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BLACK HISTORY PROGRAM AT 2 PM AT THE COMMUNITY CENTER SUNDAY

TUESDAY / FEBRUARY 4, 2014

SERVING THE COMMUNITY SINCE 1936 RECIPES / COMMUNITY, 4

JSU / SPORTS, 7

PATRICIA CLAYTON LOVES HER STUDENTS AT PMS www.jaxnews.com

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City will observe Black History Month Sunday Matt Reynolds / JSU

Slideshow will honor Mandela’s memory

The snow covered Burgess-Snow Field at JSU Stadium.

City survives Leon Meals on Wheels deliveries resume on Friday

Some 45 recipients of lunches delivered by Meals on Wheels volunteers missed their meals on Wednesday and Thursday because of snow and ice that accumulated in the city. Somehow though, those volunteers got through with the lunches on Tuesday, before roads became a sheet of ice. Virginia MacRae, who coordinates drivers for the program, said Regional Medical Center-Jacksonville, which prepares the meals, had some employees who couldn’t make it into work those two days because of the condition of the roads. “I called each one of them (food recipients) to make sure they had food, and they said they could get by,” said MacRae. “We sent out double portions on Friday so that they would have an extra large meal for the weekend.” Police Chief Tommy Thompson ■ See SNOW, page 14

Anita Kilgore

Despite all the trouble winter storm Leon caused, Emma and Carlee Deason couldn’t have been happier with the white stuff. They built a snowman in their front yard Wednesday. ABOVE: Emma and Carlee pose with their creation. PLEASE SEE PAGE 14 FOR MORE PHOTOS. ALSO VISIT ANNISTONSTAR.COM FOR AN ONLINE SLIDESHOW.

BY MARGARET ANDERSON NEWS CORRESPONDENT

In celebration of Black History Month, members of the Black History Committee are finalizing plans for the 14th Black History program at 2 p.m. Sunday at the Community Center. The theme this year is “It’s Not Just Our History, It’s American History.” Committee chairman and city council member Sandra Sudduth said the youth of the community will be recognized. There will be a special presentation, “Mountain Top Experience,” by the Dejembe drama group of Rome, Ga. Mayor Johnny Smith will give the welcoming address and read the proclamation. During the soul food meal, slides will be shown in memory of the late Nelson Mandela, complete with photos and quotes from Mandela. “We’re dedicating this program to the memory of Chargina Moore who was a longtime faithful committee member,” said Sudduth. “Chargina passed away since the last program.” Moore was a member of New Hope Baptist Church and worked at 2nd Chance in Anniston. Her parents are Mr. and Mrs. Charles Moore. Sudduth said the committee appreciates former city clerk Jeanne Jordan who, 14 years ago, had the vision for the celebration. “It started in the city council chamber, and it’s grown into us having to move to the Community Center,” said Sudduth. ■ See BLACK HISTORY, page 8

FACES IN THE COMMUNITY

PHS wrestling coach is continuing his education

Harley Lamey is working on doctorate BY MARGARET ANDERSON NEWS CORRESPONDENT

late Gene Taylor. “Coach Taylor was my motivation,” said Lamey. “There were times I couldn’t stand him because he was so demanding. But I grew to appreciate him.” Lamey’s team won the state championship in 2009. They won the sectional tournament in 2009, 2011 and 2012 and the county tournament in 2009 and 2010. “The kids at Piedmont have a willingness to work hard,” said Lamey. “They push themselves when they don’t think they can

Harley Lamey is wearing a lot of hats these days. He’s decided to go back to school to get a EdD in education administration and it’s making his life a lot busier. In addition to being a student, Lamey is a husband, father, teacher and coach. For the past 12 years, he’s coached wrestling at Piedmont High School. Lamey was on the wrestling team at Weaver High School and was inspired by his coach, the ■ See LAMEY, page 8

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THE PEIDMONT JOURNEL DEDICATED TO THE GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT OF JACKSONVILLE AND CALHOUN COUNTY

OBITUARIES See page 3.

•Garvis ‘Sonny’ Williams Jr., 76

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Harley Lamey and his son Jack.

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INDEX Opinion/Editorial . . . . . . . . .2 Community Notes . . . . . . . 3 Police Digest. . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Community . . . . . . . . . . . . 4,5

Church Devotional . . . . . 6 Sports. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7, 9 Puzzles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Classifieds . . . . . . . . . . . . 13

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PAGE 2 / TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 4, 2014

OPINION/EDITORIAL TOWN & GOWN

Jayme Wagner crowned Miss JSU 2014 By Heather Greene

On January 17, 2014, Miss Jayme Rheann Wagner, 20, was crowned Miss Jacksonville State University 2014. Wagner is a native of Oxford, and the daughter of Kim Wagner and Pat Cleveland. She is in her junior year at JSU and is majoring in family and consumer sciences with a concentration in merchandising. While she enjoys style and is considering the possibility of using her degree to work as a buyer for a company or store, Wagner confesses she “really just wants to be a flight attendant.” Although she is not new to pageants, having competed while a student at Oxford High School and in the Miss JSU pageant last year, Wagner admits that she was shocked when she was crowned Miss JSU. “I didn’t know what to think,” explains Wagner. “It’s just not something you expect. You just hope for the best.” On her experience competing in the Miss JSU pageant, Wagner states, “It’s a lot of fun for sure…it’s not just about beauty, but it’s about who you are as a person.” For her talent, Wagner, who has done ballet for about 15 years, did a pointe routine to Christina Aguilera’s “Candyman,” a fast-paced selection which she explains was a little more “unusual” than what she normally does, but “something different” and fun to perform. Every contestant in Miss American Organization pageants selects a platform. Fighting childhood obesity will be Wagner’s crusade during her 2014 reign. “Ever since I was little, I’ve been involved and have done extra-curricular activities,” says Wagner. “My mom made me lead a healthy life-style and taught me how to be comfortable in my own skin and make healthy choices. I think every kid deserves that…I want

Jayme Wagner every child to feel comfortable in their own skin and know that it’s not just how much you weigh or what you look like on the outside, it’s how you feel in your own skin and that you know you are healthy.” To support her platform, Wagner plans to enthusiastically raise funds to revamp a park in Oxford, which would be utilized by children in the surrounding area. This is only one of many reasons she looks forward to

her reign as Miss JSU. “It’s just an exciting experience as a whole,” she says. While the college student life rarely allows for an excess of free time, between class, work and her Miss JSU activities, Wagner enjoys reading, especially historical fiction and biographies. Further interests of Wagner include listening to oldies music and collecting vintage and Marilyn Monroe items. Wagner serves as a JSU GO! Leader, which she states has been her favorite experience at JSU. “You get to usher in the freshmen, show them your love for JSU and instill your love for JSU in them. That’s just really neat; to see that you made a difference. You made them love your university like you love your university. It’s just one day, but you can do a lot in one day to show them the pride you have in JSU.” In addition to her work as a JSU GO! Leader, Wagner is an SGA Senator, member of Zeta Tau Alpha and the secretary of the College Democrats. Wagner will be competing in the Miss Alabama pageant in June and is looking forward to the experience, “I’m excited to meet everyone because I know there will be girls just like me for whom this will be their first time ever going…it’s just going to be a new experience. Nervous, but exciting.” While many would probably consider the private interview with the judges to be their least favorite part of a pageant, Wagner admits to actually looking forward to her interview time at Miss Alabama, as it allows the judges an opportunity to see a contestant’s personality, which is then magnified during the on-stage performances. Jacksonville State University would like to wish Jayme Wagner an amazing year as Miss JSU 2014 and the best of luck at Miss Alabama! For more information about the Miss JSU pageant, visit www.jsu.edu

The gift of time can be turned into stories

The recent snow days gave many of us time to do things we normally do not do, such as listening and asking questions of those who are older and have stories to share. So, on one of the snow days, I asked posed some questions to my mother, Sarah Ford, about her childhood. I recorded some of her stories. The idea came to me because of the recent death of a longtime family friend. He, his wife, and their parents have been acquainted with my mother’s family for more than 100 years. Back then, they all lived near Wedowee in the Morrison’s Crossroads area -- a place back then that was extremely rural. “Nobody had much of anything,” Mother has always said, referring to the lack of material goods. Two years ago, Mother and I visited in the Saks home of our friend and his wife. At that time, I wrote down the stories they told me. I learned that my grandparents, Robert and Claudia Cole, were tall and attractive. They both liked to sing at church. He sang in a quartet, and she played the piano at Jordan Chapel Methodist Church. Our friend said he remembered the first time he saw my mother. She and her sister, Gaye, were little girls riding in the back of someone’s pickup truck. One story our friend told was about a walk he took with my great-grandfather, Sam Bowen. They came to a certain rock and turned it over. “Pick up that Prince Albert can,” said my great-grandfather. “Open it up and give me the cash.” Our friend reached into the tobacco can, pulled out three hundred dollar bills, and handed

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them over. Also, he told us stories about how my great-grandfaSherry ther would sell a plug of chewing Kughn tobacco to anyone who asked. He would charge that person one or Sherry-Go-Round two pennies. I also heard stories about a great-uncle who liked to drink too much. One day he drove by our friend’s house in a Model T car and saw him coaxing bees from a wooden box. My great-uncle, in spite of being drunk, got out of his car, lifted out the hive, and then went on his way. He left several astonished onlookers behind. Our friend knew a lot about my grandfather, and his wife contributed to the stories, too. Neither one of them, however, remembered much about my grandmother. So, during a recent snow day, I asked Mother to tell me stories about her mother who died from an illness when Mother was a teen-ager. I learned that my grandmother was part of a home-demonstration club that taught women to can, sew, quilt, and do other domestic activities. I learned that one time, when my grandmother was at a meeting, she left mother, my aunt, and a girl cousin in charge of her baby boy. My great-grandmother stayed behind but

was busy in the house. Mother said she and the other two girls decided they would get the horse-drawn buggy (minus the horse) out of the barn and give the baby a ride down a hill. “Of course, we were the ones wanting to ride,” Mother said. My aunt climbed aboard the buggy and held the baby in her arms. Mother and her cousin pulled on the shafts until the buggy went too fast. They jumped aside and watched as the buggy crashed and catapulted my aunt and the baby into the air. Both survived but were bloody and bruised. Mother said her mother’s reaction was of consternation. “She was always calm and reserved,” Mother said. “She never spanked us, but we knew we had let her down. That was worse than a spanking.” Such stories from the friends and my mother gave me knowledge of family members I never met or knew only when they were older. As I imagined the scenes the stories created in my mind, I gained insight into the personality and character of my mother and me. I was determined and adventurous, like my mother apparently was, and I was always penitent whenever I let her down. My mother, like her mother, was usually calm and reserved even when angry. I, like my mother, am usually calm and reserved even when angry. I can’t wait to hear more stories, but I must make some time to write them down rather than waiting on the weather to give me opportunity. One day it will be too late. Email Sherry at sherrykug@hotmail.com

Strom Thurmond could filibuster Over the years some of you have inquired about the use of the filibuster in the halls of the U.S. Steve Congress and Senate. Flowers The word itself is not something that the average citizen is familiar with or totally knowledgeable of its meaning. A filibuster Inside The Statehouse is simply a fancy word for talking a piece of legislation to death. It is a dilatory tactic that senators use to delay a vote on a bill and hopefully tire out the proponents of a prospective law. The filibuster is most times associated with the Senate. Under the parliamentary rules of both the U.S. Senate and the Alabama State Senate, the length of time that a senator can debate a bill is longer than the time limits allowed in the House of Representatives. Therefore, the filibuster is primarily orchestrated in the Senate. Our forefathers designed these rules to allow the Senate to be the more deliberative body. They wanted the upper chamber to be more like the British House of Lords. The ability to filibuster has long been a part of Senate history. The best depiction of the senate filibuster is the scene portrayed by Jimmy Stewart filibustering for hours on the floor of the U.S. Senate in the famous movie “Mr. Smith Goes to Washington.” The legendary South Carolina Senator Strom Thurmond holds the record for the longest talk-a-thon on the floor of the U.S. Senate. Thurmond stood on his feet for a talking record of 24 hours and 18 minutes against the Civil Rights Act. Some of the topics he used in his historic filibuster were historic documents. He read from and recited the Declaration of Independence, the Bill of Rights and President George Washington’s farewell address. The South has had some legendary and colorful political characters. Georgia had Gene Talmadge. Louisiana had Huey Long. Mississippi had Theodore Bilbo. We had Wallace and Folsom. Strom Thurmond is South Carolina’s contribution to the southern political folklore of our greatest politicians. Indeed, none of the above can match Strom’s endurance and longevity in the southern political arena.

Strom was born in 1902 in Edgefield, South Carolina. This small hamlet had amazingly produced several South Carolina governors before Strom. The most famous of which was the legendary populist “Pitchfork” Ben Tillman. Strom studied at Clemson University and was first a teacher and superintendant of education. He then became a lawyer and quickly became a Circuit Judge. In 1947, he was elected Governor of South Carolina. He became a national figure a year later. In 1948, when Harry Truman insisted on promoting civil rights as a major plank in the Democratic Party platform, most of the southern delegates walked out of the Democratic Convention. They joined hands and created the Dixiecrat Party. Gov. Strom Thurmond became the presidential candidate of the Dixiecrat ticket. Thurmond and the Dixiecrats carried the Deep South states. However, Truman prevailed over Republican Thomas Dewey and captured the White House. Strom was elected to the U.S. Senate in 1954. In 1964, he led the Republican Revolution in the South. His change to the Republican Party paved the way for the South’s transition to the Republican Party. He literally unscrewed his desk from the senate floor, picked it up and moved it from the Democratic side of the aisle to the Republican side of the aisle. His dramatic move was the beginning of the end of the Democratic South. The rest is history. His ability to pick up and move a 200-pound antique senate desk illustrated his uncommon energy and legendary fitness. Strom did hundreds of sit-ups and pushups every day. He neither smoked nor drank. He did, however, like women. He fathered children into his mid 70’s and had a penchant for fondling women in the senate elevator. Strom served as Chairman of the Senate Armed Services Committee. His tenure on the Armed Services Committee, coupled with his incomparable seniority allowed him to bring home the bacon to South Carolina. He retired from the U.S. Senate in 2012 after having served a remarkable 48 years. Strom Thurmond was the oldest person to have served in Congress and was a Senate member longer than anyone else in U.S. history. He died at the age of 101 in his hometown of Edgefield. Steve Flowers is Alabama’s leading political columnist. His column appears weekly in more than 70 Alabama newspapers. Steve served 16 years in the state legislature. He may be reached at www.steveflowers.us


TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 4, 2014 / PAGE 3

THE JACKSONVILLE NEWS

Obituary WILLIAMS

Jacksonville - Funeral service for Garvis “Sonny” Williams Jr., 76, was held on February 2, 2014 at 3 p.m. at K.L. Brown Funeral Home and Cremation Center Chapel with the Rev. Ronny Moore and the Rev. Wayne Stevens officiating. The family received friends at the funeral home Sunday from 1 - 3 p.m. prior to service. Mr. Williams died Wednesday, January 29, 2014, at his residence. He is survived by his wife of 54 years, Mary Lee Williams; one daughter, Anita Gail Williams; three sons, James Scott (Shelly) Williams, Phillip (Juanita) Williams and Mark (Brandy) Williams, all of Jacksonville; eight grandchildren, Christin, Chelsea, Lacey, Rachel, Holly, Brittney, Brooke and Braxton; three sisters, Carolyn Atkins of Austin, Texas, Sylvia Wilkinson, of Hueytown, and Rose Diangelo, of Daphne; three brothers, Charles Williams, of Sacramento, Calif., Alvis Williams, of Houston, Texas and Noel Stanley Williams, of Riverside. Pallbearers will be Dwight Roper, Ronald S. Thomas, Henry H.

Pritchett, Houston Jenkins Jr., Joe Diangelo and Doug Phillips. Mr. Williams was a member of West Point Baptist Church and served in the U.S. Air Force during the Korean War. After he retired from A.A.D with 10 years of service, he became an insurance agent for Liberty National Insurance Company and National Life Insurance Company. He enjoyed studying and talking about God’s word, spending time with his family, fishing and working with his hands. Mr. Williams was preceded in death by his parents, Garvis and Mary McDonald Williams Sr. The family would like to give a special thank you to New Beacon Hospice, Carsen, Kandra, Jamie, Gail and the Jacksonville Fire Department. In lieu of flowers donations may be made to the Jacksonville Fire and EMS, 506 Chinabee Avenue, SE, Jacksonville, AL 36265. Online condolences to the family at: www.klbrownfuneralhome.com. K.L. Brown Funeral Home & Cremation Center 322 Nisbet St., N.W., Jacksonville, AL 36265

Alabama will keep limited snow equipment BIRMINGHAM (AP) — The state of Alabama probably won’t go shopping for snowplows despite last week’s winter storm. The Alabama Department of Transportation already has trucks, snowplows and equipment to spread sand and salt water, and spokesman Tony Harris said purchasing many more doesn’t make much sense. The equipment isn’t used very often, he said Friday, and the cost of additional machinery outweighs the benefit. “We’ll look at it, but the last ones we bought rusted after 1993,” said Harris, referring to the state’s last major snowstorm. Before last week, the state’s last major traffic problem linked to snow and ice happened a year ago in north Alabama. Hundreds of motorists were stuck for hours on Interstate 65 in Cullman County after a storm predicted for days dumped 4 inches of snow. This time, the forecast was the problem. The storm dumped about 2 inches of snow and ice on central Alabama, including metro Birmingham, despite forecasts that only a trace of snow would fall. Based on forecasts the storm would strike closer to Montgomery than Birmingham, Transportation Department workers took snow plows and spreading equipment south before last week’s storm, said Harris. The equipment had to be returned north once the scope of the problem was evident. Some counties have their own snow removal equipment, and Harris said the state took a “real hard look” at its resources and purchased more bumper-mounted snow plows after the 2013 traffic snarl in north Alabama. Aside from those plows, which can be attached to large pickup trucks used year-round, Harris said the state has as many as 10 plow blades that fit on dump trucks for larger jobs. “We have hundreds of dump trucks that are capable of operating, and sand spreaders. We’ve probably got 10 to 20 spreaders just here in Montgomery,” he said. Transportation officials will assess the state’s response to the storm as early as this week.

Community Capsule • COPING WITH GRIEF. A coping with grief - even if nobody died group meets every 2nd and 4th Tuesdays at 6 P. M. at Jacksonville First United Methodist Church. Please call the church office for information and directions (256-435-6021). • February tree events : The Jacksonville Tree commission will observe Jacksonville Arbor Day during February. From 10 a.m.-noon Feb. 8, a community tree planting will take place along the newly-paved portion of Creekside Trail next to the historic cotton mill near the Ladiga Trail gardens. Everyone is invited to join in or drop by to watch the volunteers work. Dogwoods, oaks and river birches will be planted. The event is sponsored by the tree commission in partnership with the boy scouts. A tree give-away, in conjunction with the Calhoun County Beautification Board, will be on the square Feb. 21 from noon-5 p.m. or as long as trees last. An Arbor Day celebration will be at 3:30 Feb. 25 at Jacksonville State University. • The J.O.Y. Quilt Guild will meet Thursday, February 6 at 9.30 a.m. in the FMC of the First United Methodist Church in Jacksonville. Visitors are welcome. • The Calhoun County Community Band meets every Tuesday night at 6:30 at the Jacksonville High School band room. • Free GED classes will be held from 8 a.m.-noon and 5-8 p.m. in Room 173, Self Hall, Jacksonville State University. Call 256-782-5660 for more information. • Bradford Health Services has free family support meetings from 5-6 Monday nights at 1701 B Pelham Rd., S., Suite D (Brookstone Building next to RMC Jacksonville). The meeting is for anyone experiencing behavioral problems with a loved one, has a family member of any age with drug or alcohol problems, needs help coping with a loved one’s drug or alcohol problems or needs help making decision on how to help a family member of any age. A counselor will facilitate the meetings. • Venecia Benefield Butler’s book, “I Have to Get Some Things Off My Chest,” can be purchased for $15 (including tax) by mailing a check to P. O. Box 572, Piedmont 36262, or take money or check to Butler’s sister, Randa Carroll, at the office of Benjamin Ingram at 207 Rome, Ave., Piedmont. Proceeds will go to the V Foundation, founded by Butler, to purchase gift bags for patients going through chemo treatments. The bags will include items such as comedy DVDs, chap stick, gift cards, gas cards, crossword puzzles, Sudoku, search-a-word, lubricant eye drops, gum and peppermints, soft toothbrushes, queasy drops, lotion, neck wrap or hydrating socks. • Classes for the Jacksonville State University Adult Wellness classes at Pete Mathews Coliseum are at 8 a.m., Monday, Wednesday and Friday for senior water aerobics and senior floor aerobic classes and 8 a.m. Tuesday and Thursday for water aerobics and senior therapeutic yoga classes. Contact Aubrey Crossen at 689-2580 or jsu9517k@jsu.edu for more information. • Mom to Mom, a group for moms of all ages with children of all ages, meets from 6:30-8:30 p.m. the third Monday every month at EaglePoint Church. Visit www.

momtomomjacksonville.org. Supper and childcare provided. • The Jacksonville Aspiring Writers Group meets from 4 to 6 p.m. on the first and third Tuesday of every month at the public library. Anyone interested in the creative writing process is welcome. Bring samples of original writing to share. The group offers support, critique and information about writing and possible publishing venues. Call 256-499-2182 for more information. • Alcoholics Anonymous meets at noon each Thursday at St. Luke’s Episcopal Church, 400 Chinabee Ave., just off the square. Call 847-0909. • A Narcotics Anonymous group meets from 6:307:30 p.m. Tuesdays and Thursdays at First United Methodist Church behind McDonald’s. For more information, call Pearl Williams at 435-4881. • A senior dance for those 55 years and older will be at the Senior Center from 6:30-9:30 p.m. the second Friday night of each month, featuring music, fun, friends and food. The Fun Tyme Band will be there to provide the music. Cost is $5 per couple; $3 for single. • The Friday Night Opry Show is presented from 6:30-9:30 Friday nights at the Golden Saw Music Hall in the Williams community. Call 435-4696. • Celebrate Recovery, a Christ-centered 12-step program, meets every Friday night at First Baptist Church. Dinner is served at 5:30. Large group meetings with worship and praise bands and guest speakers begin at 6:30. Small share/support groups meet after that at 7:30 p.m., followed with cake and fellowship. Call 435-7263 or 225-2492. • The Calhoun County Stamp Club meets at 7 p.m. on the second and fourth Tuesdays in Room 327 Stone Center, Jacksonville State University, corner of Church Avenue and $$ Eleventh Street. Visitors Injection Combo Injection and new members are withJanuary February with welcome. Call 782-8044, Special Special 782-5604 or 435-7491. First initial visit only with this coupon, cannot be used • Jacksonville Fire with any other offer. Department is looking Expires 2/28/14 Expires 1/31/14 for information and items (Includes doctor visit & relating to the history of written SPECIAL prescription for $50 2 weeks of the department. If you (Includes visit & Genericdoctor Appetite have anything to share, written prescription for Suppressants) Listed: call David Bell at 310Phentermine 1 month of(Adipex) Appetiteor Phendimetrazine (Bontril) 8961. Suppressants) $ • The Public Library 65 - $(Adipex) 71 Phentermine Feb. Special Board of Trustees meets Phendimetrazine (Bontril) at 3:30 p.m. the third Written Monthly RX Lipotrophic B6-B12 Wednesday of each month Liptrophic B6-B12 Injections $6-$13 Injections $6-$13 at the library annex. Anyone needing accommodaGadsden tions is asked to contact Weight Control librarian Barbara Rowell 256-442-2686 at 435-6332.

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MONTGOMERY (AP) — A federal judge said Monday that he will rule soon on whether to throw out a lawsuit challenging a new Alabama law that provides tax credits to families who move their children from failing public schools to private schools. U.S. District Judge Keith Watkins heard about an hour of arguments Monday on a request from state officials to dismiss the lawsuit that seeks to block the Alabama Accountability Act, which also allows students to transfer to non-failing public schools. The suit was filed by the Montgomery-based Southern Poverty Law Center on behalf of eight low-income children living in four counties in central and south Alabama. Southern Poverty Law Center attorney Jerri Katzerman said some rural students don’t have the income or transportation to move to non-failing schools because they live too far away or the schools won’t accept new students. “The statute operates to deny them access to a non-failing education,” she said. Assistant Attorney General Will Parker told the judge that the state officials sued by the law center aren’t denying anyone the right to transfer. “The act is an Fertilization, Weed, Insect & Disease Control even-handed measure with respect to children in failing schools,” he said. The judge said he will rule “pretty quickly” on whether to dismiss the suit or let it proceed to trial. The state teachers’ organization, the Alabama Education Association, has filed a separate suit in state court challenging the law. A judge will hear arguments Thursday on a request by state officials to dismiss that suit.

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PAGE 4 / TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 4, 2014

THE JACKSONVILLE NEWS

Patricia Clayton counsels PMS students Mother of three has spent 22 years in education

P

MARGARET ANDERSON Journal Correspondent

atricia Gilmore Clayton had excellent role models growing up in the Birmingham area -- her parents -- and, in particular, her mother. Patricia’s father worked at the steel mill in Fairfield, and her mother was in nursing education. She was dean of several schools of nursing, including the University of Alabama and Samford University. In fact, she started many of the nursing schools that exist in Alabama today. Patricia has spent the past 22 years of her life in education, either as a teacher or as a counselor. She is currently counselor to the 280 students at Piedmont Middle School. “I moved from a much larger school, and I like it here very much because I know most of the students,” she said. “It’s really very enjoyable. I had 2500 students in grades 6-8 in Orlando, so I like having only 280 students. You get to know your students and their parents much better.” Patricia believes that middle school grades are an exciting time that mark the beginning of an important new phase in a child’s education and personal development. The curriculum is more varied and goes into more detail, and students have more activities available to them. “It’s a time to begin seriously thinking about careers, life choices and plans for higher education,“ she said. “It can also be a bewildering time. Students in the middle grades change rooms and teachers throughout the day. Students worries that they may not find her way from room to room. Will they remember their locker combination? What if they don’t know anyone in their classes? Will they be able to complete homework?” Patricia said her purpose for Piedmont Middle School guidance is to provide a comprehensive, developmental counseling program addressing the academic, career, personal and social development of all students. “In partnership with educators, parents, and community members, the program is designed to facilitate a support system to ensure students are prepared with the knowledge and skills to contribute at the highest levels of society,” she said. “We strive to ensure that each individual student is provided opportunities to develop personally and socially through understanding themselves and others and that they develop their full academic potential for a successful future.” Patricia said she loves what she does.

CORN CASSEROLE 2 lbs. frozen shoepeg white corn (or several cans of shoepeg white corn, drained) 1 pt. heavy cream ¼ c. baking mix Salt and pepper to taste 1 stick melted butter Thaw frozen corn. Mix in heavy cream, melted butter, baking mix, salt and pepper. Spray large casserole dish with non-stick spray. Put corn mixture in dish. Bake at 350 degrees until brown around edges (30-40 minutes). Serve hot. PRETZEL STRAWBERRRY SALAD 2 c. crushed pretzels 1 stick butter ¼ c. sugar Mix together and press into baking dish. Bake at 350 degrees for 10 minutes. Allow to cool. 2 c. Cool Whip 1 – 8 oz. pkg. cream cheese 1 c. confectioner’s sugar Mix together until smooth. Spread over cooled crust. 1 – 6 oz. pkg. strawberry jello 2 c. boiling water Mix and put in refrigerator to begin to gel. (Do this first.)

Anita Kilgore

Patricia Clayton, seated, with some of her students. From left, Mr. PMS Noah Cole Maddox, Good Citizenship Girl Emily Kisor, Good Citizenship Boy Cole Chasteen and Miss PMS Macy Hanson.

“Our parents instilled the right values in us and helped us make appropriate choices,” she said. “My mother was in education, so that was what I knew to do.” Though she’s currently fulfilling her dream of working with and helping children, when her own children were younger she was a stay-athome mom. “But at that point, I was actively involved in their schools and I was PTA president for six years at the elementary, middle and high school level,” she said. “So even though I wasn’t teaching, I was at school every day.” Her teaching background includes English and special education. Patricia and her husband Ronnie moved here 14 years ago from Orlando. Ronnie is the Glenn Huie Chair and Eminent Scholar and professor of finance at Jacksonville State University. They met while attending the University of Alabama. They’ve lived in several southern states, including Alabama, Georgia, Kentucky, Virginia, Tennessee, and Florida. Ronnie was born in Florida and grew up on Sand Mountain in DeKalb County. Patricia graduated from Ensley High School in Jefferson County. The Claytons have three children. Ashley lives in Tuscaloosa and is event and tour coordinator for

RECIPES 2 – 10 z. pkgs. frozen strawberries. Spread over cream cheese mixture. Allow all to cool. Cut and serve. SUGAR COOKIES 2 c. all-purpose flour 1 ½ t. baking powder 6 T. butter 1/3 c. Crisco shortening ¾ c. white sugar 1 egg 1 T. milk 1 t. vanilla Mix all ingredients. Chill for at least 3 hours. Roll and cut into shapes. Ice as desired. MAW MAW’S SWEET POTATO CASSEROLE 4-5 med. large sweet potatoes 3 whole eggs 1 c. light brown sugar 1 c. white sugar 1 c. chopped pecans (can use walnuts for slightly different taste) 1 t. vanilla flavoring Peel and slice potatoes. Boil until fully cooked and tender. Cool. Using an electric mixer beat well. Add eggs, both sugars, and flavoring. Mix well. Add

I want to live a healthy lifestyle. And it helps the stress level.” Patricia Clayton

the University of Alabama Alumni Association. Jeremy is youth minister at the First United Methodist Church in Jacksonville. Gregory is a fitness trainer and part-time youth minister in Tuscaloosa. Patricia enjoys shopping and exercising. She takes Zumba, yoga, pound and step aerobics. “I want to live a healthy lifestyle,” she said. “And it helps the stress level.” Patricia grew up with two brothers, one older and one younger. She said she had the usual household chores such as cleaning house, keeping her room clean, helping her mother cook and cleaning the kitchen. Now that the Clayton children are grown, Patricia said she and Ronnie have changed roles in the kitchen. He cooks more often now than she does. “We just switched roles,” she said. “That makes me happy.” She has some favorite recipes and shares some of them. In particular, the sugar cookies are a Christmas tradition that started when Ashley was about 3 years old. “Each Christmas since we have cooked and decorated cookies at Christmas,” said Patricia. “This tradition has continued for more than 25 years.” (Contact Margaret at pollya922@gmail.com)

additional brown sugar to taste. Mix in pecans or walnuts or both if you prefer. Spray casserole dish with non-stick spray. Put mixture in dish. Topping 1 c. chopped pecans 1 c. 1 minute oatmeal 1 c. light brown sugar ½ c. baking mix 1 stick butter (salted or unsalted as you choose) Mix all ingredients together. Spread over top of potato mixture. Melt 1 stick of butter and drizzle over topping. Bake at 350 degrees until set and topping is browned. Serve hot. CRAN-APPLE CASSEROLE 4-5 lg. red delicious apples 1 lb. bag of cranberries, washed thoroughly 2 c. white sugar Peel and chop apples, cranberries and sugar in large bowl. Spray large casserole dish with nonstick spray. Pour mixture into the casserole dish. Prepare topping as for sweet potato casserole. Top the cranberry-apple mixture. Melt butter and drizzle over topping. Bake at 325 degrees for about 1 hour until the mixture begins to gel. Serve hot.

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TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 4, 2014/ PAGE 5

THE JACKSONVILLE NEWS

Nomination Form Book of Golden Deeds Recipient Exchange Club of Jacksonville The Exchange Club of Jacksonville is looking for a Book of Golden Deeds Award recipient. We would like for readers or organizations to nominate someone in the community who exemplifies volunteerism. The Book of Golden Deeds Award is an Exchange Club program that honors a worthy person or group, which continuously donates time, talent and energy to help those in need. Many times, fine citizens of our community do numerous good deeds, which go unnoticed. The Exchange Club of Jacksonville would like to publicly recognize these generous people. In selecting your candidate, please keep in mind that the only criterion for receiving the award is that the nominee must have made significant contributions to the community. Please send your nominee’s name, address and your reasons for making the selection to Mike Hindman, 306 Ashton Drive, N. E., Jacksonville, AL 36265 or email him at mike. hindman2@gmail.com by March 1. The recipient of the Book of Golden Deeds Award will be presented a special plaque to commemorate the occasion. His or her name, photograph and description of achievements will be placed in the Exchange Club’s Book of Golden Deeds, and a news release will be sent to the local media. We thank you for you cooperation. Please be assured that your candidate will receive every consideration in the final selection. Best Regards, Mike Hindman, President The Exchange Club of Jacksonville Name of Nominator: _____________________________________________ Phone Number of Nominator: _____________________________________ Name of Nominee: ______________________________________________ AddressofNominee:_____________________________________________ Phone Number of Nominee: _________________ (Cell) _________________ Please indicate in the space below why you believe this individual is deserving of the Book of Golden Deeds award. Please attach additional pages as needed. _____________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________

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PAGE 6 / TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 4, 2014

Compliments of

THE JACKSONVILLE NEWS

“This devotional is made possible by these sponsors who encourage all of us to attend worship services.” Tommy Thomas, Manager 1575 Pelham Rd. S Jacksonville, AL 36265 calhouncoop@cableone.net 256-435-3430 Fax: 256-435-9922 Cell: 256-310-6295

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TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 4, 2014/ PAGE 7

THE JACKSONVILLE NEWS

JSU Softball Fun Day

More than 1,500 fans showed up Sunday for Jacksonville State University’s Fun Day.

Cocky puts on a show for the crowd.

Coach Jana McGinnis Photos by Matt Reynolds/ JSU

Young fans compete in a contest.

Taylor West tosses t-shirts.

Players sign posters for fans.


THE JACKSONVILLE NEWS

PAGE 8 / TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 4, 2014

Commissioner Rudy Abbott will not seek re-election After finishing his third term in November, Calhoun County Commissioner Rudy Abbott will not seek re-election, he announced Thursday. The commissioner from District 5, who serves residents in Jacksonville, Piedmont, and parts of Pleasant Valley, Rabbittown and White Plains, officially announced his decision at the commission’s meeting. The meeting was Abbott’s last as chairman under the commission’s rotating schedule. Commissioner

Tim Hodges will take the post in February. Abbott said the primary reason not to run again was to spend more time with his 13-year-old grandson, whom he recently adopted. “I’m not getting any younger and he’s getting older,” Abbott said. “When you get to be 73, you don’t have a whole of people left in your life who depend on you, but he needs me more than the commission needs me.” Abbott said he had been asked to run for re-elec-

tion, and had also been approached to run for other positions, including for the state board of education, but said Thursday he’s done with politics. Abbott was first elected to the commission in 2002, and re-elected in 2006 and 2010. The former Jacksonville State University baseball coach said he ran for the seat on the urging of his friend and former commissioner Eli Henderson. He said Thursday he was most proud of his first year in office when he

worked to secure federal money for residents’ safety and protection during the early stages of the incineration of the Army’s chemical weapons stockpile in Anniston. Hodges thanked Abbott at the meeting for his most recent nine-month tenure as chairman, and also his 11 years in office, emphasizing Abbott’s role in parks and recreation activities for the county. “It didn’t matter if it was in Anniston, or Oxford, or Jacksonville, Rudy is

always the go-to guy when you need a ball field,” Hodges said. “I don’t know what we’re going to do without him, but I’m sure we’ll keep him around.” Only one candidate has announced intentions to run for Abbott’s District 5 seat; Jacksonville resident Jay Dill announced in November he will run on the Republican ticket. Abbott is one of three locally serving Democrats in elected office in Calhoun County.

Rudy Abbott

Alabama store giving $70,000 in refunds after Super Bowl JON ANDERSON AL.com

File photo

The Djembe Drummers from Rome, Ga., will entertain again this year.

BLACK HISTORY: The event is free From page 1

“We’ve had speakers who grew up in Jacksonville and went on to make significant contributions to not only the city and state but also the United States.” Sudduth said the committee feels that it’s important to spotlight the city’s youth and give them a chance to learn about black history in Jacksonville. SeveralorganizationsfromJacksonville State University will be on hand including the JSU ROTC who will post colors,

the National Panhellenic Council and the African American Association. Girls from the Coosa Valley Detention Center will serve as ushers. “We invite everyone to come out and enjoy this special program,” said Sudduth. The event is free. Door prizes will be served. For more information call Sudduth at 435-5109. (Contact Margaret at pollya922@ gmail.com)

Submitted photo

Jacksonville State student managers have fun at JSU Stadium in last week’s snow.

GARDENDALE — The Super Bowl safety that shocked football fans across the country scored about $70,000 in refunds for customers of a Birmingham-area jeweler. Jeff Dennis Jewelers ran a promotion over the past two weeks that promised all of his customers a cash refund on their purchases if a safety was scored in the Super Bowl by either team. And they would get to keep their jewelry. Then, on the first snap of the game tonight, the center snapped the ball over Peyton Manning’s head. The ball was recovered in the end zone by the Broncos, resulting in a safety for the Seattle Seahawks. It was the fastest scoring play in Super Bowl history, just 12 seconds into the game. A safety occurred in the previous two Super Bowls but had happened in only three other Super Bowls in the game’s history. Dennis and his customers, even those that are Broncos fans, are cheering. Dennis has an insurance policy through Lloyd’s of London that covers all the refunds. All he had to pay was a premium on the policy. “I’m ecstatic,” Dennis said. “I can’t put it into words. It’s unbelievable.” This is the third such promotion that has paid dividends for Dennis in the past three years. In November 2012, Dennis ran a promotion that offered refunds to any customers who bought jewelry the week before the Iron Bowl if either Alabama or Auburn shut out the other team. When the Crimson Tide beat the Tigers 49-0, Lloyd’s of London had to shell out about $55,000 worth of refunds to 303 of Dennis’ customers. Then on Labor Day of last year, Dennis offered refunds to every customer who bought jewelry in his store between Aug. 1 and Aug. 26 if it rained more than 1 inch on Labor Day at the National Weather Service monitoring station at the Birmingham-Shuttlesworth International Airport. It rained more than 1.4 inches, and 592 customers got refunds from Lloyd’s of London totaling almost $90,000. Each time, many of the customers who received refunds turned around and spent the money back in his store, he said. This time, about 400 customers will be getting refunds, Dennis said. Some of the purchases were for $30 or $40 bracelets, but there were

numerous customers who spent several thousand dollars, including one $6,000 purchase, he said. One couple put half the amount down for their engagement rings with the intention of letting the refund pay for the other half, he said. Brian Nunnally of Kimberly is one of Dennis’ happy customers. When the safety was scored, he jumped up excitedly and ran into the bedroom where his wife, Gracie, was and then realized she didn’t know why he was so excited. He had bought her a floating pendant necklace from Jeff Dennis Jewelers as a Valentine’s Day gift, and while she had given him a potential gift wish list at his request, she didn’t know what he had bought, he said. “She knew about the promotion, so she figured out what was going on - that a safety had occurred in the game,” he said. He was so happy that he went ahead and gave her the necklace tonight. And now they’re due for a refund of about $260, he said. “I just couldn’t believe it,” Nunnally said. “We’re definitely happy about it .... We really do appreciate Jeff.” Dennis said he just thought of this promotion two weeks ago, so he was only able to promote it on Facebook. The snow and ice storm that hit central Alabama last week kept him shut down a couple of days during the promotion, but he ended the week with strong sales the past couple of days, he said. Dennis said he loves the fact that his customers are so happy with these promotions. “People like to shop where it’s fun, and this has been very successful for us,” he said. His business has grown tremendously over the past year. “The exposure of something like this you just can’t buy,” he said. “It’s put my name in front of a lot of people ... I just feel blessed. I really do.” National media picked up on the last two promotions and likely will be interested in this one, too, he said. Dennis had just sat down in his recliner at home to watch the game when the safety occurred. It was very nerve-wracking while he waited to make sure the Broncos had recovered the ball and the referees sorted through a penalty that eventually was waived, he said. Then things went wild. “My phone is blowing up” with text messages and Facebook messages, he said. “It’s been absolutely crazy, and it’s going to get crazier.”

LAMEY: Educator wants to share with others what he’s learned From page 1

go any further.” Lamey teaches on-line health, sociology, psychology, media production and facilitates some ACT prep courses. “It all takes up a lot of my time, especially on Sunday afternoons,” he said. “That’s when I have to make sure I get all my course work finished so it won’t interfere with my coaching and teaching.” Lamey explains on his PHS website that he went into education because he felt that it was his duty to share with others the knowledge and lessons that he learned from his parents, coaches and teachers along his educational journey. On the website he said he believes that technology

in the classroom is important because of the fact that the world has shifted to an always on, always engaged atmosphere. “There is an endless amount of information available to us by our smart devices at the simple touch of a screen,” he said. “We would be apathetic not to use these tools that are available now to improve the educational environment that we present to our children.” Lamey was born at Fort McClellan where his father was stationed. His father Harley lives in Leesburg with his wife Jodi. His mother, Martha Lamey, lives in Memphis. His sister, Theresa McCary, lives in Southside with her husband Robert and daughters, Lily and Charlotte. Lamey attended Gadsden State and is a graduate of Jacksonville State University where he received his

bachelor’s in 2000 and his master’s in 2007. In May 2013, he completed his educational specialist degree in educational administration from Liberty University in Lynchburg, Va. He and his wife, the former Heather Kirby, have a son, Jack, who attends school in Piedmont and, like his father did in school, wrestles. Living with the Lameys are a cat named Reese and two dogs, Jimmy and Curtis. The family attends Covenant Life Ministries in Alexandria where Lamey serves on the media team on Sundays and special occasions. Lamey said right now, it’s difficult to find family time, but that will change next year, once he finishes his doctorate, also from Liberty University.


THE JACKSONVILLE NEWS

TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 4, 2014/ PAGE 9

Morehead ends Jacksonville win streak at three MOREHEAD, Ky. - Jacksonville State’s quest to extend its three-game winning streak to four games was quickly dashed as Morehead State scored 43 of its points in the opening half as the Eagles cruised to a 73-53 win over JSU on Saturday at Johnson Arena. The loss drops the Gamecocks to 9-15 overall and slips to 5-6 in Ohio Valley Conference action. MSU snapped a two-game losing skid and improved to 10-12 overall and 4-5 in league play. The 20-point win by MSU was the seventh consecutive against Jax State. The story of the contest was the quick start by the Eagles as they came out of the gates energized with a 9-0 run to start the game and limit JSU to just 18 first-half points a season low for points in a half by the Red and White. The Gamecocks did not hit double figures until a pair of free throws by Kelly Naughton with 3:05 left in the first half. JSU finished the first 20 minutes 7-of-25 from the field, while the Eagles connected on 58 percent from the field (17-of-29), including six made three-point baskets. Almesha Jones finished the first half with 19 points and tallied 21 total points in the contest. Mackenzie Arledge and Shiloh Murphy added nine points each in the first half. Arledge and Murphy posted 15 points each. Murphy, who entered the game with eight-made treys on the season, finished with five three-point baskets in the game. JSU was led by Destany McLin in the first half with eight points. The Athens, Ala.-sophomore led all scorers with 23 points and a team-high eight rebounds. McLin was one point shy of matching her career best of 24 points and carded her third career 20-plus point game. McLin sparked the Gamecocks’ second half run with 15 of the 29 second half points. JSU, after trailing by as many as 31 points in the first half, was able to slice that deficit in half by the eight-minute mark at 59-43 after a McLin basket. MSU would push the lead back out to 20-plus points by the five-minute mark and would eventually win the game by the 20-point margin. Jax State posted a positive second half shooting mark, knocking down 52 percent from the field. MSU turned in a stellar day shooting with a 52 percent mark, including 11-made treys. McLin was the lone double figure scorer as JSU’s leading scorer, Candace Morton was limited to nine points. It was just the second time this season that the Lexington, Ky.-native did not reach double figures. Miranda Cantrell and Briana Benson added six points each. After three consecutive road games, JSU begins a three-game homestand Saturday, Feb. 8 against OVC East rival Tennessee Tech. Tip off is set for 2 p.m. The contest will follow the Jax State men’s contest with the Eagles that will get underway at 11 a.m. at Pete Mathews Coliseum.

Four Gamecocks selected to team Jacksonville State’s Griffin Thomas, DaMarcus James, Max Holcombe and freshman Josh Barge were all named All-American, as announced by Phil Steele’s College Football Preview on Friday. Thomas was named first-team, while James and Holcombe were each named fourth-team All-American. Barge was named to the freshman All-American squad. Thomas finished as one of the top kickers in the country after setting numerous Ohio Valley Conference and school records during the 2013 season and was a first-team AllOVC selection. The Snellville, Ga., native set the OVC records for made field goals (24) field goal attempts (32) and points scored by kicking (134), and he also finished 62-of-63 on extra points this season, which were also both school records. James had a record-breaking season, where he has rushed for 1,477 yards on 292 carries to set the school’s single-season rushing record. The junior running back also set the OVC record with 29 rushing touchdowns to finish second in the nation, and he scored a rushing touchdown in the final 12 games of the season to extend his school record. The Demopolis native now has 35 career rushing touchdowns, which is the third most in school history, and his 13 career 100-yard rushing games is also the second most in school history. Holcombe, from Tuscaloosa, has started 37 straight games for the Gamecocks and is the anchor on the offensive line. He played a total of 1138 snaps and posted the highest grade on the offensive line at just over 87 percent for the season. The Gamecocks led the Ohio Valley Conference in rushing with an average of 239.1 yards per game to rank 12th nationally,

Bill Wilson / Consolidated News Service

Jacksonville States Avery Moore passes the ball during action earlier this season at home against Tennessee State.

Second-half cold spell dooms Gamecocks against Morehead MOREHEAD, Ky. - The Jacksonville State men’s basketball team couldn’t overcome a second-half cold spell in a tough 65-54 Ohio Valley Conference loss at Morehead State on Saturday afternoon. The Gamecocks (10-15, 4-6 OVC) led by as many as seven in the first half, but the Eagles (15-9, 6-3 OVC) turned the tide to start the second half and used an 11-2 run to take control of the game. JSU battled back to within three late but MSU seemed to continue to find answers down the stretch. Junior Avery Moore scored 13 to lead the Gamecocks, 11 in the first half. He paced a 4-for-7 start from behind the arc for JSU, who then missed 11 in a row from outside while Morehead State made its run. The Tallahassee, Fla., native was 3-for-8 from 3-point land on the afternoon. Junior D.J. Felder added 12 points and six rebounds for JSU and led the Gamecocks in the post against an Eagle team that has been outrebounded just once in its 24 games this season. The top rebounding team in the OVC and one of the best in the nation used a 27-10 advantage on the glass in the second half to outrebound JSU 40-21. The Eagles got 14 points from Angelo Warner, while Greg Dotson and Billy Reader each added 10. Chad Posthumus entered the game averaging a double-double and had eight points and 12 boards off of the bench for MSU. Moore got the Gamecocks started, making the team’s first three baskets, all from behind the arc, and pushing it to an early 9-3 lead. The Eagles cut into it but watched JSU answer with another run in the post that stretched the Gamecocks’ lead to 18-11 halfway through the first half. The Eagles scored eight in a row to take their first lead of the game at 19-11 with just under eight minutes in the half, but JSU answered again to pull back on top.

JSU softball begins in Mississippi tournament JACKSONVILLE – More than 1,500 softball fans showed up for Jacksonville State’s annual Fan Day on Sunday at University Field. The 2013 Ohio Valley Conference Tournament Champions and six-time NCAA Regional participant Gamecocks were on hand for a day filled with free prizes and snacks. Free t-shirts were among the many

PUBLIC NOTICE The regular monthly meeting of the Planning Commission of the City of Jacksonville is scheduled for Thursday, February 20, 2014, at 6:00 p.m. in the Council Chambers at City Hall Annex #1, 300 Church Avenue, SE Jacksonville, Alabama. Those persons who have business to bring before the Planning Commission should call City Hall at (256) 435-7611 to obtain the schedule of deadlines for submitting information for Planning Commission consideration. Should any member of the public require any special accommodations in order to attend this meeting, please call (256) 435-7611 five (5) days in advance of the public meeting. Jimmy L. Howard Chairman

The Gamecocks stretched it to as many as six again, but Morehead answered with a long trey from Jordan Purcell to cut that in half. JSU took a 30-28 lead into the half, one that saw seven of the nine Gamecocks that saw the floor score. Moore led them with 11, while Nick Cook had five. MSU scored the first five points of the second half to take a 33-30 lead with 17 minutes left, the Eagles’ first lead of more than one in the game. The Eagles stretched their run to 11-2 and pushed out to a 39-32 with 13:33 left to play. The ball started falling for JSU but MSU kept it up and stretched it lead to as much as 11 at 51-40 with just under seven minutes remaining. The Gamecocks got a pair of free throws from D.J. Felder to stop the MSU run and then got a pair of 3-pointers from Undra Mitchem to cut the deficit to 51-48 with 4:26 left. Mitchem’s back-to-back triples snapped an 0-for-11 skid from behind the arc for JSU after a 4-for-7 start. The Eagles answered again, getting Drew Kelly’s second three of the game and a dunk from Jordan Percell to stretch their lead to 56-48 with four minutes to play. The Gamecocks got a basket to pull to within six and then a stop to get the ball, but after a MSU defender knocked the ball away, the Eagles were given the ball back. Warner was given an old-fashioned 3-point play on the ensuing possession to push the game out of reach. The Gamecocks won’t play a midweek game for the second-straight week but will finally return home on Saturday to host Tennessee Tech. The game will start at 11 a.m. and will be televised on CSS. JSU students and all fans ages 18 and under get in free.

giveaways, while soda and popcorn were free. In her 21st season, head coach Jana McGinnis is prepping her team for the 2014 season, which begins on Feb. 7 at the Mississippi State Kickoff Classic in Starkville, Miss. The Gamecocks open their home schedule on March 11, when they host Ball State at University Field.

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THE JACKSONVILLE NEWS

PAGE 10 / TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 4, 2014

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THE JACKSONVILLE NEWS

TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 4, 2014/ PAGE 11


PAGE 12/ TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 4, 2014

THE JACKSONVILLE NEWS

Enjoying Creekside Trail

FUN & GAMES WITH THE NEWS

Anita Kilgore

ABOVE: Margaret Ward and Pippi don warm clothing for a walk on the Creekside Trail, just off the Ladiga Trail, on a recent mild day. City workers have recently paved the Creekside Trail and placed benches along the Ladiga Trail. BELOW: Ward holds Pippi while Pippi appears to be posing for the photographer.

Jacksonville holds first 1 to World iShowcase Jacksonville City Schools recently held their first 1 to World iShowcase in which faculty members presented to their peers on the innovative, creative, and effective ways they integrate technology in the classroom. The showcase sessions were designed

Last week’s answers

to strengthen and enhance the district’s rigorous college and career ready curriculum by expanding teacher instructional capacity to develop student skills necessary to be successful in a global society, which has not yet been imagined.

Sudoku Submitted photo

Kitty Stone Elementary teachers, Jennifer Loos and Caroline Arthur, speak on virtual field trips in the classroom.

Folsom says paperwork no indication he’s running MONTGOMERY (AP) — Former Lt. Gov. Jim Folsom Jr. said Monday that he's not planning to run for lieutenant governor even though he filed paperwork creating a campaign committee for this year's race. Folsom's longtime campaign chairman, Montgomery attorney Peck Fox, filed the paperwork with the secretary of state Friday. Folsom and Fox said the filing was required by Alabama's new campaign finance law because Folsom has $2,002 left in his campaign account from the 2010 election. “I don't have any plans to run. That was strictly a compliance measure,” Folsom said in a phone interview.

Folsom said friends and supporters have been encouraging him to run again this year, and filing the paperwork prompted more calls. But a return to politics is not in his plans for now, he said. Folsom lives in Cullman and operates an investment business in Birmingham. He was elected twice as lieutenant governor before moving up to governor in 1993 when Gov. Guy Hunt was convicted of an ethics violation and removed from office. Folsom lost a bid for a full term in 1994 and left politics for several years before returning in 2006 to win the lieutenant governor's office again. He lost his re-election bid in 2010 to Republican Kay Ivey.


The Jacksonville News

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FORM OF ADVERTISEMENT FOR COMPLETION

Legal notice In accordance with Chapter 1, Title 39, Code of Alabama, 1975, notice is hereby given that Kilgore Construction, Inc., Contractor, has completed the Contract for (Construction) (Renovation) (Alteration) (Equipment) (Improvement) of Alexandria-Wellington Road Bridge Cover at Alexandria/Jacksonville Road, Alexandria, AL for the State of Alabama and the (County) (City) of Calhoun, Owner(s), and have made request for final settlement of said Contract. All persons having any claim for labor, materials, or otherwise in connection with this project should immediately notify Bill Whittaker Architecture, West Glen Drive, Alexandria, AL. Kilgore Construction Inc., PO Box 315 Dearmanville, AL 36257 The Jacksonville News Calhoun Co., AL February 4 & 11, 2014

IN THE PROBATE COURT OF CALHOUN COUNTY, ALABAMA

IN RE: The Adoption Petition of: MARIBEL ANAYA RIMES & CHRISTOPHER WADE RIMES CASE NO. 31821 That any unknown father, SERVICES DIVORCE WITH or without whose whereabouts are unchildren $125. Includes name known, of said child, must anchange and property settle- swer the adoption petition of ment agreement. Save hun- Maribel Anaya Rimes and dreds. Fast and easy. Call Christopher Wade Rimes within thirty (30) days of the last 1-888-733-7165, 24/7. _________________________ publication date 2/18/14 of this HIGH-SPEED Internet is now notice, or his parental rights available where you live for may be terminated and the only $39.99 per mo. New Su- adoption petition granted in perfast Satellite Internet with Case No. 31821, Probate speeds up to 15 Mbps! Ask Court of Calhoun County, Alaabout discounts for DishNet- bama. work or DirecTv customers! Said child was born on or We also now offer phone ser- about October 25, 2013 to Mevice as low as $19.99 per mo. ghan Christina Pinkard. Call Today! 1-800-266-4409 Done this the 24 day of January, 2014. www.pbsinternet.com _________________________ Shirley Miller Clerk of Probate Court INSTRUCTION MEDICAL OFFICE trainees Allen W. May, Jr. needed! Train to become a Attorney for Petitioners Medical Office Assistant! No 2703 7th St experience needed! Online Tuscaloosa, AL 35401 training at SC gets you job 205-345-0286 ready! HS diploma/GED & PC/Internet needed! The Jacksonville News Calhoun Co., AL 1-888-926-6075. (R) _________________________ January 28, February 4, 11, 18, 2014 HELP WANTED-DRIVERS 25 DRIVER TRAINEES needed now! Become a driver for TMC Transportation! Earn NOTICE TO $750 per week! No experience needed! Job ready in 15 days! CREDITORS 1-888-743-4611. (R) _________________________ STATE OF ALABAMA ATTN: DRIVER trainees need- CALHOUN COUNTY ed now! $800 to $1000 a week PROBATE COURT plus great benefits! Home CASE NO. 31769 weekly or OTR available. No IN THE MATTER OF THE CDL? We will train you! Call to- ESTATE OF WILLIAM LAMAR SMITH, DECEASED day 1-800-878-2537. _________________________ Letters of Administration on the DRIVERS - CDL-A solo & estate of WILLIAM LAMAR deceased, having team drivers needed. Top pay SMITH, for hazmat. OTR & regional been granted to the underruns. CDL grads welcome. signed on January 7, 2014, by 700+ trucks & growing! the Honorable Alice K. Martin, 1 - 8 8 8 - 9 2 8 - 6 0 1 1 . Judge of Probate of said County, notice is hereby given www.drive4total.com. _________________________ that all persons having claims DRIVERS: RUN FB with WTI. against said estate, are hereby Be home through the week and required to present the same weekends. Start up to 28% within the time allowed by law, plus fuel bonus. New equip- or the same will be barred. ment. BCBS. Experience need- LISA SMITH, Personal Repreed. LP available. Call sentative of the Estate of WILLIAM LAMAR SMITH, De1-877-693-1305. (R) _________________________ ceased. NEW CAREER - CDL training. Alice K. Martin Jobs available if qualified. Call Judge of Probate today - start tomorrow! WIA, VA, Post-9/11 G.I. Bill & Re- The Jacksonville News hab. ESD TDS, LLC. Calhoun Co., AL 1-866-432-0430. www.ESDs- January 21, 28, February 4, 2014 chool.com. (R) _________________________ HELP WANTED-ADMIN/PROF F.T. IT Technician - City of NOTICE TO Selma - performs full range of network/mainframe CREDITORS operations. Proficient in MS Of- STATE OF ALABAMA fice Suite, A/V skills. Apply at: CALHOUN COUNTY Selma City Hall, 222 Broad PROBATE COURT Street Selma, AL 36701. CASE NO. 31556 _________________________ IN THE MATTER OF THE LAND FOR SALE ESTATE OF MOLIMEA KA2 ABUTTING SMITH Lake LEUATI MASANIAI, DEfront lots. Being sold as 1 just CEASED $59,900. On maintained road Letters Testamentary on the with all utilities in place. Great estate of MOLIMEA KALEUATI location, beautiful land ideal for MASANIAI, deceased, having friends and family. Priced for been granted to FAGALOA quick sale but must be bought KALEUATI, the undersigned together. Call 1-877-452-8406. on January 7, 2014, by the _________________________ Honorable Alice K. Martin, SMITH LAKE 2 acre deep Judge of Probate of said dockable, 230+ ft. waterfront. County, notice is hereby given Was $220k, now $89,900 that all persons having claims (brand new covered double against said estate, are hereby dock slip installed). Call required to present the same 1-855-389-3620. within the time allowed by law, _________________________ or the same will be barred. FOR SALE FAGALOA KALEUATI, PersonDISH TV retailer. Starting al Representative of the Last $19.99/month (for 12 mos.) Will and Testament of MOLIBroadband Internet starting MEA KALEUATI MASANIAI, $14.95/month (where Deceased. available.) Ask about same day Alice K. Martin installation! Call now! Judge of Probate 1-800-311-7159. _________________________ The Jacksonville News SAWMILLS FROM only $4897. Calhoun Co., AL Make & save money with your January 21, 28, & February 4, own bandmill. Cut lumber any 2014 dimension. In stock ready to ship. Free info/DVD: www.NorNOTICE TO woodSawmills.com. 1-800-578-1363 ext. 300N. CREDITORS _________________________ STATE OF ALABAMA MEDICAL SUPPLIES NEW AND used - stair lift ele- CALHOUN COUNTY vators, car lifts, scooters, lift PROBATE COURT chairs, power wheel chairs, CASE NO. 2014-0013 walk-in tubs. Covering all of IN THE MATTER OF THE Alabama for 23 years. Elrod ESTATE OF WILLIAM CLAYTON BIRCHFIELD JR., DEMobility 1-800-682-0658. (R) _________________________ CEASED

Letters Testamentary on the estate of WILLIAM CLAYTON BIRCHFIELD JR., deceased, having been granted to JERRY K. BIRCHFIELD, the undersigned on January 10, 2014, by the Honorable Alice K. Martin, Judge of Probate of said County, notice is hereby given that all persons having claims against said estate, are hereby required to present the same within the time allowed by law, or the same will be barred. JERRY K. BIRCHFIELD, Personal Representative of the Last Will and Testament of WILLIAM CLAYTON BIRCHFIELD JR., Deceased. Alice K. Martin Judge of Probate The Jacksonville News Calhoun Co., AL January 21, 28, February 4, 2014

NOTICE TO CREDITORS

STATE OF ALABAMA CALHOUN COUNTY PROBATE COURT CASE NO. 31877 IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF ANTONIO PHILLIPS, DECEASED Letters of Administration on the estate of ANTONIO PHILLIPS, deceased, having been granted to the undersigned on January 10, 2014, by the Honorable Alice K. Martin, Judge of Probate of said County, notice is hereby given that all persons having claims against said estate, are hereby required to present the same within the time allowed by law, or the same will be barred. WESLEY M. FRYE, Personal Representative of the Estate of ANTONIO PHILLIPS, Deceased. Alice K. Martin Judge of Probate The Jacksonville News Calhoun Co., AL January 21, 28, & February 4, 2014

NOTICE TO CREDITORS

STATE OF ALABAMA CALHOUN COUNTY PROBATE COURT CASE NO. 2014-0010 IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF O.R. BREWER, DECEASED Letters Testamentary on the estate of O.R. BREWER, deceased, having been granted to DEBORAH BREWER FAGAN, the undersigned on January 8, 2014, by the Honorable Alice K. Martin, Judge of Probate of said County, notice is hereby given that all persons having claims against said estate, are hereby required to present the same within the time allowed by law, or the same will be barred. DEBORAH BREWER FAGAN, Personal Representative of the Last Will and Testament of O.R. BREWER, Deceased. Alice K. Martin Judge of Probate The Jacksonville News Calhoun Co., AL January 21, 28, February 4, 2014

NOTICE TO CREDITORS

STATE OF ALABAMA CALHOUN COUNTY PROBATE COURT CASE NO. 2014-0012 IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF HAROLD MITCHELL COCHRAN, DECEASED Letters Testamentary on the estate of HAROLD MITCHELL COCHRAN, deceased, having been granted to MICHAEL STEVEN COCHRAN, the undersigned on January 16, 2014, by the Honorable Alice K. Martin, Judge of Probate of said County, notice is hereby given that all persons having claims against said estate, are hereby required to present the same within the time allowed by law, or the same will be barred. MICHAEL STEVEN COCHRAN, Personal Representative of the Last Will and Testament of HAROLD MITCHELL COCHRAN, Deceased. Alice K. Martin Judge of Probate The Jacksonville News Calhoun Co., AL January 28, February 4 & 11, 2014

NOTICE TO CREDITORS

STATE OF ALABAMA CALHOUN COUNTY PROBATE COURT CASE NO. 2014-0038 IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF GARLON SHERMAN WILKINS, DECEASED Letters Testamentary on the estate of GARLON SHERMAN WILKINS, deceased, having been granted to MYRA JANE GLENN, the undersigned on January 23, 2014, by the Honorable Alice K. Martin, Judge of Probate of said County, notice

is hereby given that all persons having claims against said estate, are hereby required to present the same within the time allowed by law, or the same will be barred. MYRA JANE GLENN, Personal Representative of the Last Will and Testament of GARLON SHERMAN WILKINS, Deceased. Alice K. Martin Judge of Probate The Jacksonville News Calhoun Co., AL February 4, 11, & 18, 2014

NOTICE TO CREDITORS

STATE OF ALABAMA CALHOUN COUNTY PROBATE COURT CASE NO. 2014-0022 IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF JOHN ROBERT ARBUCKLE, DECEASED Letters testamentary on the estate of JOHN ROBERT ARBUCKLE, deceased, having been granted to WILLIAM MACKENZIE ARBUCKLE, the undersigned on January 15, 2014, by the Honorable Alice K. Martin, Judge of Probate of said County, notice is hereby given that all persons having claims against said estate, are hereby required to present the same within the time allowed by law, or the same will be barred. WILLIAM MACKENZIE ARBUCKLE, Personal Representative of the Last Will and Testament of JOHN ROBERT ARBUCKLE, Deceased. Alice K. Martin Judge of Probate The Jacksonville News Calhoun Co., AL January 28, February 4 & 11, 2014

NOTICE TO CREDITORS

STATE OF ALABAMA CALHOUN COUNTY PROBATE COURT CASE NO. 2014-0027 IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF VERA VAUGHAN, DECEASED Letters of Administration on the estate of VERA VAUGHAN, deceased, having been granted to the undersigned on January 16, 2014, by the Honorable Alice K. Martin, Judge of Probate of said County, notice is hereby given that all persons having claims against said estate, are hereby required to present the same within the time allowed by law, or the same will be barred. CONNIE VAUGHAN NOLEN, Personal Representative of the Estate of VERA VAUGHAN, Deceased. Alice K. Martin Judge of Probate The Jacksonville News Calhoun Co., AL January 28, February 4 & 11, 2014

NOTICE TO CREDITORS

STATE OF ALABAMA CALHOUN COUNTY PROBATE COURT CASE NO. 2014-0021 IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF UNA FAYE HOUK KIRBY, DECEASED Letters testamentary on the estate of UNA FAYE HOUK KIRBY, deceased, having been granted to JEFFERY BARTON KIRBY, the undersigned on January 16, 2014, by the Honorable Alice K. Martin, Judge of Probate of said County, notice is hereby given that all persons having claims against said estate, are hereby required to present the same within the time allowed by law, or the same will be barred. JEFFERY BARTON KIRBY, Personal Representative of the Last Will and Testament of UNA FAYE HOUK KIRBY, Deceased. Alice K. Martin Judge of Probate The Jacksonville News Calhoun Co., AL January 28, February 4 & 11, 2014

PUBLIC AUCTION

Jacksonville Mini Storage 850 White’s Gap Road SE Jacksonville, AL 36265 A cash only Auction will be held on Friday, February 14, 2014 at 11:00 am at Said above address in Accordance with Alabama Law, Section 7-7-209-7-7-210, Sale of Units in Default: #43 Claude Jason Zimmer, miscellaneous goods #76 Sharone Nicole Hervey, miscellaneous goods #80 Shatae Alexandria Martin, miscellaneous goods #87 Stacey Gibson, miscellaneous goods Jacksonville Mini Storage Reserves The Right to Refuse Any and All Bids. The Jacksonville News Calhoun Co., AL January 28, February 4, 2014

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PAGE 14/ TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 4, 2014

THE JACKSONVILLE NEWS

SNOW: ‘The national guard came out that night and helped us.’ From page 1

expressed his relief that there were no major accidents in the city. “When it tuned to ice, nobody could move in it, and we had to get our 4-wheel drive Blazer out,” said Thompson. The national guard came out that night and helped us out.” Thompson said the Blazer is a military surplus vehicle his department acquired several years ago. Thompson cited one accident, which was outside the city limits on Cedar Springs Road when the car a woman was driving overturned three times and ended up in a ditch.

“The air bags deployed, and she wasn’t injured bad, but she was injured from the tumble she took,” he said. “They transported her to the hospital. The rest of the accidents happened when cars ran into ditches or into each other. Nobody got hurt.” Fire Chief Wade Buckner said his usual six to eight calls per day doubled during the storm. Firefighters received 16 calls on Tuesday and 14 calls on Wednesday, three of which were structure fires. The department made around 30 runs between Tuesday and Wednesday. In one incident, firemen were dispatched to a structure fire on Maple Lane off Alabama 21.

The structure suffered significant damage. They also helped put out a structure fire in Piedmont. Assistant fire chief Chris Roberts said no one was injured in either incident. Jacksonville firefighters also helped get workers to Regional Medical Center and let stranded motorists wait out the storm at the station. “Having that additional staffing early on and having them already in the station rather than the way we normally operate -- that made a big impact,” said Bucker. Winn-Dixie store manager Michael Vickery said his store was busy but sporadic. Vickery said several of Winn-

Dixie’s customers walked to the store on Wednesday, while others drove. The store worked with a limited number of employees and closed at 4 p.m. “We wanted to make sure everybody was safe,” Vickery said. About 10 people left their vehicles and walked to the local Hampton Inn, said property manager Sandy Powell. That hotel sold out Tuesday and Wednesday, she said. Kitty Stone Elementary School reheated vegetable soup for students who were marooned until late in the day. Kitty Stone and Jacksonville High were empty by 5 p.m., and their employees and

students were home for the night. “While they were with us, they were in a safe, warm environment,” Jacksonville City Schools superintendent Jon Paul Campbell said. “There was not a sense of panic. The kids were great. The teachers were phenomenal.” The Jacksonville Wal-Mart was the only Wal-Mart in the county to close during the storm. It closed at 10 a.m. Tuesday and reopened on Wednesday. Alabama 204 and some roads in the Pleasant Valley area were difficult to navigate on Tuesday, even in a Humvee. All city streets were open at 3 p.m. Thursday.

ABOVE LEFT: Residents of White’s Gap Estates line up at the bottom of the hill, not being able to make it up to their houses because of the icy road. BOTTOM LEFT: A snowy scene on Aderholdt Lake Road. ABOVE: Four-wheelers were the only way to travel Tuesday afternoon and Wednesday. A four-wheeler on 11th Avenue enjoying the ride.

// PHOTOS BY ANITA KILGORE //SEE SLIDESHOW AT ANNISTONSTAR.COM

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The Jacksonville News - 02/04/14  

The Jacksonville News for February 4, 2014.

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