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JOURNAL FEATURE: Doug Rosser of Piedmont Outdoors, SEE PAGE 12. RECIPES / COMMUNITY, 5

FRIDAY NIGHT LIGHTS / SPORTS, 8

PAM YOUNG LIKES COOKING FOR NIECES AND NEPHEWS

BULLDOGS ADVANCE IN PLAYOFFS

The Piedmont Journal www.thepiedmontjournal.com

75 CENTS

WEDNESDAY // NOVEMBER 20, 2013

COUNCIL

Schools still awaiting word on Internet LAURA GADDY Consolidated News Service Piedmont City Schools will have to wait a little longer to find out whether the city will help pay to provide wireless Internet service for students. Earlier this month Piedmont schools Superintendent Matt Akin asked the council to reinstate a $6,250 payment to

help the schools for Internet service, and the council planned to vote on the matter Tuesday. Instead the council tabled the matter and voted to hold a work session to discuss whether the city can afford to make the payment. “We need to help the school, but we need to know exactly how far we can go,” said Councilman Ben Keller, who proposed the delay and the work session.

The $6,250 in question is made possible by a $6,500 payment to the city each month from the Wetumpkabased Internet provider, Information Transportation Services. The company pays to use city-owned cables to supply Internet service to students, who are given passwords to access the service. The agreement between the city and the Internet company began when

Piedmont’s school district secured an $867,000 Federal Communications Commission grant to begin offering wireless Internet service to students. In 2012, under former Mayor Brian Young’s term in office, the council agreed to make the $6,250 payment for a three-year period. The city stopped ■ See COUNCIL, page 10

THIS WEEKEND NOV. 22-24

Piedmont teachers outpacing nation

MARGARET ANDERSON Journal Correspondent

LAURA GADDY Consolidated News Service

Bear Cutlery Inc., at 1111 Bear Blvd., S.W., is presenting a chance to buy early Christmas presents Nov. 22-24 at the company’s 17th knife sale. The sale on Friday will be from 7:30 a.m. 6 p.m. Saturday, it will be from 7:30 a.m.-5 p.m., and Sunday from noon-5 p.m. Door prizes will be given hourly, and those who spend $100 will receive a gift. Ken Griffey, president, said since the knives are made in the backyard of Jacksonville’s residents, he wants to allow them and others a chance to be able to purchase quality knives at a nominal cost. “You’re getting up to 70 percent off retail,” he said. “They make good stocking stuffers and makes your Christmas buying go a long way. With a knife, you don’t have to worry about whether it will fit

About 30 students in Angela Studdard’s advanced math class at Piedmont High School worked together to master the congruence theorem Thursday. Instead of asking Studdard to help them solve their problems, they turned to each other. Some asked questions of classmates in the next desk. A couple of students, already done with the assignment, got up and leaned over their classmates’ desks to offer one-on-one assistance. “Used to, this amount of chatter I wouldn’t have allowed,” said Studdard, who has been teaching for 22 years. She said her idea about the proper decorum of a classroom began

17TH ANNUAL

Bear & Son Cutlery announces sale

File photo by Anita Kilgore

Patrick Swann, Jorge Piedra and Derek Williams do a little Christmas shopping at last year’s knife sale.

■ See SALE, page 10

■ See TEACHERS, page 5

Newspaper publisher is deacon at church John Alred publishes three papers BY MARGARET ANDERSON JOURNAL CORRESPONDENT

Anita Kilgore

: 666000999999 PU

From left, Karen Alred, Rev. Bob Staggs and John Alred.

MAG 80 NBAR .0104 BWA -0.0015

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After John Thomas Samuel Alred, 63, graduated from Jacksonville State University with a bachelor’s in arts and a minor in economics and political science, he had every intention of going back as soon as he could to get his master’s. He knew he’d need to work awhile though. “I came from the poor side of town, so I didn’t have money to go back to school

right away, so I came out and worked at a couple of jobs,” said Alred. Alred had a friend who was a typesetter at The Gadsden Times who told him that the paper had a job opening for a proof reader. Alred applied and got the job. “A proof reader is what they call a spell checker today,” he said. “We read all the copy that everyone wrote and made sure there were no spelling mistakes or mistakes in grammar,” he said. “It was a hard job because you just read all day. But the ■ See ALRED, page 5

THE PEIDMONT JOURNEL

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VOLUME 32 | NO. 47

OBITUARIES See page 3.

6

66000 99999

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• Joyce Cronan Webb,67 • Leland Franklin Williams, 82

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PAGE 2 / WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 2013

THE PIEDMONT JOURNAL

OPINION/EDITORIAL Alabama was divorce mill from 1945 to 1970

By all accounts Alabama is a very religious and pro-family state. We are considered the Heart of the Bible Belt. However, Alabama flourished as a divorce mill for about 25 years from 1945-1970. Yes folks, good old conservative Alabama was known as the haven for quickie divorces. Famous people flocked here to get unhitched. This practice of granting quickie divorces began in 1945 when a law was abolished that required a one-year residency before folks could divorce in Alabama. Most states had a similar requirement at that time and a good many still do today. Divorces became a gold mine. It was a lucrative practice for lawyers. In fact, some of our state senators, who were also lawyers, became the primary divorce lawyers in the state. Their ability to expedite the divorces for the rich and famous was enhanced by local bills that made it even easier in their home counties. Their relationships with their local circuit judges did not hurt their case either. They usually controlled the judges’ salary by way of local legislation. In some cases, the judge was a former law partner. The legendary Rankin Fite got rich through this quickie divorce scheme. He was the lawyer of record for quite a few of the rich and famous who high tailed it to Alabama to get unhitched. Rankin would bring these folks into Marion County and get them a divorce in a New York minute. That was fitting and proper since a good many of them were from New York. Rankin even had his own airplane. As Speaker of the House he got the state to build an airport in Hamilton so he could fly his personal plane to and from Montgomery. His airport in Hamilton, a hamlet of 5,000, had an airport the size of

any city of 100,000 in the state, all for Rankin’s personal use so that he could Steve get back home and Flowers represent New Yorkers in their divorces. They, of course, claimed northwest Alabama as their residency. Most folks in the Inside The Statehouse country perceived that Reno, Nevada was the divorce capital of the United States. Not so. It was Alabama. In 1962, Time magazine published an article entitled “Alabama Unbound.” It chronicled Alabama’s prominence as the nation’s divorce capital and stated that divorces in Alabama far outnumbered those in Reno. In 1960, Alabama granted more than 17,000 divorces while Nevada only filed 9,274. Over this 25-year span the state’s reputation drew thousands of socialites and celebrities. They could easily sidestep residency laws and get divorces in as little as a few hours. John Daly, the host of the game show “What’s My Line,” divorced his first wife in Luverne in Crenshaw County so he could marry his second wife, Virginia Warren the daughter of Chief Justice Earl Warren. Her lawyer was State Senator Alton Turner. Also during the 1960’s a divorce was granted in Alabama to Barb Adams, the wife of renowned New Yorker magazine cartoonist Charles Adams. They were granted a divorce with a

one-day wait in Limestone County. Probably the most famous and more than likely most lucrative of the Alabama divorces of this era was that of Tina Onassis, the daughter of Greek shipping magnate Stavros Livanos, who divorced her husband Aristotle Onassis. They were unhitched in Washington County in 1960. Her lawyer was the flamboyant and debonair State Senator Pierre Pelham of Mobile. Pelham was a legend in the State Senate. He was impeccably dressed in white linen or seersucker suits. He had an audacious southern demeanor. He also had the perfect Alabama name, which fit his perfect gentlemanly southern accent. He also loved fine wine. Pierre had been born and raised in Washington County. He went to Harvard for law school. He gave Ms. Onassis’ divorce more dignity and credibility than most. He asked her to actually reside in Mobile for a week prior to her divorce. She rented a penthouse apartment in the fashionable Creighton Towers complex on Springhill Avenue. She paid a year’s rent in advance. Pelham took Onassis to the Mobile Public Library and got her a library card. He took her to Dauphin Island and bought her a lot. He then took her to Washington County and she was divorced in five minutes. Alabama’s glory days as the nation’s quickie divorce capital ended in August of 1970. In Geneva County, two circuit judges and seven others were indicted in a quickie divorce scheme. Steve Flowers is Alabama’s leading political columnist. His column appears weekly in more than 70 Alabama newspapers. Steve served 16 years in the state legislature. He may be reached at www.steveflowers.us.

Giving thanks for dreams and realities

Recently I saw a fascinating sight in a meadow-like lane at McClellan. A yellow, boat-shaped launcher shot out several people dressed like piñatas. As they flew through the air, their costumes came apart and all sorts of clothes fell out. A crowd of people ran and picked up the clothes. “This event is so artful,” I thought, “and it would make a wonderful topic for a column.” I could hardly wait to start writing about it. Then, I woke up. I lay in my bed chuckling that I had had such a crazy dream. However, I realized it had ties to reality. For instance, I recently rode through McClellan and admired the various meadow-like tracts of land. Also, I have a friend who flies a para-cycle. It’s similar to the ones used by the piñata people, only

Sherry Kughn Sherry-Go-Round theirs was faster and quieter. (Don’t ask me why they needed a yellow launcher.) Before I had gone to bed on the evening before the dream, I had watched a story on television about a woman who shopped at thrift stores and bought clothes to refashioned them. Of course, being on the lookout

for a good topic for my weekly column is reality, and a few readers may think weird dreams are fodder for many of my columns. I can assure them - my piñata dream was a first. Another reality occurred in the summer while I was in New York City. I saw an artful display of color created by artist Orly Genger. It consists of thousands of pounds of brightly painted nautical rope woven together and piled up in wave-like shapes. All of these “realities” swirled together in my head like the eggs, cornbread, sage, and broth of a turkey dressing. After I awoke, while still thinking of how real the dreamed seemed, it dawned on me that, in America, dreams are certainly possible -flying devices, piñatas, a plethora

of clothing, and art for the sake of art. Also, I was thinking about the upcoming Thanksgiving holiday and how thankful I am for my country. Of late, though, we Americans seem to have forgotten our positive possibilities. We are mired in negative thoughts about politics when we see politicians more dedicated to a party rather than to the citizens. We Americans are not completely out of the recession, and some people are challenging our time-honored values. We hear that some Americans want to take prayer out of congressional assemblies and remove the mention of God from our currency. These changes would alter our heritage and identity, and I do not think the majority of American wants them. For those who are overly frustrat-

ed, where can they go where things are better? The answer is nowhere. No matter how we feel about the negative things that are happening, we know we are more blessed, as a whole, than citizens in other countries. So, next week, when we gather around our tables to celebrate Thanksgiving, let us not only give thanks for the United States, but also let us pray for her. Ask God to give us a dream to overcome our challenges and apply His truths and power to finding positive realities. I believe that the majority of us love America. Our hope for the future rests in our faith in God and in positive leadership. That is a pure and wholesome that I think the majority of Americans can make a reality. Email to sherrykug@hotmail.com

A civics lesson: How did we get here?

One of the big issues in the 2008 presidential race was access to healthcare, or by the time the progressives won the election and began working on the law, access to healthcare through health insurance that spreads the wealth. For the next two years Democrats enjoyed full control of both Houses of Congress and the White House. With that kind of control, they knew they could pass historic legislation that would completely transform America from a capitalist, market-based economy to a government-controlled economy. The next brick in the wall of that transformation was takeover of the healthcare sector. Progressives have been working on the takeover since FDR’s creation of Social Security. Then LBJ created Medicare and Medicaid with all kinds of promises regarding costs and benefits. Today, cost projections from the 1960s are laughable, and these three programs make up more than 42 percent of the federal budget. Of course Democrats in Congress did not write the Affordable Care Act aka Obamacare. Lobbyists and special interest groups wrote their own special parts of the law and Democrats took those parts along with plenty of money under the table and mixed the parts into the 2,300-page law. Not only did Democrats not write the law, but they also did not read the law. Rhetorical wars from 2009 through 2010 were

little more than kabuki theater with progressives shaming Republicans for being Daniel so hard-hearted and Gardner not wanting any of the 30 to 45 million poor Americans to have access to healthcare. Republicans tried to My Thoughts counter by agreeing with popular progressive talking points, but the mainstream media was lockstep with progressives and covered up those points of agreement. With all the attention focused on the 30 or so million Americans who couldn’t afford health insurance, few even thought about how a new law might affect those who already liked the coverage they had. President Obama famously touted over and over again that those who liked their plans could keep them, and those who liked their doctors could keep them…PERIOD. I have a feeling that last word was not on his teleprompter. He just improvised to make his point more presidential. Obamacare was passed through both Houses with highly questionable tactics by the slimmest of Democratic votes. No Republicans supported the bill. Everything was going swimmingly for the Democrats

Sound off

Thanks to those who helped in the Hillcrest Cemetery cleanup Thanks to everyone who participated in Hillcrest Cemetery cleanup on Oct 12th. This was a joint project of the Hillcrest Cemetery Committee AND Piedmont Public Safety. Thanks to everyone ... the families, city officials, city employees & residents in the cemetery neighborhood for

your hard work. “Piedmont, When We Come Together- We Can Make a Difference”. We appreciate Bobbi Beavers for her insight and coordination to make this joint event possible.   Hillcrest Cemetery Committee

until the big rollout of Healthcare.gov, which was more of a flop out. Progressives pretended glitches caused problems, and too many eager customers crashed the system. Finally, progressives promised to fix the website that had been under construction for more than three years in a mere month, and Kool Aid drinkers all cheered! Yaaaaaa! They’ll fix Healthcare.gov and we’ll all live happily ever after! Then insurance companies began following the law and sending out millions of cancellation notices to families whose policies were below standards required by Obamacare…more than 5 million and counting. Last week President Obama fixed that problem by declaring insurance companies did not have to follow the law, because he said so, and he’s the president so he can make any changes any time he wants. Obama told those nasty mean old insurance companies they didn’t have to follow the law in Obamacare and could just send out new letters telling those policy holders they could have their cancelled policies back if they wanted them. I believe there is a civics lesson in here somewhere. Daniel L. Gardner is a syndicated columnist who lives in Starkville, MS. You may contact him at Daniel@DanLGardner.com, or visit his website at http://www.danlgardner.com Feel free to interact with him on the Clarion-Ledger feature blog site blogs. clarionledger.com/dgardner/

The Piedmont Journal The Piedmont Journal Established 1907 Combined with The Piedmont Independent 1982 ISSN 08906017 Second class postage paid in Piedmont, Alabama. Published weekly by Consolidated Publishing.

“Our everlasting obligation and greatest privilege is to serve the fine people of our community.” Austin Johnson, Founder and Publisher, 1907-1963 John Alred Publisher

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THE PIEDMONT JOURNAL

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 2013 PAGE 3

Obituaries WEBB Piedmont - Funeral services for Joyce Cronan Webb, 67, were Monday, November 18, 2013, at 2 p.m. at Thompson Funeral Home with the Rev. Ashley Penton and the Rev. Chris Tierce officiating. Burial will follow at Piedmont Memory Gardens. The family will receive friends at the funeral home from 6-8 p.m. this evening. Mrs. Webb passed away Friday, November 15, 2013, at Northeast Alabama Regional Medical Center. Survivors include her husband of 49 years, Dwight Webb, of Piedmont; one daughter, Missie Bostick (Shane), of Piedmont; three grandchildren, Haley Bostick, Carson Bostick and Brody Bostick, all of Piedmont; her mother, Venice Cronan, of Piedmont; one sister, Sandra Pendergrast (Joe), of Marietta, Georgia; two brothers, Bo Cronan (Patsy), of Nances Creek and Bob Cronan, of Jacksonville, Florida; several nieces and nephews. Pallbearers will be Corey Cronan, Eric Cronan, Alan Hunt, Wayne Warren, Phillip Pope and Mike Williams. Mrs. Webb was a life long resident of Piedmont and attended Goshen Valley Baptist Church. She retired as a secretary from the Piedmont City School System with 39 years service. She devoted her life to her family and was a loving wife, mother and grandmother. She was preceded in death by her father, Kenneth Cronan. www.thompsonfuneralhomepiedmont.com WILLIAMS Spring Garden - Funeral services for Leland Franklin Williams, 82, of Spring Garden, will be held today, November 20, 2013, at 2 p.m. from Dansby Heritage Chapel with burial to follow in Piedmont Memory Garden. Visitation was held at Dansby Heritage Chapel from

5-8 Thursday night, November 19, 2013. Mr. Williams passed away Sunday, November 17, 2013, at Riverview Medical Center in Gadsden. Born in Cleburne County, Alabama, he was a retired Army veteran serving during the Korean and Vietnam eras. He was a member of Spring Garden Methodist Church, a member of the Rock Run Masonic Lodge and charter member of the Spring Garden Volunteer Fire Department. He was preceded in death by his mother, Sue Hulsey; father, Frank Williams; three brothers, Edward, Mickey, and Roger; sister, Evelyn; and his wife, Wanda Pruitt Williams. He is survived by his sons, Scott (Cindy Westbrooks) Williams, of Manchester, Tenn. and Todd (Michelle Hulsey) Williams, of Piedmont; grandchildren, Christina Williams, of Montclair, N.J., Jennifer Byrd, of Dunlap, Tenn., Melanie Sanders, of Honolulu, Hawaii, Nicholas Williams, of Nashville, Tenn., Timothy Williams, of Murfreesboro, Tenn., Megan Williams Reynolds, of Piedmont, and Evonne Hulsey, of Piedmont; five greatgrandchildren; sisters, Nan Lavender, of Plano, Texas, Oleta Griffith, of Calhoun, Ga., Janice Ragan, of Talladega, and Ella Sides, of Kemp, Texas. Pallbearers will be Timmy Williams, Nicholas Williams, Michael Burchfield, Timmy Reynolds, Scott Williams, and Todd Williams. Honorary pallbearers will be Jim Pruitt, Wayne Ragan, Carl Morton, Ed Griffith, Herman Sides, Jarrott Johnson, and Guy Needham. The family requests memorials to the Piedmont Rescue Squad or the Spring Garden Volunteer Fire Department. Dansby Heritage Chapel is honored to serve the Williams Family.

Community Calendar • The annual Piedmont First United Methodist Church bake sale, offering all manner of confectionary treats prepared by the United Methodist Women, will be on Saturday, November 23 from 8 am til noon at the church on 300 N. Main Street. This is a wonderful opportunity to stock up on desserts for Thanksgiving. • Dailey Street Baptist Church will have a Thanksgiving Revival beginning Sunday, November 17th at 5 p.m. with the Rev. Jerry Stewart of Philadelphia Baptist Church. The Philadelphia church choir will sing that evening. Services Monday, Nov. 18th through Thursday, Nov. 21st will begin at 6:30 p.m. nightly. Guest preachers will be: Monday - Rev. Ryan Shubert; Tuesday & Wednesday- Rev. Jeff McElroy of New Oak Grove BC; and Thursday - Rev. Marlon Greenwood. There will be special singing each night. For more information please call the church office at 256-4476301. • Dogs for the Deaf, located in Central Point, Ore., is a non-profit organization that rescues dogs from animal shelters and trains them to help adults and children with different disabilities, challenges, and needs. For example, a Hearing Dog is trained to alert its owner to household sounds that could affect his or her safety and an Autism Assistance Dog would keep an autistic child out of traffic, bodies of water, and other dangerous situations. Chris Hill, a resident of Anniston and a volunteer “ambassador” for Dogs for the Deaf, has a DVD presentation he will give to civic and community

Police Report Nov. 13 • Possession of a controlled substance. Officers recovered two white tablets imprinted with “M358” and an orange and white 25-mg. tablet during an incident that occurred on Ginter Drive at 2:30 p.m. Nov. 14 • Theft of services III. Officers investigated a stolen water meter lock that occurred between Sept. 14 and Nov. 13 on Ridgecrest Dr. • Criminal mischief III. A 65-year-old female reported damage done to a front wooden and glass door and two glass windows with wood frames that occurred at her residence between Oct. 4 and Nov. 13. • Theft of property III. A 65-yearold male reported the theft of a 2014 tag decal that occurred between June 14 and Nov. 7 at his residence. • Fraudulent use of credit/debit card and identity theft. A 56-yearold male reported an incident that occurred between 1:54 p.m. Nov. 7 and 1:54 p.m. Nov. 8 involving his Farmers & Merchants bank account. Nov. 15

• Theft of property III. A 63-yearold female reported the theft of a wallet containing $150 in currency, an Alabama driver’s license and a Wells Fargo checkbook that occurred on South Center Avenue between 4:30 p.m. and 5 p.m. Nov. 14. • Burglary III. A female resident of Babbling Brook Road reported the theft of a black RCA microwave, a check written on a Farmers & Merchants bank account, and a toolbox containing assorted tools that occurred between 7 p.m. Nov. 14 and 2 p.m. Nov. 15. • Theft of property III, criminal mischief III. A resident of Dailey Street reported damage done to the wires of a Power Wheel toy and the theft of a battery for the toy that occurred between Oct. 15 and Nov. 15. • Unlawful breaking and entering a vehicle. A 35-year-old male reported the theft of a Pioneer touch screen CD player, a Pioneer amplifier, and two Pioneer 12-inch sub woofers as well as damage done to the steering column, dash pad, and sliding glass window of his vehicle

Arrests Nov. 13 • Misty Farmer Shepard, 36, possession of drug paraphernalia. • Joshua Paul Henry, 29, possession of drug paraphernalia and possession of marijuana II.

organizations or individuals. Contact him at 835-6918 • The Alabama Shutterbugs, a new club for all skill levels of photographers, meets at 5:30 p.m. the second Tuesday of each month in the Noble Building, Suite 100, Anniston. Anyone interested in photography is welcome to join us. Call 236.8488 for more information. • New classes for the Jacksonville State University Adult Wellness classes are at 8 a.m. in Pete Mathews Colseium. Senior water aerobics and senior floor aerobic classes are Monday, Wednesday and Friday. Senior water aerobics and senior therapeutic yoga classes are on Tuesday and Thursday. Contact Aubrey Crossen at 256-689-2580 or jsu9517k@jsu.edu for more information. • Disabled American Veterans, Chapter 21 meets the second Tuesday of every month at 6 p.m.. at 114 N. Center Ave. downtown Piedmont, to discuss the latest veteran’s issues and benefits. If you are a service-connected disabled vet or you think you may have a military service related condition, the DAV may be able to help you. Help workshops are also available from 8 a.m.-noon on the first and third Wednesday of each month. Veterans are urged to attend for possible compensation and benefits they’re not aware of. • Anyone with knowledge about German and Italian POWs and their artifacts at Fort McClellan during 1943-46 is asked to contact Klaus Duncan at 782-2991.

while located on Vigo Road at 6:03 a.m. • Domestic violence III. A 50-year-old female reported an incident that occurred at her residence at 3:48 a.m. Nov. 16 • Burglary III. A female resident of Babbling Brook Road reported the theft of a 46-inch RCA flat screen television, a Dell laptop computer, a Gateway computer, a Playstation 3, a Murray push mower, a Sylvania DVD player and other items that occurred between 5:30 p.m. and 6:45 p.m. Nov. 15. Nov. 17 • Noise ordinance violation. A 69-year-old male reported an incident that occurred in the Mapco parking lot between 9:30 p.m. and 10 p.m. Nov. 16. • Possession of drug paraphernalia, manufacture of a controlled substance I. Officers recovered one pot meth lab and lab components along with pipes, scales, and burnt aluminum foil during an incident that occurred on Draper Street at 2 p.m.

www.thepiedmontjournal.com

• Robert Lee Henry, 57, possession of marijuana II. Nov. 15 • Joshua Steven Sullivan, 20, failure to appear. Nov. 16

• Tony James Wood, 23, criminal trespass I. Nov. 17 • Lydia Irene Saffold, 43, possession of drug paraphernalia, manufacture of a controlled substance I.

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PAGE 4 / WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 2013

THE PIEDMONT JOURNAL

Pam Young enjoys cooking for her nieces and nephews Young Oil employee loves her job

P

BY MARGARET ANDERSON NEWS CORRESPONDENT

am Young, her parents, sister and two brothers have always been close. Pam didn’t have to think twice when the time came to select a career. She knew she would work for her father at Young Oil, Inc. “It was just something I always knew I would do,” she said. Pam is the daughter of Millard and Ann Young. She graduated from Piedmont High School in 1973 and received a degree in business administration with a minor in English and economics from Jacksonville State University in 1977. “I started working right out of college,” she said. “I love it. Young Oil is a good place to work, and it’s been a very good learning experience for me. I’m glad we can continue to run it as a family business because that’s something that doesn’t happen much anymore.” Pam said she enjoys her co-workers and employees, Carol Tierce, Karen Alred and Amanda Harrell. She also works alongside her brothers, Vernon and Brian. Her sister, Karen Kisor, is a retired educator. Pam is a member of Alpha Xi Delta sorority, the Gamecock Club and the Piedmont Athletic Club. She participates in a number of activities, but her favorite thing is being with her two nieces and six nephews. Her oldest nephew, M.V. Young and his wife, the former Christa Waldrop, live in Alexandria, Va. M.V. works for Sen. Richard Shelby, while Christa works for the National Diabetic Association. Pamela Hammett is a graduate of Auburn University and is currently attending Thomas Goode Jones School of Law in Montgomery. A. J. Young, is a graduate of Auburn University and is currently studying veterinary medicine at Auburn. Daniel Hammett is majoring in occupational safety and health administration and manufacturing management at Jacksonville State University, while Adam Hammett is studying marketing at the University of Alabama. Davis Young and Emily Kisor are in the eighth grade at Piedmont Middle School. The youngest, Hayden Young, is in the fifth grade at Piedmont Elementary School. “I spend a lot of time with them,” said Pam “I love going to whatever events they are participating in,

AUNT PAM’S HOMEMADE ROLLS Dissolve 2 pkgs. yeast in ¼ c. warm water. Add 1 T. sugar. Set aide. Boil 2 c. water. Add 1c. shortening, ½ c. sugar minus the 1 T. used above and 2 t. salt. Mix and let cool. Add 2 beaten eggs and the yeast. Beat well in mixer and add 5-6 c. plain flour. Cover and refrigerate. Punch down after two hours. Refrigerate overnight. Roll out and let rise 1 ½-2 hours in a warm place. Bake at 400 degrees until golden brown. CHICKEN DIP 1 can mushroom soup 2 c. cooked chicken or 1 can white chicken 1 pkg. silvered almonds (2 ½ oz.) Beat all ingredients together. Serve with tortilla chips. Pam prefers to use the cooked chicken. POTATO SOUP 5 lbs. cubed potatoes or 1 bag hashbrowns (the cubed ones) 1 lg. can or 2 sm. cans cream of mushroom soup 1 lg. can or 2 sm. cans cream of chicken soup

Engagement announced

Justin Bergstresser and Cassie Austin Keith and Kelli Austin of DeArmanville announce the engagement of their daughter, Cassie Austin, to Justin Bergstresser, son of Thomas and Melody Bergstresser of Alexandria. The bride-elect is the granddaughter of Doris and Daniel Stearman and Ronald and Mary Austin, all of DeArmanville. Miss Austin is a graduate of Oxford High School. She is employed by Model City Pediatric. The prospective groom is the grandson of George Edward and Mina Faye Stephens of Munford and the late Carl and Gertrude Bergstresser, formerly of Anniston. Mr. Bergstresser is a graduate of Walter Wellborn High School. He is employed by Honda Manufacturing. The wedding will be 7 p.m. Nov. 27, 2013, at Janney Furnace Barn.

Anita Kilgore

Pam Young enjoys spending time with her nieces and nephews. whether it be sports, academics, or pageants. Whatever they’re doing, I’m usually there.” Though her job takes up a lot of her time, she enjoys reading, cross-stitch, needlepoint, putting puzzles together and cooking. “Mother always allowed us to cook and, as a matter of fact, she encouraged us all to learn how to cook,” said Pam. “It’s just something I grew into and soon took it up on my own.” The Young home is a hub of activity on Sundays, when everyone gathers for lunch. “Almost everyone comes every Sunday to eat,” she said. “I participate in the cooking and, sometimes, I do all of it.”

RECIPES

1 - 8 oz. cream cheese 1 stick butter 1 lg. Velveeta cheese, cut up in cubes Salt and pepper to taste Put potatoes in large boiler. Add water to generously cover potatoes and cook. Add cans of soups. Add butter, Velveeta cheese and then salt and pepper. This soup will stick easily so cover as soon as cheese melts. Then you can reheat or put in a crockpot. Top bowls of soup with bacon bits, cheddar cheese and green onions. MEXICAN CORNBREAD 1 ½ c. cornmeal

Pam said a typical Sunday meal might include salmon, biscuits, pinto beans, fried potatoes, macaroni and cheese, creamed potatoes, banana pudding, fresh fruit and pound cake. What she likes to prepare most of all are dishes that are favorites of her nieces and nephews. These include Aunt Pam’s Homemade Rolls, Chicken Dip, Potato Soup and Mexican Cornbread. Aunt Pam’s homemade Rolls are at least 75 years old and was given to Pam by a lady by the name of Pearly. Pam makes these for all holidays. Her family likes them hot out of the oven. (Contact Margaret at pollya922@gmail.com)

1 c. canned cream style corn 1 c. buttermilk ½ c. vegetable oil 2 eggs, beaten 1 T. baking powder 1 t. salt ½ c. chopped jalapeno peppers ¼ c. finely chopped onions 1 c. shredded sharp cheddar cheese Combine all ingredients except cheese in a large bowl. Stir well. Pour half of mixture into a greased 10-inch iron skillet. Top with cheese. Add remaining cornmeal mixture. Bake at 450 degrees for 30 minutes or until done.


THE PIEDMONT JOURNAL

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 2013 / PAGE 5

TEACHERS: Teachers must complete timed tests to earn certification offered to give teachers two additional paid days off during the year to work on to change about three years the certification process. ago when she sought her In addition, teachers who National Board Certifiearn their certification are cation, which requires a promised $5,000 in extra rigorous evaluation propay by the state for 10 cess. Twenty-four percent years. of Piedmont teachers have “I’ve read a lot of now earned the same cerresearch that National tification since the system Board Certification is the began offering incentives best professional develin 2010 to teachers who opment that teachers can seek the distinction. That’s receive, and it makes an significantly higher than the impact on student achievestate average of 4.5 percent ment,” Akin said. and the national average of Brandi Todd and 3 percent. Leighann Ford, Piedmont “This is uncommon to teachers and sisters, began have such a high percent of the certification process National Board Certified together three years ago Teachers in a district,” said because of the incentive. Andy Coons, the chief “It made it even more operating officer of the appealing,” said Todd. program, based in Alexan- “It was something that I dria, Va., who is himself a always wanted to do, but I National Board certified knew that it cost money,” educator. “We hope to learn Ford, a ninth-grade hisfrom Piedmont and how tory teacher, echoed her they did it.” sister’s statements. Piedmont schools Super“That certainly made intendent Matt Akin said it more appealing,” said the system three years ago Ford, who holds a master’s began offering to pay the degree. “I knew I didn’t $2,500 cost of the program have time to do a doctorate for each teacher who would just then because I had seek the designation. At small children.” the same time, the system Both women said the From page 1

experience has made a difference in their teaching. “Before, I think I was a good teacher, but I think National Board has made me a better teacher because I’m much more reflective of my teaching process,” Ford said. Todd and Ford also agreed that the certification process made them evaluate their own teaching techniques. “Reflection has become a daily part of my routine. It’s something I do without really realizing I’ve done it,” Todd said. The National Board Certification process can take as long as three years, though 40 percent of teachers earn the distinction in one year. Those who don’t complete it in the first year can try up to two more times to earn the certification. One of the most beneficial elements of the program, local teachers said, is that it causes them to assess their own performance and to consider ways they might improve. “You’re having to analyze yourself as a teacher,” Akin said. “That process makes you better.”

Trent Penny/ Consolidated News Service

ABOVE: Piedmont Elementary teacher Brandi Todd teaches her fifth grade class. She is part of the 24 percent of the teachers that have gone through a national board certification program. During the certification process, teachers are required to submit four entries in a portfolio. For the first entry teachers must submit examples of student work to show they can understand the differences in student needs. For the second and third entries they are required to submit video entries of their work with written analysis that examines their performance and student responses. Teachers are also required to submit one entry that

provides specific examples of their leadership in the school and in the community. In the end their work is evaluated against national standards by teachers from across the country. Coons said the evaluation process is intensive and detailed. “Going through this class is very personal,” Coons said. In addition to the review process teachers must also complete timed tests to earn the certification.

In Piedmont, teachers who earn the certification are recognized by school board members at a meeting, and by a small plaque that is mounted to the wall outside their classroom doors. “The level of teaching in this system continues to elevate year after year,” Akin said. “I think National Board certification certainly plays into that.”   Staff Writer Laura Gaddy: 256-235-3544. On Twitter @LGaddy_Star

ALRED: Has been married to the former Karen Bonds for 18 years From page 1

good thing about it is you knew what was happening in the world by the end of the day.” Paul Meloun, the executive editor at the Times, was known for giving his employees a chance to do other jobs. Alred went to him and told him that he’d like to write a story. The editor obliged him. Alred’s first story appeared in September during football season. He asked women on Broad Street in Gadsden what they would be doing while their husbands watched football. “It turned out pretty good,” said Alred. “My mother saved it. I go back and look at it today and I laugh. It peeked my interest in journalism though, and then I started doing more and more stories.” Alred became a feature writer and, for a while, was the courthouse reporter and then went to the desk as an editor. He’d always had a love for sports, so he began covering sports events and writing the stories. After 25 years of doing that though, he had become burned out. “I didn’t want to cover any more sports,” he said. “The last five years I was in sports, I elected to be the inside guy. I would stay at home and lay out the paper and let the younger guys cover Alabama, Auburn and Jax State.” His next job was back to the desk as editor. “This was just when newspapers were starting out very crudely on the Internet and I had a little knowledge of computers,” said Alred. “I’m very proud to say that I put the first web pages for The Gadsden Times on the Internet.” The publisher felt that Alred might be a good candidate to be head of the creative department. “I was in charge of the artists who built the ads. I made sure the ads were built, that they were correct when the advertiser looked at them and that they were correct when they were published,” said Alred. “Everybody saidI went to the dark side because I left news for advertising. What it did was give me insight into all sides of the newspaper. The non-money side (news) and the money-making side (advertising).” He stayed in advertising until he had a heart attack and had to have triple bypass surgery in 2005. After recuperating, he knew he wanted to stay in the newspaper business, but he wanted to get out of the

grind of daily newspapers. At that time Jimmy Creed was managing editor of The Jacksonville News. Alred and Creed were longtime friends. One night in 2006, he called Creed and told him what he’d been thinking and, as luck would have it, Creed told him there was an opening for a writer at the News. Creed practically hired Alred on the phone that night. “I retired from The Gadsden Times,” said Alred. “I’d had enough service in. I could retire and draw a pension from them.” About a year later, Creed left the paper, and he recommended Alred for his job. After Alred had been at the News a year, with over 32 years of newspaper experience behind him, he went from being a reporter to being managing editor of the paper. Alred is now publisher of The Jacksonville News, The Piedmont Journal and The Cleburne (Heflin) News. “I love being the publisher of these three wonderful newspapers,” he said. “There are hard times and there are good times, but the good times outweigh the bad times. With newspapers, we’ve had to cut back, and we’ve had to downsize. Because of the economy, sometimes it’s hard to do, but we’ve managed to keep our heads above the water.” Alred said that in his opinion, weekly newspapers can do more than dailies because weeklies can give everyone recognition that they probably otherwise wouldn’t get. “Anita Kilgore and I have been together since I came to Consolidated Publishing,” said Alred. “I think we make a great team. Now, we’re happy to have Margaret Anderson back with us.” Alred was born in Gadsden and graduated from Emma Sansom High School in 1968. He was the only child of the late Thomas and Essie (McClung) Alred. “I envied all my friends who had brothers and sisters, and they envied me because I was an only child,” said Alred. “I knew at Christmas that all the toys under the tree belonged to me. I really don’t know if it affected me or not, but I have some great cousins that I grew up with and we’re still close today.” Alred and his wife, the former Karen Bonds, have been married 18 years. They met on a blind date arranged by his cousin. Karen works at Young Oil Company in Piedmont.

I’m the happiest I’ve ever been in my life right now.” John Alred

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Alred has been a member of Roberts Chapel Baptist Church for the past 10 years. “The pastor came to me and told me that he and another deacon had talked and they felt that I was a good candidate to be a deacon,” said Alred. “I told him I’d pray about it.” Alred did pray about it and two weeks ago he was ordained as a deacon at Roberts Chapel. “I think this is the way God wants me to go,” he said. “I think it’s a step in my spiritual growth. I want to work for my church and help spread the Word.” Alred enjoys coin collecting and golf, although being publisher of three newspapers leaves him little time for either these days. He’s a member of the Jacksonville Exchange Club. “I’m the happiest I’ve ever been in my life right now,” said Alred. “I’m married to the woman I love, I love working for the

Lord, I love this area and I love the three newspapers I publish. I wouldn’t think about moving away from this area. This area is beautiful.” Alred said many wonder why he has three given names. First of all, he said, he wasn’t supposed to be a boy. He shocked everyone when he was the first boy born on his mother’s side of the family in a long time. There had been 11 girls born before him. “So, my mother was fully expecting a girl,” he said. “In fact, I was supposed to be named Constance Rebecca.” Alred said his parents were in such shock that they didn’t name him for about three days. He was just Baby Alred. The nurse finally told his mother they had to give him a name. So they named him John after his father and then added the names of both his grandfathers. (Contact Margaret at pollya922@gmail. com)


PAGE 6/ WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 2013

THE PIEDMONT JOURNAL

Piedmont

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THE PIEDMONT JOURNAL

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 2013 • PAGE 7

CALHOUN COUNTY CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

Work Week....The Voice of Business in Piedmont MEMBER OF THE MONTH — Thank you for all that you do for our community! Mark Your Calendars: Chat with the Chairman Date: December 3rd Time: 4:00pm – 5:00pm Location: Chamber of Commerce Business & Biscuits Date: December 5th Time: 7:30am – 8:30am Location: Monet Salon & Day Spa Business After Hours Date: December 17th Time: 5:30pm – 7:30pm Location: Prime Dining & Bar 320 S. Quintard Ave., Anniston Sponsored by: Top Notch

There’s no place like home for the holidays! Top Reasons to Buy Local, Eat Local, Go Local By choosing local businesses for your shopping, services, dining and other needs, you not only get real value and personal service, you: STRENGTHEN YOUR LOCAL ECONOMY! Each dollar you spend at local small businesses returns to our local economy!

ENHANCE CHOICES! The wide variety of small businesses serve the needs of each individual customer!

SHAPE OUR CHARACTER! Small Businesses help give our community diversity and often sell locally made goods.

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LOWER TAXES! The greater number of small businesses, the lower the taxes because they also generate more tax revenue per sales dollar.

GIVE BACK TO YOUR COMMUNITY! Small businesses donate more to local non-profits, events, and teams.

CHAMBER HAPPENINGS

On November 13th, the Chamber held a Basics of Business Breakfast on the social media platform known as LinkedIn. Be sure to keep an eye out on the Chamber Calendar for future information sessions.

On November 5th, Leadership Calhoun County invited LCC Alumni and current LCC class to participate in a Mayors’ Forum with 6 of the municipality mayors from Calhoun County. The luncheon was sponsored by Eastman. Pictured from left to right: Weaver Mayor Wayne Willis, Anniston Mayor Vaughn Stewart, Hobson City Mayor Alberta McCrory, Ohatchee Mayor Steve Baswell, Jacksonville Mayor Johnny Smith, and Oxford Mayor Leon Smith.

On November 7th, Youth Leadership Calhoun County had their Career & Mentors Day where each student met with a mentor in the career field they are considering pursuing after high school. Here Anniston City Councilman Jay Jenkins talks with two students about architecture.

Remember to Shop Local this Holiday Season and mark your calendars for Small Business Saturday, November 30!


PAGE 8/ WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 2013

THE PIEDMONT JOURNAL

Bulldogs to face toughest test Friday

Doug Borden

Piedmont’s Denard Spears looks for running room last week against Deshler.

Piedmont will host defending Class 3A champion Madison Academy RIP DONOVAN Journal Sports Correspondent

A year of pent-up frustration vanished on the soggy turf of Deshler’s Howard Chappell Stadium in Tuscumbia last Friday. The Piedmont Bulldogs had just rallied in the fourth quarter for a 20-19 victory over Deshler, the team that eliminated the Bulldogs from the 2012 playoffs. After the Piedmont band played the alma mater, players, coaches and the throng of Piedmont fans who had made the three-hour drive to the game exchanged hugs and handshakes and took pictures for a long time. “I thought our defense played lights out (Friday night). We didn’t do a whole lot on offense. They stymied us all night long but we made big plays when we had to make them and the kickoff return was huge,” said Piedmont coach Steve Smith. After a one-year absence, Piedmont returns to the quarterfinal round of the AHSAA playoffs for the sixth time in seven years. The Bulldogs (11-1) host defending Class 3A state champion Madison Academy (120). The Mustangs are led by junior running back and defensive back Kerryon Johnson, the MVP of last year’s state championship game. While Johnson is the most recognizable name on Madison Academy’s roster, the Mustangs have a wealth of talent around him. “They’re really sound in just about every aspect of the game. They’ve got a good football team. They don’t make a whole lot of mistakes on either side of the ball,” Smith said. “They’re very solid.” Entering the fourth quarter at Tuscumbia, prospects for a victory celebration by Piedmont looked dim. Deshler led 19-13 after three quarters. Piedmont was struggling on offense. In eight possessions, the Bulldogs had been unable to manage more than one first down in any possession. Piedmont’s two touchdowns had come on two plays – a 68-yard pass late in the first half and a 75-yard kickoff return to start the second half. Deshler’s offensive woes came in the final 30 yards to the Piedmont end zone. The Tigers turned the ball over on downs at the Piedmont 23-yard line on the game’s first possession when Piedmont’s defense stopped a fourth-and-5 run a scant two inches short of a first down. A blocked punt gave Deshler the ball at the Piedmont 31 on the Tigers’ third possession. On first down, safety Tyler Lusk dropped a runner for a 3-yard loss. When a fourth-down pass was broken up by Denard Spears, YOUR COMPASSION FOR NURSING IS NEEDED.

Deshler had lost the ball on downs again, this time at the Piedmont 28. Piedmont punted again and Deshler moved from its 34 to the Piedmont 12 on eight consecutive running plays. On fourth-and-2, Deshler’s Carson McGregory kicked a 28-yard field goal with 5:45 left in the first half. A minute later, a second blocked punt had Deshler in business at the Piedmont 33. This time, the defense held at the Piedmont 14 and McGregory sent the ball through the uprights from 31 yards out. On the ensuing kickoff, Bayley Blanchard’s return of six yards reached the Piedmont 32. Looking for a spark, Smith inserted Lusk at quarterback and went for a deep throw on first down. Lusk’s pass found C.J. Savage between cornerback Chandler Brown and safety Cecil Kennedy. Brown seemed to attempt an interception but misread the strength of Lusk’s arm. Savage grabbed the pass on the move and the play became a 68-yard touchdown. “The touchdown pass to C.J. was really a perfectly executed throw on his part, being able to get it in that tight little window,” Smith said. “I want to commend him for that throw because that’s a very tough throw to make.” Easton Kirk’s extra point was perfect and Piedmont led 7-6 with 1:24 to go. After a kickoff return to its 27, Deshler looked to throw deep, too, but Payton Young sacked quarterback Sam Howard for an 11-yard loss and the Tigers were satisfied for a no-gain running play before letting the clock expire. The second half couldn’t have started any better for Piedmont as Darnell Jackson returned the kickoff 75 yards for a touchdown. Jackson said he sensed the Bulldogs needed to add to the momentum they had gained just before halftime and called for the ball so teammate Tre Reese wouldn’t have to make a fair catch. A block from Reese sprung him initially. “I called him off. I hit a hole he blocked for me. It was a great block,” Jackson said. Kirk’s kick was blocked but Piedmont led 13-6 just 13

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seconds into the second half. The lead lasted less than three minutes. Deshler scored its only touchdown on a 44-yard pass and McGregory’s kick made it 13-13. Piedmont punted and a 12-yard return combined with a major penalty for a late hit at the end of the return set Deshler up at the Piedmont 38. The Tigers reached the Piedmont 13 before linebacker Jaret Prater sniffed out a receiver reverse and tackled the runner for a loss of nine yards on first down. Three plays later, McGregory’s 30-yard field goal had Deshler ahead 16-13. ■ See PIEDMONT, page 9

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THE PIEDMONT JOURNAL

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 2013 • PAGE 9

PIEDMONT: Gets revenge against the team that defeated them last season From page 1

Piedmont’s next possession ended in just two plays. Lusk was leveled as he released a pass toward Jackson. The ball was intercepted by Brown and returned to the Piedmont 12. Again, the defense rose to the occasion. On fourth down at the 6, McGregory kicked his fourth field goal, this one from 22 yards away with 55 seconds left in the third. “Some of the positions that our defense was put in, to hold them to field goals was really good,” Smith said. The fourth quarter didn’t begin well for Piedmont. Lusk was intercepted at midfield 14 seconds into the fourth and a pass interference call moved Deshler to the Piedmont 30. The Bulldogs caught a break when a touchdown pass was erased on a holding call against the Tigers. From the Piedmont 40, Deshler punted into the end zone with 9:33 to play. With the ball at the Piedmont 20, Taylor Hayes entered the game at quarterback and picked up two yards on a keeper. Deshler was flagged for an offside infraction. Ty Sparks, who had struggled at quarterback in the first half, returned and completed an 8-yard pass to Savage for a first down then Hayes ran for 13 yards and another first down at the Piedmont 48. Then hearts sank. A holding penalty, a pass batted down at the line, a negative play and a delay penalty sent the Bulldogs back to the Piedmont 32 on third down, 26 yards from a first down. Sparks dropped back then found Cody Daughtry on a slant route over the middle that Daughtry carried for a 36-yard gain. Despair turned to joy then more joy when Sparks combined with Spears for 14 yards on the ensuing play. Hayes kept Piedmont ahead of the sticks with a 6-yard run then slipped on the wet field for a 2-yard loss. On third-and-6 from the Deshler 14, Smith elected to roll the dice. Spears out-maneuvered the cornerback and Sparks delivered the ball to him in the end zone with 5:14 to go. Sparks, who connected on his first pass of the game then missed on five consecutive throws, was his usual composed self on the touchdown drive, going 4-for-5 with his only incompletion coming on the batted pass. “He came back in the fourth quarter,” Smith said. With the score 19-19, Piedmont needed another big play from its special teams. The snap on the extra point attempt was low but Blanchard, the holder, got the ball up for Kirk and the kick got the Bulldogs their eventual game-winning point. “For a 10th-grade holder to get that ball down in that situation with the game tied on the road and for a 9th-grade kicker to stutter-step and be able to punch that thing through, that was a big play by two of our kids on special teams,” Smith said. Deshler got two more possessions. On the first, two running plays netted five yards but Lusk made the crucial play on second down when he tipped away a deep pass intended for Howard’s favorite target, tight end B.J. Bailey. “I didn’t know at first. I was booking it to get there,” Lusk said. “I just put my hand up before he could get him on the ball.” Deshler punted out of bounds and Piedmont took over at the Piedmont 38. Jackson took a counter play 11 yards on first down. Hayes ran twice and netted five yards. On third down, Jackson got four yards and Smith sent his “kill punt” unit on the field after a timeout. Sparks’ punt traveled about

Doug Borden

Piedmont’s Ty Sparks looks downfield as Jamie Crutcher prepares to block. 30 yards in the air then began rolling toward the Deshler end zone. Daughtry flew, literally, to the ball and downed it at the Deshler 1 with 1:52 left. “Cody Daughtry laying out and blocking that ball and knocking it down on the 1-yard line, that’s huge,” Smith said. Howard threw to Bailey for 14 yards on first down. From the 15, Howard looked for Bailey again but Hayes hit Howard’s arm as he released the pass. Linebacker Neonta Alexander stepped in front of Bailey for an interception at the Deshler 20 with 1:31 left. “Our defense put pressure on the quarterback and forced him to make the short throw. I just stepped up on No. 25 (Bailey),” Alexander said. Hayes ran for nine yards then Deshler called its second timeout of the half. After Piedmont was penalized five yards, Hayes ran for seven more yards assuring that Deshler would not get the ball again. Sparks took a knee in the victory formation and the game was finished. Hayes ended with 39 of Piedmont’s 69 yards on the ground on nine carries. After a 1-for-6 start, Sparks finished 5-for-11 passing to 90 yards. Lusk accounted 68 yards through the air and 11 on the ground. “I thought all three of our quarterbacks brought something

Hall of

to the table to contribute to the win,” Smith said. Deshler ran for 86 yards in the first half, 54 on one possession, but netted just 26 in the second half. Hayes and Alexander, the inside backers, totaled 29 tackles with Hayes getting 17 of those. Smith said as much as Deshler ran between the tackles, if Alexander and Hayes had not been making stops all night the Tigers’ backs would have been “gashing us for 10, 12, 15 yards a carry.” Senior defensive end Exavyer Jackson was next on the tackle chart with 11. He had one of Piedmont’s two sacks and broke up a pass. “We knew when we were scouting them that they were a more dominant team running. We had a little chip on our shoulders because we woke up (Friday) morning and saw in the paper where their coach said the defensive line was the weak part of the team on the defensive side. We used that as motivation,” Jackson said. Safety Dreek Thompson had nine tackles. Lusk and Darnell Jackson made seven stops apiece. Each had a sack and Jackson broke up two passes. Prater had six tackles, three of those behind the line. Reese and Young each made four stops on the line. Blanchard had three tackles and Dalton Barber made two.

fame

vs Southeast Missouri State

Saturday, November 23rd 3:00 p.m. Kickoff Tickets can be purchased at (256) 782-8499 or online at www.JSUGamecockSports.com

Friday, November 22nd, 1:00 p.m JSU Men’s Basketball vs. Dalton State

YOUTH SPORTS DAY


PAGE 10 / WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 2013

THE PIEDMONT JOURNAL

SALE: About 20,000 knives From page 1

someone or not. Every knife will fit someone’s hand.” Griffey said he isn’t forgetting about the ladies. “We’re bringing in kitchen knives, and we’re going to give you a real good price on them,” he said. There will be about 20,000 knives for sale. Griffey said Bear manufactures 12,000-14,000 knives a day. Other items offered for sale include sharpness stones, knife packs and knife kits. Collectors from other states contact Griffey to purchase his knives. “There’s a lot of collectors out there,” he said. “They find out about us. We’ve got overruns and prototypes. We make up a knife for this company or that company, and it never goes into the market places. These collectors come in and want to buy them.” The knives that will be for sale, while their quality is good, don’t pass

inspection, said Griffey. He said there are three categories. “You have your blemishes,” he said. “You have your overrun and prototypes that’s all first quality. And you have your everyday first quality. We have some blimps. They’re really good knives. The handle might have a little blemish in it, and we can’t sell it to our retail market, but all of our knives are very good.” Bear manufactures over 300 different styles of knives, from traditional patterns to rockbacks, hunting knives, and multi tools, including a military/ police line. “We even make some straight knives and switchblades in that line,” said Griffey. “We also make butterfly knives which are a martial arts type.” Only credit cards, debit cards and cash will be accepted. No checks will be taken in. Bear Cutlery Inc., opened in 1991. Griffey’s wife, Sandy, is vice president. Their son, Matt, is vice president of sales. The company employs 88.

FUN & GAMES WITH THE JOURNAL

COUNCIL: Newly appointed

Councilman Harper sworn in From page 1

making those payments to the school system last November under former Mayor Rick Freeman’s order, City Clerk Michelle Franklin said earlier this month. Attempts to reach Freeman late Tuesday were not successful.   At least three of the city’s seven council members, Terry Kiser, Frank Cobb and Brenda Spears, have questioned whether Piedmont can help pay the school expense. “I just don’t see how the city can pay it,” Kiser said. Spears, a former educator, said she wants to support the schools but is also unsure whether the expense is affordable for the city. Spears said the city already pays two monthly payments that total about $27,000 for debt it took on to help make school improvements. Spears said one of those payments costs $14,946 each month, and the city will continue paying off the debt until 2040. “We have 27 years to pay this, and we’re responsible for it,” Spears said. “I have to

do what is best for the city.” In other business: — The city installed newly appointed Councilman Mark Harper during a swearing-in ceremony at the start of the meeting. Harper was selected to fill Bill Bakers District 6 seat when he left the position to become mayor after former Mayor Rick Freeman resigned for health reasons. — Voted to reappoint Calvin Houston, Randy Brown and Jay Wilson to the Piedmont Parks and Recreation Department Board. — Agreed to support a paving project that will be completed by the Calhoun County Highway Department. Calhoun County Commissioner Rudy Abbott is providing road paving funds to repave eight streets for $200,000. — Agreed to pay the Calhoun County Highway Department $53,057 to pave the parking lot in front of the city’s new pool. The county provided the lowest bid for the paving, said Carl Hinton, the Piedmont employee who is overseeing the project. Staff Writer Laura Gaddy: 256-2353544. On Twitter@LGaddy_Star

Last week’s answers

Submitted photo

Dr. Stan Cooke, Republican candidate for Lieutenant Governor, visited Piedmont High School on Friday, November 8th. Dr. Cooke toured the school after speaking with students, teachers, and city officials. Pictured: Mayor Bill Baker, student Derrick Baer, Dr. Stan Cooke, student Denard Spears, student Addison Byers, and Mayor Pro Temp Mary Bramblett. AHSAA State Football Playoffs QUARTERFINAL PAIRINGS (All games set Friday, Nov. 22, 7 p.m.) Class 1A South Brantley (10-2) at Loachapoka (10-2) Linden (9-3) at Maplesville (12-0) North Berry (7-5) at Hubbertville (10-2) Pickens County (12-0) at Ragland (10-1) Class 2A South Mobile Christian (9-3) at Washington County (11-1) Sweet Water (9-3) at Luverne (11-1) North Tanner (10-1) at Montgomery Academy (11-1) Lanett (12-0) at Fyffe (11-1) Class 3A South Bayside Academy (8-4)  at Straughn (9-2) T.R. Miller (11-0) at Leeds (10-2) North Madison Academy (12-0) at Piedmont (11-1) Saks (12-0) at Colbert County (11-1), Leighton

Class 4A South Charles Henderson (12-0) at Central-Clay Co. (10-2) UMS-Wright (10-2) at Dadeville (11-1) North Oneonta (11-1) at Cleburne County (8-4), Heflin Munford (11-1) at J.O. Johnson (11-1) Class 5A South St. Paul’s Episcopal (10-2) at Saraland (10-2) Jackson (12-0) at Spanish Fort (12-0) North Athens (9-3) at Muscle Shoals (11-1) McAdory (10-2) at Southside-Gadsden (12-0) Class 6A South McGill-Toolen (11-1) at Smiths Station (10-2) Carver-Montgomery (10-2) at Auburn (11-1) North Vestavia Hills (10-2) at Bob Jones (11-1) Hoover (12-0) at Florence (9-3)

Sudoku


The Piedmont Journal

C C

Diamond Bus Tour Washington DC, Mar. 27-Apr. 1 $525 pp, dbl occ. ALSO Savannah, Jekyll Island, St. Simon Island & Beaufort, SC Apr. 28-May 2 $450 pp, dbl occ. Call Regina (256)492-8505. JSU 1st Annual DU Banquet

Heroes American Grille December 6th 2013 5pm - 9pm

CLASSIFIEDS

TO THE BEST OF OUR KNOWLEDGE All of the ads in this column represent legitimate offerings, however The Piedmont Journal does recommend that readers exercise normal business caution in responding to ads.

Driver Trainees Needed Now!

Learn to drive for Werner Enterprises! Earn $800 per week! No experience needed! Local CDL Training. Job ready in 15 days! 1-888-743-4701

Drivers:

Immediate Openings for Short Haul Home Every Night Drivers! Off Every Weekend! Great Pay & Benefits!Full Time or Part Time Your Choice! Call: 1- 855-867-3413

Gentlemen’s Club

Atalla AL. Dancers wanted

256-458-0943 or 256-538-5676

Heavy Equipment Operator Training! Bulldozers,

Backhoes, Excavators. 3 Weeks Hands On Program. Local Job Placement Assistance. National Certifications. GI Bill Benefits Eligible. 1-866-362-6497

Simply Staffing Inc.

located in Rockmart, Ga. is now hiring mig welders, machine operators, maintenance personnel, millwrights and entry level paint personnel for a well established Polk County, Ga company. Eligible candidates MUST have valid drivers license, clean criminal background and at least 3 years verifiable metal manufacturing work experience. This company offers 2 shifts 10 hrs daily, excellent starting salaries and a complete benefits package. These positions are considered “temp” to hire meaning permanent positions are available. Apply in person to: Simply Staffing, Inc. 634 Goodyear Avenue Rockmart, Ga or call 678-757-9102 for more information. TO THE BEST OF OUR KNOWLEDGE All of the ads in this column represent legitimate offerings, however The Piedmont Journal does recommend that readers exercise normal business caution in responding to ads.

Alabama Football, Iron Bowl & SEC Championship Tickets Buy/Sell/Trade 256-237-6658

Stairlifts- Wheelchair Lifts local sales, local service, made in the USA, Grizzard Living Aids 256-237-2006 TO THE BEST OF OUR KNOWLEDGE All of the ads in this column represent legitimate offerings, however The Piedmont Journal does recommend that readers exercise normal business caution in responding to ads.

#1 I buy junk cars paying $200 & up, will match competitor’s price. Honest, dependable & fair on the price, 256-310-0552

Piedmont- Estate Sale Sat. Nov. 23 9:30am-4:00pm 214 North 5th Ave. Home & Items for sale!

PIEDMONT AREA 3BR

Call Walter or Ruby Green at 256-447-7558

256-241-1900 Toll Free

Wednesday, November 20, 2013 • 11

256-299-2153 205-884-3400

1-866-989-0873

CONSOLIDATED PUBLISHING

Medical Office Assistant! No experience needed! Online training at SC gets you job ready! HS diploma/GED & PC/Internet needed! 1-888-926-6075. (R) _________________________ HELP WANTED-DRIVERS 25 DRIVER TRAINEES needed now! Become a driver for TMC Transportation! Earn *** VA LOANS *** $750 per week! No experience needed! Job ready in 15 days! 1-888-743-4611. (R) On Manufactured Homes _________________________ You can buy land, home ATTN: DRIVER trainees need& all development ed! $800 to $1000 a week plus -0- Down Payment benefits! Home weekly or OTR! -0- Closing Cost out of pocket Everyone approved if qualified! MINTON HOME CENTER Company sponsored, cash, finance, GI bill, WIA. No CDL, Oxford, AL 256-835-0152 no problem, will train locally! FHA & Conventional 1-800-878-2537. Financing Available _________________________ DRIVERS: RUN FB with WTI. Be home through the week and weekends. Start up to 28% plus fuel bonus. New equipment. BCBS. Experience needed. LP available. Call Dachshunds AKC. Smooth 1-877-693-1305. (R) wire & long hair, all colors, _________________________ NEED CLASS A CDL training? $200 & up. 256-236-8801, Start a career in trucking today! 256-419-6063 Swift Academies offer PTDI certified courses and offer “Best-In-Class” training. New academy classes weekly, no money down or credit check, certified mentors ready and 2 and 3 BR Homes & trailers available, paid (while training with mentor), regional and dedfor rent. For more information icated opportunities, great cacall 256-447-8162, reer path, excellent benefits 256-444-7450, 256-454-5263 package. Please call: 1-520-226-4557. 2Br furn/unfurn Houses in _________________________ Piedmont for Rent, Sec. Dep., NEW CAREER - CDL training. no pets, CH&A 256-447-8994 Jobs available if qualified. Call today - start tomorrow! WIA, For Rent or Sale: Small VA, Post-9/11 G.I. Bill & Reneat 3 br, 2 ba house, located hab. ESD TDS, LLC. 3 mi. North of Piedmont in 1-866-432-0430. www.ESDsSpring Garden School Dist., chool.com. (R) _________________________ Cherokee Electric. REGIONAL CDL-A drivers (256)447-9826 for details. Averitt offers fantastic benefits and weekly hometime. 1-888-362-8608. Paid training for recent grads w/a CDL-A and drivers with limited experience. Apply online at AverittCareers.com. Equal Opportunity Employer. _________________________ HELP WANTED-ADMIN/PROF THE UNIVERSITY of Alabama is accepting Police Communications Operator/Emergency Notification Specialist applications through 11/26/13. Starting salary is $17.33/hr. Visit UA’s employment website at jobs.ua.edu for more information and to apply. EOE/AA The University of Alabama is an TO THE BEST OF OUR equal-opportunity educational KNOWLEDGE institution/employer. All of the ads in this column _________________________ represent legitimate offerings, THE UNIVERSITY of Alabama however The Piedmont is accepting Police Officer apJournal does recommend plications through 12/02/13, that readers exercise normal and the required entry-level ofbusiness caution in respond- ficer exam will be 12/19/13. ing to ads. Starting salary range is $22.51-$25.71/hr based on certifications and experience. Process updates can be viewed at police.ua.edu. Visit UA’s employment website at jobs.ua.edu for more informaLake Wedowee yr rd water, tion and to apply. EOE/AA The 3BR, 2BA, 2 car gar., floating University of Alabama is an equal-opportunity educational dock, $290,000 404-906-4275 institution/employer. _________________________ HELP WANTED-TRADES HEAVY EQUIPMENT operator training! Bulldozers, backhoes, excavators. 3 week hands on HouseJacks/Floor Supports/ program. Local job placement assistance. National certificarot seals/ba’s/kit.’s,/wd.fence/ tions. GI Bill benefits eligible. Room add.1-205-362-0128 1-866-362-6497. _________________________ LAND FOR SALE BANK REPOSSESSION oversized lake lot $49,900. Direct water frontage. Established waterfront community on Need Your Leaves Up Smith Lake with all utilities in Call Wade 256-330-3909 place. Call 1-877-452-8406. _________________________ STREAM FRONT land bargain! 1.7 acre wooded corner parcel in Blue Ridge Mtns. 390’ on crystal clear stream, Natural year-round spring. Paved road, municipal water, utilities, mild TO THE BEST OF OUR restrictions - RV friendly. Was KNOWLEDGE All of the ads in this column $69,900 now, $27,900. Excelfinancing. Call now represent legitimate offerings, lent however The Piedmont 1-866-952-5303, x 62. Journal does recommend _________________________ that readers exercise normal TENN LAND Bargain with free business caution in respond- boat slip! 1.7 acres meadows overlook 140 acre Nature preing to ads. serve, streams & ponds. Only $19,900. 6.1 acre hardwoods only $27,900. Free boat slips. Excellent financing, little down. Call now 1-877-888-0267, x 447. _________________________ AUCTIONS LAST 2013 Bankruptcy lien- MEDICAL SUPPLIES holder consignment estate NEW AND used - stair lift eleauction! 12/7/13 10 a.m. vators, car lifts, scooters, lift DFarmer793, Heritage Realty chairs, power wheel chairs, & Auction, 6877 Gadsden Hwy, walk-in tubs. Covering all of AlTrussville, AL 35173. abama for 23 years. Elrod Mo1-800-445-4608. www.Heritag- bility 1-800-682-0658. (R) _________________________ eSales.com. _________________________ ONLINE FINE jewelry auction. 12/4/13 thru 12/10/13. DFarmer793, Heritage Realty & Auction, Trussville, AL. 1-800-445-4608 or www.HeriMORTGAGE FOREtageSales.com for more info. _________________________ CLOSURE SALE SERVICES Default having been made in HIGH-SPEED Internet is now the payment of the indebtedavailable where you live for ness secured by that certain only $39.99 per mo. New su- mortgage executed by Jason perfast satellite internet with K. Hughes, a single man, to speeds up to 15 Mbps! Ask JPMorgan Chase Bank, N.A., about discounts for DishNet- on the 1st day of April, 2009, work or DirecTV customers! said mortgage recorded in the We also now offer phone ser- Office of the Judge of Probate vice as low as $19.99 per mo. of Calhoun County, Alabama, Call Today! 1-800-266-4409 in Mortgage Book 4540, Page www.pbsinternet.com 840; the undersigned JPMor_________________________ gan Chase Bank, National AsINSTRUCTION sociation, as Mortgagee/TransMEDICAL OFFICE trainees feree, under and by virtue of needed! Train to become a TO THE BEST OF OUR KNOWLEDGE All of the ads in this column represent legitimate offerings, however The Piedmont Journal does recommend that readers exercise normal business caution in responding to ads.

the power of sale contained in said mortgage, will sell at public outcry to the highest bidder for cash, in front of the main entrance of the Courthouse at Anniston, Calhoun County, Alabama, on January 27, 2014, during the legal hours of sale, all of its right, title, and interest in and to the following described real estate, situated in Calhoun County, Alabama, towit: A parcel of land located in the Southeast Quarter of the Southeast Quarter of Section 33, Township 14 South, Range 9 East; said parcel being more particularly described as follows: Beginning at the described Southeast corner of said Quarter-Quarter; thence due West 949.34 feet; thence North 08 degrees 50 minutes 00 seconds West, 120.00 feet; thence North 87 degrees 35 minutes 00 seconds East 360.00 feet to a half inch rebar on the observed West right of way line of Alabama Highway 9; thence North 08 degrees 33 minutes 32 seconds West along said right of way line 425.85 feet to a half inch rebar; thence North 07 degrees 14 minutes 08 seconds West along said right of way line 202.50 feet to a capped rebar; thence continue North 07 degrees 14 minutes 08 seconds West along said right of way line 202.50 feet to a capped rebar; thence continue North 07 degrees 14 minutes 08 seconds West along said right of way line 61.77 feet to a capped rebar and the true point of beginning of the hereafter described parcel; thence North 07 degrees 12 minutes 43 seconds West along said right of way line 61.77 feet to a capped rebar; thence South 89 degrees 31 minutes 19 seconds West and leaving said right of way line 462.41 feet to a capped rebar; thence South 01 degrees 22 minutes 00 seconds East, 64.99 feet to a capped rebar; thence North 89 degrees 04 minutes 37 seconds East, 468.66 feet to the true point of beginning. Containing 0.68 acres, more or less. Property Street Address: 8529 Al Hwy 9, Anniston, AL 36207 THIS PROPERTY WILL BE SOLD ON AN “AS IS, WHERE IS” BASIS, SUBJECT TO ANY EASEMENTS, ENCUMBRANCES, AND EXCEPTIONS REFLECTED IN THE MORTGAGE AND THOSE CONTAINED IN THE RECORDS OF THE OFFICE OF THE JUDGE OF PROBATE OF THE COUNTY WHERE THE ABOVE-DESCRIBED PROPERTY IS SITUATED. THIS PROPERTY WILL BE SOLD WITHOUT WARRANTY OR RECOURSE, EXPRESSED OR IMPLIED AS TO TITLE, USE AND/OR ENJOYMENT AND WILL BE SOLD SUBJECT TO THE RIGHT OF REDEMPTION OF ALL PARTIES ENTITLED THERETO. This sale is made for the purpose of paying the indebtedness secured by said mortgage, as well as the expenses of foreclosure. The Mortgagee/Transferee reserves the right to bid for and purchase the real estate and to credit its purchase price against the expenses of sale and the indebtedness secured by the real estate. This sale is subject to postponement or cancellation. JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association, Mortgagee/Transferee Rebecca Redmond SIROTE & PERMUTT, P.C. P. O. Box 55727 Birmingham, AL 35255-5727 Attorney for Mortgagee/Transferee www.sirote.com/foreclosures 291300 The Piedmont Journal Calhoun Co., AL November 20, 27, December 4, 2013

MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE SALE

Default having been made in the payment of the indebtedness secured by that certain mortgage executed by Eugene F. Wali Copeland, an unmarried man, to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., acting solely as nominee for Amerigroup Mortgage Corporation, a Division of Mortgage Investors Corporation, on the 9th day of March, 2004, said mortgage recorded in the Office of the Judge of Probate of Calhoun County, Alabama, in MORT Book 4226, Page 756; said mortgage having subsequently been transferred and assigned to EverBank, by instrument recorded in , in the aforesaid Probate Office; the undersigned EverBank, as Mortgagee/Transferee, under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in said mortgage, will sell at public outcry to the highest bidder for cash, in front of the main entrance of the Courthouse at Anniston, Calhoun County, Alabama, on December 16, 2013, during the legal hours of sale, all of its right, title, and interest in and to the following described real estate, situated in Calhoun County, Alabama, to-wit: Lot 1 and 2, Block 26, as shown on the map or plat of Saks Addition “C” to the North Anniston Realty Company Plat, recorded in Plat Book 1, at Page 89, in the Office of the

Probate Judge of Calhoun County, Alabama, situated, lying and being in Calhoun County, Alabama. THIS PROPERTY WILL BE SOLD ON AN “AS IS, WHERE IS” BASIS, SUBJECT TO ANY EASEMENTS, ENCUMBRANCES, AND EXCEPTIONS REFLECTED IN THE MORTGAGE AND THOSE CONTAINED IN THE RECORDS OF THE OFFICE OF THE JUDGE OF PROBATE OF THE COUNTY WHERE THE ABOVE-DESCRIBED PROPERTY IS SITUATED. THIS PROPERTY WILL BE SOLD WITHOUT WARRANTY OR RECOURSE, EXPRESSED OR IMPLIED AS TO TITLE, USE AND/OR ENJOYMENT AND WILL BE SOLD SUBJECT TO THE RIGHT OF REDEMPTION OF ALL PARTIES ENTITLED THERETO. This sale is made for the purpose of paying the indebtedness secured by said mortgage, as well as the expenses of foreclosure. The Mortgagee/Transferee reserves the right to bid for and purchase the real estate and to credit its purchase price against the expenses of sale and the indebtedness secured by the real estate. This sale is subject to postponement or cancellation. EverBank, Mortgagee/Transferee Rebecca Redmond SIROTE & PERMUTT, P.C. P. O. Box 55727 Birmingham, AL 35255-5727 Attorney for Mortgagee/Transferee www.sirote.com/foreclosures 301255 The Piedmont Journal Calhoun Co., AL November 6, 13, 20, 2013

MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE SALE

Default having been made in the payment of the indebtedness secured by that certain mortgage executed by Shannon D. Cupp and wife, Jennifer Cupp, to Regions Mortgage, Inc., on the 17th day of March, 2003, said mortgage recorded in the Office of the Judge of Probate of Calhoun County, Alabama, in Mortgage Book 4150, Page 474; said mortgage having subsequently been transferred and assigned to EverBank, by instrument recorded in Mortgage Book 4515, Page 101, in the aforesaid Probate Office; the undersigned EverBank, as Mortgagee/Transferee, under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in said mortgage, will sell at public outcry to the highest bidder for cash, in front of the main entrance of the Courthouse at Anniston, Calhoun County, Alabama, on January 13, 2014, during the legal hours of sale, all of its right, title, and interest in and to the following described real estate, situated in Calhoun County, Alabama, to-wit: Beginning at a point 6.62 feet North of Station 109 + 99 2 of S. A. C. P. 213B; thence North 3 degrees 01 minutes East along the East right of way of Saks Road a distance of 58.65 feet to a point; thence North 37 degrees 47 minutes East a distance of 65.10 feet to a point; thence North 76 degrees 52 minutes East a distance of 195.21 feet along the South right of way of Glade Road to a point; thence South 0 degrees 30 minutes East a distance of 174.7 feet to a point; thence in a westerly direction a distance of 238.67 feet to point of beginning; situated, lying and being in Northwest Quarter of Southwest Quarter of Section 18, Township 15 South, Range 8 East, Calhoun County, Alabama. THIS PROPERTY WILL BE SOLD ON AN “AS IS, WHERE IS” BASIS, SUBJECT TO ANY EASEMENTS, ENCUMBRANCES, AND EXCEPTIONS REFLECTED IN THE MORTGAGE AND THOSE CONTAINED IN THE RECORDS OF THE OFFICE OF THE JUDGE OF PROBATE OF THE COUNTY WHERE THE ABOVE-DESCRIBED PROPERTY IS SITUATED. THIS PROPERTY WILL BE SOLD WITHOUT WARRANTY OR RECOURSE, EXPRESSED OR IMPLIED AS TO TITLE, USE AND/OR ENJOYMENT AND WILL BE SOLD SUBJECT TO THE RIGHT OF REDEMPTION OF ALL PARTIES ENTITLED THERETO. This sale is made for the purpose of paying the indebtedness secured by said mortgage, as well as the expenses of foreclosure. The Mortgagee/Transferee reserves the right to bid for and purchase the real estate and to credit its purchase price against the expenses of sale and the indebtedness secured by the real estate. This sale is subject to postponement or cancellation. EverBank, Mortgagee/Transferee Rebecca Redmond SIROTE & PERMUTT, P.C. P. O. Box 55727 Birmingham, AL 35255-5727 Attorney for Mortgagee/Transferee www.sirote.com/foreclosures 305578 The Piedmont Journal Calhoun Co., AL November 6, 13, 20, 2013

MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE SALE

Default having been made in the payment of the indebtedness secured by that certain mortgage executed by Sondra K. Wade, an unmarried person, to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. solely as nominee for Irwin Mortgage Corporation, on the 30th day of June, 2005, said mortgage recorded in the Office of the Judge of Probate of Calhoun County, Alabama, in Mortgage Book 4308 Page 967; said mortgage having subsequently been transferred and assigned to Everbank, by instrument recorded in Book 4700, Page 430, in the aforesaid Probate Office; the undersigned Everbank, as Mortgagee/Transferee, under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in said mortgage, will sell at public outcry to the highest bidder for cash, in front of the main entrance of the Courthouse at Anniston, Calhoun County, Alabama, on January 13, 2014, during the legal hours of sale, all of its right, title, and interest in and to the following described real estate, situated in Calhoun County, Alabama, towit: Lot 1, as shown on the Map of Jo-Dell Subdivision, as recorded in the Office of the Probate Judge of Calhoun County, Alabama in Plat Book “K”, Page 15; situated, lying and being in Calhoun County, Alabama. THIS PROPERTY WILL BE SOLD ON AN “AS IS, WHERE IS” BASIS, SUBJECT TO ANY EASEMENTS, ENCUMBRANCES, AND EXCEPTIONS REFLECTED IN THE MORTGAGE AND THOSE CONTAINED IN THE RECORDS OF THE OFFICE OF THE JUDGE OF PROBATE OF THE COUNTY WHERE THE ABOVE-DESCRIBED PROPERTY IS SITUATED. THIS PROPERTY WILL BE SOLD WITHOUT WARRANTY OR RECOURSE, EXPRESSED OR IMPLIED AS TO TITLE, USE AND/OR ENJOYMENT AND WILL BE SOLD SUBJECT TO THE RIGHT OF REDEMPTION OF ALL PARTIES ENTITLED THERETO. This sale is made for the purpose of paying the indebtedness secured by said mortgage, as well as the expenses of foreclosure. The Mortgagee/Transferee reserves the right to bid for and purchase the real estate and to credit its purchase price against the expenses of sale and the indebtedness secured by the real estate. This sale is subject to postponement or cancellation. Everbank, Mortgagee/Transferee Rebecca Redmond SIROTE & PERMUTT, P.C. P. O. Box 55727 Birmingham, AL 35255-5727 Attorney for Mortgagee/Transferee www.sirote.com/foreclosures 291868 The Piedmont Journal Calhoun Co., AL November 6, 13, 20, 2013

NOTICE TO CREDITORS

STATE OF ALABAMA CALHOUN COUNTY PROBATE COURT CASE NO. 31812 IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF MERLINE HARRISON, DECEASED Letters of Administration on the estate of MERLINE HARRISON, deceased, having been granted to the undersigned on November 1, 2013, by the Honorable Alice K. Martin, Judge of Probate of said County, notice is hereby given that all persons having claims against said estate, are hereby required to present the same within the time allowed by law, or the same will be barred. RICHARD HARRISON, Personal Representative of the Estate of MERLINE HARRISON, Deceased Alice K. Martin Judge of Probate Piedmont Journal Calhoun Co., AL November 13, 20, 27, 2013

NOTICE TO CREDITORS

STATE OF ALABAMA CALHOUN COUNTY PROBATE COURT CASE NO. 31802 IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF W.G. CROWE, DECEASED Letters Testamentary on the estate of W.G. CROWE, deceased, having been granted to LINDA N. CARTER, the undersigned on October 25, 2013, by the Honorable Alice K. Martin, Judge of Probate of said County, notice is hereby given that all persons having claims against said estate, are hereby required to present the same within the time allowed by law, or the same will be barred. LINDA N. CARTER, Personal Representative of the Last Will and Testament of W.G. CROWE, Deceased Alice K. Martin Judge of Probate Piedmont Journal Calhoun Co., AL November 6, 13, 20, 2013


PAGE 12 / WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 2013

THE PIEDMONT JOURNAL

JOURNAL FEATURE

Sunday sermon brought new direction for Rosser Piedmont Outdoor owner works with Carpenters for Christ

D

BY MARGARET ANDERSON JOURNAL CORRESPONDENT

oug Rosser was born in 1939 at Mount Zion in Cherokee County. About all the small community had at that time was “a little school and a little church.” His parents are the late Debs and Grace (Conaway) Rosser. His sister, Glenda Marshall, lives in Newnan, Ga. He has two brothers. Larry lives in Dallas and Darryl lives in Birmingham. When he was 6, the family moved to Rock Run. After graduating from Spring Garden High School, Rosser attended college at Auburn. He studied agriscience and poultry husbandry. After graduating, he came home and worked for the late Charles Miller at Miller Poultry Co., for 15 years. “I had always enjoyed my work at the poultry place,” said Rosser. “But it sort of changed. I was over the poultry and then the cattle operation. It was wintertime and it was cold out there with the cows.”

A sermon by his preacher on a Sunday morning brought about a career change. “The preacher said if you don’t like what you do, you need to change jobs,” said Rosser. “That just stuck with me. I went in and told Mr. Miller the next week that I was going to change. I told him before I even went to look (for another job).” Miller’s reaction surprised Rosser. Miller told him that if he needed a partner for financial backing that he’d like to be a part of that. Next, Rosser visited his next door neighbor, Bobby Sexton, who owned Auto Supply. “I told him that I was going to change vocations,” said Rosser. “He said that he’d been thinking about changing, too. He had a partner, Ed Little, who owned the Pontiac and Ford place in Piedmont. Mr. Miller bought out Ed’s part, and I bought out Bobby’s part.” Miller and Rosser remained partners in Auto Supply 10 years before Rosser bought him out. Auto Supply eventually became Piedmont Outdoor, located at 613 N. Main St. It’s been in the same location 38 years. John

Anita Kilgore

Doug Rosser, right, with employee of 15 years, Mack Maddox.

Anita Kilgore

Doug Rosser poses with a 1948 John Deere tractor. Deere equipment, Stihl handheld equipment, Exmark commercial cutting equipment and Arctic Cat ATVS are some of the items sold there. Piedmont Outdoor not only provided a way for Rosser to support his family, it gave employment to his four children while they were in high school and college. Rosser and his wife, the former Janice Anderson, have been married 54 years. They have two sons and two daughters. Doug Jr., and his wife, Lisa, live in Glencoe, where he is comptroller for Burford’s Tree Service in Alexandria. Greg and his wife, Sheri, live in Centre, where he manages First Southern State Bank. Kim Compton and her husband, Neil, live in Piedmont. Kim is general manager of Piedmont Outdoor. Cindy Holbrooks and her husband, Bryan, live in Glencoe. Cindy is an accountant for McWhorter & Co., in Anniston. The Rossers have eight grandchildren. They attend First Baptist Church, where Rosser is a deacon and, for the past 31 years, has been involved in Carpenters for Christ. Each of these 31 years has carried Rosser to different states to help build churches for those not able to build if not for volunteer help. “That made me look at life different,”

he said. “What I thought was important before, then I decided it wasn’t important anymore. Material things didn’t matter. Family and relations were what was important.”   For the past five years, Rosser has collected classic and antique tractors. The oldest is a 1939 A model Farmall he bought from a man in Spring Garden. He’s working with cattle again, though this time it’s not a full job as it once was. “I used to play golf,” said Rosser. “I spend about the same amount of money raising cows as I did playing golf. But they don’t talk back to me and I don’t get as frustrated as I did playing golf.” Rosser said the day the preacher spoke, the Lord changed everything for him.  “I don’t know what else the preacher said that day, but it was like a light bulb. My motto has been since then, if you’re enjoying what you do, you never have to work a day in your life. If you don’t enjoy it, then it’s work.” Rosser, 74, is happy where he is in his life. He credits his family, friends and employees for helping make that happen. “I enjoy our business,” he said. “Most of our customers are like family. I like that.”

(Contact Margaret at pollya922@gmail. com)

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The Piedmont Journal - 11/20/13