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NET ZERO BUILDINGS • The 2013 NZB Product Advances Annual

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NET ZERO BUILDINGS

THE ANATOMY OF NET ZERO building env nvel elop o e • on-site e po pow wer • liligh ghti ting da ayl ylig ight hting • water ma mana n geme ment nt • hv vac

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CIRCLE 25


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NOV. N OV 20 2013 013

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SUBSCRIPTION INQUIRIES There is no charge for subscriptions to qualified requestors in the U.S. All other annual subscriptions will be charged $39 for standard delivery or $55 for air mail delivery. For subscriptions, inquiries or address changes, call 630 739 0900 ext. 201. Net Zero Buildings (NZB), Vol. 2, No. 4 (ISSN# 2329-065X) is published four times per year by Construction Business Media. Publication Office: Construction Business Media, 579 First Bank Drive, Suite 220, Palatine, IL 60067; 847 359 6493; www.nzbmagazine.com. (Copyright Š 2013 by Construction Business Media) POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Net Zero Buildings Magazine, 519 East Briarcli Road, Bolingbrook, IL 60440.

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Net Zero, Big Bill Style Flying home from Denver after attending the inaugural “Getting to Zero National Forum,â€? hosted by the NASEO and the New Buildings Institute, I had a lot to chew on, not the least of which is net zero’s realistic promise vs. its more nebulous fantasy. When I’m not on planes, unfortunately, I still spend a lot of time commuting. In an attempt to lull away the hours I listen to a lot of audiobooks. A recent tale—City of Scoundrels, a sort-of sequel to Devil in the White City—put me right back into the mind set of issues facing the net zero movement, and some possible answers we might learn by remembering the past. Let me give you some context: The book is an account of the political and societal upheavals in Chicago as it prepared to enter the Roaring ’20s—political corruption, labor unrest, racial unrest, crime paranoia, post-war jingoism, and fear of new, seemingly dangerous, technology—sounds familiar. A key character in the book is then-mayor “Bigâ€? Bill Thompson—an icon among Chicago’s shady, wheeler-dealer politicians. Amid all his battles and intrigues, Big Bill had a trick up his sleeve that I think is worth learning in the ďŹ ght to give net zero its due: Make no small plans‌ I know, that’s Burnham—but like

any politician worth his or her salt, always glom on to a good idea, and Big Bill did. Thompson, you see, was one of the mayors charged—perhaps most importantly—in making Burnham’s Plan reality.

WORLD TURNING By 2030 some 900 billion sq. ft. of new construction is projected to rise—roughly 60% of the world’s existing built environment. More than 50% of that construction will occur in the United States and China alone— so there’s certainly a wide-open opportunity to implement net- zero strategies.

I see a strong parallel from the early days of implementation of the Chicago Plan to goals for 2030. One of the things this early 20th century “princeâ€? clearly saw was that Burnham Plan projects were politically agnostic, and new, fancy bridges spanning the Chicago River were opportunistic means to bring all factions together to ďŹ nd the necessary funds and support to get these public initiatives implemented—after all, who wants to be the elected oďŹƒcial who stops progress? Being the savvy power broker that he was, Thompson realized these things required lots of money. Thompson’s tactic then is one that especially applies today: It’s not about focusing on an improvement’s cost, but rather emphasizing its value, and more frankly, how such things can make people money. “A Michigan Avenue Bridge will make people millions,â€? said the crafty leader, envisioning, not only construction contracts—and kickbacks— but real estate values once the two sides of the city were connected.

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NET ZERO, BIG BILL STYLE (CONT.) Strangely enough, this was an eerily similar message delivered by Ed Mazria at the aforementioned forum. Mazria, visionary of the 2030 plan, was blunt—show the rest of the world how to make money doing net zero buildings and they’ll happen. During his keynote, he presented data his team collected to help economically justify a NZE tax credit for homes. In this example, he chose the state of Minnesota, which theoretically would allow an $8,000 credit. Why? According to Mazria, the answer lies in new construction spending to the tune of $10.2 million; which in turn, he says, would create 166 new jobs. Those new homes would also generate significant taxes. So, in other words, for a $1M allocation for incentives, Minnesota, he claimed, would see a $2.01M net gain. Now add to this equation the money saved in energy costs for both the home owners and the utilities, and you’ve really got value.

Indeed, most of the case studies presented at the conference revealed that these projects, because of net zero measures, gave them greater market value vs. comparable non-NZE buildings. The challenge, according to Mazria, is to change attitudes of people across the board from focusing on first cost, to value. It also won’t hurt, he says, to get economists to start noting how states, etc., will get paid back to get them to preaching the message. Beyond cost, there are plenty of other challenges. Here’s a few I observed from discussions at the forum, in no certain order: Z Most people at the conference, and probably most of our readership already believe. The real proselytizing needs to be aimed at those who were not there—political leaders, manufacturers, educators, et. al. The idea of Net Zero

is really that it’s something for everyone, and there’s no excuse not to invite everyone to the table. At the least, more people need to be part of the conversation and be at such forums. Z Net Zero solutions need to be bold and dynamic, not piecemeal, energy “fixes.” Z Goals need to be aspirational. Part of those goals should include creating policy goals and educating policy makers. Z Replicability and scalability are critical to be able to take what’s been learned and apply it in a more cost-effective means for future projects. Z Monitoring and metering needs to be better— perhaps involving a more standardized method; there also needs to be more communication of what’s working, and more importantly, what’s not working, and how these things can be fixed.

Z There’s a need to get manufacturers involved in the equation, not only to make products appropriate for NZEBs, but to provide a road map for more industrial-level net zero manufacturing possibilities. “For this movement to succeed this must be personal—everyone must have a stake in the game,” says Mazria. There’s certainly a personal reason to be involved—the environment. Right now, Mazria says the earth’s carbon footprint is 397 ppm. The 2030 goal is to get that number down to 350. On the energy side, according to the Energy Information Administration, in 2005, the U.S. consumed 40 quadrillion BTUs; by 2020, with business as usual, Mazria says that number will be 56 QBTU. The good news is that since the recession began, these projections have dropped.

In fact, EIU has since released new projections, according to Mazria, that now include data on buildings implemented with more efficient technology. Right now, we’re flat with 2011 numbers, which equal 45 QBTU; but with best available tech, Mazria says the number would drop to around 33—and this is just equipment, not better design strategies. “So from 2005 projections to today, we will have saved $4.52 trillion in energy costs— “That directly puts money back into the economy,” says Mazria. With better tech, he adds, we could save another $2.03 trillion in energy costs.

If projects employed the “best” tech, Mazria says the total would drop to 848 GW. “So theoretically, we could see the phase out of some of the biggest power plants.”

On the power side, Mazria says we generate roughly 1000 GW today; if business as usual is maintained, that number will be 1050 GW by 2030. If just Energy Star is implemented, plus 25% better commercial building envelopes, Mazria says that number could drop to around 978 GW.

Makes sense to me.

Some final thoughts: By 2030, Mazria says the world will have built another 900 billion sq. ft., or roughly 60% of the world’s current building stock. 53% of that number will occur in the United States and China alone. “Essentially, we’ll rebuild the world over the next two decades,” says Mazria. “So we need to get to zero net energy and get to ZNE quickly.”

Jim Crockett, Editorial Director jimc@nzbmagazine.com

contents Toward Zero

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LIGHTING

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WAT ER

DAY L I G H T I N G

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NZB Primer A look at how the NZB process differs from traditional design and delivery.

f Bush Museum f Vacuum Insulation f Roof & Wall Panels f Exterior Insulation

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End Point

04 | 11.13 | NET ZERO BUILDINGS

By Barbara HorwitzBennett

f LED Technology f Low Voltage Alliance f Induction & Plasma f Fluorescent Lighting

By Kevin Willmorth

f Wind Power f Cogen f Vehicle Charging f Military Microgrids

By Chuck Ross

f Passive Cooling f Data Logging f VRF Technology f Energy Indicators

By John Mesenbrink

f Pending Legislation f Solar Thermal f Radiant Cooling f Self-sensing pumps

f Daylighting Tips f Dynamic Glazing f Side-Dayligting f Lighting Dashboard

By John Mesenbrink

By Barbara HorwitzBennett

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i n s p i r e d to create the nation’s largest Net-Zero community

Architect: Studio E Architects - San Diego, CA Details: 40,000 LF total coverage Magna-Loc 180 Roof 7/8” Corrugated Wall Vertical Seam Canopy 7 custom colors

When architects of UC Davis West Village set out to raise the bar on sustainable design, they turned to Metal Sales™ roof and wall systems. With panels formed from just a single sheet of the world’s most recycled material – steel – and protected with durable cool coatings, Metal Sales roof and wall systems represent the ultimate in material and energy efficiency. Simply sustainable. CIRCLE 27


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elivering a high-performance project is not something that should be done lightly. In fact, if architects, owners, contractors and other key consultants—even key suppliers—aren’t prepared to do things significantly differently, prepare for the worse. The design and construction process involved in delivering successful net zero, deep energy, ultra-low energy facilities—call it what you like—must be an inclusive and integrated process or it is doomed to fail. Jeffrey Murray, AIA, LEED AP, a director/design principal at CH2M HILL | IDC Architects, is a big proponent of integrated design. Speaking at the AIA annual conference earlier this year in Denver, he had some provocative things to say about how architects and other key players in the planning, design and construction process must change their ways. “We need to improve the relationship with owners, builders and suppliers. We must modify our behavior or be out of business,” says the architect.

06 | 11.13 | NET ZERO BUILDINGS

With the emergence of the sustainable buildings movement, Murray says there’s a mindset among architects— who once had total control of the design and construction process, but have since purposefully relinquished that authority to shed legal responsibilities—to try to reclaim that control. “But I don’t know that we ever had control—if we did, it was because someone gave it to us,” says Murray. In re-evaluating the architectural climate, Murray says his fellow architects first need to understand that there’s a difference between a client and a patron. The former, he says, has real needs and is goal driven—not just a source of financing. “I think architecture, in context of highperformance design, is about helping clients succeed, not about making an architectural statement,” says Murray. “So we [as a firm] stopped designing projects for our clients, and started designing projects with our clients.”

To begin, he says, it’s critical to engage the owner and get top, visionary-level people involved. “You have to communicate how the building is an investment that’s going to positively affect the business. Because a building is not neutral—it either helps or hinders your business,” says Murray. Part B of this process is also having key members of the client’s operational staff involved. Murray describes a concept he calls “rapid prototyping”—a term he borrowed from the industry, but one that’s appropriate to architecture. In a paper Murray’s written about this process, which NZB will profile in series in coming issues, the architect spells out examples of rapid prototyping in practice. For example, for a new science facility for a major Midwestern university, the process began in a most unorthodox manner. One of Murray’s associates took some preliminary sketches the team made on their initial visit, scanned them, and converted them to 3-D models, which the team then used to work with the university staff, in real time, to mock up and work out various programming permutations that eventually became the basis for the building.

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Photo ©: Bill Timmerman, Courtesy of Smith Group/JJR

Real Estate Holdings Building, Northern Arizona University, Flagstaff, Ariz. Shooting for 2030 Challenge certification, this administrative services project was grounded in reality as it had a limited budget, and more importantly only a 12-month schedule. In evaluating options, the design-build team of SmithGroup/JJR and Mortenson Construction quickly decided to focus on an unorthodox envelope solution—insulated metal panels that not only would deliver energy performance goals, but also serve as the finished exterior and interior—a definitive time and cost saver.

Nebraska Center for Virology, University of Nebraska–Lincoln

Beyond engaging the owner/operators, there are other key players that need to be added to the inner circle of the up-front planning process, particularly the contractor and key consultants. But Murray adds there’s a fourth group to consider—suppliers—as this group often can deliver valuable information about costs or other design options while design is fluid. Of course, just because a supplier is involved in the planning discussion, does not mean they’ll land a contract. When asked why manufacturers should take such a chance—essentially providing free consulting—Murray says it’s a leap of faith, and only emphasizes the need for owners to be involved—notably that the owner must factor loyalty to those that helped. At the very least, Murray says, it builds trust to work with said suppliers in the future. “There’s still an advantage created by getting exposed to the owner’s vision, how they can help— perhaps how they can uniquely help,” says Murray.

After making a quick scan of some sketches made upon the intial client visit, through a concept IDC Architects calls “Rapid Prototyping,” the team was able to interact with the lab’s staff to come up some firm programming concepts.

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The glue to all this is communication. Architects need to be much more descriptive in what they want to do— eliminate the possibility that ideas are misunderstood or misinterpreted. The design team must also more clearly define problems and issues for clients. How? Come up with lots of ideas, even crazy ones. “When you do this, it often helps better define or ID problems, especially if key personnel are involved,” says Murray. Another architect who believes in working with key suppliers early is Mark Roddy with the Phoenix office of the SmithGroup/JJR. Also speaking at AIA, Roddy presented a case study of the Real Estate Holdings Building at Northern Arizona University. A catch-all facility for administrative services, the project had lofty performance goals—shooting to meet the 2030 Building Challenge—but a limited budget, and only a 12-month time frame. The team, a design-build effort with Mortenson Construction, decided to sink a large part of the budget into the building envelope, as it would allow them to kill two birds with one stone. The key element in the equation was insulated metal panels. “The panels were huge,” says Roddy.”

NET ZERO BUILDINGS | 11.13 | 07


Images courtesy: David and Lucile Packard Foundation

David and Lucile Packard Foundation, Los Altos, Calif. Doing something almost unheard of in California’s mild climate, the designers of the world’s largest certified net zero facility, EHDD Architects and the Integral Group, decided to specify triple-pane glazing for the project—a premium employed only in cold regions like Minnesota. But according to Integral’s Lisa Matthiessen, the move allowed the team to simplify the HVAC system, and actually save $75,000 in first costs. Furthermore, the reduced energy load meant the facility needed far fewer solar panels to offset the building’s load, resulting in another $300,000 savings.

Not only did the façade system from Kingspan deliver performance—roughly an R-value of 22, opposed to the more common R-value of 13 associated with stick-built designs—but it saved the team on the budget front, as panels double as both the exterior and interior finishes. Further, there was a structural element of the system that allowed this to happen—the entire wall is only 3-in.thick. “It was really kind of an eerie feeling that it was such a thin connection to the outside,” says Roddy. The unorthodox curtainwall at NAU is indicative of the kind of outside-the-box thinking that’s required to deliver these kinds of facilities. Because budget realities are not going to go away any time soon, delivering net zero or near-net zero buildings often requires fairly radical design decisions like this—often eliminating certain elements that would be part of a core design-bid-build process and trading them out for perhaps a more expensive, but better value, system that will achieve the team’s performance goals.

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This was definitely the case with the David and Lucile Packard Foundation in Los Altos, Calif.—the largest net zero-certified building in the world. According to Lisa Matthiessen, a principal with the Integral Group, who along with EHDD Architects, designed the nearly 50,000-sq.-ft. facility, the team decided to essentially trade a traditional HVAC system for a triple-paned curtainwall. Speaking this past fall at the Getting to Zero National Forum in Denver, sponsored by NASEO and the New Buildings Institute, Matthiessen, a LEED Fellow, presented a number of net zero projects her firm was involved in, including the Packard Foundation. The economics of the decision: a $75,000 premium for installed glazing, but a $150,000 savings for a simplified heating system, which equaled a total of $75,000 in first cost savings. At a bigger-picture level, the team saved an additional $300,000 by needing far fewer PVs to offset the facility’s entire load.

desired—and an actual monetary budget; both should be set at the same time. Second, she says, you need to have a team with no weak links. “Everyone has to be on board from the beginning, and costs have to be moved up front,” says Matthiessen. Third, be bold and know your stuff, such as the idea of substituting better glazing for traditional HVAC. “There is risk, but you have to overcome your fears,” says Matthiessen. “To do so, you have to have enough of an understanding of what’s happening to do something to change the risk.”

There are several key lessons would-be NZEB project designers can take away, says Matthiessen. First, before even starting any kind of design, she advises having both an energy budget—as far as the performance levels

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Bullitt Center, Seattle, Wash.

Images courtesy: The Bullitt Foundation

Photovoltaics don’t come cheaply. And to generate the kind of power net zero projects require, you need a lot of it, as did the Bullitt Center. The foundation that operates the building, however, made a bold move and entered a unique agreement with Seattle’s local utility to purchase “energy services.” In exchange for delivering guaranteed saved “negawatt hours,” the foundation will receive $800,000

Of course, if people can’t be changed, designers or owners can always change the way they operate. The Bullitt Center in Seattle is a perfect example. Located on a hill overlooking downtown, the project is singular—not only is it an ultra-low energy consuming building, it has a unique utility power agreement, and is its own water district. Also speaking at the Net Zero Forum, Denis Hayes, the president of the Bullitt Foundation, gave a run through of the 50,000- sq.-ft. project. As a cost reference, he said the Net Zero and Living Building Challenge-certified structure was “just south” of the cost of a LEED platinum building (actually $350 per sq. ft.). Yet, the real cost question net zero building designers should be considering, he says, is how does one monetize sustainable design. “There are significant public benefits if you’re willing to spend more money up front,” says Hayes. For example, take solar. The Bullitt Center features a large, flat roof, with a significant cantilever reminiscent of the brim of a gunslinger’s hat. The large roof was necessary to accommodate the amount of PV the facility needed to meet its energy-neutral goals. PV, of course, came as a significant cost to the project. But Hayes and his team

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found a way to make PV—perhaps the most expensive NZE technology—pay back. Through a first-of-its-kind agreement with Seattle’s local utility, the Bullitt Center does not buy electricity from the utility, but pays, rather, for “energy services,” even though it’s drawing power, mainly, from solar sources. Under the agreement, Hayes explains that if the building delivers the energy performance it was designed to produce—230,000 kWh/year— the utility will pay them $800,000 per year for 20 years in compensation for the power sent back to the grid. Technically, he says they’re selling metered “saved negawatthours” to the utility. Over the long term, he says that will certainly pay for the PV system. He predicts that similar deals may emerge in places like Boulder, Colo.; Austin, Texas; and Palo Alto, Calif.; communities like these have independent utility structures that may allow them to think outside the box.

Per Matthiessen, Hayes had other takeaways for net zero proponents. Replicability was a subject voiced repeatedly throughout the forum as a means to bring down the cost of net zero projects; while Hayes didn’t disagree, he warned that a major difference with NZEBs and other projects is that each must be designed specifically for the place they inhabit. Per Matthiessen’s point about substituting triple-pane glazing for HVAC, the Bullitt Center also beefed up its envelope at the expense of traditional HVAC, in large part, because of the more moderate, yearround temperatures in the city. This also allowed the design team, led by Miller Hull Partnership, to pursue natural ventilation. But it wasn’t a no-brainer. After exploring many options, Hayes pointed out the team had to engage in a license agreement with a German-based curtainwall company that had the only solution that would work for them. In turn, they had to have a local fabricator custom create the system to make the high-tech envelope work. “The process is key—you must have integrated teams who play well together,” concludes Hayes.

NET ZERO BUILDINGS | 11.13 | 09


Photo: Jeff Buehner, courtesy of Robert A.M. Stern Architects

ENVELOPE

George W. Bush Presidential Museum & Library, Dallas

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Designed by Robert A.M. Stern Architects, the 226,000-sq.-ft. facility incorporated sustainability in a subtle manner. The library features 19,000 sq. ft. of solar panels, but they’re all mounted on the roof so as not to detract from its Georgian architecture. Beyond solar, the top of the structure also incorporates reflective and vegetated roof systems. High-performance glazing also helps reduce glare and the heat load of the building while still allowing for natural light.

First Line of Defense

T

he building envelope, according to the organization Better Bricks, should be designed and operated with energy top of mind. Better Bricks is the commercial building initiative of the Northwest Energy Efficiency Alliance, and it champions the idea that buildings are the first line of defense from the elements. The envelope, however, is also the mechanism that provides the facade for the built environment. In that context, the organization argues that building envelopes should provide more than shelter and good looks, but be an integral part of a building that responds to the weather by nurturing the occupants and organizations within.

fort and energy performance of the building. Additional strategies such as selecting “cool” white roof materials and insulation options greatly impact the energy demand and occupant comfort of the building. But perhaps the most significant factor, according to Better Bricks, is that an integrated design process should be at the heart of any high-performance project. Integrated design, suggests Better Bricks, will identify the interaction of envelope choices with other building systems and the ultimate performance and comfort of the building. Key elements of the envelope that affect thermal performance include shading elements, air tightness, wall and roof insulation and roof reflectance.

So what are some of the next steps in achieving this superior envelope? First, the group notes a climateresponsive building envelope should use a combination of shading, high-performance windows, and the thoughtful placement of windows to enhance the com-

Last, but not least, one of the most critical elements of a modern building envelope, according to Better Bricks, is systems and strategies that bring daylight into a building’s interior without heat and glare. A great example of such an integrated design effort is the George W. Bush

10 | 11.13 | NET ZERO BUILDINGS

Presidential Museum and Library in Dallas, pictured above. A LEED Platinum-certified building designed by Robert A.M. Stern Architects, its envelope incorporates high-performance glazing, photovoltaics, reflective and vegetated roofing technologies. Aesthetics, however, were not forgotten, as the library resides on the edge of the campus of Southern Methodist University. In fact, PV choices were carefully evaluated as they did not want the panels to interfere with the Georgian architecture. In turn, the team also had to be careful that the panels were not shadowed at any time of day, as the PV provides 10% of the building’s power. A final consideration of the PV system was also how it would integrate with the roof, as the National Archives & Records Administration was concerned about leaks that might occur as a result of punctures of the roof membrane. As a result, the team selected a ballasted system. Following are products and some applications which can help designers and specifiers achieve such goals.

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It takes a special kind of glass to make the Glasshouse. Artist Dale Chihuly is known for the color of his glass. That’s why Owen

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Richards Architects specified Guardian SunGuard SuperNeutral 62 on clear for the Glasshouse, the centerpiece of the Chihuly Garden and Glass exhibition in Seattle. With a visible light transmission of 62%, SN 62 allows the beauty of Chihuly’s artwork to be seen from the outside. And with a solar heat gain coefficient of 0.31, it meets the City of Seattle’s tough energy requirements as well. For complete performance data and other ways to Build With Light, visit SunGuardGlass.com. Or call 1-866-GuardSG (482-7374).

CIRCLE 28

GLASSHOUSE, CHIHULY GARDEN AND GLASS, SEATTLE, WA ARCHITECT: Owen Richards Architects GUARDIAN SELECT™ FABRICATOR: Hartung Glass Industries GLAZIERS: Novum Structures and Eastside Glass (Guardian Glazier Connection™ Member) SUNGUARD GLASS: SuperNeutral 62 on clear


ENVELOPE

Vacuum Wonder Vacuum insulation panels are capable of delivering insulation values of R-60 per inch thanks to its laminate film wrapping, which creates a low vacuum inside and controls thermal conduction. Made from 75% recycled glass, the product is also highly recyclable. Shown above, compared to traditional insulation materials, the panels have a slimmer profile yet have similar insulation values. Panasonic www.panasonic.ca.com CIRCLE 308

SOLAR SOARING? “To get to zero we have to self generate,” says Rhone Resch, president and CEO of the Solar Energy Industries Assn. (SEIA). At the recent Solar Power Intl. show in Chicago, SEIA released the results of its annual “Solar Means Business,” study. Briefly, the organization reported that the top 25 companies by capacity installed 445 MW of PV in 2013—up from 2012’s 300 MW figure. Visit www.seia. org for the full report.

W H I L E EN V ELO PE S PROV ID E SH ELT ER A N D G O O D LO O K S , THE Y S H O U L D A L SO B E A N IN T EG R A L PA RT O F A B U IL D IN G TH AT R E S P O NDS TO T H E W E ATH ER BY N U RT U R IN G O CCU PA N T S WI THI N . A K E Y ELE MENT O F CO N SID ER ATIO N M U S T B E S TR AT EG I E S TH AT BR I NG DAY LI G H T IN TO T H E IN T ER I O R W IT H O U T H E AT A N D G L A R E . I NTEG R ATED DE SIG N C A N H EL P ID T H E IN T ER AC TIO N O F EN V ELO PE CH O I CE S W I T H OTH ER B U IL D IN G S YS TE M S A N D T H E U LTI M ATE PER FO R M A N CE A N D COM FO RT O F T H E B U I L D I N G.

MULTI-FUNCTIONAL WOOD Serving as a thermal insulator and humidity regulator, the unique properties of Agepan Functional Wood enable it to deliver an R-value of R-3 per in. In addition, the wood absorbs excess room moisture; when the room is too dry, the wood releases moisture through its wood fibers. As revealed in its Environmental Product Declaration, the product contains no added formaldehyde. Peak Building Products www.peakbp.com CIRCLE 307

CERTAINTEED + PENN STATE To help train students and building professionals in solar roofing installation, CertainTeed has teamed up with Penn State University to build a solar power training facility called the GridStar Center at Philadelphia’s Navy Yard. In addition to the rooftop, which features solar roofing shingles and rackmounted solar panels, a net zero energy demonstration home incorporates numerous other exterior and interior CertainTeed products.

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ENVELOPE

IMP TRANSPARENCY The Metal Construction Assn. has released an environmental product declaration (EPD) for insulated metal panels. The EPD is based on cradle-to-gate life-cycle assessment of this product category. To obtain a copy of the EPD, visit the Technical Resources section at www. metalconstruction.org.

CURTAINWALL BOOST Southwall Technology’s Heat Mirror suspended film helped the net zero-certified David and Lucile Packard Foundation in Los Altos, Calif. achieve an energy-efficient curtain wall and window system. The glazing infill itself, which was assembled by Serious Materials, consists of Cardinal low-E glass and Heat Mirror film to create two argon-filled cavities. The film helps deliver high light transmission, thermal insulation, sound reduction and natural ventilation. Southwall Technologies www.southwall.com CIRCLE 306

PROUD GREEN HOME With contributions from multiple vendors, the Proud Green Home at Serenbe—a net-zero energy prototype outside of Atlanta—is now open for visitors. It’s so sustainable, the home is actually projected to produce more energy than it will ultimately consume. Showcasing the latest green building technologies and products to support energy and water efficiency, durability, low maintenance and net-zero energy usage, the home incorporates Energy Star roof and wall panels from Metal Sales with solar panels and a rainwater catchment system. Metal Sales www.metalsales.us.com CIRCLE 305

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ENVELOPE

INCREDIBLY INTACT Not only did the installation of StoTherm Premier NExT Exterior Insulation and Finish System boost energy savings by 33% at Lido Beach Towers in Long Island, but the system remained largely intact following the devastation of Hurricane Sandy last year. “The system worked exactly how it was designed and intended and performed exceptionally well given the fact that was completely submerged in up to 8 ft. of sand and salt water for more than a week in some areas,” relates Dan Canova, senior sales representative, east region, Sto Corp., Philadelphia. Prior to the hurricane, when the building owners decided to reclad the 300-room seaside retreat, which was originally built in 1929, the hotel was able to continue operating, and the dozens of water leaks and air leaks plaguing the original building envelope completely disappeared. Sto Corp. www.stocorp.com CIRCLE 304

HEAVY-DUTY PANELS With its new heavy-duty composite insulation panel, Insulfoam offers a sound solution for roofing systems in severe weather climates. The closed-cell, lightweight and resilient EPS foam is bonded to a high-density polyisocyanurate cover board delivering a high compressive strength of 100 psi and high thermal efficiency. The fully adhered single-ply roof system can be made more resistant to abuse.

GO PRO Joining the ranks of YKK AP’s ProTek portfolio is the YUW 750 XTH unitized wall system, offering a new innovative solution for hurricane impact resistance. Ideal for low- to mid-rise commercial structures in coastal regions, the system meets stringent energy codes and can easily be configured for multi-span curtain walls, single-span ribbon walls or a combination of both. With an advanced thermal barrier design, the system is projected to deliver U-factors as low as 0.30.

YKK AP America www.ykk-ap.com CIRCLE 302

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Insulfoam www.insulfoam.com CIRCLE 303

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ENVELOPE 0$7(5,$/6

Cattails Meet Insulation While not the first commercial application for cattails, German researchers are well on their way to converting the leaves of this wetland plant into a high performance insulation material. Previously used to clean wastewater at sewage treatment plants, detoxifying soils and as a healing plant, researchers at the Fraunhofer Institute for Building Physics IBP in Valley, Germany, have recognized the insulative properties of this rapidly renewable material and are working with typha technik Naturbaustoffe, a start-up based in Bavaria, to create a magnesitebound insulation panel, currently patent pending. “As one of nature’s swamp plants, cattails are resistant to molds and are very well equipped to deal with moisture,” explains Dr. Martin Krus, who heads up IBP’s test center. “The leaves of the plant have a fiber-reinforced supporting tissue that is filled up with a soft sponge tissue. Through this special construction, they are extraordinarily stable and possess an excellent insulating effect. This effect is also preserved in the finished products.” Proving his case, the product has been tested to deliver a low heat conductivity of 0.052 W/mK (watts per meter and Kelvin) and offers a high level of fireproofing. In addition, the insulating panel is relatively permeable, yet tight enough that a vapor control barrier may not be necessary.

In order to validate these properties, researchers retrofitted the walls of a half-timbered home in Nuremberg with the Typha panels and took measurements over the course of 18 months. “The local craftsmen were enthused by this sustainable material,” reports Krus. Although Typha’s initial application is for wall insulation, the Krus’ team sees potential for its use in roof construction or as a sandwich element for flooring and intermediate ceilings on account of his high flexural rigidity and low weight. In addition, researchers project that it can be used in door leafs, window and door lintels, and as a replacement material for timber beams. In terms of how the plant’s leaves are actually converted into the building blocks for this building material, the leaves are detached horizontally, cut to seven centimeters, sprayed in a drum with non-toxic mineral adhesives and then brought into a heated press. Because processing is conducted manually, first cost remains high. However, if and when a manufacturer agrees to product the panels, the material could become very competitive.

11 TIMES SQUARE The mixed-use project in Manhattan by FXFOWLE Architects, involved 387,000 sq. ft. of glazing. The primary glass was made up of Viracon’s insulating VRE13-46 product using PPG’s Starphire coating; its Insulating VE13-52 (also Starphire); and the company’s insulating laminated VRE13-46 product (also with Starphire).

Another stumbling block is the fact that cattails are not currently grown as a crop plant, and while the plant can easily be produced, Germany has no available farmland to cultivate the cattails, so at present, the cattails are being imported from Romania and Hungary. For more information, see: www.fraunhofer.de/en/press/researchnews/2013/may/using-cattails-for-insulation.html

Viracon www.viracon.com CIRCLE 301

Photo: Mark Todd Photography

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BIM HELP Need a handle on glazing choices? Guardian Industries has launched its BIM Generator tool as part of its Glass Analytical suite. Available at sunguardglass.com, the the Generator, populates BIM content with data for thermal and optical performances of custom project-specific customer IG make-ups. The data can then be plugged into Guardian’s Building Energy Calculator to compare cost, consumption and payback.

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Valley View Middle School, Snohomish, Wash. Dykeman Architects built the school with the idea of creating a sustainable building that would teach environmental stewardship, saturate the building with natural light and provide panoramic views. As a result, the architects specified Guardian’s SunGuard SuperNeutral 68 triple glazed product. The glazing has a visible light transmission of 52% and a low solar heat coefficient of 0.32, and a total fenestration value of 0.17. According to lead architect Tim Jewett, the glazing allowed the team to meet even tougher energy codes enacted just this past summer.

SLOPING PANELS Expanding its portfolio of metal architectural systems, the new Profile Series Cascade Metal Panel System from CENTRIA is an interchangeable rainscreen panel with dramatic curves and a flat slope rib profile. With its 1 ½-in. deep rib and angular sloped web, the uniquely shaped panel offers a new degree of creative design freedom to architects. Available in seven different profiles, which can be installed both vertically and horizontally, the panels can be stucco-embossed or smooth finished. CENTRIA centriaperformance.com CIRCLE 300

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LIGHTING

Peerless Lighting www.peerlesslighting.com CIRCLE 299

Blue Communications, Montreal

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Located on the 8th floor of the former Dow Brewery in Montreal, the office features ceilings as high as 30 ft., so natural lighting was a major goal. To complement the daylighting scheme, Goneau Design chose Peerless’ new Bruno LED linear luminaires, which incorporate the company’s 360-degree Total Integration System, which includes built-in sensors for dimming, flicker-free drivers, and of course, energy efficient light output delivering up to 116 lm. per watt.

Which Course?

W

hat is net zero lighting? To date, there haven’t been a lot of defining examples, at least as far as systems that ultimately offset their total power consumption. Lighting in most NZE projects typically involve efficient fluorescent systems, often paired with aggressive daylight or occupancysensing controls. But where is the LED? That was the question the Dept. of Energy recently asked in compiling a study summarizing the current U.S. lighting market. According to DOE, the study tried to answer four key questions: 1) How much energy was consumed in 2012 by nine common lighting applications where LED is competing with traditional sources; 2) Which technologies were used for each application; 3) How much energy was actually saved by reliance on LED technology vs. traditional technologies; and 4) How much energy would have been saved if LED technology was the only lighting technology used. Researchers classified the nine applications into three groups: 1) indoor lamps— A-type,

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directional, MR16 and decorative; 2) indoor luminaires— downlights, troffers and other fluorescent and high-bay fixtures; and 3) outdoor luminaires—streetlight and parking lot/garage fixtures. The study found that in 2012, about 49 million installations relied on LED, with A-type lamp replacements (your basic Edison bulb) leading the way. In fact, they were used in just over four of every 10 LED installations. Nonetheless, LED A-type lamps accounted for less than 1% of all installed Edisontype lamps. That’s not the case with MR16 lamps, as the study found that about one in 10 MR16 installations used LED alternatives. LEDs installed in 2012, however, did generate significant energy savings—some 71 trillion British Thermal Units (tBTU), according to DOE, which translates into annual energy-cost savings of about $675 million. In fact, DOE says yearly savings could approach almost 3.9 quadrillion BTUs if all nine applications identified used LEDs

exclusively. Still, many are skeptical. “We’re still a long way from 100% reliance on LEDs,” says National Lighting Bureau Chair, Howard P. Lewis in a press release reacting to the study. “And, frankly, I doubt we’ll ever see anything even close to that given the significant progress still being made within the traditional lighting technologies.” That said, at the recent “Getting to Zero National Forum” in Denver, conducted by NASEO and the New Buildings Institute, Walgreens begged to differ. Jamie Meyers, the gentleman in charge of the drug store’s new net zero outket going up in Chicago’s north suburbs, noted the retailer came away with a clear lesson learned from the experience: LED was the way to go. In fact, Meyers, the chain’s manager of sustainability, says the drug store giant will use LED only in all of its new stores—both inside and out—starting in March 2014. Considering the chain operates nearly 8,000 outlets, there’s certainly a tremendous potential for retrofit, if the chain goes that route.

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LIGHTING

VERSATILE EFFICIENCY Logos track luminaires are available in a range of lighting distributions, color temperatures and finishes, with four interchangeable beam angles. Additionally, color temperatures can be retrofitted with available replacement LED modules. The fixtures, designed for high-end retail and other commercial applications, feature a lockable aiming mechanism with 360-degree horizontal rotation and a 180-degree vertical tilt. WAC Lighting www.waclighting.com CIRCLE 298

Rijksmuseum, Amsterdam Amsterdam’s famed Rijksmuseum recently reopened its doors after a major renovation project, and visitors now will find the entire facility, more than 100,000 sq. ft., illuminated by LED fixtures and lamps from Philips. Energy efficiency is important in a facility this size, but the fact the new lamps don’t emit the UV beams that can harm any of the 7,500 priceless artworks was just as critical. The Rijksmuseum now is the largest gallery space ever lit entirely by LEDs.

AMSTERDAM

RIJKSMUSEUM’S NEW LIGHTS NOT ONLY ARE ENERGY EFFICIENT, BUT DON’T EMIT UV BEAMS THAT CAN HARM THE 7,500 PRICELESS ART WORKS, NOW THE L ARGEST GALLERY SPACE EVER LIT ENTIRELY BY LEDS.

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LIGHTING

architectural grade

Exterior Decor LIGHTING

LED

Bulkheads

FCW8050 0

CROSSBEAM TECHNOLOGY The brand new Selux Cross Beam Technology (CBT) consists of injection-molded and vacuum metalized reflectors to create IES distribution types III wide, III narrow and V with IDA approved “Dark Sky Friendly” performance. CBT creates harmonious brightness transitions for optimal visibility and a unique appearance. The Avanza family is constructed from die cast, low copper aluminum housing with a hinged door for tool-less access to a fully sealed optical chamber. The LED light engine is available up to 107W system power. The Avanza product line is covered by the Selux 5-year warranty for ambient temperatures up to 104oF.

FCW3263

Selux www.selux.us/en CIRCLE 297

FCW3362

See our Bulkhead family sizes. Over 50 styles to choose from.

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An EMerging Low Voltage Alliance The EMerge Alliance is making slow but steady progress in gaining partners to deploy 24V DC power to lighting systems in place of conventional line voltage distribution. This improves efficiency of individual luminaires by eliminating redundant power conversions, and is better matched to the low voltage DC characteristic of solid-state products. Recently, Armstrong and Osram have agreed to co-market new products using this approach, joining Philips, Acuity, Focal Point and JLC Tech in offering luminaires and systems. The future potential includes integrating photovoltaic power collection directly, to take lighting loads off-grid during daylight hours, of not completely through use of battery power storage. Further, the growth in supporting components, as well as controls integration, offers an attractive alternative for both luminaire manufacturers and application designers alike.

All have LED specifications Delivering over 70 Lumens / Watt Up to 3400 Delivered Lumens Enhanced polycarbonate lenses Easy wall & ceiling mount 4 standard colors or custom 8-stage powder coat

PARK IT The TLED-C Canopy/Garage Luminaire is offered in three housing styles for use in both retrofit and new construction. Designs are available to meet needs specific to parking garages gas station canopies and general-utility applications such as freezers and enclosed walkways. Barron Lighting Group www,barronltg.com CIRCLE 230

800-900-1730

download Exterior Decor brochure

FCLighting.com CIRCLE 30


LIGHTING

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Induction and Plasma Niche-ing Forward Induction lamps and plasma-based light sources have been slow in development. Induction lamp technology offers long life and efficiency similar to linear fluorescent. Unfortunately, the light sources themselves are large and clumsy, making them unsuitable for any application where precise optical control is desired. Plasma offers HID level power, in a very compact, high intensity light source package that increases optical efficiency. A plasma source delivers the greatest brightness within the smallest physical source size of any modern light source, including LEDs. However, both induction and plasma sources come at a high cost. Further, while induction lamp products have seen growth in availability, plasma remains somewhat obscure. Solid-state lighting employing lowand mid-power LEDs has the potential to displace induction lamp products in large luminous surface luminaires (induction lamp). While plasma holds an advantage in shear energy packaging, the costs involved remain an issue. Where these two technologies fall in the pecking order over the next decade is unknown.

Fluorescents Both Strong and Under Attack Linear fluorescent lighting has traditionally delivered a rock solid value in light output, control integration and operating expense. New generations of T5 and T8 lamps offering lifetimes of 40,000 hrs (to 50% lamp failures) is a significant improvement. When coupled with proper program start ballasts, this can be extended even further. Low mercury lamps address the long standing issue of contamination, with several now so low they fall below what the EPA classifies as hazardous. Because of this, and the familiarity and low cost of linear fluorescent systems, these sources will remain a viable option for several more years to come. On the opposite end of the spectrum, CFL lamps have always been a compromise between quality of light, service life, and energy efficiency. Few in the design profession consider this light source a favorite. Between issues of short life, slow warm up, poor color performance, and a form factor that defies efficient optical design, these lamps are used grudgingly to replace incandescent lamps. Little has changed in this technology, beyond the increase in offering of low mercury variants and a few quicker starting lamps. Development here is considered by most manufacturers a stop gap, as solid-state lighting is poised to replace these sources in a few short years.

HIGH-BAY OPTIONS The Hazardous Kemlux III LED fixture, shown here, is designed to perform in challenging chemical, marine and power generation settings and is one of three new high-bay fixtures, each designed to meet application-specific needs. Also in the lineup are the HBLHA High Ambient LED High Bay for large interior spaces and the Lightwatt LED for high-efficiency illumination on vertical and horizontal surfaces in warehouses, shipping docks and parking garages.

At the offices of SAP headquarters in Newton Square, Pa., a LEED Platinum-certified facility, Lutron’s Hyperion Solar Adaptive shading system is programmed to respond to the position of the sun to reduce glare and heat gain while still taking advantage of the natural light in the space. Lutron’s Quantum Total Management system regulates the fluorescent fixtures to adjust electric lighting in concert with the daylighting.

HALOGEN GETS EFFICIENCY BOOST LITE PAR Eco lamps provide familiar halogen illumination with at least a 20% reduction in electricity demand. The product family includes PAR20, PAR30, PAR30LN and PAR38 lamps, with five different lumen options. The products all are direct replacement for traditional PAR offerings. Litetronics www.litetronics.com CIRCLE 294

Hubbell Industrial Lighting www.hubbellindustrial.com CIRCLE 295

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LIGHTING

The New Linear

CoveLine

SERIES

Powerful Low Profile Cove Luminaire

Bringing Bling to Light Riddle’s Jewelry operates 57 stores, all previously using 75W halogen PAR lamps to show off the retailer’s selection of fine rings, pendants and gemstones. Now, though, 20W PAR38 LED replacement lamps from GE are replacing the halogen products and electricity savings already are adding up. Stores are seeing monthly savings ranging from $100 to $225, depending on the number of fixtures, thanks in part to lower air-conditioning loads created by cooler-running LEDs.

WITH THE PROMISE OF LED A N D SOL A R , TRU LY SUS TA IN A B LE LI G HTIN G S YS TE M S A R E N OT I M P OS S I B L E TO ACH I E V E .

A CERTAIN GLOW Cyrus is a hand-blown German Artisan glass pendant featuring clear crystal glass or an internal opaque lacquering for an alpine or tuxedo exterior. Its interior is hand painted with gold or silver leaf to create a dramatic, organic, warm or cool glow. The fixture is offered in either a GU24 or Edison base for line voltage. It can also be mounted to any Bruck line voltage track with an appropriate adaptor. Bruck Lighting www.brucklighting.com CIRCLE 293

tLM79 tested tSpecification grade tEven linear light distribution tCoves, wall washes, indirect t2700K, 3000K & 4000K tSeveral optical solutions tDelivers 100 lumens / watt

Savings From the Start The Benjamin Franklin Library might be located in Monterrey, Mexico, but its lighting is designed to U.S. standards, including those set by the National Electrical Code and the Illuminating Engineering Society. To meet both lumen requirements and efficiency goals, designers specified LED flat-panel ceiling fixtures, along with lightbars and downlights, all from MaxLite.

877- SSL- GREEN download brochure at

SolidStateLuminaires.com www.nzbmagazine.com

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POWER

Dow Jones, South Brunswick, N.J.

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During peak sunshine the 3.6-MW solar carport installation at Dow Jones’ South Brunswick, N.J., campus generates approximately 50% of the facility’s electricity demand. The solar canopies from Solaire Generation cover almost 230,000 sq. ft., which the company says makes this the largest solar carport in the United States.

Getting Control of Storage

E

nergy storage has long been viewed as a sort of Holy Grail for variable and intermittent renewable technologies, such as photovoltaic panels and wind turbines. Attached batteries or other storage devices can be used to smooth out production peaks and valleys, and provide backup when the sun goes down or the wind simply dies. While battery research is going strong for these applications—thanks, in part, to the work of electric vehicle makers—the real excitement in energy storage these days is happening with the software that can control storage operations. The overall energy-storage industry is expected to nearly double in the next decade, according to Navigant Research, which sees its revenues topping $7.5 billion by 2022, from this year’s $3.9 billion. However, excitement over the market’s potential is driving research into a broad range of battery technologies, from improving old-school lead-acid products long used in uninterrupt-

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ible power supply installations, to the latest lithium-ion models. As a result, some startups are bringing controls solutions to market that can work across all battery options, so their fortunes aren’t dependent on a successful gamble on any single battery chemistry. Greensmith Energy Management Systems is one of the players placing themselves above the individual-technology fray. In fact, the company really doesn’t manufacture anything, instead it’s a kind of integrator, bringing together batteries with third-party inverters, and then adding in its proprietary control system. With its own CPUs attached to each battery unit, Greensmith links systems together, using algorithms to oversee energy dispatch based on customer priorities to optimize a utility bill or fill in gaps of variable or intermittent generation. Demand Energy takes a similarly “battery-agnostic” approach with its Joule System. It doesn’t care what batteries you use, because the value this cloud-based

“Big Data” offering provides lies in its ability to consider all sides of the energy marketplace at once. The Joule. System follows grid-connected electricity rates and stores electricity when prices are low for facility use during more expensive peak periods. Importantly, control systems such as those offered by both Greensmith and Demand could help create new revenue streams for storage-system owners over the next decade or so, enabling participation in the ancillary-services market. Electricity-grid operators often need short “bursts” of electricity to help balance out voltage irregularities and other potentially damaging conditions. An individual storage installation might not be able to provide much support in these situations, but these new cloud-based control systems could enable a number of sites to be networked to operate as a single resource. Such demand-side participation in ancillaryservices markets is a hot topic.

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SAGEGLASS® INSTALLED IN OVERHEAD GLAZING KIMMEL CENTER FOR THE PERFORMING ARTS, PHILADELPHIA, PA

96° outside. 1 bride. No sweat. The Kimmel Center’s Hamilton Garden Terrace was always in high demand for events, especially weddings. But a mix of intense heat and no shade created by the Center’s vaulted glass roof made the temperature impossible to control. The venue was unusable in the summer. And couples had to settle on another site for their big day.

Then SageGlass® was installed. Now, at the push of a button, the heat of the sun is tamed. The temperature is comfortable. And hosting weddings year round is a piece of cake.

See more SageGlass® transformations at sageglass.com or call 877-724-3321.

Visit SAGE at Greenbuild, booth #1511. The SageGlass installation at the Kimmel Center is part of the official Green Building Tours during the show. For details: http://www.greenbuildexpo.org/ education/green-building-tours.aspx

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POWER

According to the DOE, the wind sector’s growth underscores the importance of continued policy support and clean energy tax credits to ensure that wind manufacturing and jobs remain in America.

NOW THAT’S BRILLIANT GE’s latest wind turbine is so smart the company’s calling it “Brilliant.” The 2.5 MW turbines offer a 25% increase in efficiency and a 15% increase in power for low-wind sites. Built-in intelligence helps manage wind variability, and internal battery storage also aids variability by providing short-term ride-through capabilities. GE www.ge.com CIRCLE 292

ENERGY STORAGE FOR CELLULAR SYSTEMS A new hybrid power system is especially designed for telecom applications to provide power for cellular base stations and other needs. The system combines a diesel generator set with storage batteries, using networked energy-management technology to cycle the batteries. Renewable energy equipment, such as photovoltaic panels and wind turbines, can be added to the networked generator to reduce fuel use and maintenance. Cummins Power Generation www.cumminspower.com CIRCLE 291

Cogen Plant Earns Texas-Sized Savings We’re often told everything is bigger in Texas—apparently, that aphorism includes energy savings, or at least a recently completed cogeneration installation on the campus of Texas A&M University would lead one to believe so. The $70 million upgrade includes a 32.5 MW gas turbine and an 11 MW steam turbine was expected to save the school $500,000 per month, but actual savings in just the first month of operation totaled $1 million. The project earned the school’s Utilities and Energy Services Dept. a Global District Energy Climate Award from the International District Energy Assn.

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POWER

EV CHARGING WITHOUT NEW WIRES The new Poulsen Power electric vehicle charging station provides Level 2 charging for all electric vehicles that use standard SAE J1772 connectors without the need for running a new 220V/240V dedicated line from a power panel to the charging location. Instead, a single-throw 120V circuit breaker at the panel can be converted to a doublethrow 220V/240V breaker to power an existing 120V line, the same used to power existing outlets, lights and garage door openers. Poulsen Hybrid www.poulsenhybrid.com CIRCLE 290

T H E OV ER A LL EN ERGY-S TO R AG E IN DUS TRY IS E X PEC TED TO N E A R LY D O U B L E IN THE N E X T D EC A D E , W H ICH SEE S IT S R E V EN U E S TO PPI N G $7. 5 B IL L IO N BY 202 2 , FRO M T H IS Y E A R ’ S $3 .9 BI LLI ON .

A STUDY IN GREEN A new 503 kW solar array now tops the Massachusetts Museum of Contemporary Art, located in North Adams, Mass., in the heart of the Berkshire Mountains. Installing such a sizable system (it spans six rooftops) with a priceless art collection below took special care. The project’s developer and contractor, Tecta Solar, combined a series of custom racking systems designed for the museum’s mix of flat and sloped surfaces. The company’s solar experts also helped the museum get a federal grant to aid with the financing needed for completion.

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SURVEY SAYS: CHANGE COMING TO UTILITY BIZ MODELS The electric utilities we know today—generators and distributors of centrally produced electricity—are unlikely to look the same two decades from now, according to the executives leading those companies. Instead, they may more closely resemble today’s mobile phone providers, offering a range of services that customers can bundle (or un-bundle) as they choose. This possible evolution is outlined in the latest Global Power & Utilities Survey from the international consulting firm PricewaterhouseCoopers (PwC), which details the significant changes utility executives from around the world see coming their way. Some 94% of these leaders predict complete transformation or important changes to the current power-utility business model between now and 2030, due largely to decentralized power generation and new, less-expensive shalebased sources of natural gas. European utilities see the greatest potential for disruption – in fact, that region is in the middle of major change today – but North American executives see similar upheaval in their futures, too. In fact, fewer than 10% of them expect the current scheme of centralized generation and transmission will play the lead role in meeting future demand growth. And 90% expect distributed generation will force utilities to significantly alter their business models.

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POWER

OFF-GRID SOLUTION The Conext SW solar and backup power inverter/charger offers an option for complete off-grid operation. The 24V direct current system is available in 2.5 kW and 4.0 kW versions, both providing pure sine-wave output for powering modern electrical appliances and equipment. Breaker panels and other accessories also are available for building a complete electrical system.

Military Microgrids Come the zombie apocalypse, U.S. military bases may well be the last best hope for survival. In addition to all the soldiers and guns, many of these facilities are gaining microgrids capable of maintaining partial-base electrical operations during utilitysystem outages. The most recent installation at Colorado’s Fort Carson has added electric vehicles (EVs) to the mix, offering one of the earliest real-world examples of EVs being used as grid resources. The effort is part of a larger Joint Capability Technology Demonstration that involves the Dept. of Energy, the Dept. of Defense and the Dept. of Homeland Security and also includes work at Joint Base Pearl Harbor Hickam in Honolulu. At Fort Carson, the Smart Power Infrastructure Demonstration for Energy Reliability and Security (SPIDERS) will create a network integrating the operations of a 2 MW photovoltaic array, several diesel generator sets and five electric vehicles (with their related supply equipment). Five bidirectional vehicle chargers, along with their control system, went live this September, demonstrating the ability of connected vehicles to, among other things, import and export reactive power to help correct power factor imbalances. This new capability is already providing bottom-line benefit—by absorbing reactive power, the vehicle-to-grid system has boosted the base’s power factor and, as a result, reduced its monthly utility bill.

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Schneider Electric www.schneider-electric.us CIRCLE 289

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COLOR YOUR WORLD Colored photovoltaic glass is available in a broad palette of more than 2,000 hues to allow designers to go green (or blue, purple, pink or fuchsia) with their next curtainwall, skylight or canopy. The glass is available in four standard sizes and in a range of transparency options. Onyx Solar www.onyxsolar.com CIRCLE 288

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T H E R E A L E XCIT E M EN T I N EN ERGY S TO R AG E THE SE DAYS IS H A PPENING WITH THE SOF T WA R E TH AT C A N CO N T RO L S TO R AG E O PER ATIO N S .

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POWER

COGEN KEEPS THIS CO-OP RUNNING The Bevoort co-op building remained one of the few bright spots in New York City’s Greenwich Village in the wake of Hurricane Sandy, thanks to a cogeneration system capable of standalone power production. In addition to supplying heat and hot water, the Tecogen InVerde system also kept electricity flowing throughout the 20-story building for a full five days, until local utility ConEd was able to restore gridsupplied power.

Walmart Opts for Wind Retail giant Walmart is working toward a goal of powering its stores and warehouses with 100% renewable energy, through a mix of onsite generation and purchased-power arrangements. A new wind turbine at its Red Bluff, Calif., distribution center now is adding an estimated 2.2 million kilowatt hours toward achieving that goal. Though the project was developed by Foundation Windpower, which also owns the turbine, Walmart is purchasing 100% of the 265-ft.-tall turbine’s electricity production through a power purchase agreement.

Tecogen www.tecogen.com CIRCLE 287

Wells Fargo Center for the Arts, Sonoma County, Calif. The sunlight shining on California’s famous Sonoma County vineyards is also helping to turn the area’s art scene just a little bit greener. A new 1,630-panel solar installation on the grounds of the Wells Fargo Center for the Arts started generating up to 400 kW of clean electricity in February. The center is buying the power through a 10-year power purchase agreement with installer Nelson Solar Projects; at the end of the agreement, the center will own the installation, which could mean annual savings of up to $100,000.

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HVAC

The Great River Energy corporate headquarters, is a four-story 166,000-sq.-ft. office building located in Maple Grove, Minn. Great River Energy supplies electric service to 28 member cooperatives in Minnesota and parts of Wisconsin.

Great River Energy, Maple Grove, Minn.

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To match Great River Energy’s desire to provide excellent indoor air quality to its 350 employees, the company selected Greenheck fire smoke dampers, which meet UL requirements and appropriate NFPA Standards. To help support an indoor air quality management plan in accordance with requirements for LEED certification, Greenheck shrink-wrapped the dampers prior to shipping.

Not Your Father’s HVAC

i

t’s an exciting time to be in the HVAC industry, whether you are an installer, facility manager, specifying engineer or manufacturer. Advancements in technology and strides toward energy efficient buildings have made HVAC a key ingredient in the building owner’s recipe for success. From VAV (variable air volume) to VFD (variable frequency drive) to VRF (variable refrigerant flow) to IAQ (indoor air quality) to BAS (building automation systems), the HVAC and mechanical systems are the backbone to any building’s infrastructure. Strip away the layers of the construction process and what you have remaining is the central nervous system of a structure, which consists of plumbing, electrical and HVAC systems. Building intelligence relies on the sophistication of the HVAC components, and whether it’s hardware, controls, software, building automation integration, etc., there is no better time for serious consideration of energy efficient HVAC systems.

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According to Automated Logic’s director of technical information, Steve Tom, the biggest single advancement in smart buildings is the electronics. Even the least expensive controllers, such as VAV box controllers or fan coil unit controllers, can have processing power and memory that were undreamed of a few years ago. At the network level, BACnet seems to have firmly established itself as the protocol of choice, making networking systems much easier. For example, a single BACnet occupancy sensor can provide valuable data to the HVAC, lighting and security systems. Work is being done at the enterprise level, where Web services (XML and SOAP), as well as publicly available interfaces, make it possible to integrate systems and implement high level analytics.

in any particular building are its occupants. Increased comfort through temperature moderation and satisfactory indoor air quality, for example, leads to increased productivity levels of those occupying the space. Information provided by the Institute for Building Efficiency, an initiative of Johnson Controls, suggests that indoor office temperature is a key determinant of productivity. A meta-analysis of studies of temperature and productivity found that performance increases with temperature up to 21-22°C (69-71° F) and that performance decreases with temperature above 23-24°C (73-75°F). At 30°C (86° F), performance is only 91.1% of the maximum. This indicates that energy efficiency improvements that also help maintain indoor temperatures in the optimum range may result in significant productivity gains.

All About Comfort What it really boils down to is comfort. Plain and simple. It has been suggested that the most important assets

Providing comfort while reducing energy costs? Now that’s a win-win.

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7SPEV7LEHMRK0SYZIV7]WXIQW COLT GROUP USA

SHADING LOUVERS

COLT’S RECORD & CAPABILITIES

Mestek has a strategic alliance and exclusive license agreement with Colt Group USA. Mestek is the exclusive licensee to produce and market the Colt designed products for the US market and all products are produced in the USA.

Solar shading louver systems are one of the most effective ways to reduce air conditioning loads, while offering designers the opportunity for distinctive architectural impact.

Colt has more than 40 years experience in the design and supply of solar shading louver systems.

Additionally, Mestek’s Architectural activities include Linel and AWV. The emphasis for these companies is in providing products and solutions that beautify and improve the performance of buildings through Intelligent Envelopes™.

Radiation from the sun is transmitted, absorbed and reflected by the louvers. As a result solar heat gain is prevented from passing into the building. If an operable system is chosen, the adjustable louvers will track the position of the sun increasing the systems shading effectiveness and further reducing glare. On overcast days, the operable louvers can be opened to maximize the natural daylight into the building.

Colt was the first to incorporate electricity generating photovoltaic cells into solar shading systems. Colt continues to build on this experience and has been providing solar shading systems for the US market since 2006. We offer an extraordinary range of solar shading systems from fixed to fully operable with a variety of carrier systems, materials and finishes.

101 Linel Drive, Mooresville, IN 46158 317.831.5314 P 317.831.9260 F

www.linel.co

www.awv.com

www.coltgroupusa.com

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HVAC

Oakland Unified School District, Oakland, Calif. Big Ass Fans partnered with Taylor Engineering to enable California’s Oakland Unified School District to achieve its ambitious goal of avoiding all compressor-based cooling in classroom spaces. In phase one of OUSD’s Downtown Educational Complex, the design team employed a three-layer strategy for maintaining comfort without traditional HVAC in La Escuelita Elementary School through a nighttime cooling cycle, high thermal mass walls and large diameter, low speed ceiling fans specifically engineered for the space. In consideration of the comfort requirements, Big Ass Fans’ engineers configured a ceiling fan that moves air throughout the room at velocities that keep students comfortable without causing papers to flutter. The Big Ass Fans engineering team used pipe, tarp and student desks to create a classroom model in the company’s research-and-development lab. They tested various fan placements and diameters and came up with the perfect solution. Big Ass Fans www.bigassfans.com CIRCLE 248

2813 PREDATOR UNIT The York Predator Ultra High Efficiency Packaged Unit is a combination of the unit’s two-stage compressor, variable-frequency drive , high-efficiency indoor/outdoor coil and premium-efficiency indoor/outdoor motor, which delivers the highest AHRI-listed efficiencies in the industry, and reduced energy use—up to 18.1 SEER and 14.35 EER. York www.york.com CIRCLE 286

California’s Oakland Unified School District set out to avoid all compressorbased cooling in classroom spaces through night time cooling cycles, high thermal mass walls and large diameter ceiling fans.

DATA LOGGERS The HOBO UX100 Series is Onset’s next-generation family of data loggers for tracking temperature and relative humidity in indoor environments. The data loggers deliver higher accuracy, larger measurement capacity, and more LCD display features to make environmental data collection faster and easier than ever. HOBO UX100 data loggers streamline indoor environmental monitoring applications, and make deployment faster than ever. The loggers feature an easy-to-view LCD display that visually confirms logger operation and battery status, eliminating the need to connect the logger to a PC to see the information. A large memory capacity enables users to deploy the loggers for longer periods with fewer site visits. Onset www.onsetcomp.com CIRCLE 285

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Jess S. Jackson Sustainable Winery, Davis, Calif. The 8,500-sq.-ft. Jess S. Jackson Sustainable Winery Building (JSWB) at UC Davis is expected to be the first building at any university to be certified Net Zero Energy under the Living Building Challenge and only the second such building in California. This building will use various green services to provide sustainable resources, such as water harvesting and filtration and power production, to the adjacent Teaching and Research winery and August A. Busch III Brewery and Food Science Laboratory. The JSWB will house equipment and systems that will allow the winery, brewery and food-processing facility to be the world’s first self-sustaining, near zero-carbon footprint teaching and research facility. Pankow Builders and Siegel & Strain Architects delivered proven passive design strategies—with first-of-its kind sustainable design and construction practices and products—to deliver a high-performance, completely passive building.

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GEO/HVAC TEXTBOOK McGraw Hill Education has published a follow-on graduate level textbook to its highly successful Geothermal HVAC: Green Heating and Cooling undergraduate textbook, published in 2011. In addition to geothermal consultant Jay Egg, one of the authors to the first textbook, the new volume, Modern Geothermal HVAC: Engineering and Control Applications, which came out this summer, features contributions from Greg Cunniff, P.E., Applications Engineering Manager for Taco and Carl Orio, chairman of Water Energy Distributors. Modern Geothermal HVAC: Engineering and Controls Applications was designed for graduate level students and industry professionals who wish to deepen their knowledge of geothermal applications and advanced hydronics. The textbook contains 15 chapters ranging in topics from geothermal open and closed loops and standing well methods and applications to HVAC basics, equipment, and the latest developments in radiant cooling with chilled beams, variable-speed pumping and controls. The book also includes the latest information on geothermal rebates, incentives and renewables legislation in place. Each chapter concludes with a series of review questions. Geothermal loops in water-to-water applications work particularly well with advanced hydronic equipment provided by a manufacturer like Taco, which specializes in pumps, valves, heat exchangers and controls.

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HVAC

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Energy-Efficiency Focused Educational Sessions Center Stage at AHR With nearly three dozen educational sessions and hundreds of new product solutions focused on achieving greater energy-efficiency, the 2014 AHR Expo will serve as the HVACR industry’s ‘Sustainability Central,’ Jan. 21-23, in New York City. According to AHR Expo show management, nearly one third of the more than 100 educational sessions being offered by ASHRAE and AHR Expo during the show will be focused specifically on achieving greater energy efficiency and sustainability. Ranging from seminars on such broadbased topics as “Effective Energy Management in New and Existing Buildings” to more specific topics like “Data Center Energy Efficiency,” these sessions are designed to help attendees save money on energy costs and achieve better operating performance. Many of these educational sessions will be offered freeof-charge, including ASHRAE’s “Trends in Building Energy Disclosure: Increasing Energy Efficiency without Retrofits,” and “Building a Better Benchmark: Lessons from New York City’s Local Law 84 Energy Disclosure Data.” Several of the nearly three-dozen sessions will feature energyefficiency experts from the New York area speaking about governmental regulations and initiatives emanating from the East Coast.

Photos ©: Jeff Amram for Mercy Corps

PROACTIVELY MANAGE HVAC SYSTEMS Commercial HVAC rooftop units are about to get more intelligent with the help of Intel technology. Daikin Applied (formerly Daikin McQuay) plans to use Intel-based intelligent gateway solution to harness big data by creating intelligent building systems. These systems intuitively know, and adjust to what building occupants need for comfort and energy efficiency. Daikin Applied is making use of the Internet of Things (IoT) through the integration of an Intel-based intelligent gateway solution in its existing Rebel rooftop units. With the Intel-based intelligent gateway solution, Daikin Applied is able to seamlessly connect Rebel units to the cloud and securely aggregate, filter and share data. Daikin Applied www.daikinapplied.com CIRCLE 284

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DESTRATIFICATION SYSTEMS Businesses are looking for ways to trim costs without incurring significant expenses. For facility managers, that means keeping a sharp eye on operating costs. Given its impact on the bottom line, the HVAC system is an important target. According to Charlotte, N.C.-based Duke Energy, air temperature in a building will rise an average of ½ degree per vertical foot. The Air Pear Thermal Equalizer air destratification system by Airius delivers energy conservation for sustainable businesses seeking affordable green and Net Zero building technologies. Thermal equalization by the Air Pear system results in no more than 3º difference in temperature from ceiling to floor and wall-to-wall, allowing thermostats to be set at a lower temperature in winter and higher in air conditioning seasons. Destratification also helps prevent heat loss through the ceiling. Airius www.theairpair.com CIRCLE 283

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Net Energy Water Loop Systems

Mercy Corps International, Portland, Ore.

Net zero energy has become an important factor in the design of the modern building. Jointly with other organizations, ASHRAE has developed Advanced Energy Design Guides to achieve 50% energy savings towards a net zero energy building focusing each guide on a different type of property. The net zero energy concept analyzes the unique energy use of an entire building and reduces the energy footprint without sacrificing functionality or comfort. As the energy footprint is reduced, onsite renewable energy has a bigger impact on the net zero energy goal.

Shooting for LEED Platinum certification, the team of Thomas Hacker Architects and Glumac Engineering, Inc., realized early on, that the focus of the project should be on energy performance. The project team elected to implement Mitsubishi Electric’s VRF system, which allowed the team to earn 100% of LEED’s Energy and Atmosphere credits. With the inclusion of the dedicated outside air system, the overall building refrigerant was limited to meet this credit requirement with zero use of CFC based refrigerants. It allowed the building to easily split into five different tenant zones.

As recognized in each of the Advanced Energy Design Guides, a water loop heat pump (WLHP) system achieves these core requirements. Beginning with a basic system of a water source heat pump (WSHP) connected to a net energy water loop, net zero energy strategies can be customized to take advantage of an individual building’s unique energy profile and onsite renewable energy. With these enhancements, a net energy water loop system becomes a buildingwide energy transportation system that can achieve as much of net zero energy goal as possible.

Mitsubishi Electric www.mitsubishipro.com CIRCLE 250

Source: Alan Niles, Commercial Sales Group, WaterFurnace International

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HVAC

CHILLY BEAMS IQHC (high capacity) Series of active chilled beams provide high efficiency cooling/heating and are specifically designed for the loads of North American commercial building applications at hospitals, office buildings and schools. The IQHC offers one of the industry’s highest capacities, but features up to a 25% and 50% reduction in pump and fan horsepower respectively, versus conventional chilled water loop or rooftop forced air HVAC system methods.

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Interest in Energy Efficiency is up but Barriers Remain Johnson Controls Institute for Building Efficiency has released the results of the 2013 Energy Efficiency Indicator (EEI), a global study of how corporations are investing in energy management. The EEI is an industry indicator of change over time in how decision-makers view energy efficiency policies, and helps establish benchmarks. Highlights: Z Globally, companies are more interested in energy efficiency—a 116% increase since 2010; in fact, nearly half are categorizing energy management as “extremely important.” That said, investment is flat, and spending over the last year fell well short of projections. Z Signs are positive that companies want to be more energy efficient: the number of organizations that set goals in 2013 reached 73%.

Semco www.semcohvac.com CIRCLE 282

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SAS, Cary, N.C. With HVAC accounting for more than 50% of a building’s energy load, it makes it the most logical place to look first for energy savings. Commercial buildings consume 40% of all energy in the United States. HVAC accounts for half of that, and supply and return fans represent half of that—over 10% of all consumed energy. Filtration costs are often overlooked for large returns. 90% of the cost of filtration is energy cost. When SAS set out to build a world-class conference center and office building at its Cary, N.C. headquarters, the business analytics leader envisioned a showcase to host current and prospective customers from around the world. The goal: to highlight the company’s emphasis on innovation, technology and sustainability. Dynamic Air Quality Solutions not only helped to reduce fan horsepower and conserve energy, but the air cleaner media pads have a much smaller footprint and longer maintenance intervals than equivalent conventional passive filters. The low static pressures inherent in V8 Air Cleaning Systems save energy by reducing the horsepower required to move air through the system. The long service life of the replacement media means a smaller carbon footprint and reduced maintenance costs. Dynamic Air Quality Solutions www.dynamicaqs.com CIRCLE 249

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Z Companies who made public goals were more likely to make significant progress, implementing 50% more measures than organizations without. Z Barriers in the policy ecosystem are preventing a number of companies from taking internal goals public, with 41% of U.S. companies reducing investments due to uncertainty in government budgeting and tax reform efforts. Z More companies would publicly commit to energy efficiency if stronger leadership, smarter policies, increased awareness and better private investment help were more clear.

I N CR E A S ED COM FO RT T H RO U G H T E M PER AT U R E M O D ER AT I O N A N D SATISFAC TO RY IND O OR A IR QUA LIT Y, FO R E X A M PLE , LE A DS TO I NCR E A SED PRO D U C T IV IT Y L E V EL S O F T H OSE O CCU P Y I N G THE S PACE . 34 | 11.13 | NET ZERO BUILDINGS

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For over 35 years we have operated under the premise Azon Saves Energy. Daylighting systems produced with Azon structural thermal barrier technologiesâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;the MLPâ&#x201E;˘ or Dual Cavityâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;for aluminum windows and Warm-LightÂŽ warm-edge spacer for insulating glass, will yield a fenestration system capable of upholding the highest efficiency and sustainability standards. s0OLYURETHANEPOLYMERWITHSUPERIORinsulating properties for the BESTBALANCEOFENERGYEFFICIENCYand performance s.%7-,0â&#x201E;˘(mechanicALLOCKPROFILE ANDDUALCAVITYDESIGNS for fenestration products used in the most demanding climates and conditions s(IGHSTRENGTHFORLARGERSPANSÂ&#x2C6;INDUSTRYSSTRONGESTTHERMAL barrier for aluminum storefront, curtainwall and windows s!:/4ECÂŽ technical services with expertise in window design Contact us to learn about the role of Azon thermal barriers in energy conservation.

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Photo ©: EchoFirst/SunEdison

WATER

Solar Heating and Zero Energy Buildings

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A critical component of NZEB design concerns not only electricity consumption, but heat requirements, as well. In many areas of the U.S., natural gas is the predominant energy source for space and water heating. In these areas, conversion to 100% electricity in order to achieve a net zero design may not be feasible. One approach is the use of combi solar heating and solar electric systems— photovoltaic/thermal (PVT). Solar energy is captured in the form of electricity by PV panels, which can provide water heating.

Taking Center Stage

p

erhaps the biggest oversight from building owners and architects alike is to disregard the water component when considering net zero, or at the very least, achieving a high level of sustainability, for that matter. According to information provided by the EPA’s WaterSense program, commercial and institutional buildings can account for approximately 17% of the municipal water demand in the United States. Behind the wall and relatively “un-artsy” in its very nature, plumbing/water conservation is ready for its “coming out” party. From water efficient fixtures to rainwater capture to heating and cooling contribution, water plays a significant role in a building’s sustainability and/or net zero aspirations. Having a comprehensive water management plan—water metering, leak inspection, water efficient fixtures and mechanical systems and rainwater harvesting and graywater— should be front and center.

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Big Changes Coming It has been suggested over the years that the plumbing industry is a relatively mature industry and slow to adapt to newer technology. But there are some federal regulations coming to the forefront within the next few years that will directly impact the plumbing industry. Lead-Free Legislation: On Jan. 4, 2014, federal law mandates the wetted surface of every pipe, fixture and fitting sold for or installed in potable water applications not contain more than 0.25% lead by weight. This new legislation will reduce the permissible levels of lead in pipe, fittings and fixtures for potable water to a weighted average less than or equal to 0.25% from the current national standard of a 0.8% maximum. What does this mean for building owners? Put simply, it means every potable plumbing product that does not meet this new standard will be illegal and cannot be sold or installed for use with potable water. Any pipe,

fittings or fixtures exposed to potable water sources need to be changed out by that date. With manufacturers changing over their lines, you might see a slight increase in material cost. 2015 Water Heater Efficiency: The U.S. Dept. of Energy has proposed higher efficiency standards for gas and electric water heaters starting in April 2015. U.S. Dept. of Energy (DOE) Secretary Steven Chu announced in April 2010 that the DOE had finalized higher energy efficiency standards for a group of heating appliances that potentially could save consumers up to $10 billion and prevent the release of up to 164 million metric tons of carbon dioxide over 30 years. These new standards will reduce pollution, prevent the release of harmful nitrogen oxides and mercury, and avoid emissions equivalent to taking 46 million cars off the road for one year, the DOE said.

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DISTINCTIVE STYLE demands distinctive windows & doors

Kolbe is your window and door expert for educational projects and designs that require a look of distinction. Whether your project is traditional, modern, or anything in between, Kolbe will provide you with specialized products that can fit any design style. Choose from a multitude of performance options, including sustainable design, energy efficiency or impact resistance. With a number of different product lines that each offer multiple opportunities for customization, the possibilities are endless with Kolbe.

See the Difference Quality Makes® 1.800.955.8177

„ Revit® and Google™ SketchUp models of many Kolbe products are available on our website „ CIRCLE 35

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WATER

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Chillin’ in OKC The Charles Machine Works, Oklahoma City, designed its latest geothermal project, a retrofit system for its existing product development center, with innovative new simultaneous heating and cooling heat pump units from neighboring Oklahoma City-based ClimaCool. Three 50-ton ClimaCool SHC onDEMAND modular chiller units were specified to replace an antiquated reciprocating chillerdriven HVAC system installed during the building’s original construction in 1978. The SHC onDEMAND units’ ability to allow any module to be indexed for heating or cooling regardless of its position in the bank, providing optimum module/compressor run time equalization, was also viewed as a significant benefit. Each of the three, six-pipe ClimaCool SHC onDEMAND units also feature a unique modular design with built-in redundancy with separate module electrical feeds and dual independent refrigeration circuits, allowing for the unit to maintain operation while individual modules are being serviced.

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WATER

THE KWC AVA BATH FAUCET Faucet incorporates a Neoperl Caché aerator that reduces water flow to 1.5 gallons per min., a 40% savings over conventional 2.5 gpm faucets. But the more intriguing feature is the COOLFIX technology that allows the user to save energy by not using hot water unnecessarily. The standard setting of the operating lever of a conventional single-lever faucet is straight ahead in the “six o’clock” position. Lifting the lever in this position typically brings a mix of hot and cold water, even if the user neither needs nor wants warm water, thus wasting energy. With COOLFIX, the six o’clock position has been designed to be “full cold,” with no hot water delivered in this setting. This, in turn, saves energy each time the faucet is activated. The only way to draw warm water— and use energy to heat that water—is to deliberately rotate the lever clockwise and away from the middle position. KWC www.kwcamerica.com CIRCLE 281

Marine Co. 9, New York Fire Dept. of New York Marine Co. 9 is one of three marine departments in N.Y. that built a new firehouse barracks to provide a home pier for their new vessels. At 140 ft. long, The Firefighter II is the country’s biggest fireboat. Like the ship it houses, the 8,000-sq.-ft. firehouse is on the cutting edge of design and sustainability. Located along Staten Island’s northern shore, the facility’s design focuses on sustainability, durability and affordable maintenance. A ‘green’ roof, two solar arrays and a tight building envelope help reduce its carbon footprint. The larger of the two arrays is a solar thermal system, comprised of nine evacuated-tube panels. The array, which provides domestic hot water and space heat, covers 450 sq.-ft. of the roof. It’s capable of producing nearly 400 MBH, although New York weather makes actual heat output subject to wild variation. The other array is a 4.5 kW photovoltaic system, and is tasked with providing power for system controls and circulators.

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I’VE GOT THE POWER M•Power faucets are designed with conservation, hygiene and durability in mind. A unique motion sensor, with a 30-second “auto-off” function, starts and stops the flow of water–automatically reducing daily gallons used, reducing sewage bills, limiting hot water consumption, saving energy and preventing the risk of accidental overflow. M•Power faucets also offer a hygienic solution in helping to prevent the spread of germs and bacteria. Moen www.moen.com CIRCLE 280

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WATER

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Water & Energy Savings The American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy (ACEE) and the Alliance for Water Efficiency (AWE) have teamed up to bring extensive research on saving water and energy through the recently released Saving Water & Energy Together: Helping Utilities Build Better Program research report. According to the report, water and energy are inherently linked, intersecting at both the supply side (electric generation and water/ wastewater facilities) and the end-use side (residential, commercial, industrial, and agriculture sectors). This intersection is commonly called the “energy-water nexus.” The waterenergy linkage means that efficiency programs operated by a water utility will benefit an energy utility and vice versa. Some energy efficiency programs have begun to address and account for water savings, and conversely some water programs have begun to account for energy savings impacts, but this has occurred only in a patchwork of programs across the country. Greater efficiency could be gained from recognition of the energy-water nexus in program delivery and accounting practices and better understanding and coordination between the two communities. This report provides recommendations on program models and frameworks that utilities can use to save both water and energy. For more info on the report, www.allianceforwaterefficiency.org/WtrEnrgyReport-10-2013.aspx.

NREL Research Support Facility, Golden, Colo. The Research Support Facility (RSF) in Golden, Colorado—a $64 million complex built by the Dept. of Energy’s National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL)—showcases what is technologically possible and commercially viable. A term that seeks to define this new and more sustainable way of designing and constructing commercial spaces is thermally activated building system, or TABS. Like the Earth itself, a TABS structure uses its mass to absorb or emit heat through its conditioned surfaces to regulate then interior environment. Two key features typically characterize TABS structures are high-performance enclosures; and a reliance on concrete slabs embedded with hydronic tubing, usually made of crosslinked polyethylene tubing (PEX), for low-temperature radiant heating (emitting energy) and high-temperature radiant cooling (absorbing energy). More than 40 miles of PEX tubing, manufactured by Uponor, was subsequently prefabricated into numerous rolls whose dimensions were customized to match those of the RSF’s various heating and cooling zones. Uponor www.uponor-usa.com CIRCLE 246

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B EH IN D T H E WA L L A N D “ U N - A RTS Y ” IN I TS V ERY N AT U R E , PLU M B IN G/ WATER CO N S ERVATI ON I S R E A DY FO R IT S “COM I N G OUT” PA RT Y.

ESYNC TECHNOLOGY The Rheem H2AC Rooftop Unit featuring eSync Integration Technology delivers air conditioning and water heating from a single source. This system takes the heat removed by a commercial A/C unit and uses it as an efficient source for heating water. H2AC can pre-heat a facility’s cold water supply to as much as 125oF, and Rheem anticipates it can save a building owner or franchisor 50% each month on water heating expenses. Rheem www.rheem.com CIRCLE 279

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WATER

Mechanical Systems Water Use

HOSPITALS OFFICE BUILDINGS SCHOOLS RESTAURANT TS HOT S HOTEL

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Mechanical systems are used in nearly every type of commercial and institutional facility to provide building heating and cooling. Some also use mechanical systems to cool specific pieces of equipment, such as vacuum pumps, X-ray equipment and ice machines. Levels of water use vary widely for different commercial facility types, amounting to as much as 30% of the total water use within a facility as shown to the left. Source: WaterSense

Bullitt Center in Tune with Geothermal To achieve the twin Imperatives of net-zero energy and net-zero water use, Seattle’s Bullitt Center comes with a geothermal system and in-floor radiant heating, a 14,000-sq.-ft. canted and extended rooftop filled with PV solar capture arrays to make electricity, a rainwater capture/purification system for potable systems with a 56,000-gallon basement cistern, onsite waste management through water saving composting foam flush toilets, and large thermally glazed curtain wall windows. Bosch Thermotechnology’s FHP Manufacturing division‘s water-to-air heat pump units were selected by specifying engineer, PAE, to provide heating and cooling to the center’s conference rooms, data center, and elevator machine room. FHP heat pumps connected to PEX tubing deliver BTUs for radiant heating and cooling, and also generate heat recovery for the ventilation system’s outside air unit, which preconditions incoming fresh air with outgoing air.

www.nzbmagazine.com

CHILLER PLANT AUTOMATION Interfacing seamlessly with an existing building or chiller plant automation system, the Armstrong OPTI-VISOR controls the key components of a chiller plant, providing the optimal operating settings for equipment such as water-cooled variable speed chillers, variable flow cooling towers and variable speed pumps on the chilledwater and tower water circuits. By controlling the chiller plant settings to maximize system-wide efficiency, OPTI-VISOR will generate valuable energy savings—even when applied to recently installed equipment. Armstrong Fluid Technology estimates that an energy savings of 15% to 30% can be expected from a typical installation on an existing variablespeed chiller plant. Armstrong Fluid Technology www.armstrong fluidtechnology.com CIRCLE 278

2909

NET ZERO BUILDINGS | 11.13 | 41


DAYLIGHTING

A study shows improved results for daylight responsive dimming systems with roller shades.

Performance Boost

%$5%$5$+25:,7=%(11(77

Proposing a way to improve performance for daylight responsive dimming systems integrated with roller shades, a Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory white paper describes a closed-loop proportional control algorithm to predict the varying correction of the photosensor signal to the daylight workplane illuminance. This runs according to roller shade height and sky conditions for better accuracy. The study found improvements in system. To view the report, visit: http://gaia.lbl.gov/btech/papers/4418.pdf.

We Won’t Leave the Light on for You

H

aving a meeting in the local suburban commuter train station not far from the office, I was struck by two things: 1) It was really noisy, given the trains had left quite a while ago (maintenance decided it was a good time to buff the floor); and 2) it was a rare case where I was in a space where someone actually turned off all the main overhead lights and let daylight do its thing. Clearly, daylighting has grabbed the attention of many sustainably-minded architects today, but there is still much about the idea that remains poorly executed, namely, leaving the lights on. Following are some boilerplate tips courtesy of Eric Truelove, PE, of Renschler Co., who penned a daylighting piece for the Wisconsin Energy Center’s Daylight Collaborative “Enlighten” newsletter— an excellent resource for great daylighting information (www.daylighting.org).

Z Keep the window-to-wall ratio between 25% and 35%. Z Go with an ideal finished ceiling height of 9 ft. Z Specify glass with a visible light transmittance

between 0.40 and 0.60.

42 | 11.13 | NET ZERO BUILDINGS

Z Mount light fixtures parallel to the nearest exterior

wall. Up/down suspended fixtures are ideal. Z Put exterior overhangs on the southern exposure or

recess the windows. These overhangs or recess should equal about one-third of the window assembly height.

Z Don’t value-engineer the lighting controls. If you

don’t have daylighting controls on your fixtures, you don’t have daylighting.

Z Use skylights or light-tubes in spaces more than 20 ft.

from an exterior window, but make sure the skylight/ light tube area is no more than 5% of the total roof area. Z Specify a finished ceiling that is white. Do not use an

open ceiling. Z Specify wall and finished floor colors with a mini-

Anyway, here are Truelove’s baseline suggestions:

dark colors, especially carpeting, absorb too much light which caused the occupants to override the lighting controls and switch on the lights near the curtain wall glass even though it is a clear, sunny day outside.

mum reflectivity of 0.8—an important consideration, as

The litmus test for successful daylighting, says Truelove, is simple: walk into a daylit space on a sunny day, look up at the ceiling to see whether the lights are on or off. A working design actually tricks occupants into thinking lights are on. When people think are comfortable with the surroundings, they have no inclination to reach for the light switch.

www.nzbmagazine.com


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New Solatube SkyVault M74 DS The Solatube SkyVault M74 DS is the first phase in a trailblazing new line of daylighting products intended specifically for high bay, high-volume environments. Our largest tubular daylighting device ever, it features a 29 in. (74 cm) diameter tube that is nearly twice the aperture of our SolaMaster Series products. As a result, it maximizes light output and minimizes the number of roof penetrations required. We have an expansive network of Commercial Representatives trained on design and implementation of all Solatube products, from new construction to retrofit projects. Let us help you turn your electric lights off! Contact your local Commercial Representative: • WAREHOUSES • MANUFACTURING • AIRPORT TERMINALS • AGRIBUSINESS • CONVENTION CENTERS • RETAIL SPACES

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Solatube International, Inc. 2210 Oak Ridge Way, Vista, California 92081-8341 CIRCLE 36


DAYLIGHTING

And the Forecast Is… In their latest window, door and skylight industry trends and forecast report released in August, AAMA/WDMA 2012/2013 U.S. Industry Statistical Review and Forecast, the American Architectural Manufacturers Assn. (AAMA) and Window & Door Manufacturers Association (WDMA) share historic residential and non-residential historic and project market volumes. In addition, the report covers trends and product relationships, as well as breaking down market data into regions.

LRC Headlines with Daylighting Dashboard Thanks to a new metric developed by the Rensselaer Poytechnic Institute’s Lighting Research Center(LRC), architects can be better understand how a proposed design can potentially meet eight specific performance goals. The daylighting dashboard was created to be a visual feedback on the performance of daylighting patterns early in the design process,” says Russ Leslie, M.Arch., LRC Associate Director Professor. “Other daylighting evaluation metrics are either too complex to be practical during schematic design or ignore important considerations that should be in the forefront of the designer’s mind while the building’s orientation, configuration and fenestration are just being formulated,” explains Leora Radetsky, a lead research specialist at the LRC. This daylighting metric evaluates potential designs based upon average illuminance, coverage, diffuse daylight, daylight autonomy, circadian stimulus, glazing area, view and solar heat gain. Described as the first integrative approach to daylight analysis, which includes a validated circadian stimulus model, the system takes into consideration the photobiological benefits of daylighting, such as daytime alertness and more restful sleep at night. Sponsored by the U.S. Green Building Council, the daylighting dashboard was unveiled in the Lighting Research & Technology journal and subsequently received a Leon Gaster Award from the British Chartered Institution of Building Service Engineers’ Society of Light and Lighting . Putting the dashboard to the task, the LRC utilized it to communicate the annual lighting performance for multiple spaces inside upstate New York’s new U.S. National Guard maintenance facility. “The dashboard allowed us to easily show the lighting quality improvements afforded by high performance glazing, diffuse white baffles to control direct sun and prevent glare, and additional skylights over a baseline design with low visible transmittance glazing and zero skylights,” reports Leslie.

W H EN PEO PL E T HIN K T H E L IG H T S A R E ON I T I S BEC AUS E THE Y A R E COM FO RTA B L E W IT H T H E SU R ROUN DI N GS A N D THE Y H AV E N O IN CLIN ATIO N TO R E ACH FO R THE LI G HTS .

In addition, the daylighting dashboard has been included in the Patterns to Daylight Schools for People and Sustainability book, which the USGBC commissioned the LRC to research and compile for architects.

A Guide to Cool

As pictured in the diagram above, a classroom with a large south-facing window, another classroom with a south-facing roof monitors and baffles, and a third classroom with small south-facing windows and skylights, are being evaluated. The goal is to gear the proposed design toward the green zone for as many metrics as possible. Meanwhile, yellow tells the designer that it will take more careful evaluation and/or modification to ultimately meet that goal and red is a warning that goal is unlikely to be met with the chosen daylighting pattern.

The American Architectural Manufacturers Assn. (AAMA) has released AAMA 643-13, “Voluntary Specification, Performance Requirements and Test Procedures for Solar Reflective Finishes.” AAMA offers more guidance when it comes to utilizing these coatings on a building façade, window frame or other outdoor applications. AAMA 643 helps building team members select finishes that provide higher than standard Total Solar Reflectance values and still maintain a high level of performance in terms of film integrity, exterior durability and appearance.

44 | 11.13 | NET ZERO BUILDINGS

www.nzbmagazine.com


DAYLIGHTING

SIDE STRATEGY Delivering superior glare and solar control, the LightLouver Daylighting system is a side-daylighting strategy, which is more cost effective than traditional light shelf designs or automated shades, while delivering a larger daylit area, better energy savings and visual comfort. The system features a patented optical design, annual ambient illumination levels of 25 to 30 footcandles, a unique self-shading design and no moving parts. LightLouver www.lightlouver.com CIRCLE 277 Photo ©: Dennis Schroeder/NREL

National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, Colo. At the National Renewable Energy Laboratory’s Research Support Facility in Golden, Colo., RNL Design specified LightLouver units in the daylight portion of the windows on the building’s top floor to redirect daylight deep into the open office area.

DAY LIG H TI N G H A S G R A BBED T H E AT T EN T IO N O F M A N Y SUS TA IN A BLY- MINDED A RCHITEC TS TO DAY, BUT THER E IS S TILL MUCH A BO U T TH E I DE A T H AT R E M A IN S PO O R LY E X ECU T ED.

2224

GET THE SCOOP Created by the Lighting Research Center, a light scoop is a south-facing skylight that utilizes tilted transparent glass panels to direct light to the interior. As compared to conventional skylights, light scoops can block more light in the summertime, which avoids overlighting and glare, while bringing in more sunlight during the winter months. Custom-designed for each project based upon latitude, climate and siting, specifiers have a variety of shapes to choose from including short back, long back, splayed walls and a long back with a deep well. To help architects take advantage of this new daylighting product, a complimentary light scoop design guide is available at: www.lrc.rpi.edu/researchAreas/pdf/LightScoopsDesignGuide_Final.pdf.

www.nzbmagazine.com

NET ZERO BUILDINGS | 11.13 | 45


DAYLIGHTING

Rotunda Magic At San Jose City Hall in San Jose, Calif., the glass Rotunda stretches 110 feet high and serves as the visitor entryway. The 10-story glass rotunda is virtually all glass. Point fixed and perforated at the corners, the glass is tempered and laminated with a high performance e-coating. Structurally, the glass was set up in 12 bays, each spanning 26 ft. in between structural steel arched beams and rising up 108 ft.

BUILD YOUR OWN Fully customizable and scalable, CPI Daylighting’s Quadwall system is a sophisticated engineered assembly of two separate translucent Pentaglas glazing panels the can be set up in a variety of configurations. Essentially a build-your-own skylight/ translucent wall panel, the system doubles as a highly insulated building envelope with options for enhanced sound reduction, fire-rated materials and controlled daylighting via dynamic solar blades. CPI Daylighting www.cpidaylighting.com CIRCLE 275

46 | 11.13 | NET ZERO BUILDINGS

2854 www.nzbmagazine.com


DAYLIGHTING

University of Albany, N.Y. As part of the sustainable design of University of Albany’s new 96,000-sq.-ft. School of Business Building, tracking LEED Gold, Perkins+Will created floor-to-floor terracing for increased daylighting and visual connectivity. A customengineered butterly skylight reduces east-west exposure for minimal glare, lets in a controlled level of southern light, and opens the space of to the indirect northern exposure. In addition, precast fins are angled to block out low-angle glare while bouncing daylight into the interior.

THE RIGHT DIRECTION

Photo ©: Gary Gold/Perkins+Will N.Y.

As a substitute for light shelves, Daylight Redirecting Film from 3M changes the direction of daylight as it enters the interior. Utilizing a microreplication process, precisely-shaped pyramids on the holographic film’s surface work to reduce glare and bring more light into the occupant space. 3M www.3m.com CIRCLE 276

DAY LIGHTING H A S G R A BBED TH E AT T EN T IO N O F M A N Y SUS TA IN A B LY MINDED A RCH ITEC TS TO DAY, BUT THER E IS S TILL MUCH TH AT R E M A IN PO OR LY E X ECU T ED — LI K E L E AV IN G T H E L IG H T S O N .

Cannon Design, Chicago While re-locating their office in downtown Chicago, Cannon Design decided to conduct a detailed daylight and energy modeling study to optimize the daylighting design. After discovering that predicted outdoor conditions would sufficiently light the space 80% of the time, Cannon projected that they would be able to save 14,600 kWh annually, translating into utility cost savings of $1,460. The utility kicked in an additional $1,460 to offset the cost of the daylighting control and dimming system. The final design utilizes seven-foot-tall windows equipped with daylight sensors which are connected to custom-made LED fixtures.

www.nzbmagazine.com

NET ZERO BUILDINGS | 11.13 | 47


DAYLIGHTING

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Sustainable Daylighting System The Lenawee Intermediate School District (LISD) has installed Solatube Daylighting Systems made by Solatube International, manufacturer of Tubular Daylighting Devices (TDDs), in its groundbreaking Center for a Sustainable Future (CSF) in Adrian, Mich. The CSF features 21 Solatube 750DS-C units and five 750DS-O units, designed for school and commercial applications. The Solatube Systems were installed in the 8,600-square-foot, netzero energy classroom building, which was completed in June 2013 and targeting LEED Platinum certification. The facility is designed to produce as much energy as it uses, a first for a K-12 building in Michigan. The educational campus embodies environmental sustainability and offers hands-on learning experiences. “The use of Solatube Daylighting Systems is an integral part of our energy management system providing natural light, which is very conducive to the learning environment,” said Jim Philp, Lenawee Intermediate School District superintendent.

Quabbin Regional High School, Barre, Mass. After a translucent insulated fiberglass skylight at Quabbin Regional High School in Barre, Mass., had worn down beyond repair, a new Quadwall barrel vault skylight system was specified in its place. “We liked the detailing and that the Quadwall didn’t rely on sealants. The energy value was just so much better and it looked better,” relates project architect Elvin Phillips, Boston Bay Architects, Allston, Mass. The 5,000-sq.-ft. skylight was set up with two, single slope 147-ft. × 14-ft. skylights over clear matte which run the length of the barrel vault on each side. “The added insulation is just so much higher than the other products to consider with a thinner envelope,” adds Phillips.

D O N ’ T VA LU E- EN G IN EER T H E L IG H T IN G CO N T RO L S . IF YO U D O N ’ T H AV E DAY LI G HTI N G CO N T RO L S O N YO U R FI X T U R E S , YO U D O N ’ T H AV E DAY LI GHTI N G.

300 New Jersey Ave., Washington, D.C. Thanks to a stunning new 10-story atrium connecting two existing office buildings, 300 New Jersey Ave., located just one block from the U.S. Capitol Building, has been given new life. A vertical glass wall stretches 90 ft. high and then slopes back close to 14 ft. where it connects with the glass roof. The skylight is a low ridge, furrow design, which covers 12,500 sq. ft. and utilizes insulatedlaminated glass with a ceramic frit and low-E coating. Meanwhile, a tree-like steel construct structurally supports the atrium and a trapezoidal flying roof of glass while carrying exposed HVAC and other building system components.

COOL BLUE The latest release from glazing giant Viracon, Graphite Blue is a light blue-grey coating with high visible light transmission and low interior and exterior reflexivity. When combined with low-E glass, Graphite Blue can achieve light-to-solar-gain ratios as high as 1.87. In addition, it can be incorporated into insulating glass units, laminated make-ups or used monolithically. Viracon www.viracon.com CIRCLE 274

2425 48 | 11.13 | NET ZERO BUILDINGS

www.nzbmagazine.com


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© 2013 MechoShade Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. All trademarks herein are owned by MechoShade Systems, Inc. No part of this advertisement may be reproduced or otherwise used without the express written consent of MechoShade Systems, Inc. ,New York Times Building. PDK Commercial Photographers.

The New York Times Building pursued a WindowManagement® System with energy efficiency and cost savings in mind. MechoSystems’ state-ofthe-art SolarTrac® System—paired with the electrical lighting—is saving up to 25% in energy costs.


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In the June issue, in the envelope section, incorrect text ran with the image of the 11 Times Square project, which used Viracon glazing featuring PPG’s Starphire coating. The corrected item runs on p. 15 in the Envelope section. And to give credit where credit is due, the Zero Net Energy Center featured in the September issue was noted in the headline as IBEW Local 595, when in fact it was a joint venture of IBEW and the National Electrical Assn. A corrected version of the story is available at nzbmagazine. com. Finally, in September’s Envelope pillar, an incorrect Bush Library image ran on p. 20. The correct photo of the George W. Bush Library, by Robert A.M. Stern Architects, appears on p. 10 of this issue’s Envelope section.

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| END POINT |

-2+10(6(1%5,1.

Meter Tippin’ Net zero energy use is all about turning back the utility meter. What factors do you consider when looking at the NZE equation?

52 | 11.13 | NET ZERO BUILDINGS

“ T H E EFFI CI EN C Y LE V EL S N EED ED FO R N ZEB S A R E O BTA I N A B LE W I T H CU R R EN T T ECH N O LO GY AT A R E A S O N A B LE COS T.”

As we move into an age where buildings are becoming more efficient, there are still circles of industry professionals that contend that a net zero energy building—one that uses no more energy over the course of the year than they produce from on-site renewable sources—are unattainable or infeasible. When talking with manufacturers, contractors, engineers and architects about net zero, some tell me I should use more appropriate terms such as “toward zero” or “near zero” when broaching this subject.

The March 2012 Research Report from NBI indicates that of the 21 NZEBs:

According to research in the Getting to Zero 2012 Status Update: A First Look at the Costs and Features of Zero Energy Commercial Buildings report from the New Buildings Institute (NBI), Vancouver, Wash., there are 21 certified net zero energy buildings (NZEBs) across the country, with another 39 zero energy-capable (NZEC) buildings. Buildings classified as zero energy capable include buildings with documented energy use low enough to potentially reach net zero through the addition of onsite generation, even if they may not currently have taken that final step.

While reading the NBI report, I began thinking about net zero in general; I decided to list six major factors that play into the net zero equation:

Z Four NZEBs in mild climates have completely eliminated traditional HVAC systems and utilize passive strategies to maintain thermal comfort. Z Building use patterns and climate also become important when striving for net zero. Based on anecdotal information, many of the net zero buildings are occupied primarily during daylight hours, resulting in little need for artificial lighting.

1) Cost. Undoubtedly, it is the single-most prohibitive factor when considering net zero, and it could dissuade some from considering it at all. Return on investment is critical, both in dollar figures and timeframe payback. 2) Size/Buildings type. A majority of the projects in the NBI report showcased relatively small structures; unfortunately, when significant square footage is added, it seems all bets are off. The report indicates that extending the goal of net zero to a broader range of building types, climates and use patterns will likely prove

challenging. In dense urban areas, it may not be possible to locate sufficient renewables on each site, but the net-zero-capable pathway still enables energy efficiency, making district and equivalent renewable strategies feasible. 3) Equipment/Technology. The efficiency levels needed for NZEBs are obtainable, with current technology at reasonable incremental costs, cites the NBI report. Demand for energy-efficient products is high, and more manufacturers are getting into the game. The more the merrier, I say. It might bring down the costs of these otherwise unattainable systems. 4) Systems Integration. Further NBI research stated that integrated design allowed projects to maximize energy savings among interacting systems, creating bundling measures that ultimately limited incremental costs of advanced technologies. 5) Incentives. Be vigilant of federal and state rebates and incentives. Any push to help incentivize more efficient building components, the better. Check out DSIRE (www.dsireusa. org), a comprehensive

DAYLIGHTING HE LIGHTING HE ENVELOPE HI R-VALUE GLAZING NATURAL VENT HE HVAC HT RECOVERY COOL ROOF RADIANT GSHP UFAD/DISLMT

0%

20%

40%

60%

80%

PERCENTAGE OF PROJECTS source of information on incentives and policies that support renewables and energy efficiency in the United States. 6) New Construction vs. Retrofits. When talking net zero, perception remains that net zero energy use can be achieved through new construction. The September 2013 issue of NZB featured a great example of how net zero can be achieved through a retrofit. The Zero Net Energy Center of the IBEW Local 595/NECA and Alameda Electrical Joint Training Committee near Oakland, Calif., was proof positive that net-zero renovations could be achieved for the price of conventional retrofits.

The above chart presents the technology penetration of 11 design strategy categories reported in the net zero-capable buildings. All of these strategies align well with the proven design approach of starting with a good building envelope, access to natural light and ventilation, and an integrated design of building systems. This summary is an indication of the types of strategies that have been considered noteworthy. Source: NBI.

John Mesenbrink Contributing Editor john@nzbmagazine.com

www.nzbmagazine.com


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Net Zero Buildings - November 2013