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The Anniston Star l Sunday, February 23, 2014 l Page 6E

SUNDAY RECORD YOUR GUIDE TO PUBLIC RECORDS AND VITAL STATISTICS IN CALHOUN COUNTY BANKRUPTCIES

DEATHS Bertha A. Ackles, Oklahoma Brenda Joyce Allen, Heflin Gary Anderson, Anniston Jimmy Victor Hughley Armstrong, Anniston Dura Manley Benefield, Woodland Willie Frank Carr, Anniston Maria Jane (Ria Jane) Clinkscales Chiepalich, Jacksonville Harvey A. Clay, White Plains Helen Clevenger, Oxford Tyler “TyTy” Cone, Oxford Braxton Curry, Munford Jay L. Daugherty, Hokes Bluff Margaret Fuqua Deason, Georgia Billy Edwards, Oxford Carnell Freeman, Heflin Doris Faye Freeman, Heflin Janice Martin Gambrel, Piedmont Joe Garrett, Talladega Charles W. Green, Lineville Mable Elsie Harrell, Gaylesville Henry Leroy Heine Sr., Ohatchee Lawrence Hillard, Mexico Patricia D. “Patty” Holloway, Anniston Holley Yates Howard, Roanoke Grady Thomas Johnson, Talladega Andrew Paul “Drew” King, Phenix City Jerry Edward LeCroy Sr., Anniston

Jessica C. Leonard, Anniston James Martin Lockridge, Spring Gardens Eva Witt Mellon, Eastaboga James “Jimmy” Miller, Fruithurst Steve Mobbs, Centre Colleen Morris, Talladega James “Snooker” Mosley, Alexandria Rhonda Plyler O’Harrow, Anniston Jason Michael Parker, Georgia Barbara A. Killian Perry, Anniston Corey Delon Phillips, Oxford Henry W. Phillips, Folsom Charles “Sunny” Ray Prince, Heflin Martha C. Rainey, Lineville Thomas J. Rhodes, Piedmont Mattie Hardin Roberts, Centre Clarissa Roper, Rome, Ga. Margaret Katherine “Mammy” Sims, Talladega Don Smith, Lincoln William Henry Supon Jr., Georgia Bernice Underwood Welch, Lineville Clara B. White, Ohatchee Kingston James Vernard White, Anniston Obie Williams, Jacksonville Carolyn J. Morris Winston, Anniston

RATE OF BANKRUPTCIES 2020 1515

18 13

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RELIGION ROUNDTABLE Local faith leaders answer your questions every Saturday.

A Chapter 7 bankruptcy allows the debtor to retain certain exempt property, but the debtor’s remaining property is gathered and sold by a trustee from which creditors will receive payment. It may also be used by businesses which wish to terminate their business. A Chapter 13 bankruptcy enables debtors, through court supervision and protection, to propose and carry out a repayment plan under which creditors are paid, in full or in part, in installments over a three-year period. During that time, debtors are prohibited from starting or continuing collection efforts. The following bankruptcies declared by Calhoun County residents were recorded by U.S. Bankruptcy Court Northern District of Alabama last week:

Chapter 7 • Tequila L. Hickonbottom, Anniston Beach Road, Anniston • Michael W. Lake and Maria L. Lake, Piedmont Avenue, Piedmont • Charles Edward Funderburg and Kathryn Kay Funderburg, Bennett Street, Oxford • Janie King, Athens Street, Eastaboga • Charlie D. Walker and Starla R. Walker, Dearmanville Road, Anniston • Earnest D. Groves and Debbie A. Groves, Lone Oak, Drive • Dana Smith Knight and Marvin Felton Knight III, Arrow Avenue, Anniston

MARRIAGE LICENSES • William Randall Jones of Clarksville, Tenn., to Sandra Denise Jackson of Anniston • Clarence Lavon Smith III of Anniston to Stephanie Faye Leann Simpson of Anniston • David Christopher Durham of Ohatchee to Carla Michele Potter of Ohatchee • Gary Jack Hayes of Ohatchee to Diana Michelle Stewart of Ohatchee • Franklin Jessie Graham of Jacksonville to Alexis Nicole Tolbert of Jacksonville • Terry Dale Clotfelter of Alexandria to Christy Lynn Clotfelter of Alexandria • John Campbell Franklin of Anniston to Dianne Karen Vandeinse of Anniston • Dennis James Hodge Jr. of Anniston to Latosha Daniell Carlisle of Anniston • Traveno Leyoun Burnett of Anniston to Tiana Quina Cannon of Anniston • Nicholaus Jedidia Conner of Anniston to Cora Mae Carter of Anniston • Courvoiser Rodrecux Hall of Oxford to Takeshia Nicole Taylor of Alpine • Kenneth O’Brian Thomas of Anniston to Chanita Maurtrice Christian of Anniston

• Joshua Lee Diggs of Anniston to Stephanie Leann Bailey of Anniston • Luis Alberto Vargas-Torres of Anniston to Maria Marlene Gonzalez-Hernandez of Anniston • Shaler Chuck Whiteside of Alexandria to Tonya Burke Moore of Anniston • Dalton Clay Roszell of Anniston to Emily Renea Devney of Anniston • Jason Cruise Humphries of Ohatchee to Crystal Gayle Nelson of Ohatchee • Matthew Dreu Sams of Jacksonville to Rebecca Ann Johnson of Jacksonville • Jeffrey Ray Luallen of Anniston to Christy Marie Gibson of Heflin • Curtis Daniel Nichols of Ohatchee to Amy Kay Owens of Ohatchee • Thomas Roy Hayes of Alexandria to Courtney Annette Thomas of Alexandria • Carlos Derunt Miller of Anniston to Monita Jervet Wilson of Anniston • Marcus Darrell Davis of Forest Park, Ga., to Ashley Shante Harrell of Gadsden • Jesse Ethan Hunt of Anniston to Heather Anne Bowers of Anniston

CATTLE SALE

Here is the livestock market report for the Tuesday sale. Receipts for this week 893 compared to 231 last week. Receipts a year ago 737.

FEEDER CLASSES:

Bulls and steers (Medium and Large No. 1 and No. 2): 200-300 lbs. 220.00 to 240.00; 300-400 lbs. 215.00 to 235.00; 400-500 lbs. 200.00 to 220.00; 500-600 lbs. 182.00 to 205.00; 600700 lbs. 160.00 to 173.00. Heifers (Medium and Large No. 1 and No. 2): 200-300 lbs. Too Few; 300-400 lbs. 190.00 to 202.00; 400-500 lbs. 170.00 to 185.00; 500600 lbs. 155.00 to 175.00; 600-700 lbs. 142.00 to 154.00.

SLAUGHTER CLASSES:

Cows: Breakers 91.00 to 96.00; Boners 98.00 to 104.00; Lean 85.00 to 91.00. Bulls: Normal Dressing 54-58% 109.00 to 113.00; High Dressing >58% 117.00 to 121.00; Low Dressing <54% 106.00 to 108.00.

INCORPORATIONS

• Mourtada Family Health Service Inc. Chapter 13 • The River Outpost • Foundation and Home • Jeanell Wynn Hope, Meadowlark Drive, Services LLC Anniston • Pam Nichols Manage• Kelly D. Haywood, Cecile Drive, Oxford ment Services Inc. • Kevin Blake Edmondson, May Avenue, • KirbAppeal Lawn and Oxford Landscape LLC • Mary F. Watkins, Anniston • Kyu Corp. • E Clothing Co. LLC • Black Bear Solutions AnnistonStar.com • Asset Protectors of Alabama LLC • JCBS Enterprises LLC • Southern Climbers Tree FORECLOSURES Care LLC • Randall Holley, Rosser sub- • Tommy A. Morton, Sherwood • Grace V. Barnard, Lenlock • 4 Legs 4 Justice Animal division, lot 8. Forest subdivision, block 3, lot subdivision, 2nd section, block Advocates and Rescue • James Head and Mary Head, 8. 3, lot 14. a parcel of land in section 20, • David Trussell and Melissa • George A. Taylor, Buckhorn Dissolved • G.L. Vernon and Associtownship 16, range 7. Trussell, Creek Woods subdi- subdivision, phase 5, lot 26. • Timothy M. Smith and Kristy vision, lots 9 and 10. • Matt Forthofer and Michelle ates Inc. M. Smith, a parcel of land • David R. Thompson Jr. and Forthofer, a parcel of land in • Bruner Valley Farm LLC addressed 319 Dailey Street, Amber O. Thompson, Hidden sections 29/30, township 13, • JTG Group LLC Piedmont. Valley subdivision, lot 12. range 9. • Horace Cousin and Yolanda • Aracely Young and Ethan • Sheldon Estes, a parcel of WILLS PROBATED Cousin, Glenndale subdivision, Young, Valley Brook subdivi- land in section 6, township 15, • Monica M. Stokes 2nd addition, block A, lot 1. sion, block 1, lot 7. range 8. • Donald R. Hudson • William J. Sheppard • Shelbie J. Sheppard ▶ SUBMIT YOUR YOUR ITEMS FOR SATURDAY’S COMMUNITY SECTION • James E. Cullins E-MAIL ❙ community@annistonstar.com FAX ❙ 241-1991 CALL ❙ 235-3556 • James Ralph Ezell • Tennie Olena Hubbard MAIL ❙ Community, The Anniston Star, P.O. Box 189, Anniston, AL 36202. Taylor • Rilla Jo Patterson

ARRESTS The people listed in this arrest report, whose names and charges are obtained from public records, are presumed innocent unless proven guilty in a court of law.

Anniston The following felony arrests were reported by the Anniston Police Department (addresses not provided) during the seven-day period ending at 7 a.m. Thursday. • Haley Rae Haynes, 27: second-degree theft. • Jacquana Renae Jones, 26: first-degree theft of services. • Ernest Todd Combs, 43: discharging firearm into a building. • Tia Velise Ford, 33: second-degree promoting prison contraband. • Deanna Kay Cain, 43: possession of a controlled substance.

• Joshua Dean Kellum, 31: possession of a controlled substance. • Charles Tarrell McGhee, 30: possession of a controlled substance. • Michael Anthony Young Jr., 37: first-degree possession of marijuana. • Adarius Derrell Savage, 20: third-degree burglary. • Tamarius Jermel Swain, 23: possession of a controlled substance. • Jesse Blake Snyder, 26: possession of a controlled substance.

• Beulah Lee Kilgore, 32, of Anniston: arrest other agency. • Steven Joseph Guglietti, 40, of Alexandria: second-degree domestic violence. • Jarred Blaine McBrayer, 20, of Piedmont: domestic violence. • Wilson Kyle Hazelwood, 20, of Oxford: second-degree unlawful manufacturing. • Michael Lamar Young, 26, of Jacksonville: warrant of arrest. • Nicole Dawn Hamer, 35, of Oxford: first-degree theft of property. • Christopher Montel Ball, 18, of Hobson City: destruction of state property. Calhoun County • Peter Corona Cernas, 21, of Oxford: failure The following felony arrests were reported by to appear in court. the Calhoun County Sheriff’s Office during the • Brandon James Garrard, 29, of Weaver: seven-day period ending at 7 a.m. Thursday. failure to appear in court. • Carissa Hope Curvin, 21, of Anniston: writ • Olivia Jewel Gentry, 19, of Heflin: first-deof arrest. gree possession of marijuana.

• Bridgett Champion Frazier, 31, of Oxford: second-degree escape, failure to appear in court.

Oxford

The following felony arrests were reported by the Oxford Police Department during the seven-day period ending at 7 a.m. Thursday. • Adarius Derrell Savage, 20: second-degree theft of property. • Lydia Grace Cooper, 23: second-degree possession of a forged instrument. • Christopher Darrell Ervin, 21: first-degree theft of property. • Randall Skyler Gaddy, 18: auto theft. • Raymond Dickinson Jr., 45: second-degree possession of a forged instrument. • Tressie Sharee Wills McKinney, 45: second-degree theft of property.

BLOTTER Crimes are listed by location. Anonymous tips • School, 300 block of E.A. Darden Drive: utility may be called in to Crime Stoppers at 256-238- cart, leaf blower, utility box, electrical cords. 1414. A reward of up to $1,000 may be given. • Residence, 1200 block of Chatwood Drive: television, laptop computer, cash. • Residence, 1700 block of Charlotte Avenue: Anniston cash. The following property crimes were reported • Unknown location, 3400 block of McClellan to the Anniston Police Department during the Boulevard: carpet tiles, shingles, string trimseven-day period ending at 7 a.m. Thursday. mer, leaf blower, tools. • Residence, unspecified block of Net Street: Burglaries copper tubing and wire, heat pump. • Residence, 1900 block of Morrisville Road: • Residence, 300 block of Seminole Drive: copper tubing and wire, water heater, bathguitar, amplifier. • Residence, 3900 block of North Cross Street: room vanity. ceiling fans, tools, rug, air conditioner, gas • Residence, 600 block of North Ledbetter Street: television. log heater.

Thefts • Residence, unspecified block of Johnson Drive: cash. • Residence, 2900 block of McClellan Boulevard: cash, cell phone. • Residence, 200 block of Tomahawk Trail: utility trailer. • Residence, 500 block of Rosewood Circle: jewelry. • Drug store, 700 block of East 10th Street: jewelry. • Residence, 2400 block of Gurnee Avenue: house siding. • Public building, 100 block of East 6th Street: tools, stereo system, television, shop vacu-

um, buffers, pressure washer, DVD player. • Residence, 100 block of East 49th Street: laptop computer. • Church, 5800 block of Weaver Road: utility trailer. • Restaurant, unspecified block of Bill Robinson Parkway: cash.

Auto-related thefts

• Parking lot, 100 block of West 13th Street: purse, wallet, cash, personal I.D., cell phone. • Service station, 1700 block of Quintard Avenue: cell phone. • Parking lot, 100 block of West 7th Street: navigation system. • Parking lot, 300 block of East J Street: car

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The Anniston Star

Sunday, February 23, 2014 Page 7E

SUNDAY RECORD CALENDAR: AnnistonStar.com/calendar PROPERTY TRANSFERRED

• Housing & Urban Development to Donna H. Perygin, a parcel of land in section 9, township 14, range 8, $10. • Glenda Griffin to Owen D. Griffith, a parcel of land in sections 11/14, township 13, range 7, $10. • Preston Scott Godfrey and Ashley Nicole Godfrey to Sherry Lynn Barker, Anniston Mobile Home Court, 1st addition, lot 10, $10. • Sherwood Howland to Sherwood Howland, a parcel of land in section 4, township 16, range 7, $10. • Vanessa Renee Prickett to Michael W. Prickett, a parcel of land in section 23, township 14, range 7, $10. • Amy Nunnelly to Terry B. Nunnelly, fractional section A/H of a parcel of land in sections 6/7, township 15, range 6, $10. • Southern States Bank to Robert Pope and Berneice Pope, a parcel of land in sections 23/24, township 15, range 7, $10. • Thomas M. Bergstesser and Melody M. Bergstresser to Timothy

Ray Salers, Corning Land & Loan Co., block 47, lots 8-10, $10. • Veterans Affairs to Debbie Clayburn, a parcel of land in section 9, township 16, range 7, $17,000. • Kenneth Garrett to Allan Harper, a parcel of land in section 26, township 16, range 8, $900,000. • Patricia Dianne Holloway and L. James Holloway to L. James Holloway and Patricia Dianne Holloway, Valley Brook subdivision, block 3, lot 5, $10. • Betty Joe West to Betty Joe West, James Edward Ramsey and Gloria Denise Ramsey, a parcel of land in section 21, township 16, range 6, $10. • Betty J. West to David H. West and Kathy D. West, a parcel of land in section 25, township 16, range 6, $10. • Douglas L. Higgins to Jerry B. Curry and Mary Nell Curry, Friendship Court, block A, lot 5, $51,781. • TS Fairways LLC to Weldon D. Svoboda, The Fairways at Cider Ridge, phase 1, block 3, lot 10, $170,500.

• Sammy R. Freeman to Martin R. Felton and Judy A. Felton, a parcel of land in section 5, township 15, range 8, $100. • Katherine Helen O’Konski to Judy L. Berry, Rolling Acres subdivision, block 1, lot 5, $55,000. • Billy E. Blount Sr., Dorothy K. Blount and Tracy E. Blount to Billy E. Blount Jr. and Sarah H. Blount, a parcel of land in section 25, township 13, range 8, $10. • Billy E. Blount Jr. and Sarah H. Blount to Billy E. Blount Sr. and Dorothy K. Blount, a parcel of land in section 25, township 13, range 8, $10. • Billy E. Blount Sr. and Dorothy K. Blount to Billy E. Blount Jr. and Sarah H. Blount, a parcel of land in section 25, township 13, range 8, $10. • Clara F. Freeman to Clara F. Freeman and Charity Lynn Freeman Parris, a parcel of land in section 21, township 14, range 8, $10. • Brittany Reaves to Tina K. Usrey, a parcel of land in sections 21/28, township 14, range 6, $10.

• William F. Couch to Wesley E. Couch, Club View Heights, block 565, lot 15, $10. • Kelly Taylor Broome Helms to Blake A. Broome, a parcel of land in section 3, township 13, range 10, $10. • Larry Miller to Judy Miller, Lake Park subdivision, block 3, lot 5, $10. • Housing & Urban Development to Peyton Properties LLC, Idlewild subdivision, lot 3, $10. • George L. Gorey to 2KW LLC, Jacksonville Mining & Manufacturing Co., block 341, lots 4-8, $10. • Jerry P. Bender to John L. Verburg, Plainview subdivision, block 5, lots 6 and 8, $94,900. • Larry L. Jones to Douglas Wade, Whites Gap Estates, 1st addition, block A, lot 3, $110,000. • First National Bank to Jimmy E. Webb and Joyce A. Webb, a parcel of land in section 15, township 16, range 6, $45,000. • Charles Russell Davis and Karen Anne Davis to Jeffrey C. Harding and Valerie R. Harding, Pine Hill Links, lot 21, $315,000.

BLOTTER

RESTAURANT INSPECTIONS Here are food service establishments recently inspected by the Calhoun County Health Department, along with scores. A score of 100 indicates the inspector found no deficiencies. Continued from Page 6E Potentially hazardous deficiencies (four- or five-point demerit items) are noted. These must be corrected immediately and inspectors say they are often corrected while the inspection radio. is underway. Restaurants earning below 70 must raise their • Residence, 1300 block of Christine Avenue: mp3 player. scores within seven days or face closure. • Parking lot, 1500 block of East 10th Street: bags, paperwork, cell phone NO MAJOR DEMERITS chargers, ammunition. China Luck, 503 Quintard Drive, Oxford - 97. Dad’s Bar-B-Q, 700 Noble St., Anniston - 97. Jack Hopper Dining Hall, 700 Pelham Road, N., Jacksonville - 98. Calhoun County Wow food truck, 700 Pelham Road, N., Jacksonville - 100.

BLOTTER

The following property crimes were reported to the Calhoun County Sheriff’s Office during the seven-day period ending at 7 a.m. Thursday.

Burglaries • Residence, Riddle Farm Road, Anniston: televisions, tablet computer, cedar chest, blankets, laptop computer, decorations.

STEP IT UP Winning ideas for improving the Oscars Los Angeles Times

We’re 7 days away from the Oscars, which means we’re about 7 days and 10 seconds away from the first tweet complaining about the show. But why wait? Let’s be clear: We’re not wishing failure on this year’s Oscar telecast or predicting that host Ellen DeGeneres will bomb. When it comes to the Oscars, we’re always hopeful, like Linus waiting for the Great Pumpkin or an L.A. resident dreaming of decent public transportation. And then the show starts and Seth MacFarlane spends 16 minutes making a joke about how he’s going to fail at the job and then goes on to do just that for the next three hours and ... mmmph ... it’s wait ‘til next year. But it’s going to be different on March 2, right? Producers Craig Zadan and Neil Meron are back on the job, as is DeGeneres, returning as host seven years after her first turn. We’re sure they’re going to put all that experience to good use. But, you know, just in case, here are a few ideas for a more perfect night, both for this year and the future.

Ramp up the energy, Ellen We enjoyed your low-key charm back in ‘07. Asking Steven Spielberg to snap your picture with Clint Eastwood? Adorbs. But there’s a fine line between unpretentious and just a little dull. Don’t let MacFarlane’s failure last year keep you from stirring the pot. As long as you’re funny, no one will mind the barbs. (Publicly, at least.)

Pick a host Then stay the course. We’ve gone from the “OMG! Oscars heart young people” Anne Hathaway / James Franco debacle to nostalgic, Old Hollywood Billy Crystal (“We’ve cornered the 70- to 85-year-old market!”) then, last year, to naughty (MacFarlane) to this year’s return to nice. The Golden Globes, meanwhile, are enjoying record ratings, having established a consistent tone by employing the same great hosts year after year. (Ricky Gervais ran things from 2009 to 2011; Tina Fey and Amy Poehler are signed next year for a third straight go-around.) The audience knows what to expect and actually looks forward to what’s coming. Crazy, huh? So, if DeGeneres kills it this year, bring her back. If not, the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences needs to find the 21st century equivalent of Crystal, Johnny Carson and Bob Hope — hosts who skillfully presided over the Oscars for years. Since ABC has the telecast through 2020, it’s not going to be Jimmy Fallon, who amped up the fun as Emmy host in 2010. So why not Jimmy Kimmel,

•Residence,ThompsonRoad,Ohatchee: 2002 Yamaha Big Bear ATV. • Residence, Pitts Avenue, Anniston: firearm. • Supermarket, Choccolocco Road, Anniston: security system.

Auto-related thefts

• Specialty store, U.S. 431, Alexandria: 2006 Ford F650 wrecker. • Residence, Rich’s Lane, Jacksonville: 2014 Nissan Versa. Thefts • Residence, Lillian Lane, Anniston: • Residence, DeArmanville Road, Annis- shoes, laptop computer, 2001 Pontiac ton: medications, cash, jewelry. Grand Am, came console, computer.

Robert Gauthier/Los Angeles Times

BY GLENN WHIPP

• K-Jon Properties LLC to Willow Point Homeowners Assoc., Willow Point subdivision, $10. • Fannie Mae to Adkison Properties LLC, Pokagon Park subdivision, block 12, lots 3 and 4, $10. • Cynthia Y. Turner to Teresa Scott Bolton, a parcel of land in section 35, township 14, range 8, $10. • Dana O. Retherford, Ann O. Jonakin and Margaret O. Isenhour to Joseph Stephen West, a parcel of land in section 12, township 16, range 7, $10. • Darwin C. Hardison and Elaine S. Hardison to James E. Smith and Betty E. Smith, Seymour M. West Jr. subdivision, lots 3-5, $10. • James E. Smith and Betty E. Smith to Kathy E. Chamberlin and Janet S. Moore, Seymour M. West Jr. subdivision, lots 3-5, $10. • Burt Franklin Arthur and Caroline Arthur to Brian L. Johnson and Cheri K. Johnson, Historic Buckner subdivision, lot 3, $10. • Tim W. Cain to Emily Dickens, a parcel of land in section 6, township 14, range 7, $100.

who, at the 2012 Emmys, displayed a winning goofiness that played both at home and the room itself?

Change the venue “The Oscars used to be a good time,” says Robert Osborne, author of “85 Years of the Oscar: The Official History of the Academy Awards.” “But that was back in the early years when it was a banquet and people used to be able to eat and drink and relax. It was a party everyone wanted to attend. Now no one wants to go unless they have to.” So why not move it back to a ballroom? Scaling back on the starchiness of a theater setting would do wonders for the vibe in the room and, by extension, the show itself. If, as Tina Fey says, “high levels of stress are shooting out of just about everyone” at the Oscars, a cocktail — or a plate of Wolfgang Puck appetizers — might help.

Keep it at three hours The Oscars used to clock in under three hours regularly. Then, beginning in 1974, the show began to stretch, immune to the plight of East Coast viewers and sentient life forms unsympathetic to canned banter. Osborne attributes the bloat to added performance numbers and actors who believe that time limits for speeches “apply to everyone else but them.” So how do you trim the fat? • Move the shorts categories. They exist to honor up-and-comers — and to screw up everyone’s Oscar pools. But how about a separate ceremony where the work can be celebrated at greater length and mentorships can be established? • Not all songs are created equal. And songwriters would be the first to tell you this. Some songs fit nicely within the context of a film but aren’t exactly performance show-stoppers. Others, like Adele’s “Skyfall,” rank as moments that will draw viewers. This year’s plan to have all four of the nominees perform might seem like overkill, but it’s a good call. U2 — can’t go wrong. Karen O’s tender, bittersweet “The Moon Song” will get the home viewers to stop chatting and pay attention. “Frozen’s” “Let It Go”? That’ll get the kids to watch. Pharrell Williams? Great, his hat could bring in an audience all on its own. • Streamline the best picture introductions. Or eliminate them altogether. How about just a clip reel ping-ponging between great moments from all the nominated movies? Do keep the “In memoriam” tribute, though it can celebrate without being so somber. May we suggest that someone (Karen O?) sing “We’ll Meet Again”? It’s sentimental without being maudlin, and Stanley Kubrick liked it enough to put it in the last scene of “Dr. Strangelove.” That’s movie magic.

An Oscar snub may not be career killer BY JOHN HORN Los Angeles Times

Winning an Oscar — or just being nominated — can transform a Hollywood future. Yet just because some actors and filmmakers weren’t shortlisted for an Academy Award doesn’t mean their great work is going unrewarded. Critics have rightly pointed to 2013 as one of the best movie years in recent history. Consequently, the fields for top Oscars were impossibly crowded, with highly praised performances by Tom Hanks, Emma Thompson, Robert Redford and Oprah Winfrey left on the sidelines. That A-list pack didn’t exactly need awards attention to boost their careers. The more consequential group is those actors and filmmakers a few rungs down the ladder, where acclaim can spell the difference between job offers and unemployment. So far, the industry isn’t letting a March 2 invitation to the Dolby Theatre — or the lack of one — determine their value: In some cases, the snubbed are as much in demand as the nominated.

‘LONE SURVIVOR’ Peter Berg is one such person. Even though he was nominated for a Writers Guild of America honor for adapting the screenplay for “Lone Survivor,” which he also directed, the filmmaker received no Oscar love. But because “Lone Survivor” was a commercial and critical success, the rebuff didn’t matter. “The phone rings a lot more, and there are more opportunities,” said Berg, who is now working on two HBO series (“The Leftovers” and “State of Play”) and is now considering multiple options for his next feature. It was a different situation following his previous feature, 2012’s flop “Battleship.” “When you’re up it’s great,” Berg said. “When you’re down, you have to work a little bit harder. And I’ve had both” Some of the overlooked-yetin-demand include: • David Oyelowo, who played the activist son of a White House domestic worker in “Lee Daniels’ The Butler.” He’ll soon play Martin Luther King Jr. in “Selma,” a civil rights drama that has been nearly 10 years in the making. • Brie Larson, who starred as a residential treatment supervisor in “Short Term 12,” is currently starring opposite Mark Wahlberg in “The Gambler.” Larson also

is penciled in to co-star in “The Good Luck of Right Now,” an adaptation of the Matthew Quick novel by the directors of “Little Miss Sunshine.”

CHADWICK BOSEMAN • Chadwick Boseman, who played Jackie Robinson in “42,” will play James Brown in the upcoming biopic “Get On Up.” • Greta Gerwig, the lead and co-writer of “Frances Ha,” has been tapped to star in, produce and possibly write “How I Met Your Dad,” a spin-off from the hit CBS series. • Oscar Isaac, who had the lead role in “Inside Llewyn Davis,” has four features in the can and is now starring in a new crime drama from “All Is Lost” filmmaker J.C. Chandor. • Cinematographer Sean Bobbitt, who shot Steve McQueen’s “12 Years a Slave,” is now among the town’s most coveted directors of photography and he just completed the Jeremy Renner film “Kill the Messenger.” Just as past performance does not guarantee a stock will continue to soar, today’s Oscar adulation is no predictor of accomplishment tomorrow. While the Oscars certainly can elevate an actor’s profile — few people in town probably knew of Jennifer Lawrence before 2010’s “Winter’s Bone” became an awards contender — the Academy Award promise of greater things to come can go unfulfilled.

‘WINTER’S BONE’ Adrien Brody, who won the lead actor Oscar for 2002’s “The Pianist,” is now mostly seen in direct-to-video B movies like “Wrecked,” “InAPPropriate Comedy” and “The Experiment.” The last three movies starring Mira Sorvino, the winner of the supporting actress trophy for 1995’s “Mighty Aphrodite,” were “Space Warriors,” “Theo” and “Trade of Innocents,” which had a combined box-office take of $15,091. Even two-time best actress winner Hilary Swank has struggled to find her footing, failing to generate the kind of buzz and box office of her two Oscar-winning movies, “Boys Don’t Cry” and “Million Dollar Baby.”


Sunday Record for February 23, 2014