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KITTY STONEDAY ELEMENTARY VETERANS DAY PROGRAM FRIDAY AT 1:45 FIRST OF WINTER IS SATURDAY, DECEMBER 21 P.M.

TUESDAY / DECEMBER 17, 2013

SERVING THE COMMUNITY SINCE 1936 RECIPES / COMMUNITY, 4

SPORTS / NEWS, 8

GINA ANGEL LOVES TO DECORATE FOR HOLIDAYS www.jaxnews.com

LADY EAGLES UNBEATEN IN AREA

VOL. 79 • NO. 51

75 CENTS

SANTA COMES TO TOWN

‘Nobody rains on Miss Rita’s parade’ Christmas parade honors Thompson Nash Wagoner BY MARGARET ANDERSON NEWS CORRESPONDENT

Though the weather didn’t cooperate the way she had hoped it would and there were parades in Anniston and Oxford, Christmas parade coordinator Rita Edwards said it was nothing less than wonderful. The original date of the parade was canceled due to rain. It was held at 6:30 Thursday night. “You’ll lose a few and you’ll get a few when something like that happens,” she said. “You have no control of the weather. And, also, people have other commitments. You do what you have to do. I never worried about it, because nobody rains on Ms. Rita’s parade.” The highlight of the parade, besides Santa

Claus, was Thompson Nash Wagoner’s float. Thompson was supposed to lead the parade as grand marshal but had to be in Memphis to continue his treatments at St. Jude’s Children’s Hospital. His uncle and aunt, Jon-Paul and Crissy Werner drove the truck carrying the float Thompson would have been riding on. Taking his place on the float were another uncle and aunt, Mike and Beverly Almaroad, and their grandchildren, along with Thompson’s brother, Sam Parker. “Spectators along the parade route joined in and walked behind Thompson’s float,” said Edwards. “I thought that was wonderful. He’s a special little kid. We want him well.” Anita Kilgore

■ See PARADE, page 5

Grand marshal Thompson Nash Wagoner missed parade.

St. Luke’s, firemen donate food Gamecocks’ PLAYOFFS

Daughters of the King gives rice and beans

dream season ends

BY MARGARET ANDERSON NEWS CORRESPONDENT

If it’s left up to St. Luke’s Episcopal Church and the Jacksonville Firefighters Association, everyone will walk away from their meal on Christmas Day with a full stomach. St. Luke’s conducts a food drive each year at this time. This year, though, they had some help from the firefighters, who collected about 400 pounds of food. David Bell, president of the Jacksonville Professional Firefighters Association 3948, said he and his fellow firemen were glad to be able to help. “This is an extension of our work in Jacksonville,” said Bell. “We live at least 240 hours a month in Jacksonville. This is our second home. We eat, sleep and work here and we protect those in our community, so this is just an extension of our work here.” “The holiday season is the perfect ■ See ST. LUKE’S, page 9

Anita Kilgore

Michael Rich (far right) leads firefighters in delivering food. Jacksonville firemen were happy to be able to provide 150 bags of food for St. Luke’s Episcopal Church. The church distributed the food to residents in 40 minutes.

CHENEY, Wash. - The red carpet on the road to Frisco, Texas, turned out to be a roadblock for Jacksonville State. Something had to give when the fourth-ranked total offense among Football Championship Subdivision teams met the sixth-best pass defense in Saturday’s national quarterfinal on the red turf at Eastern Washington’s Roos Field, aka “The Inferno.” Walter Payton Award finalist Vernon Adams threw two touchdowns and Albert Havili provided a back-breaking 77-yard interception return for a score as No. 3 Eastern Washington held off No. 20 Jacksonville State 35-24. The Gamecocks end their first season under head coach Bill Clark with an 11-4 record. Eastern Washington (12-2) hosts Towson State next Saturday in the FCS semifinals. Injuries to starting quarterback Eli Jenkins and record-setting running back DaMarcus James proved too much for the Gamecocks to overcome after battling the Eagles evenly for one half. ■ See JSU, page 8

FACES IN THE COMMUNITY

Merle Norman Studio offers beauty products Facials are complimentary

BY MARGARET ANDERSON NEWS CORRESPONDENT

Anita Kilgore

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Lori BusseyEncode: and666000999999 RogerPUClemment.

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THE JACKSONVILLE NEWS

THE PEIDMONT JOURNEL DEDICATED TO THE GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT OF JACKSONVILLE AND CALHOUN COUNTY

See Page 3.

•Ferrell Lairdraine Crook, 72 •Herman Douglas Ponder, 81 6

66000 88888

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■ See MERLE NORMAN, page 5

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OBITUARIES

USPS 2722480 ECR-WSS

Lori Bussey, who manages the Merle Norman Studio at 1505 Pelham Rd. S., said the cosmetic business offers a variety of products and services. The studio opened in August. Bussey’s fiance’ Roger Clemment is the owner. “We do mini facials, and we have five different facials all together that we do,” she said. “All of these are complimentary. A lot of people don’t even know that we

offer them.” Merle Norman also sells many beauty products including makeup and also products for skin care, including anti- aging products and everything from normal to sensitive to problematic skin, including acme and rosacea. The studio also sells lipstick, eye shadows, blush, foundation, powder and bronzer. “Our motto is try before you buy,” said Bussey. “We want you to come in and have a seat. Let us do an analysis on your skin.

Nice weather on tap 6 66000 99999 9 until the weekend.

INDEX Opinion/Editorial . . . . . . . . .2 Community Notes . . . . . . . 3 Police Digest. . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Community . . . . . . . . . . . . 4,5

Church Devotional . . . . . 6 Sports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Puzzles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 Classifieds . . . . . . . . . 10, 11

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THE JACKSONVILLE NEWS

PAGE 2 / TUESDAY, DECEMBER 17, 2013

OPINION/EDITORIAL TOWN & GOWN

Bart Bell: A cyclist with a mission

This article was written by Emil Loeken, a graduate assistant in the Jacksonville State University Office of Public Relations One might think the likelihood of running into Lance Armstrong’s former training partner in Jacksonville is nonexistent. The next time you are enjoying a sunny day on the Chief Ladiga Trail or strolling around Jacksonville State University’s campus, however, keep an eye out for Bart Bell. Bell, a former national cycling champion with a passion for success, is testimony not only to how far a strong willpower can take a person, but also to how a great mentality and work ethic can impact quality of life. Bell’s cycling career started in 1984 during the Los Angeles Summer Olympics. For a while, Bell had been pondering about what he would do with his life. He was a solid football player, had excellent grades, and was even interviewed by the Navy for a Reserve Officers’ Training Corps scholarship. The seventeen year old, however, was not feeling it. While watching the Olympic athletes compete for hardware, honor, and national pride, Bell was stunned by the coolness of velodrome cycling. He had never seen anything like it. “I told my dad I was going to be a cyclist,” Bell said. “I made up my mind that I was not going to practice to become good enough for any state universities or regional teams. I wanted to be the best there is.” Bell knew he was capable of the challenge. He had been raised in the South where one works hard growing up. “Your success in any sport does not depend on what natural born talent you have,” Bell said. “It all depends on your ability to work hard towards your goals and dreams.” The ambitious teenager researched the sport and found the roster of national development team coaches. He got in touch with a guy in Colorado Springs, Colo., and presented himself as a “fast and strong nobody.” “The guy on the phone told me they had a training camp for people like me,” Bell said. “They invited me to come out and show them what I got and see if they could mold me into a cyclist.” Nine months before the camp, Bell moved to Houston, Texas, where he sought experts in the cycling industry. On April 6, he gathered with 70 other cycling hopefuls in Colorado Springs. After three days of intense training and workouts, eight cyclists were selected for further evaluation. “When they called my name, I remember sitting there thinking ‘I know that guy’” Bell said. “I was in shock, but I

had paved myself into a corner where I had to win. I had to be successful—I am that kind of person. I have had plenty of strikeouts and mess-ups, but when preparing to win and succeed psychologically, the body will follow.” Bell’s three-day invitation to Colorado Springs turned into three months. The development camp introduced him to the national team, to the coaches, and to the athletes. They would travel the country, practicing in cities with the best possible conditions. “It was obvious that I was a greenhorn and did not know what I was doing,” Bell said. “But I would work extremely hard.” Over the next eight years, Bell performed exceptionally well. He was part of various championship teams, became the national champion, and set several qualifying records. “I was fortunate to be around, train, race, and live among the greatest people in the industry,” Bell said. “The racing had a big impact on my life and I have a lot of great memories. I gained friends all over the world.” Bell’s promising career took a U-turn on June 28, 1992, in Blaine, Minn. during the Olympic Trials for the Barcelona games. While pedaling a tandem bike in the first of the bestof-three 1,5000-meter sprint championship races, only 40 meters from the finish line, he crashed. Bell hit his head and blacked out. The brutal accident put Bell in a coma for 13 days. He suffered from amnesia and total memory loss. “It is like a chapter torn out of a book,” Bell said. “The last thing I remember before the race was eating dinner three days before the accident.” Not only was Bell in a coma for two weeks, but in a state between coma and full consciousness for another three. “I did not even know I was hurt,” Bell said. “I recall lying in the hospital realizing it was August 2. My first thought was, ‘Oh my God, I overslept’. Then I noticed that my family was around my bed and that I could not walk. I had been in a wheelchair for three weeks without even knowing it. Once my mind came back, it was like a deflating balloon.” Bell believes the Lord saved his life and gave him the opportunity to live again. After gaining full consciousness, Bell was finally transferred to Lakeshore in Birmingham. The doctors told him he would, with consistent progress, be able to walk within nine months. “I did not believe them,” Bell said. “They did not know me.

I told myself I would not leave the hospital until I could walk out the doors on my own feet. That was my goal, vision, and inspiration.” While at Lakeshore, Bell continuously pushed his own limits. “I would hold onto the railing in the hallways and let go for a few seconds at the time,” Bell said. “Eventually, I would park my wheelchair on one side of the hospital hallway and make my way to the end. I was kind of tricking myself, as I would have to walk all the way back to get my wheelchair.” Bell is proud of his effort in learning how to walk again. He utilized the same competitive mentality that he had in sports and used it to improve his quality of life. After gaining his strength and ability to walk, Bell went back to California in an effort to return to cycling. “After a month or so, it was obvious to everyone that I would not be able to compete professionally again,” Bell said. “My coaches and teammates already knew it, but now I knew, too.” Upon returning to Jacksonville, Bell went back to school and finished his undergraduate degree. Subsequently, he started a family and went into business. Together with his wife, he would own rights to almost twenty Pit Stop Grill franchises. As a man constantly looking for new challenges, Bell recently enrolled in graduate school at JSU where he is pursuing a master’s degree in human performance. “JSU has grown a lot since I was an undergraduate student,” Bell said. “I enjoy the university’s innovations, updates, and how it makes waves outside the local community.” Bell believes there is a tremendous potential for JSU with new programs and focuses. He would like to see the university become a training hub for Paralympic cycling athletes. “I can envision the university playing a leading role in the development of wheelchair, blind tandem, and amputated athletes,” Bell said. “There is a need to help wounded military veterans and those suffering from traffic accidents etc. Right now I am taking baby steps to get there. Everyone at JSU has been very helpful and open to my ideas.” Although only time will tell whether or not Bell will see his dream for his alma mater through to fruition, one thing is certain—there is no end to his determination. For more information about Jacksonville State University’s programs in health, physical education and recreation, visit the JSU College of Education and professional Studies website, http://www.jsu.edu/eduprof/

There’s a new sheriff in Montgomery: ALFA

When I went to the legislature in 1982 as a 30-year-old freshman, there were two powerful Steve organizations. The Alabama Farmers Federation (ALFA) Flowers and the Alabama Education Association (AEA) were omnipotent. The Farmers Federation had prevailed as the King of Goat Hill for decades and probably going Inside The Statehouse back to when Alabama became a state. You chose early which side you were on, either ALFA or AEA. It was almost like football in our state where you have to side either with Auburn or Alabama. My choice was easy. Being from a rural county and being a business person, I cast my allegiance with ALFA. Most of us who were pro business chose ALFA. We became known as the conservatives. It may surprise some of you young folks to know that there were essentially no Republicans. We all ran under a Democratic banner even though we were really Republicans. Therefore, we were labeled as conservatives or liberals rather than Republicans or Democrats. The ALFA team and I quickly bonded because even though I was young, I was extremely conservative. In addition to being conservative, I had an insurance background. This they liked because there were very few legislators who were in the insurance business and

understood that industry’s intricacies and nomenclature. Therefore, they leaned on the Speaker and orchestrated my fast track to the chairmanship of the Insurance Committee. There is an old political saying that when a legislator or congressman is close to a group they are asked to carry a lot of water for them. Well, folks, I carried a lot of water for ALFA for close to two decades. We indeed had a special bond and I was their titular floor leader throughout the 1980’s and 1990’s. Around the time I left the legislature in 1998, AEA dethroned ALFA as the big kid on the block. The AEA’s Dr. Paul Hubbert was the new King of Goat Hill for the next two decades. Even though Alabama is a conservative state, the AEA and liberal Democrats ruled the roost. The AEA was the big loser when the Republicans took control of the legislature in 2010. Their demise was to be expected with the GOP takeover. However, nobody knew to what extent the new herd of elephants would stampede and stomp on the once vaunted teachers’ union. In three short years, they have dismantled almost everything Dr. Hubbert garnered over his 24-year reign. It appears that ALFA has regained their throne as the leading conservative voice in Alabama politics. Five generation Chilton County Farmer, Jimmy Parnell, has risen to head the Alabama Farmers Federation. Jimmy became a leader in the Federation as a young man. He was the state leader of the young farmers at a very early age. All of the older farm leaders in the state respected him and thought of him as their peer even though he was half their age. They

expected him to eventually lead the organization one day. He is and has always been wise beyond his years. He comes from the old school and has paid his dues. He is adroit, tactful and understands politics. He will be a political force in the state for years to come. Parnell showed his astuteness by choosing Beth Chapman to be his political general and confidant. Beth’s addition is a brilliant coup. She brings a wealth of knowledge as well as integrity to the table. She understands politics as well as anybody in the state. She also has rural roots. She grew up in Greenville and is a country girl at heart. She is a proven conservative and very popular. She has authored several books with a patriotic theme. Beth Chapman would have been a formidable candidate for the open sixth district congressional seat being vacated by Spencer Bachus next year. She was also projected as one of the leading candidates for governor in 2018. Instead, due to the tragic and untimely death of her husband, she needed to enter the private sector to provide for her family as a single mother. It should be noted that there have been four special elections in the state since Parnell and Chapman came to power. ALFA has been responsible for all four of their endorsed candidates winning. There is a new sheriff in town riding a white conservative horse. That horse is called ALFA. Steve Flowers is Alabama’s leading political columnist. His column appears weekly in more than 70 Alabama newspapers. Steve served 16 years in the state legislature. He may be reached at www.steveflowers.us

Local physician writes of knights and maidens

Recently, a friend presented me with his first book – a novelette of historical fiction called “Will and Ro.” He is a busy physician who wrote it at various times in his days and evenings. Dr. James Ready (pronounced “reedy”) is an Anniston internist who specializes in treating arthritis. The idea for a book came to him about five or six years ago when he was doing something else he enjoys – re-reading classic literature. “You can learn a lot from the classics when you read them as an adult,” he said . Ready came across a once-familiar book, “Ivanhoe.” It is an 1820 novel by Sir Water Scott about a heroic knight. In Scott’s novel, the female character Rowena approaches Ivanhoe who is dressed as a pilgrim returning from a crusade. She doesn’t recognize him, but inquires about her beloved Ivanhoe and says to him, “Thank you, Pilgrim, for news of my childhood friend.” The sentence stayed in Ready’s mind, and he knew there had to be a back-story. He wanted to tell it. He wrote a first

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chapter and showed it to friends, who encouraged him. Then, he spent a year researching the daily lives of young men and women who lived during the 12th century, such as how they dressed, played, and viewed their future. When his research ended, he spent the next Sherry-Go-Round four years writing and editing his story. Ready said there was another motive for writing the book. He wants young women to possess higher standards of how young men should behave. “I have been disappointed in recent years seeing how young women have such low expectations about how young men should treat them,” said Ready. The topic is personal to him. When his two adult sons were children living at home, he sought to teach them how to treat women by being a husband to his wife of 31 years, Patricia. Also, as a Christian, Ready believes the issue is biblical. For instance, in 1st Timothy 5:2, the Bible character Paul told his student Timothy that young men should treat young women as sisters “with absolute purity.” The Bible also condemns sexual impurity and lust, both issues that Ready says are rampant in the news and the entertainment industry. In his book, which is only 24,000 words and can be read in one sitting, the character Ivanhoe, called Wil, displays self-discipline regarding sexual purity during a rather comical scene. An adversary approaches Wil and Ro, and they must quickly

Sherry Kughn

hide a falcon that Wil is holding. He places it beneath Ro’s billowy skirt, which causes her to behave erratically. After the adversary leaves, Wil has to retrieve the bird and, while doing so, touches Ro’s soft thighs. However, he exerts discipline and removes the bird with decorum. Parents are a good market for this story, especially ones who are trying to teach young men and women to use sexual restraint. In the book, Ro behaves herself as an outdoors woman and as a lady. As she matures, she focuses on learning the things a lady should know about serving the queen. Also in the story, Wil rescues Ro from a fire, and both characters spend their youths in preparation for living as honorable adults who face life with courage and duty. While researching and writing the book, Ready said he learned many interesting facts. For instance, the modern phrase “don’t throw the baby out with the bath water,” comes from the way a medieval family took baths. The entire family used only one tub of water, starting with the father, then the mother, then the children from the oldest to youngest. By the time the baby was bathed, it might get lost in the murky water. The novel is self-published with the help of outskirts.com and sells for about $33, but it is cheaper on the Internet or directly from Ready. It has soft-colored illustrations, which cost Ready about $2,000 more than the $900 basic price. For those wanting to order the novelette, go to www.amazon.com or email Ready at jready@cableone.net. Also, it makes a great Christmas gift. “Now I must get busy with marketing the book and recoup the money I spent publishing it,” said Ready. Then he might write another book. There are other messages Ready wants to communicate to young people. He considers his writing a ministry. Email Sherry at sherrykug@hotmail.com

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TUESDAY, DECEMBER 17, 2013 / PAGE 3

THE JACKSONVILLE NEWS

Obituaries

CROOK

Winfield - Funeral services for Ferrell Lairraine Crook, 72, were held Friday, December 13, 2013, at 11 a.m. at the K.L. Brown Funeral Home and Cremation Center Chapel with the Rev. Gary Heathcock officiating. Burial followed in Pleasant Valley Baptist Cemetery. The family received friends at the funeral home from 6-8 p.m. Thursday. Mrs. Crook died Tuesday, December 10, 2013, in Winfield. She is survived by a daughter, Beth Crook James and her husband, Reggie; three sons, Terry Crook and his wife, Leeta, Rob Crook and his wife, Lynn and Ben Crook and his wife, Sukai; a sister, Wayne Pritchett and her husband, Gary; a brother, Mike Wilkinson and his wife, Kathy; nine grandchildren; two greatgrandchildren and two nieces and two nephews. Mrs. Crook was a native of Clay County and resided in Jacksonville for most of her life. She was preceded in death by her husband, Gerald Crook; her parents, Jack and Mae Wilkinson; and two brothers, Kenneth and Kerney Wilkinson. Online condolences at www.klbrownfuneralhome.com. K. L. Brown Funeral Home and Cremation Center 322 Nisbet Street, N.W. Jacksonville, AL 36265 Phone 256-435-7042

PONDER

Jacksonville - Funeral services for Herman Douglas Ponder, 81, were held Sunday, December 15,

2013, at 2 p.m. at the First Baptist Church of Williams, with the Rev. Chris Thomas, Dr. Mike Oliver and the Rev. Bob McLeod officiating. Burial followed in Williams Community Cemetery. The family received friends at the church from 6-8 Saturday. Mr. Ponder died Thursday, December 12, 2013, at his residence. He is survived by his wife, Martha Faye Ponder, of Jacksonville; four daughters, Cindy Newsome, of Jacksonville; Leslie Phillips and her husband, David, of Union Grove, Allison Ostrander and her husband, Mel, of Jacksonville and Camille Chitwood and her husband, Joe, of Jacksonville; two sons, Sean Ponder and his wife, Patti, of Jacksonville and Tyler Ponder and his wife, Wendy, of Jacksonville; three sisters, Dolores Green , Kay Smith and Joyce Connell, all of Jacksonville; two brothers, Charles Ponder and Marion Ponder, both of Jacksonville; thirteen grandchildren; three great grandchildren; and numerous nieces and nephews. Pallbearers will be Chris Newsome, Jeremy Quinn, Robbie Quinn, Reid Ponder, Nick Howard, Jack Ponder and Wendell McGinnis. Honorary pallbearers will be his special friends, Wallace Almaroad, Jim Justice and Jimmy Green and the Doug Ponder Sunday School Class Members. Doug was an active member of the First Baptist Church of Williams, a church Deacon and Sunday School teacher for 53 years. He was known for his wisdom and wit and was an avid sports fan, especially for the Auburn Tigers. Doug was honored recently by his Sunday School Class by having the class named for him. He retired from Gadsden State Community College where he was the Information Technology Director. After retirement, Doug taught as adjunct faculty at Jacksonville State University and Ayers Technical School. Doug served his country during the Korean war in the U.S. Army. Flowers will be accepted or donations can be made to First Baptist Church of Williams Building Fund, 5579 Nisbet Lake Road, Jacksonville, AL 36265. Online condolences at www.klbrownfuneralhome.com. K. L. Brown Funeral Home and Cremation Center 322 Nisbet Street, N.W. Jacksonville, AL 36265 Phone 256-435-7042

Arrests Dec. 6 • Zayne Kary Collins: possession of marijuana (second degree) • Christopher P. Swartz: DUI (alcohol) Dec. 7 • Anthony Dean Lambert: DUI (alcohol) Dec. 10 • Bridget Deanna Connell: assault Dec. 14

• Di-Estefano NMN Mba-Obono: DUI (alcohol) • Christopher Hughel Goodgame: open container of alcohol in a motor vehicle • Marcus Lovell Mallard: burglary (third degree); possession of burglar’s tools and attempting to elude a police officer Dec. 16 Damien Frederick Greene: using a false identity to obstruct justice

Community Capsule • The Calhoun County Community Band meets every Tuesday night at 6:30 at the Jacksonville High School band room. • Free GED classes will be held from 8 a.m.-noon and 5-8 p.m. in Room 173, Self Hall, Jacksonville State University. Call 256-782-5660 for more information. • Bradford Health Services has free family support meetings from 5-6 Monday nights at 1701 B Pelham Rd., S., Suite D (Brookstone Building next to RMC Jacksonville). The meeting is for anyone experiencing behavioral problems with a loved one, has a family member of any age with drug or alcohol problems, needs help coping with a loved one’s drug or alcohol problems or needs help making decision on how to help a family member of any age. A counselor will facilitate the meetings. • Venecia Benefield Butler’s book, “I Have to Get Some Things Off My Chest,” can be purchased for $15 (including tax) by mailing a check to P. O. Box 572, Piedmont 36262, or take money or check to Butler’s sister, Randa Carroll, at the office of Benjamin Ingram at 207 Rome, Ave., Piedmont. Proceeds will go to the V Foundation, founded by Butler, to purchase gift bags for patients going through chemo treatments. The bags will include items such as comedy DVDs, chap stick, gift cards, gas cards, crossword puzzles, Sudoku, search-a-word, lubricant eye drops, gum and peppermints, soft toothbrushes, queasy drops, lotion, neck wrap or hydrating socks. • Knit “and Crochet” Night at Yarns by HPF is from 5-7 the first and third Thursday at the shop, 402 Pelham Rd., N., by Subway. • Classes for the Jacksonville State University Adult Wellness classes at Pete Mathews Coliseum are at 8 a.m., Monday, Wednesday and Friday for senior water aerobics and senior floor aerobic classes and 8 a.m. Tuesday and Thursday for water aerobics and senior therapeutic yoga classes. Contact Aubrey Crossen at 689-2580 or jsu9517k@jsu.edu for more

information. • The Jacksonville Aspiring Writers Group meets from 4 to 6 p.m. on the first and third Tuesday of every month at the public library. Anyone interested in the creative writing process is welcome. Bring samples of original writing to share. The group offers support, critique and information about writing and possible publishing venues. Call 256-499-2182 for more information. • Alcoholics Anonymous meets at noon each Thursday at St. Luke’s Episcopal Church, 400 Chinabee Ave., just off the square. Call 847-0909. • A Narcotics Anonymous group meets from 6:30-7:30 p.m. Tuesdays and Thursdays at First United Methodist Church behind McDonald’s. For more information, call Pearl Williams at 435-4881. • The Friday Night Opry Show is presented from 6:30-9:30 Friday nights at the Golden Saw Music Hall in the Williams community. Call 435-4696. • Celebrate Recovery, a Christ-centered 12-step program, meets every Friday night at First Baptist Church. Dinner is served at 5:30. Large group meetings with worship and praise bands and guest speakers begin at 6:30. Small share/support groups meet after that at 7:30 p.m., followed with cake and fellowship. Call 435-7263 or 225-2492. • The Calhoun County Stamp Club meets at 7 p.m. on the second and fourth Tuesdays in Room 327 Stone Center, Jacksonville State University, corner of Church Avenue and Eleventh Street. Visitors and new members are welcome. Call 782-8044, 782-5604 or 435-7491. • Jacksonville Fire Department is looking for information and items relating to the history of the department. If you have anything to share, call David Bell at 310-8961. • The Public Library Board of Trustees meets at 3:30 p.m. the third Wednesday of each month at the library annex. Anyone needing accommodations is asked to contact librarian Barbara Rowell at 435-6332.

Police Report Dec. 6 • Domestic violence reported in the 1200 block of Church Avenue Southeast. • Third degree criminal mischief reported in the 400 block of Church Avenue Northeast. • First degree robbery reported in the 200 block of Mountain Street Northwest. Dec. 7 • Unlawful breaking and entering a vehicle reported in the 1300 block of Quail Run Drive Southwest. Dec. 8 • Leaving the scene of an accident and damage to city property reported in the Public Square. • Second degree theft of property reported in the 600 block of Vann Street Southeast. Dec. 10 • Third degree domestic violence reported in the 300 block of Harris Street. • First degree theft of property reported in the 900 block of Pelham Road South. Dec. 11 • Third degree criminal mischief reported in the 300 block of Nisbet Street Northwest. • Unlawful breaking and entering a vehicle reported in the 1100 block of 6th Street Northeast. • Theft of property reported in the 2500 block of AL 21 North. • Third degree burglary reported in the 600 block of Gadsden Road Northwest. • Unlawful breaking and entering a vehicle reported in the 2500 block of AL 21 North. • Third degree theft of property reported in the 700 block of 11th

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ANNISTON - 1731 Noble St. ........................................(256) 237-2113 CENTRE - 500 Cedar Bluff Rd. .......................................(256) 927-4203 JACKSONVILLE - 1204 Church Ave. SE ..........................(256) 435-5741 OHATCHEE - Indian Village ..........................................(256) 892-7129 ROANOKE - Hwy. 431 Bypass .....................................(334) 863-8902

Avenue Northwest. • Third degree theft of property reported in the 300 block of Quill Avenue Northwest. • Third degree theft of property reported in the 1600 block of Pelham Road South. • Third degree domestic violence reported in the Village West parking lot. • Third degree domestic violence reported in the 1500 block of Davis Street Southeast. Dec. 12 • Harassment reported in the 500 block of Whites

Gap Road Southeast. Dec. 13 • Possession of a forged instrument and theft of property reported in the 1900 block of Pelham Road South. • Harassment and third degree criminal mischief reported in the 900 block of Mitchell Drive Southwest. Dec. 14 • Unlawful breaking and entering a vehicle reported in the 800 block of 9th Avenue Northeast. • Possession of burglar’s tools, third degree

burglary and attempting to elude a police officer reported in the 500 block of Whites Gap Road Southeast. Dec. 16 • Using a false identity to obstruct justice reported in the 400 block of Madison Avenue Northwest. • Leaving the scene of an accident reported at the intersection of Pelham Road South/James Street Southeast. • Third degree theft of property reported in the 900 block of Vann Street Southeast.


PAGE 4 / TUESDAY, DECEMBER 17, 2013

THE JACKSONVILLE NEWS

Gina Angel decorates all her rooms for Christmas Puts white Christmas tree in daughter’s room

I

BY MARGARET ANDERSON NEWS CORRESPONDENT

t’s no wonder that Gina Angel likes to decorate. She comes from a family of decorators. Her grandmother Ann Thornton of Bynum owns a floral shop in Oxford. She’s known for the beautiful arrangements she creates. Gina’s mother and aunt enjoy decorating their homes. This Christmas is the most special one of all for Gina because she and her husband Will will share it with their six-month-old daughter, Katelyn. Every room in Gina’s home on Cedar Springs Road is decorated. She took special care in decorating Katelyn’s room and chose ornaments of cupcakes and gingerbread houses for the white Christmas tree that’s in that room. She chose pink, lime green and pastels. “Katelyn loves anything that’s bright,” said Gina. “I’ll sit in a rocking chair in her room, and she’ll go to sleep while taking her bottle and looking at the lights.” There’s an 8’ tree in her den, holding snowmen and Santa ornaments. Another big tree in the foyer has no theme, but is decorated in classical gold and silver colors. “In each room, I wrap my gifts to match my tree,” she said. “I make my own bows. In the den, I wrap all my gifts in red and green. The tree in our bedroom is done in red and leopard. I collect elves to go on that one. They’re all signed and numbered. I put a lot of time into all of it.” Gina doesn’t just decorate for Christmas. She decorates for every season and all holidays. Gina was born in Oxford. Her parents are Doug and Shirley (Wooten) Thornton. Her brother, Jason, lives in Oxford. She and Will, a contractor, will be married 10 years in April. They are members of Angel Grove Baptist Church. They were introduced by Gina’s cousin Erica McKenzie. Gina received an associate degree in ultra sound from Virginia College. She works part-time at Regional Medical Center where she performs diagnostic echo cardiograms. By working part-time, she’s able to spend more time with

Anita Kilgore

Gina, Will and Katelyn Angel. Katelyn. “I love being a mother,” said Gina. “It brings me a lot of gratitude, and it’s made all my dreams come true.” She enjoys making memories by spending time with her family, reading, swimming, exercising and cooking. Gina learned to cook by watching her mother. One of the

first dishes she prepared on her own was chili. “I still use that same recipe today and everyone seems to enjoy eating it,” she said. She doesn’t cook on the days she works, but does prepare a full meal at night when she isn’t working. (Contact Margaret at pollya922@gmail.com)

RECIPES SUGAR COOKIES 2 1/3 c. flour 1 t. baking soda 1 t. ground cinnamon 1/4 t. nutmeg 1/4 t. salt 1 1/4 c. sugar 2 sticks butter, softened 1 egg 2 t. vanilla

Decorate with colorful icing. POTATO SOUP

Mix flour, baking soda, cinnamon, nutmeg, and salt. Beat sugar and butter in large bowl with mixer until light and fluffy. Add egg and vanilla and mix well. Gradually beat in flour mixture until well mixed. Refrigerate two hours or overnight until firm. Roll out dough onto lightly floured surface to 1/8 inch thickness. Cut into shapes with Christmas cookie cutters. Bake 8-10 minutes at 375 degrees.

4 lbs. potatoes, cut and boiled 1 can cream of onion soup 1 can cream celery soup 1 can chicken broth 1 pint half and half Pepper Salt

CHRISTMAS CHEESE BALLS

Mix first five ingredients in crock-pot cook. Cook on high five hours. Before serving, add pepper jack. Let melt. Serve with bacon bits. MEXICAN CORNBREAD 1 1/2 c. cornmeal 1/2 c .grated onion

SERVICE NEWS

Hagan completes basic training Air Force Airman 1st Class Mark S. Hagan graduated from basic military training at Joint Base San AntonioLackland, San Antonio, Texas. The airman completed an intensive, eight-week program that included training in military discipline and studies, Air Force core values, physical fitness, and basic warfare principles and skills. Airmen who complete basic training

1 c. grated sharp cheese 1 c. cream corn 3 T. crushed red pepper 1/2 c. oil 3 eggs 1/2 c. sweet milk Mix all ingredients. Bake in cast iron skillet for one and one half hours at 350 degrees.

earn four credits toward an associate in applied science degree through the Community College of the Air Force. Hagan is the son of Mary Zinola of Jacksonville and Dave Hagan of St. Cloud, Fla. He is a 2006 graduate of Jacksonville High School. He received a bachelor’s degree in 2011 from Jacksonville State University.

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I love being a mother. It brings me a lot of gratitude, and it’s made all my dreams come true” Gina Angel

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TUESDAY, DECEMBER 17, 2013/ PAGE 5

THE JACKSONVILLE NEWS

KIWANIS CHRISTMAS

Club members celebrate the holiday with seniors

// Photos by Anita Kilgore

Kiwanis Club members had a holiday meal and a brief meeting, then headed over to the senior center to share Christmas carols with the seniors. This has become a holiday tradition for the club. ABOVE LEFT: Sandra Triplett sings with the seniors. ABOVE: Sandra Triplett accompanied by Jan Barnwell.

PARADE: This is the 23rd year Edwards has coordinated parade From page 1

Edwards said there are no entry fees, nor are there prizes given. “I just let everybody fill out an application and just come,” she said. “Like I said in the beginning 23 years ago, all you have to have is a band, Santa Claus and children, and you can have a parade. The excitement on children’s faces when they see Santa is priceless.” Edwards said she didn’t do the work alone. She had the help of her sons and daughter-in-law, Michael, Tyler and Katie. Her husband Lynn, who owns Edwards Grocery and Valley Meats on Alabama 204, provided the candy which was tossed from the floats. “They won’t let you throw candy in a lot

of parades,” said Edwards. “I think that’s a big part of it though.” Edwards credited Police Chief Tommy and his department as well as the fire department for blocking off the roads and for their assistance in helping to see that the parade ran smoothly. “Chief Thompson always does an awesome job with that,” she said. “Radio 810 was there interviewing people and announcing the entries as they went by.” The Jacksonville High School Band was the only band in attendance. Others had to cancel. “Jacksonville High School’s band always does such an awesome job,” said Edwards. “Jeff Gossett always works with us. I couldn’t do it without my Jeff.” Edwards said she appreciated Brock

Davis driving her in his golf cart as she coordinated the units in the parade. He also helped her line everyone up. Others helping were Jimmie Coheley, Mike, Dawn and Dylan Parsons, Carol Jenkyn and her daughter, Christine, Kyle Womack, Derrick, Lynn, Katie and Tyler Alexander. Steve Clendon made the banner again this year. The banner tells the parade theme and leads the parade. This year’s theme was “Rocking Around the Christmas Tree.” Edwards said she wanted to recognize News photographer Anita Kilgore who has never failed to photograph a parade.” “We appreciate her time and her talent,” said Edwards. “No matter what the weather is, she’s always there and is always so cooperative.” Everyone cheered as Santa (aka) Max

King bought up the rear of the parade. Riding on a fire truck, Santa was a big hit, just as he is every year. Churches, clubs, scouts, individuals and merchants made up the parade. There were entries from Anniston, Oxford and Gadsden. This is the 23rd year Edwards has coordinated the parade. When asked if she’s going to do it next year, she gives a quick answer. “I can’t give it up,” she said. “It’s my pride and joy.” Edwards said she’s already planning next year’s parade. “I’m in the process right now of picking a date,” she said. “I’m ready to go.” (Contact Margaret at pollya922@gmail. com)

Walgreens helps disabled vets at Christmas

ABOVE: Ryan Fragoso (back, left) and Aveil Zapata of Scout Troop 19 help a customer as he makes a donation to help Disabled American Veterans during the Christmas parade Thursday night. Walgreens will use the donations for raffles to help raise money for the Anniston and Piedmont chapters of the DAV. Even though the parade is over, donations can still be made by calling Buddy Jones at 782-1502 for more information. RIGHT: Walgreens float in the Christmas parade.

See more parade photos on page 12.

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// Photos by Anita Kilgore

In 2013, AARP fought hard to convince the Alabama Public Service Commission to lower rates for all Alabamians.

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And the decision was made behind closed doors. AARP will continue to be an advocate for our members because they deserve fair and affordable rates and public rate cases like those in every other state.

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PAGE 6 / TUESDAY, DECEMBER 17, 2013

THE JACKSONVILLE NEWS

Jacksonville This is my commandment, That ye love one another, as I have loved you.

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TUESDAY, DECEMBER 17, 2013/ PAGE 7

CALHOUN COUNTY CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

Work Week....The Voice of Business in Jacksonville MEMBER OF THE MONTH — VERIZON WIRELESS

Thank you for all that you do for our community! Live, Shop, Think LOCAL this holiday season! Top Reasons to Buy Local, Eat Local, Go Local this Holiday Season By choosing local businesses for your shopping, services, dining and other needs, you not only get real value and personal service, you: STRENGTHEN YOUR LOCAL ECONOMY! Each dollar you spend at local small businesses returns to our local economy! SHAPE OUR CHARACTER! Small Business help give our community diversity and often sell locally made goods. LOWER TAXES! The greater number of small businesses, the lower the taxes because they also generate more tax revenue per sales dollar. ENHANCE CHOICES! The wide variety of small businesses serve the needs of each individual customer! CREATE JOBS AND OPPORTUNITIES! Small Businesses employ more people directly and are the customers of local printers, accountants, farms, attorneys, etc., expanding opportunities for the other local entrepreneurs. GIVE BACK TO YOUR COMMUNITY! Small businesses donate more to local non-profits, events, and teams.

Be on the lookout for your Chamber Connections Magazine, with recaps of Chamber events, stories and spotlights on local business and industries and more!

MARK YOUR CALENDAR: Annual Meeting Thursday, January 23, 12-1:30 p.m. at the Oxford Civic Center More information COMING SOON! For sponsorship information, please call the Chamber at 256-237-3536. Levels available range from Platinum, Gold, Silver or Bronze.

Monday, December 16, the Chamber’s Restaurant Committee and Anniston Community Education Foundation’s Americorps team volunteered to help out at The Right Place work day. The Right Place is a newly formed organization that will aid the homeless and low income families and individuals in Calhoun County. For more information on The Right Place, contact Rita Flegel at 256-238-6231.

Dec. 13, the Chamber Staff retreated to Shocco Springs Baptist Conference Center to make plans for a great and opportunity packed 2014.

Thursday, December 12, the Chamber’s LCC Class held their Community Service Day with the non-profit agency fair and tours of local non-profit agencies.

The first Thursday of each month, the Chamber holds its Business & Biscuits. For the Tuesday, December 10, this year’s YLCC class had their Community Service Day, month of December, Monet Salon and Day Spa, located at 326 E. Blue Mountain volunteering for local non-profit organizations. Road, Anniston, hosted the networking event.


THE JACKSONVILLE NEWS

PAGE 8 / TUESDAY, DECEMBER 17, 2013

JSU: Injuries slow down Gamecocks

From page 1

Jenkins had accounted for 245 total yards (127 passing, 118 rushing) before leaving with an injury late in the second quarter. James, who had a 1-yard TD run midway through the second quarter, also sat out the second half after being hurt. James finished the 2013 campaign with a school-record 29 rushing touchdowns. Eastern Washington scored on its first drive of the second half to regain the lead for good. The Eagles added the clincher when Havili stepped in front of a Max Shortell pass and returned the interception 77 yards with 10:40 remaining to make it 35-24. Jacksonville State - which had outscored its first two playoff opponents (Samford, McNeese State) by a combined 59-0 in the first half - found itself tied with the high-octane Eagles 21-21 at intermission. The two offenses piled up 649 yards in the first 30 minutes. JSU’s defense forced a pair of first-half turnovers after the Eagles had moved into the red zone. The first turnover, a fumble recovery by Harris Gaston, came after the only punt of the half, a 35-yarder by Hamish MacInnes that gave EWU possession at JSU’s 37. But Gaston forced a fumble at the goal line and recovered it in the end zone to stop the threat. Jacksonville State came back with a 60-yard march from its 20 to Eastern Washington’s 20. But the Gamecocks came away without points when All-American kicker Griffin Thomas missed a 37-yard field goal attempt wide to the right. Eastern Washington covered 80 yards in six plays after the missed field goal try. Adams capped it off with a 29-yard scoring pass to Cooper Kupp at the 5:52 mark to make it 7-0. The Jenkins-led Gamecocks’ offense took the ensuing kickoff and drove 75 yards in 13 plays to tie it. Telvin Brown capped the drive by taking a pitch from Jenkins and tossing a 3-yard pass to tight end Gavin Ellis in the back of the end zone. Thomas kicked the PAT to make it 7-7 with 55 seconds left in the first quarter. Robert Gray intercepted Adams early in the second quarter and JSU took advantage of the second EWU turnover. Jenkins’ running and passing quickly moved the Gamecocks 80 yards in 12 plays. Jenkins finished off the go-ahead scoring march with a 10-yard pass to Anthony Johnson at the 10:48 mark and Thomas’ PAT gave JSU a 14-7 lead. Eastern Washington’s second scoring drive of 1 minute, 45 seconds pulled the Eagles into a 14-14 tie. Forte went three yards for a touchdown at the 9:03 mark and Kevin Miller’s kick tied the game for the second time. But the first-half scoring outburst wasn’t over. James took a direct snap and ran in from the EWU 1 with 6:11 left in the second quarter to finish off a 72-yard drive. Thomas’ PAT put Jacksonville State ahead for the second time, 21-14. The Eagles, however, answered with another quick score, drawing even at 21-21 when Adams and Ashton Clark hooked up on a 41-yard TD reception with 2:39 left before halftime. Eastern Washington’s Adams, a sophomore, threw for 324 yards with two touchdowns and two interceptions. Clark caught 11 of Adams’ 18 completions for 181 yards and one TD. Shortell was 12-of-22 for 173 yards in relief of Jenkins with two interceptions. Troymaine Pope gained 49 yards on 14 carries after stepping in for James. The Gamecocks are slated to kick off the 2014 season on Aug. 30 at defending Big Ten Conference champion Michigan State.

Lori Tippets

Quenteeria Mooney fights a Lady Warrior for the ball in area action.

Lady Eagles remain unbeaten in area play LORI TIPPETS teamtip@hotmail.com

The Jacksonville Lady Eagles took a quick lead in area standings last week beating Hokes Bluff 59-41 and Cherokee County 63-42. The Lady Eagles (7-3, 2-0) dominated both games from the start. Against Hokes Bluff, Jacksonville built on a 13-4 first quarter lead to go up 20-10 at the half. Jacksonville kept the pressure on in the second half outscoring Hokes Bluff 18-15 in the third quarter and 21-16 in the fourth quarter to take the 59-41 win. Virginia Poe led the Lady Eagles with 19 points. Also scoring in double figures were Dasia Kirksey and Angel Kidd both with 11 points. Sierra Stone also contributed nine points, and Destiny Easley, Darrien Martin and Quenteeria Mooney all chipped in three points. The Lady Eagles doubled Cherokee County’s score in the first quarter, 18-9, and outscored the Lady Warriors 35-17 in the second half for the 63-42 win. Poe, hitting 10-for-20 from the field, once again led Jacksonville with 24 points. Stone, hitting on 5-of-7 from the field ended with 10 points. Also scoring for Jacksonville were Kirksey and Kidd with eight points each, Martin, 6, Destiny Easley scored four and Ataliya Morgan had three.

JHS boys drop two close area games Jacksonville High School’s boys’ team finds themselves down two area games after losing two close ones last week. The Eagles lost to Hokes Bluff 61-58 and Cherokee County 59-54. Despite being outrebounded 33-16 by Hokes Bluff with their 7’2” Purdue bound Isaac Haas bringing down most of those rebounds, the Eagles played a tight game throughout. Jacksonville was actually up by one at the end of the first quarter 13-12 and had a 34-33 lead going into the locker room. Both teams battled each other in the second half but it was Hokes Bluff squeaking out the win 61-58. Cameron Horton led Jacksonville with 25 and Sid Thur-

mond was also in double figures with 16 points. Lavontae LaCount scored eight points, Tay Ackles 3, and Payton Sims, Miles Clark and Dakota Doss all had two points. Haas finished the game with 25 points, hitting 11-of-12 from the floor. The Eagles (3-4, 0-2) jumped ahead of Cherokee County 18-12 in the first quarter but Cherokee County kept them at bay throughout the rest of the close game. Horton once again led the Eagle scoring with 24 points, and Thurmond, who was 6-for-6 from the foul line, had 16. Doss added six points to the Jacksonville total with Ackles adding three, Elijah Cunningham and LaCount two each and Sims one. Tony Pruitt had 22 points for the Warriors.

JCA girls pick up win over Sacred Heart

The JCA Thunder girls’ team picked up an area win to bring their mark to 2-1 in area play, 5-3 overall. The Thunder beat Sacred Heart 50-36. Sarah Crook had 20 points for JCA with Elysabeth Morales adding 10 points and nine rebounds. Rachel Russaw had four points, seven rebounds, three assists and six steals in the win with Joeley Cupp contributed eight points.

Pleasant Valley boys lose to Ohatchee

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Dartmouth rocks Jaxmen, 76-46

Trent Penny / Consolidated News Service

Jacksonville State linebacker Robert Gray leaps high to intercept a pass in the end zone against Eastern Washington during Saturday’s game

HANOVER, N.H. Four players scored in double figures to help Dartmouth hand the Jacksonville State men’s basketball team a 76-46 loss on Saturday at Leede Arena. Senior Nick Cook led the Gamecocks with eight points while junior Darion Rackley added seven points and a teamhigh five rebounds. The Gamecocks shot just 30.4 percent (17-of-56) while being out-rebounded 46-23 to fall to 4-8 on the season. Alex Mitola scored 16 points behind a 4-of-7 night from behind the 3-point line while John Golden added 14 points to lead the Big Green. Tyler Melville and Brandon McDonnell each finished with 12 points as

Dartmouth shot 54.2 percent (26-of-48) from the field to improve to 4-4 on the year. The Gamecocks struggled from the field in the first half, shooting just 6-of-26 (23.1 percent) while watching the Big Green knock down 6-of-13 from three while shooting 48 percent (12of-25) from the field. Freshman Undra Mitchem knocked down a three to tie the game at 10-10 before Dartmouth used a 10-0 run to take a 20-10 lead with 10:14 to play. Cook then ended a four minute scoring drought for JSU with a layup underneath to break up the Big Green run. Mitola then hit his third 3 of the half with 5:09 to play to give Dartmouth

a 31-15 lead. The Big Green then closed the half hitting six straight free throws while building a 37-17 lead at the break while holding the Gamecocks scoreless for the final 2:24 of the half. The Gamecocks will next return home to Pete Mathews Coliseum for a rematch with Central Michigan on tonight. Tipoff is set for 7:45.

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THE JACKSONVILLE NEWS

TUESDAY, DECEMBER 17, 2013/ PAGE 9

FUN & GAMES WITH THE NEWS

Anita Kilgore

Daughters of the King members Sandra Caldwell (left) and Laura Leigh Cobbs help get food ready to be distributed at St. Luke’s.

ST. LUKE’S: Gave out 150 bags of non-perishable food Saturday From page 1

time to remind people of the importance of giving year round,” said St. Luke’s rector Michael Rich. “The firefighters wanted an opportunity to become more involved in the community. The church is already deeply involved and, by coming together in this effort, we’re able to serve others as we approach Christmas, which is a time when our hearts and minds are turned toward giving to others.” St. Luke’s Daughters of the King gives out bags of rice and beans from Sandra

Caldwell, president of that organization, said members thought they needed to do something special since it’s Christmas, so they gave out 150 bags of non-perishable food Saturday, with the help of the firefighters association. “I just think Christmas is giving, and I wanted our church to give more than just the beans and rice,” she said. Caldwell said she’ll be baking cookies to take to the firemen as a way of thanking them for their help. (Contact Margaret at pollya922@ gmail.com)

Last week’s answers

Anita Kilgore

From left, firefighter David Bell, Laura Leigh Cobbs, Sandra Caldwell and Michael Rich congratulate each other after a successful food drive conducted by St. Luke’s and firefighters.

MERLE NORMAN: Couple go to West Side Baptist Church From page 1

That way, when you walk out of our store, you’re going to have a product that is just right for you.” Bussey said the Jacksonville community has received the new business warmly. “Everyone has been wonderful,” she said. We have people, even if they’re not

interested in our products or services, to come in and welcome us to the community.” Clemment works at Anniston Army Depot. He and Bussey attend West Side Baptist Church. They will marry in October. (Contact Margaret at pollya922@ gmail.com)

Merle Norman manager Lori Bussey and owner Roger Clemment with Bussey’s son Garison Mayne. The Merle Norman store is now open for business and offers free facials as well as a full supply of beauty products.

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The Jacksonville News

10 • Tuesday, December 17, 2013

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TO THE BEST OF OUR KNOWLEDGE All of the ads in this column represent legitimate offerings, however The Jacksonville News does recommend that readers exercise normal business caution in responding to ads.

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STATE OF ALABAMA CALHOUN COUNTY PROBATE COURT CASE NO. 31836 IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF HESTER LETT, DECEASED Letters Testamentary on the estate of HESTER LETT, deceased, having been granted to JUDITH ANGEL, the undersigned on November 21, 2013, by the Honorable Alice K. Martin, Judge of Probate of said County, notice is hereby given that all persons having claims against said estate, are hereby required to present the same within the time allowed by law, or the same will be barred. JUDITH ANGEL, Personal Representative of the Last Will and Testament of HESTER LETT, Deceased. Alice K. Martin Judge of Probate The Jacksonville News Calhoun Co., AL December 3, 10, 17 2013

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The Jacksonville News Calhoun Co., AL December 3, 10, 17 2013

NOTICE TO CREDITORS

STATE OF ALABAMA CALHOUN COUNTY PROBATE COURT CASE NO. 31815 IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF HENRY E. WYNN, JR., DECEASED Letters Testamentary on the estate of HENRY E. WYNN, JR., deceased, having been

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DEADLINE Tues., Dec. 17, 9:00 a.m. Tues., Dec. 17, 12 noon Wed., Dec. 18, 9:00 a.m. Wed., Dec. 18, 12 noon Thurs., Dec. 19, 12 noon No Publication - Merry Christmas! Fri., Dec. 20, 12 noon Mon., Dec. 23, 12 noon Thurs., Dec. 26, 10:00 a.m. Fri., Dec. 27, 10:00 p.m. Fri., Dec. 27, 12 noon Fri., Dec. 27, 5:00 p.m.

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CLEBURNE NEWS PUBLICATION Thurs., Dec. 26 Thurs., Jan. 2

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326133


The Jacksonville News

Summary of City’s Obligations with Respect to the School Board Sept. 1 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022 2023 2024 2025 2026 2027 2028 2029 The Jacksonville News 2030 Calhoun Co., AL 2031 December 3, 10, 17 2013 2032 NOTICE TO 2033 2034 CREDITORS 2035 STATE OF ALABAMA 2036 CALHOUN COUNTY 2037 PROBATE COURT 2038 CASE NO. 31838 2039 IN THE MATTER OF THE 2040 ESTATE OF MINZO CHILDS, 2041 DECEASED 2042 Letters of Administration on the 2043 estate of MINZO CHILDS, de- Minimum Annual Amount Alloceased, having been granted cated by the City of Jacksonto the undersigned on Novem- ville to the Jacksonville City ber 21, 2013, by the Honorable Schools Alice K. Martin, Judge of Pro- $400,000 bate of said County, notice is 400,000 hereby given that all persons 400,000 having claims against said es- 400,000 tate, are hereby required to 400,000 present the same within the 400,000 time allowed by law, or the 400,000 same will be barred. 400,000 WESLEY M. FRYE, Personal 400,000 Representative of the Estate of 400,000 MINZO CHILDS, Deceased. 400,000 Alice K. Martin 400,000 Judge of Probate 400,000 400,000 The Jacksonville News 400,000 Calhoun Co., AL 400,000 December 3, 10, 17, 2013 400,000 400,000 ORDINANCE NO. 400,000 400,000 0-558-14 400,000 AN ORDINANCE AUTHORIZ- 400,000 ING, APPROVING AND EXE- 400,000 CUTING A FUNDING AGREE- 400,000 MENT DATED AS OF DE- 400,000 CEMBER 1, 2013 BETWEEN 400,000 THE CITY OF JACKSONVILLE 400,000 AND THE CITY BOARD OF 400,000 EDUCATION OF THE CITY 400,000 OF JACKSONVILLE 400,000 WHEREAS, the City Board of Portion of Annual Amount AlloEducation of the City of Jack- cated to School Improvements sonville (the “Board”) is vested in City’s Series 2013 Warrant with the general administration Issue and supervision of the public $230,126 schools and educational inter- 228,426 ests of the City of Jacksonville 231,726 (the “City”). 229,926 WHEREAS, the Board has pro- 233,126 posed to issue its approximate- 231,226 ly $8,440,000 principal amount 228,376 of Special Tax School War- 230,526 rants, Series 2013, dated De- 231,526 cember 1, 2013 (the “Series 229,033 2013 Warrants’’) pursuant to a 231,408 resolution to be duly adopted 228,108 by the Board (the “Authorizing 229,808 Resolution”). 231,243 WHEREAS, the Series 2013 232,463 Warrants are issued for the 228,400 purposes of (1) constructing a 232,150 new 230,400 elementary school and (2) pay- 228,400 ing issuance expenses. 231,150 WHEREAS, the City has deter- 228,400 mined that it is in the best pub- 232,000 lic interest to commit not less 230,200 than the amounts set forth on 228,200 Exhibit A attached hereto and 231,000 incorporated herein to the pay- 228,400 ment of debt service on the 230,600 Board’s 2013 Warrants. 232,400 WHEREAS, the Board has re- 228,800 quested and the City has 0 agreed to enter into a Funding Minimum Remaining Balance Agreement dated as of Decem- of Annual Amount Payable to ber 1, 2013, pursuant to which Jacksonville City Schools Unthe City will agree to transfer der This Funding Agreement the $169,874 aforesaid committed amounts 171,574 to the Board for payment of the 168,274 debt service on the Series 170,074 2013 166,874 Warrants. 168,774 NOW THEREFORE BE IT 171,624 ORDAINED BY THE CITY 169,474 COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF 168,474 JACKSONVILLE, ALABAMA, 170,967 AS FOLLOWS: 168,592 Section 1. 171,892 The foregoing “WHEREAS” 170,192 clauses are hereby incorporat- 168,757 ed herein by reference. 167,537 Section 2. The Funding Agree- 171,600 ment, a copy of which is at- 167,850 tached hereto as Exhibit B and 169,600 incorporated herein by refer- 171,600 ence, in substantially the form 168,850 and of substantially the content 171,600 as the form of that which was 168,000 presented to and considered at 169,800 this meeting, with such chang- 171,800 es 169,000 or additions thereto or dele- 171,600 tions therefrom as the Finance 169,400 Director/Treasurer and Chief 167,600 School 171,200 Financial Officer of the Board 400,000 shall agree to and the Mayor Exhibit B (includes exhibits to shall approve, which approval agreement) shall be conclusively evi- FUNDING AGREEMENT denced by the Mayor’s execu- Dated as of December 1, 2013 tion of the same as hereinafter By and Between CITY OF provided, is JACKSONVILLE, ALABAMA hereby approved, adopted, au- and CITY BOARD OF thorized, ratified and con- EDUCATION OF THE CITY firmed. OF Section 3. The Mayor and the JACKSONVILLE, ALABAMA City Clerk are hereby author- FUNDING AGREEMENT ized and directed to execute This Funding Agreement (the and deliver the Funding Agree- “Agreement”), by and between ment as directed by the Board. the City of Jacksonville, AlaSection 4. The City agrees, bama (the “City”) and the City with respect to the Board’s Se- Board of Education of the City ries 2013 Warrants, to pay the of Jacksonville, Alabama (the Board not less than the month- “Board”), is made and entered ly installments set forth on Ex- this 1st day of December, hibit C attached hereto and in- 2013. corporated herein by refer- Recitals ence. The Board is vested with the Section 5. The City’s obligation general administration and suunder the Funding Agreement pervision of the public schools is a general obligation of the and educational interests of City but is not chargeable and in the City. against the state constitutional The Board has proposed to isdebt limit thereof by virtue of sue its approximately being solely attributable to $8,440,000 principal amount of school purposes. Special Tax School Warrants, Section 6. Nothing herein shall Series 2013, dated December limit or prevent the City, in any 1, 2013 (the “Series 2013 year or month, from contribut- Warrants”) pursuant to a resoing to the Board more than the lution duly to be adopted by the amounts contemplated herein Board (the “Authorizing and as set forth in the Funding Resolution”). Agreement. The Series 2013 Warrants are PASSED AND ADOPTED this issued for the purposes of (1) the 9th day of December, constructing a new elementary 2013. school and (2) paying issuance Approved by Mayor Johnny L. expenses. Smith The City has determined that it Attest: City Clerk Dorothy P. is in the best public interest to Wilson CMC commit not less than the EXHIBIT A amounts set forth on Exhibits A granted to LINDA WYNN LYONS, the undersigned on November 19, 2013, by the Honorable Alice K. Martin, Judge of Probate of said County, notice is hereby given that all persons having claims against said estate, are hereby required to present the same within the time allowed by law, or the same will be barred. LINDA WYNN LYONS, Personal Representatives of the Last Will and Testament of HENRY E. WYNN, JR., Deceased. Alice K. Martin Judge of Probate

and B attached hereto and incorporated herein by reference each year to the payment of debt service on the Board’s 2013 Warrants. The Board and the City have entered into this Funding Agreement to provide for the transfer of the committed notless-than amounts from the City to the Board for the payment of the debt service on the Board’s Series 2013 Warrants. The Board and the City have entered into this Funding Agreement pursuant to the laws of the State of Alabama, including Section 16-13-309 of the Code of Alabama, 1975. NOW, THEREFORE, in consideration of the premises and the mutual covenants and agreements hereinafter contained, it is hereby agreed between the City and Board as follows: SECTION 1. Agreement of City to Provide Funds. (a) The City hereby covenants and agrees to pay monthly to the Board, in bankable funds and without the necessity of demand therefor, not less than the amounts set forth on Exhibit B attached hereto and by this reference made a part hereof, each said amount to be paid in monthly installments during the twelve-month period set opposite such amount as more particularly provided in subsection (b). The obligation of the City to make such payments as herein provided shall be a general, irrevocable obligation of the City and shall remain in full force and effect, regardless of the happening of any event, until this Funding Agreement is terminated in accordance with its terms. (b) Beginning on or before January 25, 2014, and continuing on or before the twenty-fifth day of each month in each year thereafter, until this Funding Agreement is terminated in accordance with its terms, the City shall pay to the Board not less than the amounts set forth on Exhibit B opposite the applicable twelve month period in which said payment is made; provided that if not needed to pay debt service on June 1, 2014, the amount received as accrued interest on the 2013 Warrants may be used as a credit against the payments to be made by the City for the first twelve month period. (c) If any monthly payment to the Board is less than the amount herein provided to be paid in such month, the amount of any such deficiency shall be added to the amount due to the Board on the then next ensuing payment date hereunder. (d) Notwithstanding anything herein to the contrary, if on any principal or interest payment dates the balance in the Warrant Fund created under the Authorizing Resolution is insufficient to pay the principal of, premium, if any, and interest on the 2013 Warrants due and payable on such date and the City has made its required payments hereunder, then the Board shall forthwith pay any such deficiency into the Warrant Fund. (e) The City may make such payments to the Board from any funds or revenues which at the time of any such payment the City is authorized by law to transfer to the Board to pay debt service on capital improvements to the Board’s educational facilities. (f) The City’s obligation to make the payments described on Exhibit B shall survive the refunding, whether in whole or in part, of the Series 2013 Warrants and shall apply to any obligations issued to refund the Series 2013 Warrants, whether in whole or in part. Nothing herein shall prevent the City from contributing more to the Board than the monthly amounts shown on Exhibit B. SECTION 2. Binding Effect; Governing Law. This Funding Agreement shall inure to the benefit of and shall be binding upon the City and the Board and their respective successors and assigns. This Funding Agreement shall be governed exclusively by the applicable laws of the State of Alabama. SECTION 3. Effective Date; Termination. This Funding Agreement shall take effect upon the date hereof and shall not be terminated by either party until all of the 2013 Warrants (and/or obligations hereafter issued to refund the same) shall have been paid in full. SECTION 4. Third Party Beneficiaries. Regions Bank, the paying bank for the 2013 Warrants, is explicitly recognized as a third-party beneficiary hereunder and may enforce any right, remedy or claim conferred, given or granted hereunder. SECTION 5. Continuing Disclosure Undertaking. To the extent required by Rule 15c2-12 promulgated by the Securities and Exchange Commission pursuant to the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, the City agrees to provide to the Board such financial information as the Board may reasonably request. SECTION 6. Execution In Counterparts. This Funding Agreement may be executed in several counterparts, each of which shall be an original and all of which shall constitute but one and the same instrument. SECTION 7. Section Captions. The section headings contained herein are included for convenience only and should not be considered a part hereof or affect in any manner the construction or interpretation of this Funding Agreement. SECTION 8. City May Make Additional Payments To Board.

Nothing herein shall limit the City in any year or month from contributing funds to the Board in addition to those shown herein and described on Exhibits A and B. IN WITNESS WHEREOF, the City and the Board have caused this Funding Agreement to be executed in their respective corporate names and have caused their respective corporate seals to be hereunto affixed, and have caused this Funding Agreement to be attested, all by their duly authorized officers, and have caused this Funding Agreement to be dated the date and year first written above. CITY SEAL Attest: City Clerk Dorothy P. Wilson, CMC CITY BOARD OF EDUCATION OF THE CITY OF JACKSONVILLE President SCHOOL BOARD SEAL Attest: Superintendent and Ex-officio Secretary EXHIBIT A Summary of City’s Obligations with Respect to the School Board Sept. 1 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022 2023 2024 2025 2026 2027 2028 2029 2030 2031 2032 2033 2034 2035 2036 2037 2038 2039 2040 2041 2042 2043 Minimum Annual Amount Allocated by the City of Jacksonville to the Jacksonville City Schools $400,000 400,000 400,000 400,000 400,000 400,000 400,000 400,000 400,000 400,000 400,000 400,000 400,000 400,000 400,000 400,000 400,000 400,000 400,000 400,000 400,000 400,000 400,000 400,000 400,000 400,000 400,000 400,000 400,000 400,000 Portion of Annual Amount Allocated to School Improvements in City’s Series 2013 Warrant Issue $230,126 228,426 231,726 229,926 233,126 231,226 228,376 230,526 231,526 229,033 231,408 228,108 229,808 231,243 232,463 228,400 232,150 230,400 228,400 231,150 228,400 232,000 230,200 228,200 231,000 228,400 230,600 232,400 228,800 0 Minimum Remaining Balance of Annual Amount Payable to Jacksonville City Schools Under This Funding Agreement $169,874 171,574 168,274 170,074 166,874 168,774 171,624 169,474 168,474 170,967 168,592 171,892 170,192 168,757 167,537 171,600 167,850 169,600 171,600 168,850 171,600 168,000 169,800 171,800 169,000 171,600 169,400 167,600 171,200 400,000 EXHIBIT B City’s Minimum Monthly Payment Schedule to School Board Monthly Installment Period January 25, 2014 August 25, 2014 September 25, 2014 August 25, 2015 September 25, 2015 -

Tuesday, December 17, 2013 • 11

August 25, 2016 September 25, 2016 August 25, 2017 September 25, 2017 August 25, 2018 September 25, 2018 August 25, 2019 September 25, 2019 August 25, 2020 September 25, 2020 August 25, 2021 September 25, 2021 August 25, 2022 September 25, 2022 August 25, 2023 September 25, 2023 August 25, 2024 September 25, 2024 August 25, 2025 September 25, 2025 August 25, 2026 September 25, 2026 August 25, 2027 September 25, 2027 August 25, 2028 September 25, 2028 August 25, 2029 September 25, 2029 August 25, 2030 September 25, 2030 August 25, 2031 September 25, 2031 August 25, 2032 September 25, 2032 August 25, 2033 September 25, 2033 August 25, 2034 September 25, 2034 August 25, 2035 September 25, 2035 August 25, 2036 September 25, 2036 August 25, 2037 September 25, 2037 August 25, 2038 September 25, 2038 August 25, 2039 September 25, 2039 August 25, 2040 September 25, 2040 August 25, 2041 September 25, 2041 August 25, 2042 September 25, 2042 August 25, 2043 Minimum Amount Due Monthly $21,235 14,298 14,023 14,173 13,907 14,065 14,302 14,123 14,040 14,248 14,050 14,325 14,183 14,064 13,962 14,300 13,988 14,134 14,300 14,071 14,300 14,000 14,150 14,317 14,084 14,300 14,117 13,967 14,267 33,334 EXHIBIT C City’s Minimum Monthly Payment Schedule to School Board Monthly Installment Period January 25, 2014 August 25, 2014 September 25, 2014 August 25, 2015 September 25, 2015 August 25, 2016 September 25, 2016 August 25, 2017 September 25, 2017 August 25, 2018 September 25, 2018 August 25, 2019 September 25, 2019 August 25, 2020 September 25, 2020 August 25, 2021 September 25, 2021 August 25, 2022 September 25, 2022 August 25, 2023 September 25, 2023 August 25, 2024 September 25, 2024 August 25, 2025 September 25, 2025 August 25, 2026 September 25, 2026 August 25, 2027 September 25, 2027 August 25, 2028 September 25, 2028 August 25, 2029 September 25, 2029 August 25, 2030 September 25, 2030 August 25, 2031 September 25, 2031 August 25, 2032 September 25, 2032 August 25, 2033 September 25, 2033 August 25, 2034 September 25, 2034 August 25, 2035 September 25, 2035 August 25, 2036 September 25, 2036 August 25, 2037 September 25, 2037 August 25, 2038 September 25, 2038 August 25, 2039 September 25, 2039 August 25, 2040 September 25, 2040 August 25, 2041 September 25, 2041 August 25, 2042 September 25, 2042 August 25, 2043 Minimum Amount Due Monthly $21,235 14,298 14,023 14,173 13,907 14,065 14,302 14,123 14,040 14,248 14,050 14,325 14,183 14,064 13,962 14,300 13,988 14,134 14,300 14,071 14,300 14,000 14,150 14,317 14,084 14,300 14,117 13,967 14,267

33,334 The Jacksonville News Calhoun Co., AL December 17, 2013

NOTICE TO CREDITORS

STATE OF ALABAMA CALHOUN COUNTY PROBATE COURT CASE NO. 31816 IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF WILLIAM GARLAND CHISOLM, DECEASED Letters of Administration on the estate of WILLIAM GARLAND CHISOLM, deceased, having been granted to the undersigned on December 3, 2013, by the Honorable Alice K. Martin, Judge of Probate of said County, notice is hereby given that all persons having claims against said estate, are hereby required to present the same within the time allowed by law, or the same will be barred. DENISE M. GANN, Personal Representative of the Estate of WILLIAM GARLAND CHISOLM, Deceased. Alice K. Martin Judge of Probate The Jacksonville News Calhoun Co., AL December 10, 17, 24, 2013

NOTICE TO CREDITORS

STATE OF ALABAMA CALHOUN COUNTY PROBATE COURT CASE NO. 31795 IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF KIMBERLY SUE MCCOY, DECEASED Letters of Administration on the estate of KIMBERLY SUE MCCOY, deceased, having been granted to the undersigned on November 22, 2013, by the Honorable Alice K. Martin, Judge of Probate of said County, notice is hereby given that all persons having claims against said estate, are hereby required to present the same within the time allowed by law, or the same will be barred. WESLEY M. FRYE, Personal Representative of the Estate of KIMBERLY SUE MCCOY, Deceased. Alice K. Martin Judge of Probate The Jacksonville News Calhoun Co., AL December 10, 17, 24, 2013

NOTICE TO CREDITORS

STATE OF ALABAMA CALHOUN COUNTY PROBATE COURT CASE NO. 31834 IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF JAMES BERRY MCINTYRE, DECEASED Letters Testamentary on the estate of JAMES BERRY MCINTYRE, deceased, having been granted to KAY M. TOLBERT, the undersigned on November 19 , 2013, by the Honorable Alice K. Martin, Judge of Probate of said County, notice is hereby given that all persons having claims against said estate, are hereby required to present the same within the time allowed by law, or the same will be barred. KAY M. TOLBERT Personal Representatives of the Last Will and Testament of JAMES BERRY MCINTYRE, Deceased. Alice K. Martin Judge of Probate The Jacksonville News Calhoun Co., AL December 3, 10, & 17, 2013

NOTICE TO CREDITORS

STATE OF ALABAMA CALHOUN COUNTY PROBATE COURT CASE NO. 31684 IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF KAYLA LARSHAWN DICKERSON, DECEASED Letters of Administration on the estate of KAYLA LARSHAWN DICKERSON, deceased, having been granted to the undersigned on December 2, 2013, by the Honorable Alice K. Martin, Judge of Probate of said County, notice is hereby given that all persons having claims against said estate, are hereby required to present the same within the time allowed by law, or the same will be barred. KENDA ROSCHELLE CALDWELL, Personal Representative of the Estate of KAYLA LARSHAWN DICKERSON, Deceased. Alice K. Martin Judge of Probate The Jacksonville News Calhoun Co., AL December 10, 17, 24, 2013

NOTICE TO CREDITORS

STATE OF ALABAMA CALHOUN COUNTY PROBATE COURT CASE NO. 31839 IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF CLARA L. KENNEDY, DECEASED Letters Testamentary on the estate of CLARA L. KENNEDY, deceased, having been granted to LINDA ANN KENNEDY STANSELL, the undersigned on November 25, 2013, by the Honorable Alice K. Martin, Judge of Probate of said County, notice is hereby given that all persons having claims against said estate, are hereby required to present the same within the time allowed by law, or the same will be barred. LINDA ANN KENNEDY STANSELL, Personal Representative of the Last Will and Testament of CLARA L. KENNEDY, Deceased. Alice K. Martin Judge of Probate The Jacksonville News Calhoun Co., AL December 10, 17, 24, 2013


PAGE 12 / TUESDAY, DECEMBER 17, 2013

THE JACKSONVILLE NEWS

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The Jacksonville News - 12/17/13  

The Jacksonville News for December 17, 2013.

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