires façade and landscape lighting to turn on/off as a function of the building’s use times,” says Jepsen. “All other lighting, not classified as building façade and landscape, must reduce lighting by at least 30%, no later than midnight and 6 a.m., or one hour after business closing to one hour before business opening, depending on which timeframe comes first. These provisions will reduce energy consumption by using time-scheduled controls to reduce or turn off unneeded exterior lighting during nighttime hours.”

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EMILY CARR UNIVERSITY OF ARTS AND DESIGN Vancouver, BC

A Vision Award winner for both Interior Lighting Design, as well as for Energy and Environmental Lighting, the facility, designed by WSP Lighting Studio, was the top winner of the recently announced awards by the British Columbia chapter of IES. A consolidation of two buildings, the 290,000-sq.-ft. purpose-built facility met the university’s desire for “industrial” settings. The architecture creates a mixture of informal gathering and presentation spaces both indoors and out. Despite being a public-private partnership with a tight design-build budget, LED lighting, including the digital lighting control system,

met the budget. Different types of luminaires suit each space: panels for office, meeting rooms and classrooms; suspended indirect luminaires and track lighting for studios; slotlights and track lighting for corridors and galleries; recessed downlights and RGBW theatrical lights for theater; exterior wall cutoff luminaires for the building perimeter; post top luminaires, LED strips and pole RGBW-DMX spotlights in the plaza. Various color temperatures with 90+CRI, suit each major program’s requirements: gallery, exterior 3000K; offices, meeting rooms, classrooms 3500K; corridors, studios 4000K;

Photography: Tom Arban, Silent Sama

Pennsylvania is adopting a new energy conservation code effective Oct. 1, 2018 through an update of the Pennsylvania Uniform Construction Code (UCC). The 2015 IECC will be the new building efficiency standard statewide except for in the city of Philadelphia, which is adopting the newer 2018 IECC standard. These updates represent a more than 26% increase in energy efficiency over the current standard. Harold Jepsen, Vice President of Standards and Industry, Building Control Systems at Legrand, notes major changes: Automatic daylight-responsive controls are now required for windows and skylights. “This will save energy by automatically reducing the light level when there is a contribution of natural daylight through skylights, windows and other vertical fenestrations,” says Jepsen. “Some space types, like offices, classrooms, labs and library reading rooms require the use of less distractive continuous dimming daylighting controls.”

digital documents, 5000K.The lighting design resulted in an LPD of 0.68 W/sq. ft.—40% below the ASHRAE/IES 2010 baseline. Occupancy sensors were used extensively and daylight harvesting controls were utilized in atrias and other spaces subject to significant daylight.

Architect: Diamond Schmitt Architects Lighting Designers: WSP Lighting Studio (Michael Graham, Ellie Niakan)

PRODUCT

HIGH OUTPUT The Intercept is a high-output, high-efficiency LED floodlight with a variety of flood distributions for lighting applications.

NOT SO GLARING SOLUTION Addressing both the replacement frequency and glare concerns common to traditional large-scale floodlighting solutions, the Intercept floodlight family is designed with recessed optics that control glare and minimize spill light. Modular optical assemblies also allow operators to scale lumen output, reducing the LED count to optimize output. Indoor and outdoor models are available, along with a range of lumen packages and color temperatures. Hubbell Lighting www.hubbelllighting.com CIRCLE 293

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LIGHTING PLUG-AND-PLAY The SHOPline linear system offers a modular approach to lighting design. It includes a range of fixture options, from linear elements, to track inserts to support a variety of heads and pendants. Tool-less assembly makes installation and redesign efforts easier.

DATAPOINT

POE GROWTH All regions around the world are expected to see substantial growth in POE. Navigant forecasts revenue to grow from an estimated $35.8 million in 2016 to $419.9 million in 2025.

Alphabet Lighting www.alphabetlighting.com CIRCLE 292

THE RESULT OF THE POST AM ROCHUS IS A BUILDING THAT FLAWLESSLY MERGES INTO THE METROPOLITAN CONTEXT OF VIENNA IN EVERY SENSE. NARROW PROFILE Round ONDARIA luminaires and corner-mounted DIAMO spotlights illuminate the conference rooms.

GLARE FREE The lounge is illuminated by the INTRO modular LED lighting system, enabling the mounting of individual spotlights in the acoustic ceiling to provide clear general lighting

NEW TECHNOLOGY IN A RETRO PACKAGE Featuring the distinctive styling of old-school HID filament lamps, these LED models are available in four classic shapes—T24, BT38, BT56 and PS52, all with an E26 base. Each draws a mere 4W and provides warm, omni-directional illumination at a color temperature of 2,150K. Satco www.satco.com CIRCLE 291

No Mailed-in Solution A lighting design by Christian Ploderer, in cooperation with Zumtobel, emphasizes the contemporary architecture of the new main Austrian Post Office in Vienna. Located in the middle of one of the city’s most vibrant districts, the new Post am Rochus cleverly fuses tradition and modernity. Ploderer worked with Zumtobel to create a concept that achieves harmony with the architecture of Schenker Salvi Weber and feld72, delivering light that is attuned to the people, the area and task. The multi-layered design was crafted for every area. The inclusion of the manufacturer enabled the realization of a holistic concept from one source—a plan where daylight combines with artificial light,

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and colors are carefully differentiated. PANOS evolution downlights are barely visible in the concrete ceilings above the connecting stairway, letting their light show users the way. The luminaires direct people inside, where fittings from the same family are mounted in the louvered ceiling. Recessed, narrow-beam and glare-free Cetus downlights from the Thorn sister brand (top) disappear like “invisible luminaires” behind the louvered ceiling of the office corridors.

The integration of the existing protected building into the new construction has resulted in award-winning architecture. The lighting by Ploderer played a decisive role in this process. His ideas fit perfectly into the interior design crafted by the architects, achieving a sweeping concept that shows the way, emphasizes the functionality of the spaces, and creates a truly pleasant atmosphere.

DON’T BE BLUE Designed for a broad range of commercial and institutional applications, the HPT 2 × 2 luminaire features a regressed diffuser for a seamless transition from the surrounding ceiling plane. The fixture provides uniform illuminance across its surface in a range of outputs and color packages, including tunable white. The 2 × 2 unit will be joined by 3 × 3 and 4 × 4 models by the end of 2018. Finelite www.finelite.com CIRCLE 290

TWO-TONED MIREL evolution pendants are mounted above computers and ensure optimal visual comfort. The fixtures are equipped with two different CCTs: 4000K direct, and 3500K indirects.

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LIGHTING CALIFORNIA ESTIMATES REPLACING 1 MILLION 60- W INCANDESCENT LAMPS USED 3 HOURS/DAY WITH LED ALTERNATIVES WOULD REDUCE LIGHTING-RELATED GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS BY 85%. PRODUCTS

GOOD POLICY  “High-quality LED light sources help reduce our carbon footprint, reduce our energy use, and save money,” said UC President Janet Napolitano. “We are excited to swap out at least a million inefficient light sources.”

HIGH-OUTPUT PACKAGE New 185- and 225-watt REV 8 Prime downlights feature a powerful output of up to 25,000 lumens, replacing metal-halide fixtures drawing up to 500 watts. The fixtures are tailored for high-ceilinged commercial and public space with ceiling heights up to 60 ft., and are available with Colorflip tunable white functionality.

TAKE A LIGHT BULB TO SCHOOL Hoping to boost uptake of high-efficiency LED lamps, the University of California (UC) has launched a program to sell one million LED A lamps, PAR lamps and downlights throughout the state. UC has collaborated with the California Community College system, the California State University system and the California Dept. of General Services in developing an online portal selling products that have been certified to meet specific performance criteria at discount of almost 50% over online retailers’ prices. The state estimates that replacing 1 million 60-watt incandescent lamps used three hours per day with LED alternatives would reduce lighting-related greenhouse gas emissions by 85%.

Meteor Lighting www.meteor-lighting.com CIRCLE 289

CASE STUDY

SPOT ON The reception area (below) and adjoining library are illuminated with Parscan spotlights (right) in warm white.

REBATE-APPROVED LINEAR PENDANT The architecturally-styled QuickLine linear-pendant series is sold in middle-of-run, prewired segments with quick connectors that offer almost tool-less installation—and the fixtures are now DesignLights Consortium-listed, qualifying them for many utility company rebates. The extruded aluminum fixtures are designed to prevent light leakage, with a performance lens and an end-cap light-block shield.

FAERBER ARCHITEKTEN Mainz, Germany

Working closely with ERCO, Faerber Architekten developed a perception-oriented lighting concept for their new offices. The illumination of room zones featuring high visual comfort and general lighting with good glare control using ERCO’s linear Compar downlights, was a priority. Individually illuminating the various workstations was also important for the lighting designers. All prestigious areas with client contact, e.g. the entrance area, reception, library and conference rooms, are illuminated with warm white light (3000K), and all work areas with neutral white light (4000K). The façade is practical and unpretentious; accent

Amerlux www.amerlux.com CIRCLE 288

lights create the impression of depth and establish a visual relationship between the indoor and outdoor spaces. Contrasts between black and white run through the complete interior. As a result, it was important for the architects that the luminaires, track and task lights be black throughout. Rear walls behind workstations are uniformly and vertically illuminated by Pantrac lens wallwashers (above left) with a connected load of 30W to achieve visually relaxed surroundings and reduced contrasts. This wallwashing also lends these smaller offices a larger appearance and helps prevent eye fatigue.

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photo courtesy of MGM National Harbor

WATER

MGM National Harbor Resort—Oxon Hill, Md.

JOHN MESENBRINK

The resort owner and design teams were seeking LEED Gold, and rainwater harvesting was imperative in their sustainable initiatives for the project. Wahaso engaged with SmithGroupJJR to meet all LEED requirements, which called for the system to meet all of irrigation and toilet flushing needs for the property. The project ranks as one of Wahaso’s most successful projects in terms of water savings, with projected annual reduction of 10.7 million gallons of municipal demand, saving the owners more than $120,000 per year in water and sewer costs at current rates. Wahaso, www.wahaso.com, CIRCLE 287 308

The Watery City

A

s long as there is advancement in the sustainable building sector, the Greenbuild Show will be highlighting it in some fashion. The show, held in Chicago this year, will feature some of the latest trends, products and technology in the sustainability charge—some of those stories are featured right here in this issue. In addition, some of the show’s educational seminars cater to these very important facets of green building.

water systems, including distribution piping in buildings and cooling towers associated with building HVAC systems. An overview of the magnitude of these risks and their underlying causes will be presented to provide building designers both the rationale and recommended approaches to minimize the risks.

The Water Catchers: Inspiration from People, Process and Performance

Wednesday, Nov. 14, 4:30 pm-6:30 pm The International Living Future Institute, in partnership with Recode, has been funded by the Rosin Fund of the Scherman Foundation to research and identify solution pathways for barriers to net positive water. One of the most prominent barriers is the lack of information surrounding the costs, benefits, and financial motivators for innovative water systems, and especially the operations and maintenance implications.

Tuesday, Nov. 13, 12:30 pm-1:45 pm See the history of water management from a global perspective and learn about ancient approaches that are incorporated into today’s rainwater management.

Preserving Water Quality in Building Design Tuesday, Nov. 13, 11:30 am-12:30 pm Chemical and biological risks can arise within building 30 | 09.18 | NET ZERO BUILDINGS

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Direct From the Source: The Costs & Benefits of Net Positive Water

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Gaming for a Resilient Future: Net-Zero Energy Campuses Thursday, Nov. 15, 8:00 am-10:00 am Verified net-zero energy (ZNE) buildings are growing. However, the vast majority of them are buildings smaller than 25,000 sq. ft. What is the right scale for this trend? We’ll elevate the conversation of achieving ZNE and energy cost savings to a campus level.

Grey to Green to Smart: The Next Generation of Urban Stormwater Management Friday, Nov. 16, 8:00 am-9:00 am By diverting and managing stormwater before it enters the sewer system, green infrastructure is augmenting gray infrastructure, to allow sewer systems to operate more efficiently. Learn how Milwaukee Metropolitan Sewerage District (MMSD) has holistically implemented green infrastructure technologies to create one of the most successful urban stormwater management plans in the United States. www.nzbmagazine.com

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November 28–29 Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Hall A | Boston, MA

Build your Network Design the Future

Devanshi Purohit, International Assoc. AIA Sr. Associate, Sr. Urban Designer, CBT Architects 4-time show attendee

The Tower at PNC Plaza, PNC, Gensler. Photo by Connie Zhou Photography. 2016 Award Winner for Sustainability Design.

Build your network at the largest design and construction industry event in the Northeast where you will design your future through trends, new technologies and educational workshops relevant across all AEC disciplines.

Register at abexpo.com to receive FREE Expo Hall admission. Enter ADG during the online registration process when prompted to enter a discount code.

Owner & Producer:

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Founder & Presenter:

Official Publication:

abexpo.com

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WATER

GREENBUILD TOUR

GREENING THE WAY TO SUSTAINABLE URBAN LIVING TM11 (TOUR MEET DESK)

Nov. 12, 1:00 pm-5:00 pm Take a tour during the show to see how sustainable residential design is growing in popularity—as more people understand the benefits to designing with the environment in mind. The home on this particular tour showcase innovative energy strategies, adaptive reuse opportunities, waterefficiency and moisture management approaches and improved air-quality results. Through strategic water management on the property—including bioswales and rainscreens—a residential hydronic radiant cooling system, solar thermal panels that are integrated with the hot water system, and a lush, nutrient-rich landscape, this home is a prime example of sustainable living.

RAINWATER HARVESTING

MINIMALIST DESIGN  ADA-compliant Serin wallmounted sensor-operated faucets reinforce the design theme of minimalist utility with their hygienic, touchfree operation. IDEAL LOCATION  The bathroom is transformed into a relaxing space. At the same time, the SpaLet AT200 is water efficient with its dual-flush ability (1.32/0.92 gallons per flush). CUSTOMER-CENTRIC  Staff showers feature the Cosmopolitan 100 showerhead from GROHE, which provides a rain shower spray pattern and a max flow rate of 1.5 gallons per minute.

RAINWATER COLLECTION

RainCycle rainwater harvesting systems capture, store, pump and treat rainwater to be used in irrigation, toilets, washing and many more applications. Modular systems can be customized to match the location and project needs. Rainwater harvesting systems efficiently capture, store, treat and deliver non-potable water for a variety of end uses. These systems can also reduce potable water consumption and stormwater runoff. RainCycle www.watts.com CIRCLE 286

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Mimicking Minimalism Each year, 27 million people from around the world visit the state of Oregon. Many of them come not to experience American culture, but rather for a taste of far-off Japan in the Portland Japanese Garden, considered one of the most authentic places outside the home islands.

Since 2017, the complex has included a cultural village, where visitors can immerse themselves in traditional Japanese arts while growing closer to history and nature. Seasonal festivals and performances educate and entertain the roughly 350,000 visitors who flock here each year.

The horticultural complex includes eight unique settings—from gardens with a rustic path of stepping stones leading to a traditional Japanese tea house, to a strolling pond garden with a relaxing stream and waterfall.

Part of this project involved partnering with sponsors who might serve as intercultural conduits. The Japanese-headquartered LIXIL Corporation— parent company for North American brands American Standard, DXV, GROHE and INAX—saw this partnership as a perfect fit and signed on to sponsor the Cultural Crossing project. This involved the donation of plumbing fixtures,

WATER-EFFICIENT TOILET The state-of-the-art Nano toilet is the latest in the company’s portfolio of products that seek to save the world’s water through everyday ingenuity. Featuring Niagara’s patented and highly innovative Stealth Technology, the Nano toilet has a compact design while maintaining the comfort of an elongated bowl, making it perfect for smaller spaces. Patented vacuum-assist flush technology means the Nano only utilizes an average of

faucets, accessories, tile and wall coverings to outfit the learning center, gallery, library, garden house and café that are all part of the Cultural Crossing area. The Garden completed construction of this project in the spring of 2017. American Standard www.americanstandard-us.com CIRCLE 285 LOCATE AT GREENBUILD

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only0.6 gallons-per-flush, making it the most water-efficient toilet on the planet. Niagara Conservation www.niagaracorp.com CIRCLE 284

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WATER PROTECTED MEMBRANE ROOF PLANNING GUIDE American Hydrotech releases its Protected Membrane Roof (PMR) Planning Guide, which strives to educate architects, engineers, general contractors and other design professionals on the key benefits of a protected membrane roof vs. a conventional roof. The guide explores areas such as typical assemblies and materials, design considerations and installation and maintenance. It also takes

The project was later expanded to include an integrated office tower now called La Tour de Montréal. It was completely refurbished and its HVAC system and domestic water systems replaced, to accommodate 1000 employees of the Mouvement Desjardins, a leading financial organization.

OLYMPIC STADIUM Montreal, Canada Built in the 1970s, Montreal’s Olympic Stadium became known, unfortunately, as among the most over-budgeted projects in the history of architecture. Nearly 50 years later, the building needed about $12 million to upgrade the HVAC and lighting systems. It was going to be a tough sell with taxpayers and public office holders. But sensorless, variable flow Design Envelope technology, 3D modeling, upgraded intelligent

SUMMIT BECHTEL RESERVE, Glen Jean, W.V.

The Boy Scouts of America wanted an environmentally friendly method for disposing of the graywater generated by the 336 shower buildings at their showcase camping and training facility, the Summit Bechtel Family National Scout Reserve in West Virginia. The chosen technology would need to be energy efficient and take up as little space as possible. An array of AdvanTex AX20-RTs—224 all together— was installed to process the graywater and treat it for reuse in toilets. Two AdvanTex AX-Max units provide additional treatment. This graywater system saves the camp up to 200,000 gallons per day during large events.

controls and a construction contract containing guaranteed energy savings all contributed to a success story. During a three year project, numerous Design Envelope pumps, circulators, heat exchangers and tanks were installed as part of a complete HVAC overhaul. They converted steam systems and boilers to hot water, replaced 5250 tons of chillers and cooling towers, added two 200-ton screw heatrecovery chillers, flue gas heat recovery, and 40,000 replacements of T12 with LED lighting.

The stadium now saves about U.S. $1.05 million on energy each year, putting the payback ahead of schedule, and creating a positive financial picture for all of the stakeholders involved. Maintenance costs have also dropped, and the facility’s greenhouse gas footprint is significantly reduced. Armstrong Fluid Technology armstrongfluidtechnology.com CIRCLE 283

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PUMP UP SAVINGS Sensorless Design Envelope technology introduced a host of savings for the new systems, such as economies realized through variable speed flow, intelligent sequencing, Wi-Fi capability and built-in monitoring.

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a look at today’s environmental challenges, detailing best practices, sustainability and LEED requirements and stormwater management opportunities on the roof.

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TREATMENT SYSTEMS The Orenco AdvenTex AX-RT eliminates the need for separate recirculation and discharge tanks by performing both functions within a single module and are ideal for sites with shallow-bury sites, sites with poor soils or sites with small lot sizes. 

Glen Jean, WV

INTELLIGENT FAUCETS

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photo courtesy of Biohabitats

The Orenco AdvanTex AX-RT Treatment Systems used at the Summit Bechtel Reserve are intended for small-flow applications that require an advanced secondary treatment system, including new installations, retrofits or repairs. Orenco www.orenco.com

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Sloan introduced its modernized Optima faucet line. More than 300 enhanced models are being introduced, complementing the largest line of sensor-activated and touchfree products in the industry. Adding to the increased level of convenience, each faucet control now features wireless capability. The new Sloan Connect App—available for free for both iOS and Android smartphones—enables building owners and facility managers to collect data and adjust settings without having to disassemble the sink or spend time working on the restroom floor. Optima faucets also offer water-saving features, including LEED compliant 0.35 gpm sprayheads and adjustable timeouts. Sloan www.sloan.com CIRCLE 280

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9/4/18 10:38 AM


POWER

Shingle-Style Solar

CHUCK ROSS

SunTegra Solar Shingles integrate into new composition-shingle roofing installations, offering a low-profile option for onsite power generation. The lightweight shingles feature integrated wiring for easier installation. They attach directly to the roof, providing primary roofing protection along with solar-generated electricity. Sunrise Solar Solutions www.sunrisesolarllc.com

Solar Integration Gains Momentum

W

e have definitely gotten better at the individual pieces and parts that help owners create buildings that reach, or at least come close to, netzero operation. Installed onsite-solar costs have dropped dramatically over the last five years, for example. And onsite storage is beginning to make real economic sense in some markets. The latest area of innovation is in the advanced software that’s tying these components together and connecting them with utility operations. California, unsurprisingly, is at the forefront of this effort, thanks largely to another piece in this puzzle, legislators and regulators who are aggressively targeting greater use of renewable resources. The state recently enacted new requirements for most new homes to feature rooftop PV. And while the state is cutting back on net-metering incentives, the new Self-Generation Incentive Program is driving new interest in onsite storage.

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Educational sessions related to onsite-power at this year’s Greenbuild are paying closer attention to the networking behind successful solar/storage integration projects.

Teslas vs. Ducks—Can Zero Energy Buildings Kill the Duck? Wednesday, Nov. 14, 1:30pm-2:30pm The phrase “duck curve” is used to describe the pattern created by two lines on a graph that illustrates the conundrum now facing California’s energy planners. One line represents solar-energy production over the course of a day. The second line represents demand from traditional grid resources, which troughs in midday, only to ramp up quickly as PV production drops. Presenters David Kaneda, principal with the San Jose-based engineering firm Integral Group, and Peter Turnbuill, zero net energy projects principal with Pacific Gas & Electric, will look at the new ways energy storage, control systems and utility rate structures will need to work in concert to “kill the duck.”

Mission Zero: Scientists’ NZE Retrofit Fights Climate Change Wednesday, Nov. 14, 4:30pm-6:30pm The American Geophysical Union (AGU) took a very scientific approach to a unique challenge—retrofitting its urban headquarters to net-zero energy performance levels. The resulting design reduced the building’s energy-use intensity to zero.

Energy Efficiency and Energy Star Tenant Space in Action Wednesday, Nov. 14, 3pm-4pm The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s Energy Star program is addressing the challenges of encouraging efficiency in leased commercial office space with its Tenant Space recognition program. Leases can play a critical role in tying the interests of tenants and owners together toward the goal of more efficient office operations.

www.nzbmagazine.com

8/31/18 1:23 PM


The most interesting AIA-approved courses on the internet are streaming video

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Emerging Top Daylighting Strategies In this course you will learn about the challenges within current daylight applications as the course focuses on best application practices, utilizing technological advancements with monument/architectural skylights, unit skylights and tubular daylighting devices.

Aspen Art Museum: Design and Construction of the Wood Roof Structure This case study presentation will describe the design and construction of the wood structure, including paths explored but not chosen for the final design.

NFPA 285: Assembly Test of Exterior Walls With Combustible Components This course explains NFPA 285 testing of building envelopes and materials, describes when testing is required and enumerates considerations necessary for compliance.

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Participants will receive a brief explanation of the purpose of moisture vapor barriers and a description of the various types, followed by an in-depth discussion of surface applied moisture vapor barriers.

Suspended Wood Ceilings: Design to Delivery This course covers the benefits of suspended wood ceilings; materials including wood options such as veneers, solid or reclaimed wood, sustainability attributes and performance.

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11/2/17 12:55 PM


POWER CASE STUDY SESSION ALERT

Lamar County Launches 52 MW Solar Site GAMING FOR A RESILIENT FUTURE: NET-ZERO ENERGY CAMPUSES

Cooperative Energy and Origis Energy earlier this year celebrated their new joint venture 52-megawatt solar project in Lamar County, signifying a major commitment to generating environmentally friendly renewable energy.

Thurs., Nov. 15, 8 am-10 am The majority of zero net energy (ZNE) buildings are smaller than 25,000 sq. ft., so how do we scale to an educational campus level? This session will start with a case study describing a single high-school district’s journey to ZNE status and the efforts a community college district made to reduce greenhouse gases. Then attendees will participate in hands-on exercises to better visualize the challenges faced and opportunities available when exploring ZNE design.

Origis Energy built, owns and operates the facility while Hattiesburg-based Cooperative Energy has agreed to purchase all electricity the plant produces. Cooperative Energy is a not-for-profit, member-owned generation and transmission cooperative that supplies electricity to 11 member cooperatives that stretch from the Gulf Coast to the Tennessee line.

PLUG LOADS: THE NEXT FRONTIER IN DEEP ENERGY SAVINGS

Thurs., Nov. 15, 4:30 pm-5:30 pm Lighting and HVAC energy demand has fallen significantly in many commercial buildings over the last decade, making plug loads—essentially, everything else—an increasingly important target for energy codes. When it comes to more efficient computers, copiers and office kitchenette equipment use, getting buy-in from building occupants is a critical ingredient for success.

Cooperative Energy owns a diverse generation portfolio including coal, natural gas, nuclear and renewables. It

began solar generation in 2016 with the start of five 100-kW solar sites built at Members’ local headquarters. “This new, utility scale solar generator represents a giant step forward for Cooperative Energy in providing solar energy for our members,” said Jim Compton, Cooperative Energy’s president and CEO. “Not only is it one of the largest solar generation plants in Mississippi, it employs the most advanced solar technology available today.” Origis Energy is helping to power the solar revolution with the construction of more than 100 operations worldwide. The company broke ground on the Sumrall facility in May 2017 and met its goal of production by year end. “Solar energy benefits all stakeholders—the companies, the end users, the public and the regulators,” said

Guy Vanderhaegen, Origis Energy’s CEO and president. Additional beneficiaries of the partnership are the Mississippi Scholars and Tech Master programs. Cooperative Energy and Origis Energy in late October announced a $125,000 donation, the largest single gift ever made to the programs.

 POWER UP The 540-acre site, MS Solar 3, includes 206,000 polycrystalline solar panels that gather sunlight and transform it to energy that will power up to 11,000 homes.

AFTER APPROVING A 2019 BUILDING CODE THAT REQUIRES ALL NEW HOMES IN CALIFORNIA TO HAVE ROOFTOP SOLAR PANELS STARTING IN 2020, THE CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION IS NOW EYEING COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS, CONSIDERING MAKING SOLAR A REQUIREMENT BY 2023.

ADVANCING COMMUNITY RESILIENCE WITH CLEAN ENERGY MICROGRIDS

Fri., Nov. 16, 8 am-9 am With damaging natural disasters happening more frequently, renewably powered microgrids now are being seen as good option for keeping critical facilities up and running. A proposed project in Berkeley, Calif., combines automated controls with on-site renewable energy and battery-based storage to minimize reliance on traditional diesel backup generators. AHEAD OF THE CURVE TO REACH NZE: ARCHITECTURAL SOLAR AND HOW TO PAY FOR IT

Fri., Nov. 16, 9:30 am-10:30 am New options for building-integrated solar now are coming to market—but how can owners finance these upgrades? Property-assessed clean-energy (PACE) financing programs for commercial owners allow use of energy savings to pay for onsite-energy investments over a long term through property tax assessments. This strategy is catching on throughout the U.S.

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DELIVERING ON ITS RENEWABLE COMMITMENT Amazon plans to install PV systems on 50 deployment centers around the world by 2020, part of a commitment the company made to renewable energy.

CASE STUDY

Amazon Rooftops Provide Prime Opportunity With its regional fulfillment centers now in building-boom mode, Amazon has made a commitment to top up to 50 of these expansive facilities with PV panels by 2020. By the end of 2017, the company could be generating up to 41 megawatts at fulfillment centers in California, New Jersey, Maryland, Nevada and Delaware. The sprawling design of these structures makes them good candidates for rooftop solar installations that could offset large percentages of each center’s demand. The company estimates that, depending on the time of year, panels could meet up to 80% of annual electricity requirements.

www.nzbmagazine.com

8/31/18 1:23 PM


POWER DATAPOINT

FIVE RECOMMENDATIONS

Carbon Emissions of Fossil Fuel End Uses in U.S. Buildings 566 Commercial Residential

246 386

CO2

169

320 107 34

217

74

TOTAL FUEL USE

SPACE HEATING

WATER HEATING

73 44 29 COOKING/OTHER

RMI Report Offers Electrifying Conclusions Moving buildings away from the onsite use of fossil fuels for heating and cooling operations is a critical element in reducing U.S. greenhouse gas emissions, but just how affordable is such a move in today’s economy? A recent report from Rocky Mountain Institute finds switching to electric heating, cooling and water-heating appliances

from those burning fossil fuels is already cost-effective for residential new construction in many areas, and could lead to big reductions in related CO2 emissions. In “The Economics of Electrifying Buildings,” RMI researchers used four cities— Oakland, Calif., Houston, Chicago and Providence, R.I.—as regional proxies for a range of

fuel mixes, utility rate structures, climates, and installation and operating costs. They compared costs and emissions for space heating and cooling equipment, along with water heaters, burning natural gas, heating oil and propane, against electric heat-pump versions.

IN THE NEWS

Uniting Every Code Under the Sun

Electrifying heating and cooling provides greater load-shaping and demand-shifting opportunities. The report offers recommendations for moving toward greater building electrification:

Designers and contractors may now have a single resource for solar design and installation requirements with the International Code Council’s 2018 International Solar Energy Provisions (ISEP). The document was developed in collaboration with the Solar Rating and Certification Corporation and the National Fire Protection Assn. and compiles provisions from the 2018 International Codes and the 2017 National Electrical Code. Presented as a model code, it is available for adoption by interested countries, states and local jurisdictions. It contains separate provisions for commercial and residential buildings.

1. Prioritize buildings that now use propane and heating oil. 2. Stop supporting the expansion of natural gas distribution systems, including for new homes. 3. Bundle demand flexibility programs, new rate designs and energy efficiency in any electrification initiatives. 4. Expand demand flexibility options for existing space and water-heating loads. 5. Update utilities’ energyefficiency resource standards and related goals across both electric and gas distribution programs.

p SOLAR CODES Presented as a model code, the 2018 ISEP now is available for adoption by interested countries, states and local jurisdictions as a solar energy code.

CASE STUDY

SOLAR JUICE Sunflare standing seam solar roof panels are nearly invisible in the home design and are running the home, an electric car, electric bikes, without interruption during tropical rains.

p

Thin is in When it Comes to PV Earlier this year the first Tesla solar rooftop projects were completed on homes, but anyone else interested in the roof of the future will have to wait. There is a six to nine month wait for Powerwall batteries and solar tile installs aren’t being booked until 2019 or later. As Tesla works to speed up production to meet demand, other solar rooftop products are under testing for market debut later this year. Sunflare has already installed its standing seam solar roof on an off-grid home in Maui. www.nzbmagazine.com

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Furthermore, solar installations on commercial buildings are gaining in popularity. The top users added 325 megawatts of installed capacity last year, according to the Solar Energy Industry Assn. This is a 2% yearover-year increase and a 43% jump since 2015, the third-largest year on record. Requirements for residential installs on new homes is driving growth in certain cities and states, and now local governments are looking toward commercial.

NEW FUEL CELL ALTERNATIVE TO DIESEL GENERATORS Diesel generators are often the go-to solution for off-grid primary power needs, despite their fuel expense and emissions. A new fuel cell that creates its own hydrogen fuel using inexpensive ammonia as a source offers a less-expensive, emissions-free alternative. The GenCell A5 can operate a full year on a single 12ton tank of ammonia, at a cost of just $0.50/kilowatt-hour. GenCell www.gencellenergy.com CIRCLE 279

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8/31/18 1:23 PM


HVAC

Wilshire Grand Center—Los Angeles, Calif.

JOHN MESENBRINK

Completed in less than 19 hours, the 82 million pounds of concrete set a “Guinness Book of World Records” for the largest continuous pour in a 24-hour period. To ensure the structural integrity of the foundation’s massive slab, the design specified a hydronic radiant cooling system to draw off the heat as the concrete cured. To ensure that a thermal cooling system would keep the slab at the proper temperature, the team installed more than 100,000 ft. of PEX tubing from Uponor that intertwined throughout the rebar of the foundation.

Cheers to Healthier Buildings

F

rom Big Data to the Internet of Things (IoT), the future of construction is here. Yet, the topic of connectivity is top of mind these days as business owners look to higher performance and healthier buildings. This year’s Greenbuild Show in Chicago puts you in the driver’s seat when it comes to topics relating to data sharing, and equally important net-zero principles.

mance goals evolve in response to changing information technology (IT), standards, work practices, and societal concerns. The Internet of Things (IoT) is helping fuel this transformation. With its potential for thousands of connected devices, the IoT has revolutionized the way information is generated and used across society—enabling unprecedented capabilities and benefits.

The Critical Role of Electrical and Digital Infrastructure in High Performance Buildings

Electricity Gets Smart at Ill. Institute of Technology

Wednesday, Nov. 14, 10:30am-11:30am (and runs many times throughout the show) Powerful new forces are driving an unprecedented transformation of the built environment. Buildings must meet performance metrics across functionality and flexibility, occupant health and productivity, safety, resilience and security, and sustainability and energy efficiency. High-performance buildings (HPBs) continue to deliver outstanding efficiency and sustainability even as perfor38 | 09.18 | NET ZERO BUILDINGS

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Friday, Nov. 16, 2pm-6pm As part of the first Dept. of Energy grants for smart grids, Illinois Institute of Technology developed the “Perfect Power at IIT” plan. The session will help identify opportunities for technologies such as dynamic operable façades and radiant cooling and heating to benefit design.

Retrofitting a Pre-1940s Building into a Power House Wednesday, Nov. 14, 1:30pm-2:30pm Through the reference case project, HouseZero for Harvard

University, the participants will be taken through the engineering and architectural solutions used to turn a pre-1940s wood frame building into a near-zero energy building with sophisticated daylight autonomy and 100% natural ventilation.

The Business Case for Net Zero Campuses Wednesday, Nov. 14, 3pm-4pm With rising energy prices and an increasingly competitive tertiary education market, Australia’s three largest universities are racing to be the first to become 100% renewable powered. This session explores the economic and technical strategies being implemented to transform large campuses into working models of a renewable powered future. With upwards of 60,000 students each and large operating budgets, each university is embracing cutting-edge technology and new financial instruments to showcase practical and affordable pathways to a renewable powered future.

www.nzbmagazine.com

8/31/18 1:24 PM


PROTECT YOUR BUSINESS

MAKE SURE YOU’RE COVERED WITH A FULL LINE OF INNOVATIVE SOLUTIONS, TRAINING AND SUPPORT When everything’s on the line, it’s important to have the right team at your side. That’s why so many professionals put their trust in Fujitsu and its award-winning line-up of solutions. A partnership with Fujitsu means access to ductless products, VRF, unitary products, and first-class training and support that positions your business to succeed every single day. Fujitsu...hands down, the perfect choice.

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CIRCLE 30 Circle 37

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8/31/18 8:19PM AM 8/14/18 12:00


HVAC SLEEK CASSETTE An expansion of the M-Series line from Mitsubishi Electric, the MLZ Series One-Way Ceiling Cassette features a sleek, narrow-body ceiling cassette design. Designed to fit between standard 16-in. joists, the MLZ can be easily installed in existing homes and new construction projects. The ceiling cassette

design provides an additional option to the product offering from Mitsubishi Electric. It is effective regardless of ceiling height because of its adjustable airflow. Plus, its auto vane control is capable of adjusting air direction based on the home owner’s comfort needs. Mitsubishi Electric www.mehvac.com CIRCLE 278

CASE STUDY

Banking on Comfort, Control After breaking ground on a new, 56,000-sq.-ft. office space in 2015, the Bank of San Antonio in San Antonio, Texas needed to find an energy-efficient HVAC system that offered quality comfort and control. The search ended by selecting variable refrigerant flow (VRF) technology from Mitsubishi Electric Trane HVAC US Cooling & Heating (Mitsubishi Electric Trane HVAC US).

we’ve been seeing a lot of offices use air conditioning.” Moreno agreed that VRF’s ability to zone would allow the bank to offer comfort to every person in the building. “We needed control in the offices, conference rooms, lobby area and other communal spaces in the building. We needed to be able to manage the fluctuation of people.”

Tom Moreno, executive vice president of operations and technology for Bank of San Antonio, oversaw the project from start to finish. As the liaison for the bank, Moreno knew it would be a challenge to find an HVAC system that would meet everyone’s needs. “We were looking for a system that was energy efficient but that could also provide comfort and produce the temperatures that we needed throughout the organization.” Moreno and his team originally planned to install traditional HVAC technology, but with the assistance of local HVAC contractor, Flo-Aire Service, San Antonio, and engineering consultant, Cleary Zimmermann Engineers, San Antonio, they decided to consider VRF.

Since project completion, the VRF system has provided precise control and comfort for the bank. Moreno said, “We’ve all been in places where it’s too hot or too cold but not with this system. We like the flexibility and being able to set standardized temperatures throughout the organization. We can lock specific thermostats to control cost, but we can also unlock some thermostats when clients come into conference rooms. “They installed wall hung units in the information technology equipment office, which is essential to operation of the organization. They can’t overheat.”

Eddie McDuff, vice president, Flo-Aire Service, knew VRF would be suitable for the building since it would meet the bank’s initial requirements for an HVAC system. He said, “They needed a very energy efficient system, and VRF would give them not only energy efficiency but also zone control. It’s a newer way that

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1003 BOOTH NUMBER

SAN ANTONIO, TEXAS

 EFFICIENT CONTROL

The HVAC system offers the Back of San Antonio quality and comfort. Not only does the VRF system keep the employees comfortable, but it also keeps the bank’s technology safe, and more importantly, cool.

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www.nzbmagazine.com

8/31/18 1:25 PM


HVAC UNIVERSITY OF MIAMI UHEALTH FITNESS AND WELLNESS CENTER Miami, Fla.

 MONITORING RESULTS Energy consumption was measured using an energy meter installed by the building facility management. Chilled water consumption and outdoor conditions were also monitored.

Located at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine in downtown Miami, this 13-story building opened in Oct. 2006. The UHealth Fitness and Wellness Center occupies the top two stories and spans 60,000 ft. The center is served by four air handling units (AHUs) and a pool dehumidification system. The AHUs are connected to a central chilled-water system that serves the medical campus. The scope of this HVAC Load Reduction (HLR) installation excluded AHU-1 and the pool area since this area requires special handling and is served by a separate AHU.

DATAPOINT

ENERGY & WATER SAVINGS Using the HLR modules, the University of Miami’s Wellness Center is now using 75% less outside air and saving 988 Tonhrs per day of cooling—a 36% reduction in total HVAC energy consumption. As a result, the building is saving $19,500 each year in energy consumption. The University of Miami uses a central chiller plant, so specific water savings for the Wellness Center is difficult to confirm, but are calculated to be $9,200 annually based on the cooling load and annual cooling hours. When the center replaces the HVAC equipment, the peak capacity required will be 41% less, providing capital expense savings.

LOAD DROP Peak HVAC capacity is calculated to be 58 tons lower—19 tons saved per HLR module—which corresponds to roughly a 41% decrease in peak HVAC load.

In June 2015, enVerid and Johnson Controls installed three of enVerid’s HLR modules in the mechanical rooms serving the Wellness Center. Each HLR module includes enVerid developed synthetic sorbents housed in cartridges that adsorb CO2, formaldehyde and VOCs. The HLR module also has a set of sensors measuring temperature, relative humidity, CO2 and VOCs. The HLR system interprets the output of these sensors using control algorithms to actively and automatically manage indoor air quality and outside air volumes. enVerid Systems www.enverid.com CIRCLE 277

1578

LOCATE AT GREENBUILD

BOOTH NUMBER

CASE STUDY

CORNELL TECH PASSIVE HOUSE New York City

At the heart of the 26-story Cornell Tech Passive House is an HVAC system designed to provide comfort and indoor air quality for a fraction of the residents’ usual energy costs. The engineers responsible for the design of the mechanical system specified the use of aeroseal technology. “To achieve Passive House

THE CORNELL TECH PASSIVE HOUSE IS THE MOST ENERGY-EFFICIENT HIGH-RISE IN THE WORLD. DESPITE TRADITIONALLY HARSH NEW YORK CITY WINTERS, MOST TENANTS IN THE 350-UNIT STRUCTURE WILL NEVER TURN ON THE HEAT.

standards, it’s important to have an extremely tight building envelope, and that requires an energy efficient way to bring fresh air to all the living spaces while exhausting air from kitchens and bathrooms,” said Julie Janiski, project manager at BuroHappold Engineering, the Structure/MEP/Light-

ing Design engineers on the project. “All that required a lot of ductwork delivering air at very low CFM (cubic feet of air per minute). This meant that the ducts had to be tighter than traditional manual sealing typically provides, in order to ensure that those low CFM targets were fully delivered to the living spaces.” Testing showed that aeroseal technology reduced leakage by an average of 98% with final leakage rates under 1%.

www.nzbmagazine.com

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HYDRONIC VERTICAL STACKED FAN COIL Daikin engineers designed OptiLine to efficiently condition air from 300 to 1200 cfm, optimally matching a building’s space restrictions and efficiency needs. It leverages top efficiency to meet building owners’ environmental requirements and budget demands. Using the lowest amount of energy possible, it can reduce energy costs by 30% to 50% compared to similar products currently on the market. The fan efficiency allows OptiLine to achieve noise criterion (NC) of less than 30 for the space, and to control humidity levels to create the most comfortable space for occupants. Daikin Applied www.daikinapplied.com CIRCLE 276

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8/31/18 1:25 PM


HVAC CASE STUDY

THE MACKIE BUILDING Milwaukee, Wisc.

Originally built in 1879, the Mackie Building has a rich history, from serving as the city’s Chamber of Commerce to being The Grain Exchange during the time when Milwaukee was the world’s largest primary wheat market for trading. The large five-story building was designed in an elegant Italianate architectural style, with soaring ceilings, hand-painted frescoes and gold leaf adornments throughout the interior spaces. In 2011, Josh Jeffers, a property developer, purchased the 55,000-sq.ft. building with the vision of creating a mixed-use complex with restaurants, businesses and residential spaces.

The biggest benefit of the Multi V system offered the Mackie Building was its design flexibility. To address the lack of space on the roof and the ground level, a unique installation was created by placing the 80 tons of outdoor units in unused within the building’s clock tower—something that would have been impossible with a conventional system design. Louvers with dampers were also installed on the side of the clock tower to maintain optimal operating temperature for the system year round.

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THE QUEST FOR ULTRA EFFICIENCY When property developer Josh Jeffers put the vision into motion with a multi-million dollar overhaul, the goal for the Mackie Building was to maintain the historic design aesthetics while upgrading the HVAC system to effectively serve a diverse range of tenants. The LG VRF system allowed for a flexible design with minimal ductwork to deliver a non-invasive HVAC system.

LG Air Conditioning Technologies www.lghvac.om CIRCLE 275

“FROM AN ADAPTIVE REUSE PERSPECTIVE, WE REALLY NEEDED EVERY INCH TO MAKE THE NUMBERS WORK, SO WE COULDN’T HAVE MECHANICAL CLOSETS TAKING UP VALUABLE SQUARE FOOTAGE.”

80% 70%

ENERGY STORAGE

Minimum Average Maximum

Research Reveals Benefits of Thermal Energy Storage

60% 50%

Percent Error

The building owner, J. Jeffers & Co., and architect firm Continuum Architects + Planners, with the help of mechanical engineering firm Graef, turned to local HVAC expert Vyron Corp. to design an ultra-efficient solution that would allow for individually controlled heating and cooling in the building’s mix of residential and commercial spaces. After carefully reviewing the requirements, Vyron specified the LG Multi V IV VRF heat-recovery system, known for its incredible energy efficiency, high performance and flexibility in design and installation options. LG variable refrigerant flow (VRF) heat-recovery systems were selected because they provided tenants with the freedom to the pick their precise level of comfort through simultaneous heating and cooling while maximizing the energy efficiency by balancing the heating and cooling demands across the entirety of the system.

40% 30% 20% 10% 0%

DIRECT-EXPANSION RTU

AIR-COOLED CONSTANTSPEED CHILLER

AIR-COOLED VARIABLESPEED CHILLER

WATER-COOLED CONSTANTSPEED CHILLER

WATER-COOLED VARIABLESPEED CHILLER

THE QUEST FOR ULTRA EFFICIENCY The minimum, average and maximum error between the 10-day average baseline and the actual energy offset for a 10-story building in Sacramento with each cooling system. The current method does not adequately account for shifts in the building loads due to holidays, weekends or extreme events, when thermal energy storage can save the most energy by disconnecting cooling from the grid.

Ingersoll Rand has engaged with Western Cooling Efficiency Center at University of California, Davis, on research that shows thermal energy storage can provide significantly greater benefits to utilities and electricity grid operators than previously thought. “This study will help utility companies and building operators optimize resource planning and energy use by capturing the full value of thermal energy storage, which uses an energy storage tank and ice to shift cooling needs to off-peak, night time hours,” says Scott Tew, from Ingersoll Rand’s Center for Energy Efficiency and Sustainability, which co-sponsored the study.

The research project: “Valuation of Thermal Energy Storage for Utility Grid Operators” demonstrated that the current method for estimating the electrical grid impact of Thermal Energy Storage systems does not fully consider the impact of energy savings that occurs during the hottest days of the year, which means that estimates are far lower than previously thought. By basing estimates on a “10day average baseline,” the data drastically underestimates the impact of disconnecting the cooling system from the electric grid when temperatures outside are very hot and the grid reaches its peak load conditions. The current method under-predicts its impact on the electric grid by as much as 77%, between 38% and 57% on average, and by a minimum of 3%.

www.nzbmagazine.com

8/31/18 1:25 PM


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| END POINT |

JOHN MESENBRINK

Moving Toward Action Let’s move past semantics and take action in the net-zero crusade. Energy efficiency should be commonplace in design and specs by now. It’s time to migrate toward sustainable building practices, and environmental responsibility.

As many of you prepare for Greenbuild coming up in Chicago in November, I wanted to review the term “green,” as well as take a look at what’s happening in the host state. As far as the former, frankly, it’s just too ‘90s for my liking, as sustainability, and energy efficiency are largely commonplace in designs and specs; it’s the norm—or should be—by now. In some ways, “green” has been replaced with “intelligent” as connected devices flooding the market open the door for greater communication and data collection for metering and monitoring purposes. But in the not-so-distant future, terms like Internet of Things and Big Data will become the norm, and intelligent buildings will be referred to as, well, just buildings. It’s time to move past semantics and act. For instance, high-efficiency toilet technology has come a long way; WaterSenselabeled fixtures now feature gallons per flush levels that easily meet water conservation purposes, and get the job done. Yet manufacturers still produce larger gallons per flush units. Why? The same can be said for many of the technologies we still use in our consumption of other natural resources. Costs, admittedly—at least perception of cost—remain a prohibiting factor in getting more net-zerobuilding-kinds of systems into buildings. And while

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costs will decrease as more of the technology becomes commonplace, it’s time to shift from a slow migration toward sustainable building practices, to a mindset of environmental stewardship. It’s an Emissions Reduction Thing According to information from the Rocky Mountain Institute (RMI), 70 million American homes and businesses burn natural gas, oil, or propane on-site to heat their space and water, generating 560 million tons of carbon dioxide each year—one-tenth of total emissions. But now, it’s possible to meet nearly all the buildings’ energy needs with electricity from an increasingly low-carbon electric grid, eliminating direct fossil fuel use in buildings and making obsolete much of the gas distribution system—along with its costs and safety challenges. According to RMI’s “The Economics of Electrifying Buildings” report, in all, 10% of U.S. carbon emissions can be avoided by using electricity rather than fossil fuels to heat homes and businesses, and those savings can increase with the use of “smart” grid-connected devices to maximize the efficient use of large amounts of renewable energy.

The report shows that electrification in new construction, when combined with deep efficiency, can reduce the home energy burden, and reduce homeowners’ risk to future fossil fuel price volatility. Plus, as home energy performance becomes more transparent, it can help improve value. The report compares electric space and water heating to fossil fuel–sourced heat for both new single-family home construction and retrofits, under various electric rate structures in Oakland, Calif.; Houston; Providence, R.I.; and Chicago. Interestingly, in the latter’s state, a report called “Clean Jobs Midwest,” highlights Illinois’ growing importance in America’s transition to renewable energy generation. The state added 1,192 new jobs from 2016 to 2017 (7.6% job growth). Overall, Illinois now has nearly four times more workers in clean energy than fossil fuels. “The beauty of data is that it cuts through rhetoric. These findings show that clean energy jobs in renewable energy and energy efficiency are growing across the region,” said Erik G. Birkerts, CEO of Clean Energy Trust. “Everyone should embrace and support these sectors that are driving economic development.”

Energy Trust (CET) and the national, nonpartisan business group E2 (Environmental Entrepreneurs). Furthermore, CareerCast’s report on “green” jobs finds the projected growth outlook for most ecologically friendly careers is at 10% or higher over the next eight years. A pair of green jobs are also emerging in construction and manufacturing— industries with turbulent hiring for the past three decades. Wind turbine technicians are projected to have 96% more job prospects, while solar PV installers are forecasted for a 105% growth outlook—those numbers are expected to double by 2026.

According to the RMI report, in all, 10% of all U.S. carbon emissions can be avoided by using electricity rather than fossil fuels to heat homes and businesses.

It appears that the renewable energy and green building sector is in a healthy position to grow exponentially in the years to come. It’s time to get off the sidelines and get into the game.

John Mesenbrink Contributing Editor jmesenbrink@cbmedia.us.com

More than 119,000 Illinois residents now work in clean energy industries in every county in the state according to analysis of energy jobs data from Clean www.nzbmagazine.com

8/31/18 1:30 PM


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Net Zero Buildings - September 2018  

Highlighting the Path Toward Net Zero Building Design.

Net Zero Buildings - September 2018  

Highlighting the Path Toward Net Zero Building Design.