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CONNER RAY BRUNS Landscape Architecture Portfolio // 2018


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PARCELS AND PEPPERS

EPA RAINWORKS CHALLENGE

SELECTED WORKS

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FIRST CHRISTIAN CHURCH

SUNSET POND 2 CLICK

Thank you for taking time to view my work. This collection of 9 projects represents my technical and design skills at this point in my career. The projects to the right that have this icon indicate individual endeavors, while those with this icon represent collaborative efforts. Clicking this icon will take you to an external link to view further work, or a video fly-through of the project. I certify that the skills demonstrated in this portfolio accurately reflect my personal abilities. If you have questions about my skills or qualifications, please contact: • crbruns@ksu.edu

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THE ROYAL ATLANTIS 12

GREENING GIFFORD PARK

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SOLACE LAKE HOUSE

THE THREAD

POYNTZ PLAZA 10 18


“Nothing more clearly shows some of the cherished values of a group than the manner in which they fix boundaries, the manner in which they organize space.� ~ J.B. Jackson


“The Eye” Downtown Dallas, Texas


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Stronger Quinlan is a green infrastructure and campus beautification project that promotes sustainable stormwater management and resilience on Kansas State University’s campus in Manhattan, Kansas. The Strong Complex watershed is disconnected from Campus Creek by capturing and infiltrating stormwater runoff at the source. A network of rain harvesting cisterns collect and store up to 30,000 gallons of stormwater, decreasing the volume flowing through the creek and thereby minimizing flooding. A central bioretention cell promotes infiltration and groundwater recharge, while a circular seating plaza unifies the Strong Complex and the Quinlan Natural Area, reconnecting KSU students to this historic campus green space and the waters of campus creek. This design was awarded first place by the USEPA in the 2016 Campus Rainworks Challenge, which is featured on the EPA’s website here: https://www.epa.gov/green-infrastructure/2016-campus-rainworks-challenge#Kansas

EPA RAINWORKS CHALLENGE

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Stronger Quinlan: Connecting the Strong Complex with the Quinlan Natural Area through green infrastructure


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Legend A. Rainwater Cistern B. Basketball Court C. Table Cisterns (x6) D. Gabion Seatwall E. Bike Parking Area F. Permeable Paving Plaza G. Bioretention Cell H. Blind Swale I. Restored Nature Walk J. Restored Riparian Woodland K. Campus Creek L. Boardwalk M. Pedestrian Promenade

Student Team

Van Zile Hall

Bio/Ag Engineering: - Erica Schmitz, Kelsey McDonough Landscape Architecture: - Astrid Wong, Conner Bruns Entomology: Joe Krauska Soil Science: Joseph Weeks

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Sunset Zoo in Manhattan, Kansas was established in 1933, and began as a drive-through zoological exhibit. The zoo’s automobile-oriented design persists today and has created a problem for modern zoogoers: an unpleasant pedestrian experience. Currently, on one of the primary routes through the center of the zoo, pedestrians are directed onto an asphalt road, where they must walk alongside service vehicles in order to reach their desired exhibit. This design proposal removes much of the vehicular infrastructure carving through the heart of the zoo, swaps asphalt roads for brick-banded promenades, and creates a central park space to allow visitors to gather. The main component of this proposed park space is a pond, which is surrounded by open lawn space, seating, and flowering trees.

SUNSET POND

A new central park space for Sunset Zoo

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5 Legend A. Ramp/Stairway B. Star Burst Plaza C. Native Meadow/Raingarden D. Discovery Center Extension E. Sunset Pond & Fountain F. Central Green Space G. Chautauqua Amphitheater H. Utility Shed I. Kansas Plains Exhibits J. Concession Stand K. Restrooms L. Central Playground Pavilion M. Flamingo Viewing N. Old Education Building O. Austrailian Walkabout P. Austrailian Aviary Q. Service Road

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A Resilient St. Louis Full of Hope and Opportunity

Published Book

In the summer of 2015 a studio of 18 landscape architecture students were led by Associate Professors Blake Belanger and Howard Hahn in an intensive eight week summer semester aimed at addressing vacancy dilemmas and presenting opportunities for the City of St. Louis. In order to effectively address the complex physical, social, and economic issues present within each of the 79 neighborhoods throughout the city, it was critical for us to articulate methods for solving these ‘wicked problems.’ Our work is an ambitious effort to organize a typology of vacant property present within the city, and suggest strategies for creatively solving these issues. We had the opportunity to collaborate with multiple organizations and federal agencies, including Kansas State University’s Technical Assistance for Brownfields (TAB), the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the United States Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD), and the City of St. Louis. The result of our work is a 270 page published book full of “savory” ideas for addressing vacancy in St. Louis, which can be viewed here: http://krex.k-state.edu/dspace/handle/2097/20390

PARCELS & PEPPERS

Savory ideas for addressing vacancy in St. Louis, Missouri

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Demographics

A Princeton University study reveals St. Louis is one of America’s most segregated cities, with a major North-South demographic divide.

Commercial Corridors

Commercial corridors in St. Louis are predominately oriented in the East-West direction, exacerbating the divide by discouraging North-South movement.

Proposed N-S Connection

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A North-South commercial corridor on Grand Blvd. could help bridge the racial and infrastructure divides in St. Louis by allowing movement and commerce.


First Christian Church in Manhattan, Kansas is relocating to a site on the west end of town more suitable for their needs and growing parish. FCC stakeholders and representatives stated that they wanted a building that was easily identifiable from Grand Mere Parkway. For this reason, the hinged rectangular structure is placed high enough in the landscape to establish a strong visual identity, but also with a location that maximizes site access and minimizes grading and construction costs. FCC requested a large parking capacity of 160 stalls, which are spread between two parking lots to the north and south of the site, and feature green infrastructure amenities such as bioswales and raingardens. A preserved drainage area in the center of the site establishes an unobstructed visual corridor to the prairie landscape beyond, reaching out and embracing the Manhattan community as a new place to worship.

FIRST CHRISTIAN CHURCH A New Home for FCC: Relocation and Redevelopment of a Prominent Parish

South Parking Lot Daycare Facility Narthex Atrium Fellowship Hall Labyrinth North Parking Lot Drainage Area

Student Team

Landscape: Timothy Kellams, Neal Heidt, Conner Bruns Architecture - Paul Wickert, Renee Bresson


Grading Plan

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Concept Sketch

Plan View

Poyntz Plaza, located in Manhattan, Kansas, serves as an important terminus on a historic downtown street. The plaza acts as the entrance to the Manhattan Town Center Mall, which was constructed in the 1980s as part of an economic development project. The space now anchors the Poyntz Avenue commercial corridor. Native perennial plant beds, wood seating, light columns, and arching fountains all align to a radial grid which emanates from the doorway, directing energy and movement inward toward the mall and out towards the vibrant commercial corridor. This design proposal replaces an aging plaza with more a more accessible contemporary design and upgraded amenities, giving Manhattanites a flexible urban space they can feel proud of.

POYNTZ PLAZA

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Reenvisioning a neglected urban space in Manhattan, Kansas


Manhattan Town Center Mall: Plaza Perspective

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Construction Details

Form Studies

For nine months, from November 2015 to August 2016, I worked as an intern at 40NORTH, a small design practice out of Kansas City. Throughout the internship, The Royal Atlantis (TRA) was by far what I spent the most time on, at 70 percent of my total hours. TRA is a megaproject which encompasses a newly built 400 acre luxury resort located on the Palm Island Jumeirah in Dubai and boasts a 46 story, 800 room hotel along with 250 residences and retail locations. 40NORTH is coordinating with a lofty team of consultants on this project, with their role comprising the entire landscape plan, including the design of five pools and hardscape throughout the site. My involvement on TRA included creating construction plan sets, illustrative plan renderings, form studies, planting plans, and construction details. The project is currently under construction and will be a world renowned luxury resort when finished in 2020.

Tree and Shrub Layouts

THE ROYAL ATLANTIS

A 46 story luxury resort on the Palm Island Jumeirah in Dubai

40NORTH Design Team

Landscape Architects: Joshua Cheek, John Galloway Architect: Devin Murphy Intern: Conner Bruns


Overall Illustrative Plan

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Urban Infill of Existing Parking Lot Vegetation

Circulation In 2014, the Council of Landscape Architecture Registration Board (CLARB) issued a competition focused on public welfare in Landscape Architecture. The challenge was to devise creative methods of communicating how landscape architects influence the public´s health and well-being. CLARB outlined 7 impact factors, including: environmental sustainability, economic sustainability, health and wellbeing, building community, awareness and stewardship, aesthetic and creative experiences, as well as enabling communities to function more effectively. My team focused on how landscape architects influence public welfare through environmental sustainability, and applied these ideas to an urban infill project in downtown Manhattan, Kansas. An overflow parking lot which serves the mall is replaced with a 5 story mixed-use building with retail, restaraunts, green roofs, and a central courtyard woven with raingardens. The studio’s work can be viewed here:

Massing

https://lapublicwelfare.wordpress.com/

THE THREAD

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Mixed-use urban infill project for CLARB Competition

Student Team

Landscape: Morgan Taylor, Laura Vallo, Conner Bruns


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5 Story Mixed-Use Building

Rooftop Solar Arrays

Green Roof

Green Roof

Courtyard

Existing 3 Story Residential Complex Lawn


Streetside Stormwater Planters

LID Implements Stormwater Planters Bioretention Areas Permeable Paving Designing with the principles of Low Impact Development (LID) can help mitigate combined sewer overflows (CSO’s), a phenomenon in which storm surges cause rainwater to mix with human waste in the nation’s outdated sewer systems. This dangerous mix of pollutants often circumvents wastewater treatment plants, injecting untreated waste directly into rivers and streams, where it damages ecosystems and threatens human health. Our team identified Gifford Park in Omaha, Nebraska as an ideal site to implement a green infrastructure project while enhancing park amenities. Greening Gifford Park prevents CSOs from occurring, while improving the quality of life of the local community by creating revitalized park space and filtering stormwater pollutants. Our team was awarded First Place in the 2015 Great Plains Low Impact Development Competition hosted by the Oklahoma Water Survey at the University of Oklahoma.

GREENING GIFFORD PARK

First Place Award: Great Plains Low Impact Development Competition

Drainage Scheme Vegetated LIDs Storm Sewer Drainage Overland Flow

Student Team CLICK

Landscape Architecture: - Jonathan Knight, Conner Bruns Biological and Agricultural Engineering: - Kari Bigham, Erica Schmitz, Kelsey McDonough


Site Design Components A. Hammock Grove West B. Playground and Pollinator Oasis C. New Parallel Parking with Bulb-Outs D. Open Lawn Space E. Tennis Courts and Native Meadows F. Parking Area G. Central Plaza with Shade Structure H. Baseball/Soccer Field I. Hammock Grove East

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Outdoor Patio and Spa

Solace Lakehouse is an unbuilt residential project for a single client who is a poet. As an intellect who feels deeply connected to nature, she purchased a lakefront property deep in the alpine wilderness of the Colorado Rockies with the hopes of turning it into her summer retreat where she can escape to recharge and entertain guests. An avid swimmer and kayaker, the new home offers a carved inlet from the lake as a place to launch, as well as a full-length lap pool and outdoor spa. A guest quarters and living room is on the first floor, kitchen and personal library on the second, and a private master bedroom suite with a shaded patio on the third. Two green roofs planted with hardy alpine species allow the structure to blend with the landscape and impose a minimal impact on the pristine wilderness it is enveloped in.

SOLACE LAKEHOUSE A private escape of rejuvenation and contemplation


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Thank you for viewing my work.


Conner Bruns Landscape Architecture Portfolio  

I am a 5th year MLA student. This document is a collection of 9 projects which best represent my technical and design skills at this point...

Conner Bruns Landscape Architecture Portfolio  

I am a 5th year MLA student. This document is a collection of 9 projects which best represent my technical and design skills at this point...

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