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LI G HTIN G

CASE STUDY

LED for the Office Charlotte N.C.-based LPL Financial desired that its West Coast office be net zero. High-performance system aspects of the 13-floor, 415,000-sq.ft. office tower in San Diego, included on-site power generated by fuel cells, and an HVAC system driven by underfloor air distribution. LPL officials wanted an equally aggressive lighting system, preferably LED. That said, LPL was afraid the technology would be too expensive. They touched base with GE Lighting to explore their options. After reviewing lighting plans, which called for fluorescent sources, GE conceived a new scheme that reduced the fixture count by nearly 40%. “I’ve never seen a supplier jump in like this,” says Otto Orr, LPL’s V.P. of project management, corporate real estate. “From the start we felt like GE was one of us. They showed us an LED solution was possible.”   Specifically, the office employs the company’s Lumination BL series luminaires for employee areas and common aisles. Controls were also a major part of the solution, using GE’s Aware occupancy sensors and its LightSweep dimming control system. LPL estimates the system will save $38,000 annually over the initially proposed plan.

64 | 06.14 | NET ZERO BUILDINGS

 Believed to be the largest commercial office striving for net zero status, LPL’s San Diego facility will serve as a test bed for best practices to be employed elsewhere in the company’s real estate portfolio.

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There are obvious sources that have no place in maximum efficiency design: the incandescent lamp due to its energy consumption; and lowpressure sodium, whose poor color performance overshadows its 165 lm/W efficacy. The next source to join this list soon are compact fluorescent lamps. A final consideration in any lighting system is consistency and maintenance inventories. Use of too many different sources, such as mixing fluorescent lamps between linear and CFL, requires lamp inventories that increase operation costs. Meanwhile, the nature of LED products eliminates the need for inventories of lamps altogether, albeit with the liability of down-stream replacement to restore desired performance levels.

With this in mind, a wealth of choices means when sourcing selection must consider the merits of all available options in both the short and long terms. There has never been a time when shortsighted decision making can lead to more significant long-term negative impact. For this reason, the only viable approach is to avoid preconceptions to make the most informed decisions by objectively gathering, comparing and evaluating options. This starts with understanding the goals of the building owner, including short and long-term cost tolerance. For an example of a layered and integrated lighting plan, see page 68.

www.nzbmagazine.com

Net Zero Buildings - June 2014  

Highlighting the Path Toward Net Zero Building Design.

Net Zero Buildings - June 2014  

Highlighting the Path Toward Net Zero Building Design.