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PAGE 9

Making musical dreams come true Foundation gifts guitar to Crane teenager

Scarf tying 101

PAGE 22

Calling all chocolate lovers! Nearby festival features “food of the gods”

How to turn your scarves into fashion accessories PAGE 14

Inside:

unveiled A SPECIAL SUPPLEMENT OF CONNECTION

“I DO” A local love story

Page 47

LET THEM EAT WEDDING CAKE The perfect ending to your perfect day

NIGHT OF YOUR LIFE Tips for making your prom memorable

FEBRUARY 2013

FEBRUARY 2013

CONNECTION MAGAZINE | 1


Restoring fullness to life Outpatient therapy helps you return to a life full of possibilities. When an injury, illness or surgery interferes with your ability to engage in everyday activities, your doctor may recommend outpatient therapy. When you choose Mercy Therapy Services, you’ll have a team of skilled, caring professionals guiding you toward independence and wellness with therapies that restore function and relieve pain.

• Post-surgical rehabilitation for orthopedics and sports-related injuries. • Rehabilitation following spinal surgery. • Rehabilitation following stroke and other neurological disorders. • Treatment of balance disorders. • Hand therapy.

Mercy Therapy Services Aurora 500 Porter | Aurora, MO 65605 417-678-7887 fax 417-678-7876 Cassville 94 Main St. | Cassville, MO 65625 417-847-6085 fax 417-847-6026

• Treatment of swallowing disorders. • Therapy for speech, language and developmental issues. • Treatment of chronic musculoskeletal issues.

2 | CONNECTION MAGAZINE Medicare and all primary insurance is accepted. Services available to patients of all ages.

FEBRUARY 2013


Happy Valentine’s Day!

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FEBRUARY 2013

CONNECTION MAGAZINE | 3


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Family Practice • New Patients Welcome *Cash only with a superbill provided for your own filing. 4 | CONNECTION MAGAZINE

101 N. Elm Street, Suite E Pierce City | 417-476-7201 FEBRUARY 2013


contents CONNECTION MAGAZINE

February 2013

PHOTO BY JB PHOTOGRAPHY

unveiled A SPECIAL SUPPLEMENT OF CONNECTION

52 “I do” The love story of Chelsea Krallman and Austin McCracken 58 Let them eat wedding cake The perfect ending to your perfect day 62 Night of your life Tips for making your prom memorable 64 Wedding checklist Countdown to the big day

FEBRUARY 2013

9 14 18 22 30 38 46

Making musical dreams come true FOUNDATION GIFTS GUITAR TO CRANE TEENAGER

Scarf tying 101 HOW TO TURN YOUR SCARVES INTO FASHION ACCESSORIES

Fine dining with a German flair WEINGARTEN RESTAURANT REOPENS IN WASHBURN

Calling all chocolate lovers NEARBY FESTIVAL FEATURES “FOOD OF THE GODS”

Been farmin’ long? BY SUSAN FUNKHOUSER

Vintage Revival: PIERCE CITY’S BEST-KEPT SECRET

Taking playtime to a new level BOUNCERS IS A CHILD’S PLAY PARADISE

CONNECTION MAGAZINE | 5


Connection

A MAGAZINE DEDICATED TO SOUTHWEST MISOURIANS

PUBLISHERS Mike and Lisa Schlichtman EDITOR Lisa Schlichtman editor@monett-times.com WOMEN’S PAINTING GROUP • ONLY $15 First Thursday of every month 5:30-8p.m. Call or Facebook for Reservations “Grab A Gal Pal, Bring A Drink and Have Fun” 22768 Hwy 39, Aurora Mo. • .3 miles south of Hwy 60 • www.glazecrazestudio.com

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CONTRIBUTORS Lindsay Reed Murray Bishoff Meagan Ruffing Jo Anne Ellis Nancy Ridgley Lisa Craft Darlene Wierman Sally Reinhardt Melonie Roberts Sheila Harris Susan Funkhouser Anne Angle Pam Wormington Katie Barton PHOTOGRAPHERS Sarah Lee Mike Scott Amanda Solak Chuck Nickle Kerry Hays Patti Richardson Jeff Terry LeAnne Pfeiffer DISTRIBUTION Jim Bower TO ADVERTISE 417-847-2610 - Cassville 417-235-3135 - Monett Send e-mail inquiries to editor@monett-times.com Mailing address: P.O. Box 40, Monett, MO 65708

403 Plaza Drive MONETT 417-235-6800 EACH OFFICE INDEPENDENTLY OWNED AND OPERATED

6 | CONNECTION MAGAZINE

Connection is published monthly and distributed free in Cassville, Monett, Exeter, Washburn, Pierce City, Mt. Vernon, Aurora, Verona, Roaring River, Eagle Rock, Shell Knob, Purdy, Wheaton, Freistatt, Marionville, Seligman, Golden and other surrounding areas.

Connection is a publication of the Cassville Democrat, The Monett Times and Rust Communications.

FEBRUARY 2013


F

EBRUARY IS THE month of love when couples celebrate Valentine’s Day and the newly engaged plan for their summer nuptials. In honor of all things romantic, Connection is publishing its annual “Unveiled” bridal and prom guide in this month’s issue. This year, Unveiled, which can be found on pages 49 to 65, features a local love story that culminated in a beautiful wedding, which was anything but traditional. This country chic ceremony should provide inspiration to all those future brides who are looking for ways to make their celebrations one-of-a-kind special and affordable. As I looked through pictures from Chelsea and Austin McCracken’s wedding, I couldn’t help reflecting back on the day I said “I do” nearly 28 years ago. My wedding

occurred before there was such a thing as a wedding planner and before such reality TV shows as “Bridezillas” and “Say Yes to the Dress.” My mom orchestrated my wedding plans, and we kept to a fairly frugal budget. We shared flowers and decorations with a bride who was getting married in the same church earlier in the day, and our reception was held at the Clayton Depot, which was attached to the high school I attended in St. Louis. My mom even brokered a deal on wedding photos by allowing my wedding album to be displayed at the photographer’s studio for a year after our big day. I loved my wedding, but I often joke that my sister had a better deal when it came to her celebration. She was the baby of the family, and by then, budgets weren’t as tight. My dress allowance was a fourth of hers, and her reception was held on one of the top floors of a cool venue in downtown St. Louis while mine was held in the basement of our local community center. I had a DJ; she had a live band. Her bridesmaid dresses were sophisticated, elegant and purchased at Saks Fifth Avenue while mine were dusty rose, puffy sleeved and from a bridal discount store.

EDITOR’SNOTE

Send your Connection story ideas to me at editor@monett-times.com. Story ideas and photo submissions are always welcome.

Now don’t let me fool you, I adored everything about my wedding. We were young and madly in love, and it was one of the first weddings among our circle of friends, so it was a great big party for all involved. Plus, my mom did a spectacular job with a moderate budget, and I love her for that. And when it comes to the big hair, blue eye shadow, puffy-sleeved dresses and reception song choices like “I Feel for You” by Chaka Khan, you can blame that on the ‘80s. This month’s issue of Connection has a decidedly female feel to it, but I hope our male readers will be patient and use the subject matter as motivation to plan a phenomenal Valentine’s Day celebration for their wives and girlfriends. And if you’re looking for more manly content, be sure to pick up the latest edition of Ozarks Outdoors, Connection’s newest sister publication, which is out on the streets now. Copies of both Connection and Ozarks Outdoors can be picked up at the businesses that advertise in the magazines and at the Cassville Democrat and Monett Times newspaper offices. Keep connecting,

Lisa Schlichtman editor@monett-times.com

FEBRUARY 2013

CONNECTION MAGAZINE | 7


“I wish I had known about hospice earlier” (The most frequent comment by our hospice families)

DID YOU KNOW? • Hospice is about living, not dying. • Medicare, Medicaid, and most private insurances have a Hospice Benefit that you are entitled to use if you meet criteria. • With Hospice Compassus, YOU are in charge. You have a team of highly trained professionals ready to provide excellence in COMFORT CARE. • Hospice Compassus patients CAN retain their personal physician and pharmacy. • Hospice patients CAN go to the hospital. • ANYONE can refer a patient to hospice. • Nursing Home patients CAN have Hospice. • Hospice Compassus patients receive I-to-I care from a TEAM including a doctor, nurse, aide, social worker, chaplain, and volunteers.

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(c) Hospice Compassus 2011 8 | CONNECTION MAGAZINE

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FEBRUARY 2013


Story by Melonie Roberts Photos by Kerry Hays

Foundation gifts guitar to Crane teenager AT 17 YEARS OF AGE, LUKE SCHWARZ, of Crane, has won the battle against cancer. Diagnosed with a cancerous tumor on his thyroid in 2011, the teen was shocked when his father first delivered the news. “I thought it was just a goiter,” Luke said. “Then a nodule developed, and I had to have it removed.” Standard testing of the uncommon growth revealed the nodule was lymphoma. “They told us there was a lump there,” Luke said, “but then we kind of forgot all about it. It never crossed our minds that anything was seriously wrong. “I was out of town on a job when I got the news,” said Richard, Luke’s dad. “I got this horrible news, and I was two hours away from home. I had to wait until the next day to tell my wife and son.” “It was unreal when I first heard the word ‘cancer,’” Luke said. “I was scared. I always felt good and would never have known the lump was there. “My doctor had an immediate plan of action,” he continued. “It included surgery and chemotherapy.”

FEBRUARY 2013

CONNECTION CONNECTION MAGAZINE MAGAZINE| |9 9


Dr. Francisca Fasipe, an oncologist with a St. Jude’s Hospital affiliate in Springfield, is in charge of Luke’s care. Following surgery, Luke was faced with chemotherapy treatments every 21 days for three months. “They originally planned to give him five rounds of chemo, but after his threemonth checkup, they decided to give him four,” said Luke’s mother, Hallie. “We were pretty anxious.” The Schwarzes waited 17 years before being blessed with their only child, and the family relied on their faith to carry them through the dark days following Luke’s cancer diagnosis until he was given the all clear. “We give all praise to the Lord,” said Hallie. “We had many people saying prayers, and our church kept praying for relief. Although he did lose his hair, he never got sick from the chemo. We were very happy for that.”

The Make-A-Wish Foundation grants wishes to children between the ages of 2 and a half to 18 who have been diagnosed with a lifethreatening medical condition. Nearly 25,000 volunteers help maintain the grassroots support of the organization by granting wishes, fundraising, special events and more. Since its inception in 1980, the Make-A-Wish Foundation has granted more than 200,000 wishes. The average cost of a wish is over $7,000. For more information about the Make-A-Wish Foundation, visit www.wish.org.

10 | CONNECTION MAGAZINE

STEVE AND BRUCE ALLEN, OWNERS OF AURORA MUSIC; DANIEL PATTYSON, MUSIC INSTRUCTOR AT AURORA MUSIC; PATRICK AND SHEILA PLANER, MAKE A WISH FOUNDATION VOLUNTEERS ; AND LUKE SCHWARTZ WITH HIS NEW TAYLOR GUITAR.

FEBRUARY 2013


After discovering Luke’s love of music, Dr. Fasipe wrote a letter to the southwest Missouri affiliate of the Make-A-Wish Foundation, indicating the teenager’s love for a certain guitar -- a Taylor K 26 CE made out of rare Hawaiian Koa wood. “He came in with pictures and everything,” said Steve Allen, who, along with his brother, Bruce, owns Aurora Music Company. With a $5,400 price tag, the guitar seemed out of reach for Luke, but thanks to the Make-A-Wish Foundation, the teen’s dream came true on Saturday, December 1, 2012. “I knew something was up when my dad said he wanted to come to the music store,” Luke said. “I didn’t think it was this.”

FEBRUARY 2013

As Luke stroked the strings of his new guitar, a riff from “Sweet Home, Alabama” floated on the air, encircling the group of family members and friends who gathered at the music store to see Luke get his long-awaited guitar. “When I first saw this guitar in the store, I fell in love with it immediately. I played it for an hour when I first saw it.”

CONNECTION MAGAZINE | 11


“This is something Luke will be able to enjoy for years,” said Sheila Planer, local Make-A-Wish volunteer, “and this time, he gets to take it home with him.” Making a smooth segue into “More Than Words” by Savage Garden, Luke talks about his hopes for the future. “Music is the only thing I’ve ever been good at,” Luke said. “I play at least an hour a day. I love music, especially the guitar.” In addition to the Taylor guitar, Luke received a microphone and boom stand, a guitar stand, a case, strap, amplifier and a replacement set of strings. “I never thought that I would get all of this,” Luke said. “This is awesome.” Inspired by artists such as Keith Urban, Luke plays a medley of styles and songs ranging from the hard-hitting group Aerosmith to the Christian standards he plays at church and with his friends. Luke taught himself to play guitar by watching YouTube until his health allowed him to start taking lessons. He continues to study guitar under the tutelage of teacher Daniel Pattyson, an employee at Aurora Music. Luke, a home-schooled junior, isn’t sure what his future might hold, but he knows it will involve music. “I’ve not decided on going to college or not,” Luke said. “I really hope to join a band or form one in the future.” When he feels ready, Luke will have the opportunity to cut a demo CD with Journal Broadcast Group in Springfield. “It’s part of this Make-A-Wish package,” said Planer, who is the office manager for the business. “It will be available to him whenever he feels ready to go.” Inspired by what the Make-A-Wish Foundation has done for him, Luke is considering becoming a volunteer at some point in the future. “When I’m older,” he said. “I want to finish school and get better at guitar.” So far, it looks as if Luke will be enjoying his new guitar for years to come. “He’ll continue with checkups every three months for the first year,” said Hallie. “Then it will be every six months and then every year after that. We think the world of his doctor and truly appreciate everything she has done for us.”

12 | CONNECTION MAGAZINE

FEBRUARY 2013


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4statesdentalcare.com CONNECTION MAGAZINE | 13


1 0 1 g n i Scarf ty How to turn your scarves into fashion accessories STORY AND PHOTOS BY LISA SCHLICHTMAN

I HAVE ALWAYS BEEN INTIMIDATED BY SCARVES AND admire them on others from afar, wishing I knew the secret to artfully circling the colorful pieces of cloth around my neck to create the perfect fashion accessory. Scarves are an inexpensive and simple way to add color to your wardrobe. They also provide warmth on a cold winter day and can complement almost any outfit. With little financial outlay, you can dress up a plain T-shirt and jeans or make a sweater, dress or jacket

look expensive by throwing a scarf around your neck or shoulders. This month, Connection enlisted the assistance of Janet Richardson, the southwest Missouri sales representative for Krysan and Associates, to learn more about the art of scarf tying. Janet represents multiple lines of scarves, including Mad Style by Design, Berkley Designs and Top It Off, and she volunteered to spend a few hours with me at Whitley Pharmacy in Cassville to demonstrate some of the most popular scarf-tying techniques.

Vest

Scarves can also be made into vests. For the best results, use a long, light-weight, rectangular scarf. Fold in two and tie the ends. Then open it up and wear over a T-shirt with knot in the back.

European Loop

First, fold the scarf in half and drape around your neck. Next, take the two ends and slip them through the loop of the fold of the scarf. Pull ends tight and adjust as you like.

Turtleneck

Start with the scarf around your neck. Wrap two or three times around your neck then tuck ends under to create a turtleneck. This style looks great with a zip-up jacket.

Bunny Ears

Do the modern loop and then pass the ends through the front loop and tie them to the side.

14 | CONNECTION MAGAZINE

FEBRUARY 2013


1

Hidden knot

Do the modern one loop and tie in a knot in the front. Take the top and cover the knot.

Infinity scarf You don’t need to buy one of these scarves; instead, you can create them from an existing scarf. Just tied the ends of a scarf together and loop the circle around your neck twice, spinning the knot to the back.

The Waterfall

Place the scarf on your neck with one side down at waist height. Wrap the long side around twice and tuck in. Take the tip of one side of the scarf and tuck it in to create a waterfall effect.

Modern One Loop

Put your scarf around your neck with scarf ends hanging behind. Bring both scarf ends forward on opposite sides.

The Braid

Start with the European Loop. Grab the hole that you’ve looped the scarf through and twist it and then pull end through to create a braided effect.

The Celebrity Double rainbow

Use two scarves of roughly the same texture but different colors that work well together. Put the scarves together and then do the modern one loop. For variation, you can braid the scarves together before looping them.

FEBRUARY 2013

Start with the modern loop with a little less hanging down in the front. Wrap the scarf ends around your neck twice and loop it through one loop. With the other side, put it halfway through with a little sticking up.

CONNECTION MAGAZINE | 15


CHILDREN’S BOOKS • ROMANCE WESTERN • MYSTERY • HOW-TO • COOKBOOKS HISTORICAL • NON-FICTION

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FIDC Bill Pay & Internet Banking at www.sbswmo.com 16 | CONNECTION MAGAZINE

EQUAL HOUSING

OPPORTUNITY

FEBRUARY 2013


By Nancy Ridgley

DINING FOR DIABETES WAS HELD LAST month to raise money for people in our community who cannot afford the cost of their disease. The event began 10 years ago in response to a critical community need in Barry and Lawrence counties. The percentage of diabetes patients without the ability to afford their insulin, supplies, education, and in turn, livelihoods had reached an all-time high. As a result, Cox Monett Hospital began looking for a way to create resources to meet these needs, while at the same time educating people about the disease, early detection and prevention.

Today, 30 percent of patients being treated at CoxHealth have a diagnosis of diabetes.

This year was extra fun with our theme as “Go Team,” and it highlighted James Franklin, Missouri Tigers quarterback, as our guest speaker. Whatever your sports preference, we were able to come and cheer together for a good cause and help many of our neighbors. I am overwhelmed each year with the kindness and generosity of the people attending Dining for Diabetes. You are truly a great group of people. I would like to thank everyone who helped make this a very successful year, from donor to diner. You are the best.

1. Diabetes is the sixth leading cause of death by disease in our country. 2. It causes nearly 24,000 people to lose their sight each year. 3. It accounts for 56,000 leg and foot amputations each year. 4. It is the leading cause of kidney failure. 5. It increases the chance of having heart disease or suffering a stroke by two to four times.

Nancy Ridgley, RD, LD, CDE, is a registered and licensed dietitian, certified diabetes educator, a Mad Dogg-certified spinning instructor and director of community wellness at Cox Monett Hospital. She also holds certifications in adult weight management and childhood and adolescent weight management. The mother of three enjoys spinning, reading, Mizzou football, travel, spending time with her children and extended family and having coffee with friends. For more information about wellness and living a healthy lifestyle, check out Cox Monett Hospital’s wellness blog at www.realwellnessforrealpeople.blogspot.com.

FEBRUARY 2013

CONNECTION MAGAZINE | 17

HEALTHYCONNECTION

dining for


Story by Lindsay Reed

fine with dining a german flavor Photos by Kerry Hays

Weingarten Restaurant reopens in Washburn

COUPLES LOOKING FOR A ROMANTIC spot to celebrate Valentine’s Day, an anniversary or a special date night should consider Weingarten Restaurant, located on Highway 37 just north of Washburn. The restaurant, which also welcomes families, business groups and other dining parties, serves authentic German cuisine, steak and chicken entrees and offers an impressive wine list, along with a selection of German beers. Stepping inside Weingarten’s front entrance, customers are greeted by a hostess and one of the owners, either Frank England or Brenda Wells, and escorted to one of several antique dining tables positioned throughout the quaint restaurant. “I bought all of the furniture new and now it is antique,” said Frank with a smile. “I bought the furniture for a wine tasting bar I 18 | CONNECTION MAGAZINE

operated in Kansas City for a while.” A special area of the restaurant, including one four-person table, has been reserved in honor of Herman Jaegar, who can be credited with the first generation of French-American hybrid wine grapes. The Jaegar table sits adjacent to a large display that includes a one-of-a-kind wine bottle with Jaegar’s

original wine label. Jaeger received the Cross of the Merite Award and was knighted by the Parisian government after he sent 17 boxcar loads of grafted grape vines to Europe from America to help wineries combat a vine disease that nearly destroyed wine production in France, said Frank, who has extensively studied Jaegar’s history.

FEBRUARY 2013


Diners can also opt to continue through Weingarten’s indoor area, out the back entrance and select a seat on the beautiful outdoor patio, which offers cafestyle seating and a fire pit for cool evenings. “My favorite seat is on the patio,” added Frank. “That’s the best spot in Barry County.” Weingarten Restaurant, which originally opened over 30 years ago, enjoyed a great deal of success during its operation in the late 1980s and early 1990s. “We had the winery (O’Vallon Winery) here, so we thought we would start selling bratwurst with our wine,” said Frank. “We eased into the restaurant, but we got where we would have 100 people go through the place in an evening.” In the past, most of the restaurant’s customers came from Bella Vista, Arkansas. Today, the restaurant is attracting more customers from the north, including Cassville and Monett. “We decided to add steak to our menu,” said Frank. “Presently, we are serving U.S. Prime shipped in from the Kansas City area. We are also trying some local sources and serving choice, which is also most as good as prime, but varies.” Brenda, who served as Weingarten Restaurant’s original head chef, returned to her post when the restaurant reopened in October of 2012. “We are still working on the menu,” said Brenda. “I have a few more things I want to add.” The restaurant menu includes: sauerbraten meatballs and shrimp cocktail appetizers; beef and pork sausage bratwurst; beef sausage knockwurst; and Frank’s favorite, rouladen -- a slice of top round, seasoned with onion, bacon, mustard and rolled around a dill pickle wedge. “The rouladen is our biggest seller,” said Frank. Diners can also choose to enjoy a 10-ounce grilled, smoked pork chop, a 10-ounce Kansas City strip, a 12-ounce ribeye or a boneless pork chop, lightly breaded and topped with hunter sauce called jaegerschnitzel. Customers who prefer a chicken entree will love the hahnchenschnitzel, which is a boneless chicken breast, lightly breaded and topped with garlic mushroom sauce.

FEBRUARY 2013

CONNECTION MAGAZINE | 19


Side dishes include: German-style red cabbage, potato salad and green beans; baked potatoes; sauerkraut; hot curried fruit; and German baked beans. Frank encourages all diners to enjoy a glass of wine with their meal. A large portion of the restaurant’s wine selection comes from the Augusta Winery in Missouri. “The Norton is a native American wild grape that was found growing in Virginia well over 100 years ago,” said Frank. “Norton became one of the most important regular varieties in the world. During Prohibition it died out a little, but it has made a big comeback and is leading the way in the red grape wine industry.” The restaurant also offers Vignol, which Frank says is one of the best white grape wines available, Vidal, Seyval, Chardonel and Chambroucin, a wine Frank holds equal to the Norton. “A lot of the wine we serve are gold medal winners,” said Frank. OOVVDA Winery dessert wines include North Star Cherry, Peach Melba, Strawberry, Black Friar Plum and Sweet Blueberry. The Weingarten also serves Hofbrau, Pilsner and Boulevard wheat beers. Diners who are celebrating a special occasion can also indulge in a decadent homemade cheesecake or apple strudel with or without vanilla ice cream. “When we reopened in October, I ran advertisements in several local newspapers,” said Frank. “I didn’t know what would happen, but the very first night, we had 80 people show up and each night after that we served 100 others.” Weingarten Restaurant is open from 5 to 9 p.m. on Fridays and Saturdays. “Reservations are not required, but we would love to know you’re coming so we can have our wait staff ready,” said Frank. For more information or to make a reservation, call 417-826-5025 or visit www.weingartenswmo.com.

20 | CONNECTION MAGAZINE

FEBRUARY 2013


Connection’s Cutest PET CONTEST WINNER The winner of each month’s Connection’s Cutest Pet contest receives a $25 gift certificate from Preferred Pet Supply in Monett. Submit your entries for next month’s contest to editor@monett-times.com.

Ultra

MAX

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Izzie is a 3-year-old “Augi,” which is a half miniature Australian Shepherd

509 Dairy Street Monett, MO 65708 417-235-DOGS (3647)

and half Corgi. Izzie loves to go to horse shows all over the four-state area and beyond with her mom, Becky Hodge, of Cassville. She also loves chasing the cats, stealing sticks from her brother, Harley, riding in the convertible and being “Queen of the Castle.”

FEBRUARY 2013

CONNECTION MAGAZINE | 21

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Nearby festival features “food of the gods” en, nothing can incite passion in the heart of a woman quite like chocolate. Labeled long ago “the food of deities,” chocolate has been wellknown for centuries for its mood-enhancing qualities, making it an object of near worship for those drawn to its attributes. In recent years, the medical profession justified our culture’s love affair with chocolate when research attested to the fact that not only does dark chocolate have a positive effect on serotonin levels, but, when consumed in moderation,

22 | CONNECTION MAGAZINE

also has properties beneficial to both circulatory and brain functions. What better way, then, to commemorate St. Valentine’s Day than to attend the ninth annual Chocolate Lover’s Festival in Eureka Springs, Arkansas, an event devoted entirely to this delightful confection? Throw in the fact that the festival is also a fundraiser for area private and public schools and your license to indulge is complete. What began in 2004 as a fundraiser for Clear Springs School in Eureka Springs, the annual Chocolate Lover’s Festival has evolved into a fun event that benefits several schools in the area. Now organized and sponsored by Vacation Rentals, Inc., of Holiday Island, Bella Vista and Hot Springs, Arkansas, the festival has become so popular that vendor participation and attendance have more than doubled since Vacation Rentals took the reins in 2010. Each year’s festival represents a different era in American cultural history, with this year’s event, slated for February 9, to spotlight the 1950s. Festival volunteers will dress in fashions from that era. An Elvis look-alike mingling with the crowd and barbershop quartet

performances between 11 a.m. and 1 p.m. will complete the theme. Although the ‘50s theme is fun, the main attraction is the chocolate at this popular festival, which has received national recognition in Southern Living magazine.

What

Ninth Annual Chocolate Lovers’ Festival

When

Saturday, February 9, 2013, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.

Where

Inn of the Ozarks Convention Center, Highway 62 West, Eureka Springs, Arkansas

Ticket Price

$12 for Adults/$6 for Children

New This Year

At intervals throughout the day, five different food vendors will give 15-minute demonstrations of their techniques for cooking with chocolate. According to Pam Hinson, manager of the Holiday Island Vacation Rentals, the concept of the Chocolate Lover’s Festival is simple. “Vendors pay for booth space to display and sell their products at the festival, but in order to participate, they must provide some type of free chocolate for those in attendance,” Pam explained. For the price of a ticket, which runs $12 for adults and $6 for FEBRUARY 2013


STORY BY SHEILA HARRIS PHOTOS BY SARAH LEE

children, those attending the festival are provided with a box to contain the chocolate they collect from vendors as they make their way throughout the Inn of the Ozarks Convention Center to view the various products displayed. “Vendors are divided into two categories,” Pam said, “those who sell food and/or beverages, and those who do not. Vendors who do not sell food or drink-related items are provided space on the first floor of the convention center where guests encounter them as they enter the facility. Vendors in this area run the gamut from clothing and jewelry retailers to spas, hotels and wedding service providers. Chocolates offered in this area may be prepackaged.” According to Pam, the space available for vendors on the first

FEBRUARY 2013

floor will be expanded this year with greater participation anticipated. The basement level of the convention center is a major attraction and is reserved for vendors who sell gourmet foods and beverages. Although the products they sell are not required to be chocolate in nature, they must give away some type of homemade or gourmet product featuring chocolate. At last year’s festival, many different types of fudges and snack items featuring chocolate served in unusual ways could be found, including a chocolatehabanero fudge distributed by the Habanero Salsa Company. The chocolate martini samples offered by Dove Chocolate were another popular item, and guests were willing to wait patiently in line to sample the unique cocktail. One aspect of the Chocolate Lover’s Festival that Pam says she most appreciates is that the event allows students to participate in their own fundraiser, contributing both their time and labor to make it a success. “This is not like a door-to-door fundraiser where kids and their parents are under obligation to get out and sell pre-made products to people who likewise feel obligated,” said Pam. “Instead, students and other volunteers from the schools, which benefit, provide homemade candy and are encouraged to work at the festival either as a server or in behind-the-scenes food preparation.” Part of that preparation involves stemming strawberries and cutting up fresh pineapples to be served along with homemade candies to

guests attending the event. During the festival, student volunteers constantly circulate among the guests with huge trays of the goodies. Guests are also given the opportunity to dip their fruit into one of the four chocolate fountains

CONNECTION MAGAZINE | 23


constantly in operation throughout the festival. “The chocolate fountains are a little messy,” said Pam, “but they are extremely popular.” Last year, 18,000 pieces of homemade candy were distributed during the festival. “We also went through 30 flats of strawberries, 40 to 50 whole pineapples and around 60 pound of chocolate for the fountains,” Pam added.      The contests featuring the creations of both professional and amateur bakers are another popular part of the festival. For a small entry fee, contestants compete for sizable cash prizes. Last year’s winner in the Best Decorated Cake category in the professional division was Sherry Tucker, of SHERRYcakes in Exeter, who takes great pleasure in creating cakes with elaborate and intricate detail. Her 2012 winning entry was a woodland fantasy, boasting an assortment of forest creatures, molded from chocolate putty, adorning an extravagant, three-layer chocolate-iced cake. 24 | CONNECTION MAGAZINE

“I’m looking forward to competing again this year,” said Sherry, “although I haven’t quite decided on a theme.” “We also have contests for youth,” said Pam. “It’s a fun way for beginning bakers and candy-makers to develop their skills. “I’d really love to have more bakeries compete in the professional division this year,” Pam continued. “Not only will we give away $200 in cash for first place, but it’s a great chance for businesses to take advantage of the promotional airtime and print that winners receive with the local media.” Festival guests are also given the opportunity to bid on items offered in a silent auction as they proceed throughout the convention center. “Last year, our silent auction raised over $2,000,” said Pam. “We were very pleased with that number and hope to increase it this year. As of right now, we have several show tickets, overnight accommodations and spa packages to offer for auctioning with donations still

coming in.” Another popular fundraising item available will be the Chocolate Lover’s Cookbook, assembled by Vacation Rentals, with a portion of the proceeds benefiting Clear Springs School in Eureka Springs. Cookbooks are priced at $15 each. Total proceeds from the 2012 Chocolate Lover’s Festival allowed Vacation Rentals to donate $1,550 to each of four different nonprofit organizations. This year’s beneficiaries will be The Academy of Excellence in Eureka Springs, the Main Stage After School Kids Program for the Eureka Springs School, the Galena High School Family and Consumer Science group and the Cassville High School FFA. For more information about booth rental or baking contest entry rules for the ninth annual Chocolate Lover’s Festival in Eureka Springs, contact Pam Hinson at Vacation Rentals, Inc., in Holiday Island, Arkansas, at 479-253-7603 or email info@eurekachocfest.org, Festival information is also available online at www.eurekachocfest.org.

FEBRUARY 2013


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FEBRUARY 2013


GREENACREGIRL

Green Acres By Pam Wormington

Girl

Time to go HERE AT WORMINGTON FARMS, WE try to live economically, notice I didn’t say practically. We have a Hardy wood stove that heats our home and our water. The problem is that it has to be fed daily during the winter months in order to work efficiently. Every year, we claim we are not going to procrastinate on the wood supply and every year we find ourselves frantic at the first snow or ice storm. That is when we realize we don’t have enough wood for winter. So we don our winter wardrobe, oil the chainsaw and head out into the winter wonderland. It was definitely a winter day with ice, snow and freezing temperatures when we took on the task this particular year. Fortunately, we only had to travel to the next FEBRUARY 2013

hill on our rolling farm where there was a tree that had fallen and needed to be utilized. As Paul Bunyon was busy cutting wood, I realized I had not gone to the bathroom before leaving home, not to mention before I put on three layers of clothing, coveralls, coat, hat and gloves. Some things just can’t wait, and this nagging problem was not going away. I spied a nice group of trees that would serve as a refuge. I managed to unlayer and hold my coveralls off the ground with one hand, position my feet against the base of a tree and then hold myself up off the snow with the other hand. I felt like I was playing a cold, cruel version of the game Twister. It was then that I looked up to see the entire herd of cows watching me. Modesty

is not something that I had in my back pocket on this day, and besides, it was just us girls. Relief didn’t come as quickly as my dog, Taco. He was extremely glad to see me and showed his affection by licking my cheeks upon his arrival. Yes, those cheeks! There was not a thing I could do. My glove was frozen to the ground, my other hand was holding my coveralls and if I moved my feet down the hill I would go, exposed! All I could do was grin and bear it. It was a rather humbling moment as I managed to regain composure and return to the work of stacking wood with Mr. Bunyon who was oblivious to any action aside from the humming chainsaw. It is amazing how smart your parents become later in life. During this trial, I could hear the all too familiar words of my mother -- “I told you to go before you left the house.” I hope 2013 brings you much laughter and a few humbling moments of your own.

CONNECTION MAGAZINE | 27


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FEBRUARY 2013


Date ideas

By Katie Barton

ROMANTIC PRESSURES BASICALLY DEFINE the month of February. It’s overwhelming. I’ve put together a few of my favorite dates to ease up some of the pressure for you men. (Ladies, it’s completely understandable if you want to leave the magazine open to this page in a place where your man will see it.) Don’t forget the chocolate and flowers!

5Spend the night at home

Sometimes, the most romantic thing is to take a break from rushing around to spend some time at home relaxing together. Our date nights at home usually consist of Netflix, pizza and lots of blankets to keep cozy.

4

Talk to each other

Go exploring

It’s so easy to go on the same dates over and over and get stuck in a romantic rut. My husband and I love trying new things together to break up the monotony. In the last year we’ve tried ice skating and sushi, and we’ve explored a few nearby towns we hadn’t visited before.

2

3

Watch a sunrise

A few of my favorite dates have actually been in the morning. My husband and I have woken up early to watch the sun come up from the bed of a pickup truck. The night before we’ll make sure we have tons of blankets, coffee, chocolate milk and donuts.

Be creative

My husband and I both love being creative, so while we were dating, we started going on photo dates. We find a beautiful spot and spend an hour or two walking around, passing the camera back and forth and snapping photos. FEBRUARY 2013

Almost every date involves conversation. But, every couple of weeks, my husband and I plan a date where conversation is the main focus. We go to a local coffee shop or small restaurant, order a warm drink and spend a few hours deep in conversation at a corner table. No texting allowed.

1

CONNECTION MAGAZINE | 29

FAVEFIVE

Katie Barton is a freelance writer from Springfield. She’s the editor of Springfield Lifestyle and the associate editor of The Lawyer’s Logbook. She graduated from College of the Ozarks in May 2011 with a bachelor of arts in journalism. Barton is originally from Berryville, Ark.


By Susan Funkhouser

“I believe in the future of agriculture, with a faith born not of words but of deeds – achievements won by the present and past generations of agriculturists; in the promise of better days through better ways, even as the better things we now enjoy have come to us from the struggles of former years.” –The FFA Creed

30 30 || CONNECTION CONNECTION MAGAZINE MAGAZINE

ON A BRISK OCTOBER morning, several students, staff members, parents and community supporters gathered outside the doors of Purdy High School to welcome home their FFA dairy judging team from national competition. The crowd roared as the horse-drawn wagon carrying team members Jake Henderson, Alex Mareth, Jake Beaty and Jared Smith approached the school. Although many in the crowd couldn’t hear them, each hoof beat of the horses as they faithfully bore their burden echoed much earlier footsteps, those of the determined young men who ceaselessly toiled on family farms and forged a new school alliance -- the Purdy Chapter of Future Farmers of America (FFA). The National FFA was organized in 1928 by 33 young farm boys in Kansas City’s Baltimore Hotel. Since its inception, the National FFA Organization has grown to a membership of over 500,000 young men and women, ages 12 to 21. The Purdy Chapter was chartered in 1948 by yet another small group of determined young men. Leon Clifton, Rex Coffey, Jerry Davis, Kenneth Dodson, James Edwards, Edward Estes, Frankie Fare, Max Henderson, Charles Leonard, Dayton Mackey, Stanley Marbut, Charles

Marshall, Bobby Mizer, Jackie Purdom, Charles Rupp, Jed Terry, Lavon Wormington and several other Purdy students signed their names to a charter and embarked upon a journey that would wind through the next six decades, as FFA and farm family members passed along their traditions of hard work, personal responsibility and pride. In fact, the lineage of such treasures can be traced from the Purdy FFA’s founding, encompassing family farms and the community of Purdy itself, all the way to the horse-drawn wagon carrying the 2012 dairy judging team. I discovered the line when I began research for an article about two sons who competed in the same National FFA competition as did their fathers -- Jake and Randy Henderson and Alex and Ed Mareth. While talking with the Hendersons and the Mareths about their FFA experiences, I uncovered an intricate connection of names that made up the farming community of Purdy, much like the patchwork quilts that cover many farmhouse beds. Family members, neighbors, friends and teachers all lent their skills and wisdom to the foundation and continued success of the Purdy FFA Chapter. However, one name was mentioned more

often than the rest -- Larry Purdom, brother of charter member Jack Purdom. As I wound around a series of quiet country roads leading to the Purdom farm, I had no idea how much larger my article and my vision of the impact of the FFA organization on the Purdy community was about to grow. Soon past and present generations of FFA members began to gather. I listened delightedly as father and son duos Jake and Randy Henderson and Alex and Ed Mareth swapped stories with former Purdy FFA advisor Leonard McGee and current advisor David Mareth. Mr. Purdom, our gracious host, entered wholeheartedly into the fun. His daughter, Rhonda Purdom Windes, joined us in between chores. Perched atop an overturned five-gallon bucket and sporting a mischievous twinkle in his eye, Mr. Purdom related his own experiences as an FFA student at Purdy High School from 1955 to his graduation in 1960. “Harold Estes was the first ag instructor at Purdy,” Purdom said. “He oversaw the charter of the Purdy FFA Chapter in 1948. He started building dairy judging teams pretty soon after that. When my group came

FEBRUARY FEBRUARY 2013 2013


up, he knew he had a winning judging team, he just knew it . . . but he never did. Bless his heart! We tried!” Purdom’s judging team may not have enjoyed success in the competitive realm, but its members learned the skills and determination to succeed on their own farms. Purdom and his wife, Alice, appear in countless newspaper clippings in the Purdy FFA archives, all testifying to their prize-winning cattle. Purdom shyly noted, “I don’t want to brag, but very few farms have a deeper history of winning Holstein shows than ours.” The National FFA Organization bestowed upon Larry Purdom its highest honor in 1962 -- the American Farmer Degree. Larry and Alice Purdom chalked up another big win for themselves, the Purdy FFA and the entire community in passing along their knowledge to their own children. “We never won, but the next generation . . . our kids . . . they did.” The Purdoms’ two daughters, Teresa and Rhonda, participated in agriculture classes and the Purdy FFA Chapter, paving the way for future female participation. Both young women were highly successful. Rhonda served as chapter president her senior year, and Teresa was a member of the dairy team that won the national competition in 1978. Rhonda explained a bit of the history of women in the FFA. “The National FFA organization didn’t allow female members until 1969, but girls didn’t start

FEBRUARY FEBRUARY 2013 2013

participating in Purdy until well after that.” The Purdom sisters’ ag teacher and FFA advisor Leonard McGee added, “That’s right. Angie Dickson was the first girl to enroll in an agriculture class at Purdy in 1974.” According to Rhonda, participation in FFA was often difficult for her and her sister. “It wasn’t easy for girls at all. 1984 Purdy FFA State Champion Dairy Judging Team, left to right: advisor Leonard McGee, Kevin Keeling, Ed Mareth and John Gage. 1982 Purdy FFA State Champion Dairy Judging Team, left to right: Pat Mareth, Kippy Cullers, Randy Henderson and advisor Leonard McGee.

There were very few of us. Some of the guys respected me, because they knew I was a farm girl. Others were jealous of how much I knew. There were also boys who believed that girls only belonged in home economics.” Mr. Purdom observed, “Part of it is that age-old deal that a man hates to let a woman beat him at something!” When Mr. McGee pointed out that all of the 2012 Purdy FFA officers are female, Mr. Purdom wisecracked, “That’s women. They take over every time.” Mr. Purdom’s pride in his family was evident when he declared that the most rewarding part of farming was, “watching my girls grow up here on the farm, helping them show

their cows. I’ve even showed with my oldest granddaughter.” Mr. Purdom didn’t limit his sharing of techniques and knowledge to family; he also served as a rich instructional source for the community and the school. Leonard McGee relied heavily upon Purdom’s assistance with his FFA dairy

1978 Purdy FFA National Champion Dairy Judging Team, left to right: advisor Leonard McGee, Teresa Purdom, Larry Wormington and David Keeling.

CONNECTION CONNECTION MAGAZINE MAGAZINE || 31 31


judging teams. Leonard taught agriculture classes and served as chapter FFA advisor for 28 years, one year longer than his predecessor, Harold Estes. Leonard grew up in Kansas, actively participating in FFA as a student. He even competed in dairy judging at the national convention. “We didn’t do well,” he confessed.

toward the history of the Purdy FFA in the 1980s, the symbolic manure shoveling began. When I asked Leonard for amusing stories from the era, Randy quickly declared, “I’m sure my group and Ed’s (Mareth) group were angels.” Leonard dryly replied, “Yeah . . . no.” Ed added, “It’s a good thing we’re all getting old and our memories are going.”

Jake Henderson, left, and Alex Mareth, right, with their mentor, Larry Purdom, center.

Randy’s team judged at the national competition in 1982, achieving a sixth place finish. Ed’s group competed in 1984 and finished 12th. Both teams trained at Larry Purdom’s dairy farm, as well as at Leonard’s brother-in-law, Milton Bell’s farm, near Mt. Vernon. Although Ed’s younger brother, David, didn’t achieve personal success in his state and national dairy judging endeavors, he did catch the teaching bug from Leonard. “I’m proud of the fact that I’m only the third ag teacher that Purdy has ever hired.” David has taught and served as FFA advisor at Purdy for the past 10 years. In the spring of 2012, David enjoyed vicarious dairy judging success as his nephew, Alex Mareth (Ed’s son), and teammates Jake Henderson (Randy’s son), Jake Beaty and Jared Smith captured the state title in Columbia and qualified for national competition. Alex, Jake and their team began preparing to compete

Knowing firsthand how much can be learned from dairy judging, Leonard continued to expand the Purdy FFA dairy judging teams. “I had teams I knew wouldn’t do any good, but I took them to competition to learn. When people asked me how we did, I always answered, ‘They did alright. They learned something.’” Although not all of his dairy judging teams succeeded, Leonard instructed the only team from Purdy to win a national competition. The team consisting of Teresa Purdom, Larry Wormington and David Keeling brought home the first place trophy in 1978. Leonard also inspired success in many other FFA students, including Randy Henderson and Ed Mareth, dairy judging team members who competed at the national level, and David Mareth, who became Purdy’s third agricultural education teacher and FFA advisor. As the discussion turned 32 | CONNECTION MAGAZINE

their freshman year by watching videos and learning how to examine and rank cattle. The team trained at Tom Mareth’s dairy and also visited Larry Purdom’s farm. The Purdy team finished 15th out of the 43 teams that competed at nationals in 2012. When I asked Jake and Alex how it felt to compete in the same national arena as their fathers did, Jake responded, “It’s pretty cool, doing the same thing they did.” Alex’s thoughts were a bit more competitively turned, “I wanted to beat him.” Ed wanted the same thing. “The morning he left for nationals I said, ‘Embarrass me.’” As the two fathers basked in the success of their sons, Randy spoke for both, “I’m pretty proud of all the boys. Competing at nationals takes confidence in yourself and your teammates. There’s a lot of pressure to do your best. They worked hard.” Ed reflected on his own lessons learned through FFA and his gratitude that Alex is experiencing the same. “FFA is one of the areas where you don’t have a cheerleading squad. You’ve just got a lot of hard work, and the appreciation is self-involvement. You can say you’ve done a good job, that you worked hard. FFA is a confidence builder. It teaches you that hard work pays off.” Randy’s son, Jake, echoed Ed’s words. “FFA has given me a strong work ethic, to do it and see it through, even in the times you can’t see the results.” Alex plans to pursue a career in agricultural business, while Jake intends to carry on the tradition of family farming. According to the older generation of farmers gathered in Mr. Purdom’s barnyard, the opportunities for both

young men are endless. David pointed out, “We don’t even know the jobs that are going to be available in 25 years. It’s exciting! Someone recently asked me how I go about training students for jobs that don’t yet exist. I responded, ‘I don’t train them for jobs per se. I train them to think and to work.’ If you can think and work, you can do any job in the world.” According to the men with whom I spoke this level of determination, hard work and grit comes from farm life. “Kids learn more responsibility on the farm than they do any other place in the world,” Purdom said. “I had dinner recently with the director of the Chamber of Commerce in Kansas City. He told me, ‘We’ll hire a kid off the farm before anybody.’” Jake, Alex and other students currently being molded by farm mentors and involvement in FFA will be facing with the ever-increasing task of food production. “There are 5 billion people on this planet, and that number is projected to double by 2050,” said David. “We’ve got to feed all those people.” He pointed to Jake and Alex and declared, “That’ll be up to those guys right there.” Mr. Purdom echoed his words. “Agriculture is the single most important thing there is in the world. We can get by without other things for awhile, but we’ve got to have food.” As we wound down our conversation and listened to the sounds of farm life around us – rustling cattle, quarreling barn cats, a gentle breeze – Ed spoke up. “I don’t think there’s anything more enjoyable than being around people that want to take care of one another, and farmers have a tendency to do that. They feel like their job is to feed the world.” FEBRUARY 2013


CUTEKID

Connection’s

proud parent cutest kid contest

Levi s u c r a M i k s o l d y z S Marcus ns to Levi o ti la tu ra Cong ld son e 3-year-o th i, k s lo d y Sz Szydloski, nd Carrie of Jason a . of Monett

Are you a proud parent? If so, take this opportunity to show off that cute kid of yours. We invite you to share a photo of your child to be featured in Connection’s very own proud parent cutest kid contest. Email your child’s photo to editor@ monett-times.com. Photos should be sent in the original JPG format at the highest resolution possible. Remember to include your child’s name, parent’s name, age, city and your contact information. The contest is open to children ages 10 and under. The photos submitted will be used for the sole purpose of this contest.

FEBRUARY 2013

CONNECTION MAGAZINE | 33


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FEBRUARY 2013


LOVIN’LIFE

ONE OF THE OPTIMISMS ABOUT this month is that love and help are presented in many fashions, because we are all unique. Some very different true stories that friends have shared with me come to mind that emphasize this truth. Only in chicken country would such love stories hold a message for Valentine’s Day.

Lovin’ after 55 life BY SALLY REINHARDT

Sally Reinhardt is a transplant from the big city of St. Louis, who now lives in Monett with her husband. Sally said it was strictly by accident or fate that she ended up living in Monett. “I never imagined I would one day be living in the Ozarks, much less enjoy the opportunity to share my writings,” said Sally. “This, of course, just proves it is best to keep life’s options open. I have found here an entirely new outlook and a new set of sights, sounds and friendships.”

sidecar-sally@juno.com Joni, an RN, was winding her way down Highway 37 when her ordinary trip to work changed in the twinkling of an eye. Following closely behind a chicken truck, filled to the brim with the catch of the day, she observed one captive endeavoring to attain freedom. She watched as the bird struggled to free first its head, then a wing and, with a mighty surge, broke free to safety, only to land with a whack right on the windshield of her car. Taking it to the veterinarian and explaining the circumstances, the process of reconstruction and surgery began. A tinfoil mask was fashioned, devised to anesthetize the patient for lacerations, a broken beak, cracked leg, road rash and other injuries. Joni named the chicken Ty, and his recuperation from surgery took two weeks and required intensive care and love on the part of Joni and family. Ty followed Joni everywhere and was a member of

FEBRUARY 2013

the family for 10 months. Do you think Ty might have somehow sensed Joni’s profession as he made his escape? Mildred and hubby, Joe, extended the comforts of home to their bantam chicken. Not wanting any more chicks, they hid her nest. As fate would dictate, their cat had just given birth to kittens, and the bantam decided that it would mother these kittens. Pouncing on the cat to chase her away, the bantam then invited the kittens to eat by scratching the ground. No matter how earnest her intentions, the kittens were never interested in worms and never did catch on to this feeding enticement. When Pat sat on the front porch, it was an invitation to Thomas the turkey to jump on her lap and enjoy the comfort of some petting. Now, it wasn’t just sitting around that occupied their together time. If Pat was in the barn working, Thomas was right by her side, helping to encourage her, pecking

at shiny objects on the ground. Pat’s two hunting dogs just assumed Thomas was part of the family, as he playfully chased them. After enjoying the freedom of an easy life for two years, Thomas became a bit cantankerous and some restrictions had to be placed on his wandering. Such happenings prove that if we pay attention and take note an opportunity is presented for us to satisfy a need. Sometimes when circumstances or people we know or love disappoint us, we can change attitudes and events with a word or a thoughtful gesture. When we accomplish something, conquer a fear, or even make a mistake, make use of a simple word -- next! It proposes an awareness that there is always more we can be doing. Our destiny is just around the next corner. The Light comes when we just keep going. See ya down the road.

CONNECTION MAGAZINE | 35


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CONNECTION MAGAZINE | 37


VINTAGE

PIERCE CI

Revival:

VINTAGE REVIVAL BOUTIQUE IS NOW open at 105 N. Walnut Street in Pierce City, offering a wide variety of repurposed, refinished and vintage furniture, apparel and home décor items. Owner Shelby Gripka says the décor falls under the category of “shabby chic,” and while items are frequently over 20 years old, nothing is considered a true “antique.” “I take pieces and paint and then distress them to make them look older,” Shelby said. “I find things at garage sales, estate auctions and dig through barns and storage units. They fit in with this old building.” Shelby bought the building in downtown Pierce City three years ago and proceeded to do a complete renovation in 90 days. “I found a lot of things without character (when searching for a building to buy),” said Shelby. “I would have had to go in and renovate everything I looked at in order to make it mine. When I found this place, I knew this was it.” 38 | CONNECTION MAGAZINE

FEBRUARY 2013


Story and photos by Melonie Roberts

T Y ’ S B E S T- K E P T S E C R E T

FEBRUARY 2013

CONNECTION MAGAZINE | 39


SHELBY GRIPKA

These old things hold a story.

I love old windows and doors, because, to me, they represent the passageway to someone e l s e ’s l i f e . -- Shelby Gripka

Shelby, assisted by her mother and father, Susan and Tom Gripka, went in and chipped portions of the crumbling plaster covering off the wall to reveal the ages-old brick underneath. “We sealed the remaining plaster, so it wouldn’t crumble and then painted it,” Shelby said. “I turned the upstairs into my living quarters. This building is about 129 years old, and I loved coming in here and giving it new life.” Transforming old things into new creations translated not only into Shelby’s new home but became her business as well. “There are some things I would take and refinish and then hang onto them

40 | CONNECTION MAGAZINE

because I liked them so well,” Shelby said. “I finally had to decide to let some of the things go. “These old things hold a story,” Shelby continued. “I love old windows and doors, because, to me, they represent the passageway to someone else’s life.” Shelby said her eye for the beauty in old things, combined with a natural artistic talent, allows her to re-create pieces in new and unusual ways. “I do all of the furniture pieces and put them together,” Shelby said. “There is a lot of trial and error, and I get a lot of inspiration from the Internet.” Shelby also collects vintage buttons.

FEBRUARY 2013


“I have over 3,000 old buttons,” she said. “They have so much character. Buttons ‘made’ the outfit 50 years ago. You don’t find buttons like these now. I use them in vintage bracelets and hair accessories.” Other novelty items crafted by Shelby include old sheet music wreaths, which are embellished with paper flowers and other adornments and hung on walls or doors. “I do custom orders all the time,”

FEBRUARY FEBRUARY2013 2013

Shelby said. “Customers bring in an item or I find one to their specifications. It feels good to create something, give it new life and have someone else appreciate it as much as I do.” Shelby takes old wooden ladders and hangs photo frames from the rungs to create large photo displays in a unique manner. She also repaints and “distresses” newer furniture to give it a faded, comfortable feel and arranges artful

displays to reflect the patina of age to the best advantage. “I’m passionate about this, so why not?” she said. “The store has done well for the hours its open and the amount of foot traffic in Pierce City.” Another passion, photography, has found its way into the business. Shelby has established a photo studio in the back of the shop, calling the business Captured Moments Photography by Shelby. “I shoot families, seniors and children,” Shelby said. “I often use items from around the store as props.” Vintage Revival is open from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. on Mondays, Thursdays and Fridays, from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Saturdays and from 1 to 5 p.m. on Sundays. The business is closed on Tuesdays and Wednesdays. For more information, call 417-5315924.

CONNECTION MAGAZINE | 41


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42 | CONNECTION MAGAZINE

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FEBRUARY 2013


BOOKREVIEW

B Y E OW Y N I V E Y

Jo Anne Ellis lives in Cassville and is a member of the Crowe’s Cronies book club. She is a retired English teacher and a graduate of the University of Missouri School of Journalism. In addition to being an avid reader, Jo Anne loves to travel and spend time with her grandchildren.

Reviewed by Jo Anne Ellis

Jo Anne Ellis lives in Cassville and is a member of the Crowe’s Cronies book club. She is a retired English teacher and a graduate of the University of Missouri School of Journalism. In addition to being an avid reader, Jo Anne loves to travel and spend time with her grandchildren.

The New York Regional Mormon Singles Halloween Dance by Elna Baker

happily in their small cottage in the WHEN THE WEATHERMAN forest, but for one sorrow: they have no promised a good snow recently, I wanted children of their own. One winter’s day, to settle in for a good “snow fix” -- just they build a girl of snow.” a good book, the snow and me -- so I Jack and Mabel, a forlorn couple turned to “The Snow Child” by Eowyn who have grown apart, find a new zest Ivey, a novel set in the 1920s in the from Faina’s visits -- she unexpectedly Wolverine River area of Alaska. comes and goes, yet she avoids heat and The main characters are Mabel and RJack, E V IaEmiddle-aged W E D B Y couple J O Astruggling N N E Eto LLIS always disappears when spring comes. Blending reality and fantasy, the get established as homesteaders, trying “is like a Heather only she’s “The itNew York with Regional Mormon author shows us Alaska with its cruel to make all alone little training. attacking your spiritual Singles Halloween Dance”hoping is thetodebut climate and great beauty. Mabel gladly They left Pennsylvania escape worthiness and your dress memoir of Elna Baker, a writer, actress takes on backbreaking outdoor work a deep sorrow after the stillbirth of their size at the same time.” But and stand-up sometimes called when Jack is seriously injured. The only child 10comedian years earlier. The couple Elna gets him -- the the Mormon Tinastart, Fey. both not talking neighbor’s son, Garrett, moves in to wanted a fresh Written when she was 27, Elna tells of perfect Mormon guy -help them out and discovers Faina while about their loss. only to have New York her own “coming of of age a Mormon he is out trapping. Mabel is tired theaspity she sees in friends, who should know, New York” starting herAlaska abrupt Suspense builds as Faina seems in the eyesstory, of friends andwith wants say, “But he’s gay, isn’t he?” U-turn in choosing NYU Yorkfeels more and more real; she is wise in the to be about just her and (New Jack. She While working as a University) acting to career over BYU ways of surviving out in nature. The at fault forand heran inability give Jack page for the David (Brigham University). to stay book builds its characters with elements children.Young Jack soon feels heVowing can’t make it Letterman Show, Elna true to her faithsuch and aremain virginalone, until of suspense and romance keeping the homesteading difficulta land meets Matt, a smart, marriage, Elna sets going out tointo findthe a mines Mormon reader’s interest. I can predict a good even considering to husband. And what better place than at the handsome, wonderful guy. book club debate over the ending, but make a living. She falls hard, but he is Halloween party planned bybefriended the churchbyto this debut novel wins approval and a Fortunately, they are not Mormon and never will encourage Mormon singles to meet (and four-star rating from most readers. the Bensons --George, Evelyn and their be. The low blow is finding Only someone well acquainted with Alaska could write so marry) other. three each sons -a rough and ready, hardworking family, who invite out invigorated Matt is an atheist. Her Beeoffer costume, complete descriptively about its beauty and harshness. Eowyn Ivey was them to Queen dinner and their help. That evening, from The reader feelsfirst hersnow pain as raised in Alaska and lives there with her husband and children. She with a visit, stinger, didn’t attract are a man. So to with their Jack and Mabel thrilled see the winter’s struggles between has studied journalism and creative writing at Western Washington a and nonexistent dating life and needing In a job, run outside to throw snowballs. a playfulElna mood, they shape wanting Matt red and her faith, Elna useschild her with actinga face skills chiseled to encourage University and the University of Alaska. For 10 years she worked a snow by Jack, golden straw hair, even challenging him to as a reporter for the Frontiersman newspaper. little girls and to “adopt” creepy, expensive dolls mittens blue coat. his soul and pray to Working in an independent bookstore in Palmer, Alaska, Ivey at FAOThe Schwarz. next morning they find the snow childsearch has vanished, found a children’s book that included the Russian tale about a snow for an see answer. leaving a pile snow and straw. But soon, JackGod and Mabel a Later, sheofsees herself in a carnival child. It spoke to her and led to this novel one year later. blond child wearing blue running the woods. The Her bewildered talents lead bold, “thin” mirror, has an “aha” momentinand readerthe is told, “That night thetochild them of ice and Elna, the Although magical realism is a genre I don’t often favor, I quirky begins determined quest losewas 80 born toeducated, Saints, just getThis it, read it love, and learn “Thewhere Snow Child”Latter-day to be a likeable read. tale of snow and longing.” Willing suspend We may one,agree, into stand-upfound comedy, pounds. A streamlined Elna to gains muchdisbelief?funny a vast amountthe offantastic the real with truth the about what and forward combines stark “There is no harm in finding magicannual among the trees. she is” a tongue-in-cheekloss critic ofmoving her more attention at the next year’s Mormons areMabel like, and how they realities of the world. I real loved the advice received fromthink.” The couple mysticaland childElna inside eventually and church, and also to Yaddo, an Artists Halloween Dance coax and the elsewhere, her sister, Ada,her when Ada forwarded her the fairy tale, learn that her nameher is Faina, yet nowith one else has seen her. Faina’s I recommend thisRussian book because it is Colony where she first begins writing cleverly documents encounters to tragic tales and choose presence seems mirror Mabel’s as a child -- amemoir. “Invent our own endings enchanting, entertaining, and,joy yes,over even soul-searching drawings and mapstooutlining where,favorite when book sorrow. ” Advice gladly passItalong. Russian tale, that oldhelpful man and an old woman liveMormons is a “frank and selfAnd how do react to this I wouldeducational. and who fairy she meets, andbegins, kisses.“An Her deprecating memoir” about dating unlike book? One Mormon reader recommended charts start with her first kiss at age 22, any other -- a “tell all” by a witty 27-yearthe memoir, stating, “If you are a Mormon, and continue as she remains unmarried FEBRUARY CONNECTION MAGAZINE old Mormon who has never had sex. | 45 get it and read it. If you are a Mormon and a virgin by2013 choice. Hopefully, the popularity of her book gets worried about the Satanic influences of the A newly confident, svelte Elna sets her Elna on “The Bachelorette” with 24 world corrupting our youth, get it, read it goal of winning the most eligible and Mormons to choose from for a marriage and have your eyes opened. If you are not desirable Mormon bachelor in New York.

BOOKREVIEW

T H E S N OW C H I L D


BOUNCERisSa child’s

play paradise

Story by Meagan Ruffing Photos by LeAnne Pfeiffer WITH A BLANK SLATE AND ENDLESS ideas, Jennifer Boyd began laying the groundwork for a fun and child-like setting that would enhance the bouncing business. Bouncers, a 5,000-square-foot warehouse filled with larger-than-life inflatables, has taken playtime to the next level. Bouncers opened last June, and Jennifer says Republic and the surrounding areas have been super supportive. “Customers come back,” she says. “Their support has kept me going so far. Winter is coming, and I’m hoping the cold weather will bring business in.” Originally from Orange County, California, Jennifer moved to Newport

46 | CONNECTION MAGAZINE

Beach, Oregon, where she met her husband, Darrell. The two moved to Kansas City in 2005, when she received a job transfer. From Kansas City, Darrell and Jennifer moved to Republic and made a family decision to open Bouncers. “For every single one of my birthdays for my kids, we always rented a bouncer to come to our house,” explains Jennifer. “It was always such a fun time for the family. It’s always been such a fun memory. When my corporate job became shaky, I tried to think of something I could do where I could stay at home with my kids.” Jennifer spent one year doing research

on how to start up a small business. After she wrote her business plan, Jennifer says she “put her feelers out there to see if I was really ready. I wasn’t sure if I wanted to leave the safety of my job. It was scary, but I have no regrets.” Once things were in place, Jennifer went part time at her corporate job and started up her own company. While opening Bouncers has been a long process for the family, Jennifer says everyone has been super supportive. “All have put a lot of time and energy into this,” she says. Jennifer’s husband and her oldest son, Caden, did most of the work on the inside,

FEBRUARY 2013


which included laying the floor, painting, building the walls and rebuilding the bathrooms. Bouncers hosts many other activities besides bouncing. Mommy and Me classes have been a hit with the public. “Music with Ms. Rachel” on Wednesday mornings from 10:30 to 11 a.m. continues to be a great option for those moms who are looking to get out of the house and spend some quality time with their babies. For only $5, you and your child can enjoy the music class and then bounce for as long as you both would like. The open floor plan at Bouncers makes it an ideal place for any type of get-together.

FEBRUARY 2013

Jennifer has rented out blocks of time to various groups for kids’ activities and day-out programs. Jennifer also hosts “Parents’ Night Out” at least once a month. For four hours, she will feed your kids pizza, play games and have a bouncing good time while you and your spouse go out. The cost is $12 for the first child and $7 for each additional child. It costs $150 per two hours to rent the space out privately or you can share the space with the public for $125 for such things as birthday parties. Birthday packages start at eight kids (not including the birthday boy or girl) and include the birthday room plus pizza. Outside food and coolers are allowed. When the weather is nice and your children don’t want to be inside, you can actually rent Jennifer’s bounce houses. She and Darrell will deliver and set up your bounce house and deflate and pick it up when you are done. “It only takes two minutes to blow up,” says Jennifer.

One of the most popular features at Bouncers is the Double Drop Slide. The 20foot ceiling provides just enough room for the 18-foot slide and 16-foot castles. There is also a basketball slide combo, a fun house and a separate toddler area for children 2

CONNECTION MAGAZINE | 47


BIRTHDAY PARTY PACKAGES $125

and under. The cement floors are covered with soft padding, and the support poles have been wrapped with egg crate material to keep kids safe. The toddler area has proven to be an ideal spot for little ones. It has gymnastic-like mats and padded blocks where kids can play and it’s all enclosed behind a safety gate. Jennifer also has an alarm on the front door so that she can be alerted whenever someone comes in or out, and she has a video screen set up at her desk so that she can watch kids from all areas in the bounce houses. Bouncers really is a family business. “My teenage boys (Caden, 17, and Gracen, 13) work here on their off time,” says Jennifer. “The baby comes with me four days a week, and I use the other couple of days to do my paperwork and clean.” There is also a snack bar at Bouncers in case your kiddos get hungry or thirsty. Ranging from 25 cents to $2, packaged candy, cookies, drinks and popcorn can be purchased. There are tables set up inside the building for you to eat your snacks. Socks are

48 | CONNECTION MAGAZINE

required, but if you forget yours, you can buy a brand new pair from Jennifer for $2. Bouncers is open Wednesdays and Thursdays from noon to 7 p.m., Saturdays from noon to 8 p.m. and Sundays from 1 to 6 p.m. The business is closed on Mondays and Tuesdays. The cost is $5 during the week and $7 on the weekends. Children 2 and under are free if accompanied by another paying child or they are $1.50 if by themselves. Jennifer follows the Republic School calendar and is open every day that the school is closed. She is also open on snow days. “The biggest challenge so far,” says Jennifer, “has been advertising and reaching people. I know there’s a need for it here and there’s a want for it here, because there are people coming through the door with little to no advertising.” For more information, please call Jennifer at 417647-2217. Happy bouncing!

Includes eight kids + birthday kid, unlimited play, birthday room, pizza, share with public.

$165 Includes 16 kids + birthday kid (and all of the above).

$210 Includes 24 kids + birthday kid (and all of the above).

*$5 for additional children (per child) if your group is more than eight but less than 16. Same goes for additional tiers. **Add an additional $25 per hour if you want to rent the space out privately. ***To rent a bounce house to be delivered and set up at your house, the cost is $125 for three hours.

FEBRUARY 2013


unveiled A SPECIAL SUPPLEMENT OF CONNECTION

Inside: 52

“I do”

The love story of Chelsea Krallman and Austin McCracken

58

Let them eat wedding cake

The perfect ending to your perfect day

62

Night of your life

Tips for making your prom memorable

JB PHOTGRAPHY

64

Wedding checklist

Countdown to the big day FEBRUARY 2013

CONNECTION MAGAZINE | 49


TOP WEDDING T R E N D S FOR 2013 ■ FLOWERS of the year -peonies and garden roses in “just-picked-from-the-garden” bouquets ■ NEUTRAL color palettes ■ Wedding dresses with POCKETS and colors besides traditional white

Beautiful blooms for your special occasion

✴ BOUTONNIERS ✴ WRIST CORSAGES ✴ TUXEDO RENTALS ✴ PLANT AND DECORATION RENTALS ✴ WEDDING AND RECEPTION HALL DECORATING SERVICE (will travel)

Prettiest roses in town!

Delivering to all businesses and schools in the surrounding areas.

CASH AND CARRY

FULL SERVICE FLORIST FOR WEDDINGS AND OTHER OCCASIONS

■ GREEN weddings with plantable flowers and recycled paper invitations.

■ Clean and modern cakes with all-over appliques along with chic mini cakes rather than cupcakes. ■ THEMED BARS with an emphasis on tequila and craft beers ■ LOUNGES at receptions. An informal and comfortable spot for guests to gather away from the dance floor. ■ FEATHER centerpieces ■ Foil-stamped INVITATIONS

Carey’s

CASSVILLE FLORIST

200 West 1st Street • Cassville • 417-847-2363 www.cassvilleflorist.com

You dream it, we create it. Custom cakes for all occasions • • • •

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1701 Townsend Street Cassville 417-847-0582

■ Bridesmaid dresses in PRINTS

www.simplysweetshoppe.net 50 | CONNECTION MAGAZINE

FEBRUARY 2013


FEBRUARY 2013

CONNECTION MAGAZINE | 51


“I Do”

STORY BY LISA SCHLICHTMAN |

Chelsea Krallman

& Austin

McCracken June 16, 2012 52 | CONNECTION MAGAZINE

A PAIR OF SALVAGED RED BARN DOORS served as the backdrop for the June 16, 2012, wedding of Chelsea and Austin McCracken. Country chic was the theme for the special event, which the young couple pulled off in perfect fashion with a tableau of hay bales, old-fashioned galvanized steel wash tubs, huge burlap ribbons and Mason jars filled with bright yellow sunflowers, purple leatrice and sprigs of wheat. The outdoor wedding took place on the grounds of the First Baptist Church in Monett where an old red barn once stood. Chelsea said she had hoped to be married in the old barn, but when it was torn down, Pastor Bill Cox saved the doors to be used in the couple’s ceremony. A platform was built by Austin’s father, and the weathered wood doors became the stage where the event unfolded. Guests entered the ceremony under a flowercovered archway and took their seats on

PHOTOS BY JB PHOTOGRAPHY

hay bales after picking up pillow cases from antique washtubs that belonged to Chelsea’s grandmother. The hay was baled by Chelsea’s grandfather just for the occasion. Each row of seating was marked by tall shepherd’s hooks decorated with large burlap and purple bows and Mason jars filled with brightly colored flowers. The four bridesmaids wore short cotton dresses with Justin cowboy boots, and the groomsmen traded formal tuxedos for champagne-colored pants and vests with a subtle pinstripe. The bride looked stunning in a strapless white satin mermaid-style gown with a beaded bodice and a birdcage veil. She carried a large bouquet of fresh flowers that included sunflowers, chartreuse green cymbidium orchids, purple standard carnations, mini white carnations, mini purple calla lilies and hypericum berries. The bouquet was embellished with a small pistol charm that signified the couple’s love FEBRUARY 2013


WEDDING PARTY: Ashley Krallman and Brendon Cox Tia Baker and Adam Witt Kennadi Howard and Patrick Dargan Lindsey Turner and Michael Roberts Flowergirl: Brooklyn Krallman

FEBRUARY 2013

CONNECTION MAGAZINE | 53


for hunting and the outdoors. The bridal party traveled to and from the wedding ceremony in a vintage 1969 bird’s egg blue Chevy pickup that belongs to Chelsea’s boss, Al Dohmen, of Monett. The wedding ceremony itself was another one-of-a-kind affair with traditional scripture readings combined with country music, a unity sand ceremony and vows written by the bride and groom. After Chelsea and Austin were announced as man and wife, the wedding party danced down the center aisle to the upbeat “Stuck Like Glue” by Sugarland. “I had a vision in my head for the wedding, and once it came together, I was just blown away,” said Chelsea. “Austin and I are not traditional in any way, and we didn’t want our wedding to be traditional. We tried our best to be different.”

54 | CONNECTION MAGAZINE

FEBRUARY 2013


Wedding details: VENUE: On the grounds of the First Baptist Church of Monett

OFFICIANT: Pastor Dr. Bill Cox

PHOTOGRAPHER: JB Photography in Monett

D.J.: David Jones

FLORIST: Karon Jones – Blooming Expressions in Mt. Vernon

CAKE: SHERRYcakes in Exeter

INVITATIONS: Litho Printers in Cassville

HAIR: Stephanie McCullough with Duane’s in Monett

NAILS: Happy Nails in Monett

DRESS: David’s Bridal

BRIDE’S JEWELRY: Tomblin’s Jewelry in Cassville

GOWN: david’s Bridal in Springfield

BRIDESMAID DRESSES: Brownsberger’s in Monett

Their love story Snow played a big role in bringing this Cassville girl and Monett boy together. The couple’s first date in January of 2010 coincided with a major snow storm. Austin and Chelsea never had the chance to leave the Krallman home in Cassville after Austin’s car got stuck in the driveway. Austin’s father came to pick him up that evening, and the next day, both sets of parents met at the Krallman home to dig Austin’s car out of the snow. From there, Chelsea and Austin finally had the chance to go on their belated date with Austin choosing to take advantage of the winter snowfall by taking Chelsea to Monett’s famous South Park Hill for some sledding. From that day on, Chelsea was certain Austin was the one for her. “That is where Austin asked me to be his girlfriend,” said Chelsea. “I knew I was going to marry him from then on.” The proposal was as romantic as the first date. Austin took Chelsea to dinner at Lai’s FEBRUARY 2013

Lai’s and then invited her to walk around Jolly Mill. At the gazebo, Austin dropped to one knee and asked for Chelsea’s hand in marriage. “He said ‘Chelsea Lynn Krallman will you marry me?’ and I started crying,” said Chelsea. “The first thing I said was ‘are you sure you asked my dad?’ Then I said yes.”

TUXEDOS: Norma’s In-Line Fashions in Aurora

RECEPTION VENUE: American Legion Hall in Monett

CATERING: P & M Catering – Patty Osterloh and Mary Bellon

HONEYMOON: Ibarra Star Resort in Playa de Carmen, Mexico

Advice for brides-to-be

Perfection, according to Chelsea, is an unrealistic and stress-inducing goal for a bride. “Don’t expect everything to be perfect,” advises Chelsea. “You’re going to have problems but that’s okay. The mess-ups become what you remember.” It’s also the little touches that make weddings special. In Chelsea’s case, it was the white leather cowboy boots her dad made for her to wear down the aisle and a wedding band that belonged to her grandmother. “In the end, it really takes a family to plan a wedding,” said Chelsea. CONNECTION MAGAZINE | 55


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56 | CONNECTION MAGAZINE

FLOWER GIRL DRESSES I N FA N T TO S I Z E 1 6 FEBRUARY 2013


MAKE YOUR

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CONNECTION MAGAZINE | 57


Let wedd STORY BY SHEILA HARRIS PHOTOS BY SARAH LEE

The perfect ending to your perfect day

EVERY WOMAN LOVES A WEDDING, whether it’s her own or somebody else’s, and Sherry Tucker, of rural Exeter, who has been decorating cakes since she was 15 years old, is no exception. She recently baked, decorated and set up the nontraditional wedding cake and candy buffet for the reception of Heather and Shon Bishop at the Church of Christ in Cassville on December 22, 2012. “Weddings are such romantic, oncein-a-lifetime events that I feel both very honored and very excited when a bride asks me to design a cake for the occasion,” Sherry stated. “Wedding cakes are my favorites to decorate. They allow me to really get creative, which is my favorite part of what I do. Because weddings are planned around a particular theme and color scheme, they provide me with boundaries, but within those boundaries, the sky’s the limit for creativity.” Heather and Shon’s cake consisted of a simple, yet elegant, white fondant-iced cake topper adorned with a gorgeous redfondant bow and ribbons floating above a sea of cupcakes decorated in different styles. Sherry allowed her creativity to run

58 | CONNECTION MAGAZINE

FEBRUARY 2013


t them eat ding cake wild with the groom’s cake, which consisted of a forest of snow-capped pines, with one tree appropriately ornamented for the Christmas season and topped with an edible handcrafted star. The forest rested serenely atop a large single-layer cake covered with drifts of snowy icing. Sherry, who keeps extremely busy with her professional cake-decorating business, SHERRYcakes, states that within the last five years wedding cake styles have really changed. “Most brides today prefer fondant icing to the piped-on butter cream icing used for their mother’s wedding cakes,” Sherry explained. “Fondant icing is kneaded, rolled out into a thin sheet, then placed over the cake and sealed into place with a light layer of frosting beneath it.

FEBRUARY 2013

Decorations to adorn the satin-smooth fondant are then cut out from another sheet of fondant, either by hand or with small cookie cutters, then ‘glued’ onto the cake with dabs of icing beneath them. “The finished appearance of a fondanticed cake is much different than that of a cake iced with traditional piped-on butter cream. Some people consider the fondant

more elegant,” Sherry continued. “But really, it’s just a matter of personal preference. I can decorate with either style.” Although the fondant icing can be purchased prepackaged, Sherry prefers to make her own fondant icing from scratch using a recipe she created herself. “I just find the taste a little fresher and less sweet than prepackaged fondant,” she stated.

CONNECTION MAGAZINE | 59


For Sherry, decorating cakes is an art form, and she considers each of the ingredients she uses to be her mediums. “I use artists’ sculpting tools a lot,” she said. “I enjoy the challenge of creating ornamental elements for the icing, which are exquisitely detailed, yet totally edible.” Two of the newer cake decorating products on the market that Sherry is really excited about are metallic-colored spray-on icing, sold in a small aerosol can much like spray paint, and miniature cookie cutters for cutting fondant. “The spray-on gold or silver adds a gorgeous shimmer to a cake,” Sherry said, “and provides the elegant finishing touch on many of my projects.” In addition to the change in cake styles, candy buffets, consisting of a variety of specialty handmade candies to complement the cake, are another new wedding trend that have become popular in the last few years. Sherry and her assistant and friend Kerry Mattingly have put their heads together to provide a menu of candy items for brides to choose from for their reception, including cake-pops, browniepops, rice-crispy pops, dipped pretzels, cream cheese tartlets, dipped strawberries and pecan tartlets, to name just a few. Candy buffet items are priced per piece, with a minimum order of two dozen of any one item required.

     According to Sherry, most wedding cakes are priced per serving.      “For example,” she said, “if you expect to serve 200 people, I will charge you for 200 servings and will plan the size of the cake accordingly. Some people prefer to order a certain size of cake rather than a certain amount of servings, which is fine. In that case, I will calculate the amount of servings contained within the size of cake ordered, and once again, charge per serving.”      Sherry’s prices range from $1.50 to $2.50 per serving, depending upon the complexity of the design and the expense of the ingredients requested. She believes her prices are in line with other cake decorators in the area. For help with planning your wedding cake and the reception of your dreams, Sherry may be contacted at 417-846-6171 or at SHERRYcakes on Facebook. “I believe every wedding reception should reflect the personalities of the bride and groom,” said Sherry. “Every couple is unique, so I like to spend enough time visiting with the bride before the wedding to get a good feel for her and her fiance’s personalities and make a cake that will complement their style. I find it very rewarding when I am able to provide suggestions to the couple, which will add to the ambience of their special day.” 

Tips from Sherry for ordering your cake and planning your reception 1

Make sure to order your cake at least six weeks in advance, especially if your wedding date is scheduled for May, June, July or August.

2

Before meeting with your cake decorator, peruse some websites, such as Pinterest or Facebook, for cake style and color ideas, as well as reception themes. If you find a cake you like, please provide links or actual photos to your decorator. While Sherry does have pictures of cakes for brides to look at, she said the decision-making process is much simpler if the bride does a little advance research.

3

If possible, calculate in advance the number of people you expect to serve and decide whether you’d like a particular size of cake or a certain amount of servings. Your decorator can help you determine the amount of servings in a particular style or size of cake.

4

Wedding cakes that are several tiers high require very sturdy, level support during the reception, especially if it’s outdoors. Please plan accordingly.

5

Provide your cake decorator with well-written directions and a map to the reception site, unless he or she is extremely familiar with the area.

6

Always provide your cake decorator with a back-up contact number (such as your mother’s or an aunt’s) in case last minute information is needed on the day of the wedding.

7

Relax and enjoy your special day!

60 | CONNECTION MAGAZINE

FEBRUARY 2013


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CONNECTION MAGAZINE | 61


TIPS FOR MAKING YOUR

N

BY KAITLYN SCHUMACHER | PHOTOS BY LADONNA MCVAY

It’s hard to think about prom when Valentine’s Day is the closest special occasion, but it’s never too early to start planning. From the dress to flowers to where to eat, making sure prom is memorable is a lot of work. Speaking from experience, there’s a lot more planning that needs to be done than you realize, so let’s begin with the basics.

Dresses:

Tuxes:

Yes, they are fun and pretty and possibly the most exciting part of the whole occasion, but they are also expensive. If you go to Peppers & Co. in Monett or Norma’s Inline Fashions in Aurora, you’ll have a great selection of dresses to choose from and many are priced more reasonably than stores in Springfield or Joplin. At some of these retailers, you can pick out your dress and put it on lay-a-way until prom. So the sooner you pick out your dress, the longer you have to pay it off. When it comes to choosing a dress, keep several factors in mind. 1. GET THE DRESS THAT FITS YOU. Don’t try to fit the dress. Don’t stress yourself out thinking you need to lose an extra 10 pounds just so that dress will fit. 2. KEEP YOUR BODY TYPE IN MIND. What looks good on your friend might not look the same on you, and that’s not a bad thing. Everybody is different. 3. GIVE YOURSELF TIME TO SHOP AND TRY ON DRESSES. Just because a dress doesn’t look good on the hanger, doesn’t mean it won’t look great on you. There are lots of places in the area that sell prom dresses, so look around. You never know what you’ll find. EMILY PITTS ENJOYS PROM DRESS SHOPPING AT LOCAL STORES.

Alterations: Now keep in mind that you need to give the seamstress time to do your alterations. A window of three to four weeks before prom is just about right.

Boys, your job is simple. Get fitted and get the right color. Brownsberger’s in Monett or Carey’s Cassville Florist are great places to reserve your tux. If you and your date want to match, see if you can get a scrap piece of fabric from the dress after she’s had it altered or have a picture of your date’s dress. And don’t forget the accessories. Go to prom in style with a hat or cane to go with your tux.

Helpful hint:

Take the shoes yo u are going to wear to prom to your fitting so your dress can be hemm ed to the right length .

MATT MURPHY STOPS TRAFFIC IN HIS TUX.

Accessories: Have fun looking for all the little stuff. Necklaces, earrings, shoes and handbags really add to your overall prom look. Starla K in Monett has a great selection of jewelry for prom, and Stoops Manufacturing in Aurora has a number of shoes and purses to choose from. You would be surprised how much you can find without driving an hour out of town.

Hair: hint:

Make a hair appointment now, and choose a hairstyle that Helpful re of the tu goes with your dress and personality. If you want a super Take a pic you ant with w u style yo formal look, go for a curly up-do. Want a simpler look? so , st li y st air to your h Half-ups are always pretty and look great in pictures. hat exactly w 62 | CONNECTION MAGAZINE

w they kno done. you want

FEBRUARY 2013


PROM MEMORABLE

Night

life

of your

Flowers: Pretty simple actually. Go in and pick your ribbon, your flower or a special bracelet for a corsage and then let the professionals work their magic. Don’t be afraid to be creative though. You can have a simple wrist corsage or an elaborate one that wraps around the top of your arm. You can pretty much do whatever you want with the flowers, so get something that fits your personality.

SARAH BARTON AND MATT MURPHY MODEL THE LATEST PROM FASHIONS.

The Dance:

My personal recommendation is to stay local. There are a great variety of restaurants in the area that are perfect for the evening. The Family Room Steak House in Monett offers a special menu for prom that includes a two for $20 and a two for $25 menu. They even set up a special room with a more formal setting for prom. Other restaurants in the area to keep in mind include Bootleggers, Olive Grill and Hawgwild in Aurora, The Bayou in Monett and Geraldi’s in Cassville. So why stay local? Think about it, instead of driving you have extra time to get ready, take pictures and enjoy yourself. If you decide to go out of town, that’s two or more hours you’ll spend driving. It’s much more fun to go around town and take extra pictures, and it’s also nice to have a little extra time to sleep in on the morning of the big event. FEBRUARY 2013

MATT MURPHY AND STEPHANIE SCHUMACHER STEP OUT IN STYLE.

Dinner:

Go and have fun! Relax and cut loose with your friends and classmates. Stay until the very end, because when it’s over that’s it and you may regret missing out. Don’t be afraid to look a little silly either. The majority of the time the ones who look silly have the most fun. So get out there and dance!

After Prom: Again, go to the after-prom activity. It’s a long night, but it’s worth it. You only have this opportunity once a year, so get the most out of it and make memories. Prom is the ultimate high school dance. You look forward to it all year, so make it a prom worth remembering. Plan thoroughly, and don’t stress about the little things. CONNECTION MAGAZINE | 63


WEDDING Countdown to the big day

CHECKLIST 6 - 12 MONTHS O Discuss a budget and who will pay for what Choose the kind of wedding you will O have - theme, date and time O Look at reception locations and reserve the reception location Reserve the wedding location O O Choose the honored roles - bridesmaids, groomsmen, ushers, flower girl, ring bearer Start looking for a wedding O gown, veil, accessories and bridal party’s attire O Begin to send out save-the-date cards O Select your photographer, florist, caterer and/or videographer O Sign up for your gift registry

2 - 3 MONTHS O Order your wedding cake O Start addressing and sending out the invitations O Check state/county marriage license requirements Plan ceremony, O reception, menus and music 4 - 5 MONTHS O Place wedding announcements in the local newspapers O Order wedding invitations O Finalize arrangements with your florist O Start planning wedding decorations O Finalize your guest list

1 MONTH O Pick up marriage license O Confirm all final payment amounts, dates and times with vendors

Custom

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2 WEEKS O Write seating cards and place cards for the reception Final fittings for yourself and O bridal party O Make a wedding day itinerary O Pick up wedding rings O Give photographer a photo checklist O Give musicians a list of your music selection O Remind wedding party and families what time they need to show up for rehearsal

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WEDDING DAY O Make sure the maid of honor has the groom’s ring and best man has bride’s ring O Spend a moment alone to calm down before the ceremony O Look yourself in the morror, smile and enjoy!

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CONNECTION MAGAZINE | 65


my conn

“My Connection” photos should be e-mailed to editor@monett-times.com. Photos should be sent in the original JPG format at the highest resolution possible. A short explanation of who is in the photo and where the photo was taken should also be included.

Terri Lynn DeGraffenreid, of Cassville, married Mike Brattin, of Wheaton, on December 12, 2012, in Las Vegas, Nevada. The happy couple brought along the December issue of Connection for the special occasion.

Sandy Cupps, of Shell Knob, and her mother, Norma Schultz, not pictured, recently traveled to Tucson, Arizona, for a cousin’s wedding. Sandy posed with Connection in front of a cactus that is one of the oldest, if not the oldest, in the state.

66 | CONNECTION MAGAZINE

Ashley Cole, of Exeter, is photographed with Connection magazine on her room balcony during a Carnival cruise to Cozumel, Mexico, with friends and family in November. Ashley is the daughter of Artie and Robyn Cole.

Donna Hammond, of Monett, visited family in Rapid City, South Dakota, over Thanksgiving and was photographed with Santa at the Rushmore Mall. Pictured with Donna (at far left) are TJ, Jim and Cyndi Ronfeldt.

FEBRUARY 2013


nection Bill and Lea Hill, of Cassville, took the Connection magazine with them to the Marine Corps Recruit Depot win San Diego, California, to watch their grandson, Tyler Hill, graduate from Marine Boot Camp. Roger and Joyce Cusick, of Cassville, enjoyed a 10-day visit to Prague, Czech Republic, in December to visit Joyce’s son, Jeff Manning, and daughter-in-law, Misa. All four are pictured above with the December issue of Connection at Charles Bridge, with Prague Castle in the background. The picture below is Joyce and Roger with Connection in front of the medieval Prague Astronomical Clock or Prague Orloj, located in Old Town Square. The clock was installed in 1410.

Tammie Tyndall took a copy of Connection with her during a recent trip to Charlotte, North Carolina, with her 4-year-old grandchildren, Ayden White and Josaline Lombard. Tammie and Josaline live in Pierce City.

FEBRUARY 2013

CONNECTION MAGAZINE | 67


Dine Dine Dine Dine Dine OUT

DININGDIRECTORY DININGDIRECTORY DININGDIRECTORY DININGDIRECTORY DININGDIRECTO

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505 Plaza Drive 505 Plaza Drive 417-235-7800 Mon-Thu 11am-8pm and Fri-Sat 11am-9pm MONETT MONETT MONETT Mon-Thu 11am-8pm and Fri-Sat 11am-9pm BAYOU 417-235-7800 417-354-8408 417-354-8408 BLACK BIRD BAR & GRILL Mon-Thu 11am-8pm and Fri-Sat 11am-9pm 864 US Highway 606am-10pm Mon-Thu 11am-9pm and Fri-Sun Mon-Thu 11am-9pm and & Fri-Sun 6am-10pm BLACK BIRD BAR GRILL 1321 S. Elliott Ave. MONETT 1321 S. Elliott Ave. BLACK BIRD BAR & GRILL AURORA BAYOU 417-235-7800 BLACK BIRD BAR & GRILL AURORA 417-678-2100 1321 S. Elliott Ave. Mon-Thu 11am-8pm and Fri-Sat 11am-9pm 1321 S. Elliott Ave. 60 864 US Highway 417-678-2100 AURORA AURORA MONETT BLACK BIRD BAR & GRILL 417-678-2100 417-678-2100 417-235-7800

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1321 S. Elliott Ave. and Fri-Sat 11am-9pm Mon-Thu 11am-8pm DENALI DREAMS 316 Broadway AURORA DENALI DREAMS DENALI DREAMS 316 Broadway MONETT BLACK BIRD BAR & GRILL 417-678-2100 316 Broadway MONETT 417-772-7092 316 Broadway MONETT 1321 S. Elliott Ave. 417-772-7092 Mon 6-9pm, Tue-Thu 7am-9pm, Fri 7am-10pm and Sat 8am-10pm 417-772-7092 MONETT AURORA Mon 6-9pm, Tue-Thu 7am-9pm, 7am-10pm 8am-10pm Mon 6-9pm, Tue-Thu 7am-9pm, Fri Fri 7am-10pm andand SatSat 8am-10pm DENALI DREAMS 417-772-7092 417-678-2100

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Mon Broadway 6-9pm, Tue-Thu 7am-9pm, Fri 7am-10pm and Sat 8am-10pm 316 MOCHA JO'S 404 Broadway MOCHA JO’S MONETT MOCHA JO'S 404 Broadway MONETT 404 Broadway DENALI DREAMS 417-772-7092 MONETT 417-635-1107 MONETT 404 Broadway Mon 6-9pm, Tue-Thu 7am-9pm, Fri 7am-10pm and Sat 8am-10pm 316 Broadway 417-635-1107 417-635-1107 M, T, Th 8am-8pm, W 7am-3pm, F 8am-10pm MONETT MONETT M, M, T, Th 8am-8pm, W 7am-3pm, F 8am-10pm T, Th 8am-8pm, W 7am-3pm, F 8am-10pm MOCHA JO'S 417-635-1107 417-772-7092FAMILY RESTAURANT MONETT M, T, Th 8am-8pm, W 7am-3pm, F 8am-10pm 404 Broadway Mon 6-9pm, Tue-ThuFAMILY 7am-9pm, Fri 7am-10pm and Sat 8am-10pm MONETT RESTAURANT NEW 608 E.BEGINNINGS Broadway MONETT 106 4thE.Street MONETT FAMILY RESTAURANT 608 Broadway MONETT MOCHA JO'S 417-635-1107 MONETT MONETT 417-235-3772 608 E. Broadway M, T, Th 8am-8pm, W 7am-3pm, F 8am-10pm 404 Broadway 417-772-7206 417-235-3772 Open 7 days 6am-9pm MONETT Mon. - Fri. 6:30 a.m. - 6 p.m., Sat. 8 a.m. - 5 p.m. MONETT Open 7 days FAMILY 6am-9pm RESTAURANT MONETT 417-235-3772 417-635-1107

RICHARD’S HAWGWILD BBQ Open 7Broadway days W6am-9pm 608 E.8am-8pm, M, T, Th 7am-3pm, F 8am-10pm RICHARD’S HAWGWILD BBQ RICHARD’S HAWGWILD BBQ Downtown MONETT DOWNTOWN RICHARD’S HAWGWILD BBQ Downtown FAMILY AURORA MONETT RESTAURANT 417-235-3772 AURORA AURORA 417-678-4294 Downtown Open 6am-9pm 417-678-4294 608 E.7 days Broadway Call for hours Call417-678-4294 for hours AURORA MONETT Call for hours HAWGWILD RICHARD’S 417-678-4294

SeaFood • Steak • ChopS • paSta Diners who have never tasted a homemade olive salad, salami, mortadella, ham and provolonestuffed muffuletta sandwich should venture into The Bayou, an authentic Cajun restaurant located at 864 E. Highway 60 in Monett. The restaurant serves creamy Creole red beans and rice, jalapeno cornbread muffins, Po-Boy sandwiches and traditional spicy shrimp and sausage jambalaya. Diners can also try the cafe’s lasagna rolls florentine, a fried portobello mushroom or the half-pound Bayou burger. The Bayou offers a variety of other southern-style seafood, steak and pasta dishes and an assortment of desserts, including bread pudding, custard pie and cherry cordial cheesecake. The Bayou is open from 11 a.m. to 8 p.m. Monday through Thursday, and 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. on Friday and Saturday. Sunday hours will be seasonal. The restaurant bar offers late hours Tuesday through to join us on NFL Sundays during We Sunday. pick upBe andsure return your football season for all of We the pick games. up and return your

vehicle in the Cassville area. We pickinup return your vehicle theand Cassville area. vehicle in ORLEANS the Cassville area. REAL NEW POBOYS

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417-235-3772 BEAN UTOPIAN Call hours6am-9pm T.J.’S B.B.Q. Downtown Openfor 7 days UTOPIAN BEAN 200 Washington Street 110 W. Mt. Vernon Blvd. AURORA UTOPIAN BEAN 200 Washington Street PURDY MT. VERNON RICHARD’S HAWGWILD BBQ 417-678-4294 PURDY 417-366-2388 417-442-3014 200for Washington Street Call hours Downtown

417-442-3014 PURDY AURORA Open Tuesday through Saturday 9:00am - 8:00pm UTOPIAN BEAN 417-442-3014 52417-678-4294 | CONNECTION UTOPIAN BEAN OpenWashington Tuesday through Street SaturdayMAGAZINE 9:00am - 8:00pm 200 hours Street MAGAZINE 52Call | for CONNECTION 200 Washington PURDY PURDY 52 | CONNECTION UTOPIAN BEAN MAGAZINE 417-442-3014 417-442-3014 Tues.-Sat. a.m. - 7 p.m. Open 11 Tuesday through Saturday 9:00am - 8:00pm

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68Open | CONNECTION MAGAZINE Tuesday through Saturday 9:00am - 8:00pm 52 | CONNECTION MAGAZINE

An over-stuffed fried shrimp, catfish and cheese sandwich, covered in our own sweet Vidalia onion dressing and crunchy cabbage.

SOUPS Creole Gumbo • Hot and Spicy Jambalaya • Creole Creamy Red Beans and Rice PASTAS Hand-rolled Meatballs or Italian Sausage and Marinara Lasagna Roll Florentine • New Orleans Mardi Gras Pasta Grilled Chicken or Shrimp Alfredo •BBQ Shrimp Pasta OCTOBER 2012 OCTOBER 2012 STEAKS Seasoned and Seared Prime Rib OCTOBER 2012 Rib-Eye Steak • Filet Mignon 8 oz. of fine 100% Beef

OCTOBER 2012

FEBRUARY 2013 OCTOBER 2012

G


RECIPES

GCa m e D a y rs e s a le rowd P from the

Gl az ed Hot Win gs

3 lbs. chicken drumettes 3 tbsp. apple cider vinegar 1/4 tsp. onion powder 1 tsp. chili powder 1 tsp. paprika 1 cup apricot jam 1/8 tsp. ground ginger ased, foilArrange drumettes on a gre ˚ oven lined baking sheet. Bake in 350 aining for 30 minutes. Measure rem an. ingredients into small saucep until t hea m diu me on stir Heat and mer bubbling. Reduce heat and sim cups. awhile. Makes about a 1-1/4 gs and Brush the sauce over the win s, turning bake about 15 to 20 minute or three and bushing with sauce two times until tender.

Cheesy Sausage Hot Dip 2 lbs. Velveeta Cheese 1 can Ro-Tel with green chilies 1/2 lb. sausage, browned 1/3 cup milk 2 green onions, chopped Melt cheese on low in Crockpot. Add milk and Ro-Tel tomatoes, stirring occasionally. May add more milk if necessary. Add onions and browned sausage.

recipe box

RECIPES COLLECTED

FROM FAMILY AND FRIENDS

Easy Cheese Ball

2 8-oz. bricks of cream cheese, softened 2 bunches green onions 2 pkg. Buddig pastrami 1 small pkg. fancy shredded cheddar cheese Garlic salt to taste 2 tsp. Worcestershire sauce 1 cup chopped pecans

Thinly slice green onions. Chop pastrami into small pieces. Combine all ingredients and mix well (a food processor may be used). Form into a ball, and coat with nuts. Chill.

Spicy Spinach and Artichoke Dip 1/2 cup (1 stick) butter 1 med. (1 cup) chopped onion 2 10-oz pkg. frozen, chopped spinach, thawed and well drained 1 14-oz. can artichoke hearts, drained and chopped 8 oz. cream cheese 8 oz. sour cream 1 cup Monterey Jack cheese, shredded 1 cup grated Parmesan cheese 2 tbsp. hot sauce Salt to taste

Melt butter in a large skillet over medium heat. Add onion and cook until soft. Stir in spinach, artichokes, cream cheese, sour cream, 1/3 cup Monterey Jack cheese, 3/4 cup Parmesan cheese, hot sauce and salt. Stir until well blended, Pour mixture into casserole dish (may use Crockpot with removable crock). Top with remaining cheese. Bake in a 350˚ oven until cheese starts to brown. May be kept warm in Crockpot. Serve with chips or crackers.

If you have a recipe you’d like to share, email to Darlene Wierman at darlene@cassville-democrat.com FEBRUARY 2013

CONNECTION MAGAZINE | 69


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Community CONNECTION Downtown Monett was the scene for a Christmas-themed Broadway Nights on December 14.

1. Deryll Wormington and Nate Elmore. 2. Jeanette Freeze and Terasa Ball. 3. Sarah Swank and Kayla Lucas. 4. Zack Thompson and Ashlee Mattingly. 5. Hailee, Misty and Lilli Sitton. 6. Kim and Mason Ballay. 7. Felicia Tudor, Kathleen Marbut and Doug Tudor. 8. Sarah Baker, Jonathan Kirkland and Jordan Wyatt. 9. Enedelia Franco and Griselda Navarro. 10. Tom and Willow Welters.

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Community CONNECTION The Cassville United Methodist Church hosted its 10th annual Tinsel Tea on December 8.

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1. Laura Johnson and Jo Anne Ellis. 2. Perryleanne Lingle, Misha Blakely and Simbra Boone. 3. Trish McCracken and Elizabeth James. 4. Rita Rogers, Megan Cox and Lindy Gibson. 5. Marolyn Wood and Margaret Beeson. 6. Melanie Stringer and Stephanie Marple. 7. Becky Henningson and Laura Johnson. 8. Carolyn Stacy and Ann Warren. 9. Jill LeCompte, Lindy Gibson and Melissa Vollenweider. 10. Carmella Buckner and Patty Door. 11. Emily Wood and Kelsey Fields. 11 CONNECTION MAGAZINE | 71


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MONTH OF MARCH The Stella Senior Citizens Center and the Aurora Senior Citizens Center hold weekly dances. The Stella dance is held every Friday night from 7 to 10 p.m. with music by the McDonald County Playboys and Frosty Garland and the Road Hogs on alternate Fridays. The Aurora dance is held the second, third and fourth Saturdays of the month from 7 to 10 p.m. featuring the Funtimers Band. The Seligman Chamber of Commerce holds a consignment auction on the second Thursday of every month at the Seligman Event Center, located on Highway 37 north. Proceeds benefit the Seligman Chamber of Commerce. For more information, call 417662-2612. The Seligman Chamber of Commerce holds its membership banquet. For date and time, call 417-662-3612. The Aurora Chamber of Commerce will be sponsoring a fishing tournament. For date and time, call the chamber office at 417-678-4150. The Seligman Chamber of Commerce will hold a dance at the Chamber of Commerce Event Center on North Highway 37 every Thursday night at 7 p.m. Snacks are optional, and there is a cover charge is $4. There will be a different band each week. MARCH 1 Opening day of trout season at Roaring River State Park. Whistle blows at 6:30 a.m.

MARCH EVENTS

MARCH 2 A dance will be held at the Cassville Senior Citizens Center at 1111 Fair St. from 7 to 10 p.m. The dance features the Roaring River Sounds Band. There is a $4 cover charge with all proceeds benefitting the center.

MARCH 4 The monthly dance at the Monett Senior Citizens Center will be held from 7 to 10 p.m. at the senior center on Dairy Street. Admission is $3, and snack foods are welcome. MARCH 7 The Seligman Lions Club is hosting a community dance at the Seligman Community Center from 7 to 10 p.m. Frosty Garland and the Road Hogs is the featured band. There is a $4 cover charge with all proceeds benefitting the Seligman Lions Club. The annual Monett Chamber of Commerce meeting and dinner will be held at the Scott Regional Technology Center. The theme will be “Monett Express.� For more information, call the Monett Chamber of Commerce at 417-235-7919. MARCH 8 The Knights of Columbus in Shell Knob will host a fish fry at the Holy Family Catholic Church in Shell Knob from 4:30 to 7:30 p.m. For more information, call the Shell Knob Chamber of Commerce office at 417-8583300.

MARCH 19 The Southern Beekeepers of Missouri will meet at 7 p.m. at the First United Methodist Church of Monett. Anyone interested in bees is welcome to attend. For more information, call Leon Riggs at 417235-5053 or Kevin Young at 417-847-5464.

MARCH 22 The Knights of Columbus in Shell Knob will host a fish fry at the Holy Family Catholic Church in Shell Knob from 4:30 to 7:30 p.m. For more information, call the Shell Knob Chamber of Commerce office at 417-858-3300. MARCH 23 The Aurora Chamber of Commerce will host its annual Business Expo from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Aurora High School on Prospect. For more information, call the chamber office at 417-678-4150. The Aurora Chamber of Commerce will sponsor an Easter egg hunt at the Aurora High School at 11 a.m. For more information, call the chamber office at 417-678-4150. MARCH 28 The Pierce City Senior Citizens will host a dance from 7 to 10 p.m. at the Pierce City Senior Center. MARCH 30 The annual Pierce City Easter egg hunt will be held at South Elm Field, which is located by the water tower, west of the Pierce City Cemetery. For more information, call 417-476-2323. MARCH 31 An Easter sunrise service will be held at the Scenic View on Highway 39 in Shell Knob. For more information, call the Shell Knob Chamber of Commerce at 417-838-3300.

If you have an event you would like featured in our monthly events listing, please email the event information to Lisa Craft at community@monett-times.com. FEBRUARY 2013

CONNECTION MAGAZINE | 73

STAYCONNECTED

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ADVERTISINGINDEX

Acambaro Mexican Restaurant

28

Doug’s Pro Lube

37

Pitiful to Posh

44

Accents-N-Tents

61

Eastside Church of Christ

42

Preferred Pet Supply

21

Alice Irene’s

65

Ed’s Flea Market

34

Race Brothers

36

All Tangled Up

65

Edward Jones

26

Red Barn

13

Ava Belle’s Flea Market

16

First State Bank of Purdy

25

Sater/Old Town Pharmacy

34

Barry Electric Cooperative

42

Four Seasons Realty

26

Scott Regional Technology Center

Baywash Car Wash

42

Four States Dental Care

13

Scott Photography

Freedom Bank

28

Bennett-Wormington Funeral Home

3

4 51

Security Bank

16

6

Sexton and Associates, LLC CPAs

74

8

Simply Sweet Shoppe

50

Bookmarks

16

Glaze Craze

Brownsberger’s

56

Hospice Compassus

Burrus Jewelers

56

Ila Bohm’s Home Décor

43

Smile Designers Dentistry

Carolyn Hunter, DMD, PC

37

Journagan True Value

28

Snootie Flea

44

Carey’s Cassville Florist

50

Ken’s Collision

72

Spiritual Streams Fellowship

37

Lackey Body Works

44

Starla K Fashion Jewelry

74

The Hornet’s Nest

25

Century 21, Monett Christine’s House of Style Community National Bank

6 57 3

Les Jacobs Ford

8

Lowe’s Auto Glass

16

The Trunk

Making Memories Tours

43

Tomblin’s Jewelry & Gifts

8

56

Country Cakes and Bridal Shoppe

57

Country Dodge

13

Mercy

CoxHealth

76

Missouri Loan Center

61

Trogdon Agency, Inc.

Crane Family Dentistry

36

Mocha Jo’s Coffee Café

28

Vacation Rentals

73

Crystal Creations Floral and Gifts

61

New Beginnings Ice Cream and Deli

72

Walmart, Cassville

64

Denali Dreams

44

Ozark Healthy Herb Shop

34

Whitley Pharmacy

56

Diet Center

42

Peppers and Company

4

Wickman’s Garden Village

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Pierce City Medical Clinic

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Willis Insurance, Inc.

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2

3, 57

Treasures

26 6

To advertise, contact a sales representative today. Robyn Blankenship ADVERTISING DIRECTOR 417.342.3168 sales@cassville-democrat.com Sheila Harris ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE 417.669.3667 sharris@monett-times.com Marion Chrysler ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE 479.244.7082 mchrysler@cassville-democrat.com Cassie Brewer ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE 417.847.2610 cassvilleads@gmail.com Annie George ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE 214.762.0414 connectionsales@gmail.com Greg Gilliam ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE 417.489.1718 777caregiver@sbcglobal.net 74 | CONNECTION MAGAZINE

FEBRUARY 2013


FEBRUARY 2013

BY JEFF TERRY

Great men are like eagles, an d b u ild th eir n est o n so me lo fty so litu d e.

A RTH UR SC H O PEN H AUER

CONNECTION MAGAZINE | 75

PART ING SHOT

Parting Shot


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FEBRUARY 2013


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