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E NVE LOPE SEATTLE, WASH.

CASE STUDY

B E CO N S CI O US O F T H E OV ER A L L EFFEC T S O F TH E S PECI FI ED G L A ZI N G S YS T E M S A N D M AT ER I A L S , I N CLU D I N G TH EI R P OTEN TI A L TO A FFEC T OTH ER B U I L D I N G S YS T E M S .

Conscious Commercial Center

© Tom Kessler Photography

Bullitt Center, a sixstory commercial office building in Seattle, was designed by The Miller Hull Partnership to demonstrate how buildings can function as completely integrated, self-sustaining, living organisms. The fenestration system was critical to enabling the center to attain its ambitious energy and environmental performance goals. As part of a sophisticated curtainwall assembly designed by Schuco USA and fabricated by Goldfinch Brothers, the system incorporates triple-glazed insulating glass units (IGUs) framed in aluminum and glazed with two lites of PPG’s Solarban 60 solar control, low-E glass to provide window system U-values as low as 0.17.

 Considered one the greenest buildings in the world,

Seattle’s Bullitt Center features a fenestration system that uses PPG’s Solarban 60 solar control, low-e glass. Building incorporates a sophisticated curtainwall assembly.

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PASSIVE HEATING STRATEGY

Perforated aluminum panels such as the InSpire line cab be mounted to a wall, creating several inches of airspace. Sunlight heats the aluminum, causing a thin layer of warmed air to accumulate at the surface. Intake fans pull the heated air into the airspace where it's distributed via conventional HVAC systems. ATAS International www.inspirewall.com CIRCLE 299

40 | 06.14 | NET ZERO BUILDINGS

Envelope design will result in less energy demand for HVAC.

Given all of the factors to consider, it might seem as though architects might be increasingly forced to sacrifice aesthetic desires. However, Guardian's Blackford says that there are many different options for low-E coating color and performance, and when combined with solar control tints, the possibilities become greater. Spence notes that the increased attention given to the thermal performance of buildings should cause architects to be aware of where glazed areas are located and how each façade deserves a different treatment based on orientation and context. “Unfortunately, this level of attention is not always rewarded because many energy code requirements do not take these factors into consideration,” he says.

Perhaps the most important thing is to be conscious of the overall effects of the specified glazing systems and materials, including their potential to affect other building systems. “You can provide aesthetically pleasing projects that have abundant daylighting if you take the time to be conscious of the effects of the design choices you make on human comfort and energy use,” says Payne. “A larger and more energy-consuming HVAC system should not be required to compensate for inadequate design of the glazing systems.”

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Net Zero Buildings - June 2014  

Highlighting the Path Toward Net Zero Building Design.

Net Zero Buildings - June 2014  

Highlighting the Path Toward Net Zero Building Design.