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in East Asia

Monitoring & Evaluation Toolkit 2010


Table of Contents Global Dimension in Education ....................................................................................................... 1 Key Concepts of the Global Dimension ...................................................................................... 1 Global Dimension in Teaching & Learning ................................................................................. 2 British Council Connecting Classrooms: Providing Opportunities for a Global Dimension .............. 3 The Toolkit and Measuring the Global Dimension in Education ...................................................... Students ..................................................................................................................................... Teachers .................................................................................................................................... Schools ..............................................................................................................................................

4 4 4 4

Monitoring and Evaluation Timeline ................................................................................................ 5 Students’ Comparative Survey ........................................................................................................... 6 Student Focus Group ..................................................................................................................... 15 Teachers’ Comparative Survey .......................................................................................................... 17 Impact Study ................................................................................................................................. Student Face-to-Face Interview ............................................................................................... Teacher Face-to-Face Interview .............................................................................................. Head Teacher Face-to-Face Interview ..................................................................................... Policy-Maker Face-to-Face Interview .......................................................................................

22 22 27 34 39

Cluster report ............................................................................................................................. 43 Case Studies ............................................................................................................................................. 51 Annexes ..................................................................................................................................................... 72


CONNECTING CLASSROOMS IN EAST ASIA COMPARATIVE MONITORING & EVALUATION TOOLKIT

THE GLOBAL DIMENSION IN EDUCATION Education plays a vital role in helping children and young people recognise their contribution and responsibilities as citizens of this global community and equipping them with the skills to make informed decisions and take responsible actions. Incorporating the global dimension in teaching means that links can be made between local and global issues. It also means that young people are given opportunities to:

. . . .

critically examine their own values and attitudes appreciate the similarities between peoples everywhere, and value diversity understand the global context of their local lives develop skills that will enable them to combat injustice, prejudice and discrimination.

Such knowledge, skills and understanding enable young people to make informed decisions about playing an active role in the global community. The global dimension can be understood through eight key concepts:

. . . . . . . .

global citizenship conflict resolution diversity human rights interdependence social justice sustainable development values and perceptions

Key Concepts of the Global Dimension Global Citizenship Gaining the knowledge, skills and understanding of concepts and institutions necessary to become informed, active, responsible citizens Conflict resolution Understanding the nature of conflicts, their impact on development and why there is a need for their resolution and the promotion of harmony.

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ganisation for cultural relations and educational opportunities. A registered charity: 209131 (England and Wales) SC037733 (Scotland).


Diversity Understanding and respecting differences and relating these to our common humanity. Human rights Knowing about human rights including the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child Interdependence Understanding how people, places economies and environments are all inextricably interrelated, and that choices and events have repercussions on a global scale. Social justice Understanding the importance of social justice as an element in both sustainable development and the improved welfare of all people Sustainable development Understanding the need to maintain and improve the quality of life now without damaging the planet for future generations. Values and perceptions Developing a critical evaluation of representations of global issues and an appreciation of the effect these have on people’s attitudes and values.

Global Dimension in Teaching & Learning Embedding the global dimension in the curriculum will help learners to:

. . . . . . . . .

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explore and make sense of the big issues in the world think critically and creatively about topical and controversial issues consider issues and events from a range of perspectives communicate with people from a range of countries and cultures develop self awareness and a positive attitude to difference argue a case on behalf of themselves and others reflect on the consequences of their own actions now and in the future link learning to taking responsible actions participate in society as active and responsible global citizens


To achieve these outcomes, learners need opportunities to:

. . .. . .. .

explore concepts of conflict, diversity, human rights, interdependence, social justice and sustainable development participate in sustainable global partnerships which can be a powerful and exciting way to bring the global dimension into the classroom make links between personal, local, national and global issues and events appreciate the importance of a global context and engage in a range of culturally diverse experiences critically evaluate their own value and attitudes appreciating the similarities between people everywhere and learning to value diversity develop skills that will enable them to identify and challenge injustice, prejudice and discrimination understand and potentially make their own distinctive contribution to local and global communities consider probable and preferable futures and how to achieve the latter

BRITISH COUNCIL CONNECTING CLASSROOMS: PROVIDING OPPORTUNITIES FOR A GLOBAL DIMENSION The British Council Connecting Classrooms will help schools, school leaders, teachers and students to achieve their goals of becoming truly Global Citizens through: -

international school projects that are classroom-based with the embedding of all school linking activity within the curriculum

-

sustainable school partnerships to support teachers and learners with a range of activities which will enhance the development of intercultural understanding

-

teachers and students exchanging ideas and developing projects through their dedicated online communities of practice; provided and facilitated by the British Council.

Partner groups of Local Authorities and schools are working together on a number of collaborative projects under the common themes of: Global Citizenship Tomorrow’s World Science & Invention Climate Change Sports & Health Environmental Science Enterprise

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THE TOOLKIT AND MEASURING THE GLOBAL DIMENTION IN EDUCATION How will we know if we are achieving our goals of developing a Global Dimension to whole-school teaching and learning? This toolkit is designed as an implementation guide for British Council Connecting Classrooms’ comparative Monitoring & Evaluation. It is aimed to help you in using a set of tools to measure the development in embedding the Global Dimension into teaching and learning in schools, as a result of their participation in the programme, participating in Connecting Classrooms in East Asia. The recommended tools consist of comparative surveys, cluster report and impact study. The comparative surveys will measure schools’ progress in incorporating the Global Dimension in teaching and learning. This will be done by comparing the results of this comparative Monitoring & Evaluation against the results of the baseline Monitoring & Evaluation conducted with teachers and students last year. The impact study and the cluster report will further investigate schools’ achievements and the impact the programme has had, through incorporating the Global Dimension in education, on the students, teachers, head teachers and the governments. The comparative Monitoring & Evaluation will be carried out through three perspectives: 1. Students: 1.1 Students’ Comparative Survey – the survey will enable us to compare changes in views of those students taking the baseline survey and subsequently participating in British Council Connecting Classrooms project activities. 1.2 Students Focus Group – the students will be interviewed on a number of key aspects of Global Citizenship demonstrating the changes in their opinions and understanding of other society and the importance of being global citizens. 2. Teachers: 2.1 Teachers’ Comparative Survey – compared with the baseline survey, this will indicate how much Connecting Classrooms is helping to develop the Global Dimension in your school and your learners after working with them on British Council Connecting Classrooms project activities. 3. Schools: 3.1 Face-to-Face Interviews – Connecting Classrooms requires a qualitative study on the impact of the programme in the countries in which it works. The Connecting Classrooms programme works with policymakers, head teachers, teachers and students. This study will therefore target these groups of people to establish the impact of the programme. 3.2 Cluster report – this is a self evaluation report reflecting on what the schools have achieved in the past year which will also help clusters to ensure that schools get the most out of the programme and for Connecting Classrooms to be able to demonstrate the impact of the programme to its stakeholders.

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MONITORING & EVAULATION TIMELINE -

Countries identify consultant/researcher (March – May) Identify individuals for impact study’s face-to-face interviews (March – June)

-

Students’ survey completed (May – 31 August) Teachers' survey completed (May – 31 August) Student focus group completed (May – 31 August) Face-to-face interviews completed (May – 31 August)

-

Each country’s results are ready (20 September) Regional results are ready (30 September) Overall results are ready to be published (5 October)

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in East Asia

Students’ Survey and Focus Group


STUDENTS’ COMPARATIVE SURVEY

Survey administration At least 10% of the same set of students who took the baseline survey on ‘How International Are You?’ in 2009 will complete the online survey on ‘How International Are You?’ again. This will give a comparison of how much they have learned and understand about their own communities and cultures, and those of the UK and other participating Connecting Classrooms countries in East Asia. The comparative survey will be completed online between May and August 2010 (depending on your country) and the results will be published one month from the completion of the survey. Please note that the survey is not a test. Please encourage your students to complete the survey by themselves. Students should not seek advise or consult outside resources. The results of the baseline and comparative surveys will be analysed and finding from these will be published one month from the completion of the comparative survey.

How International Are You? Help us to help you to become Global Citizens by telling us how much you know about your own local community and the world around you by answering the questions in our survey. The survey is completely confidential. By completing the survey you will stand a chance of winning one of our special Connecting Classrooms prizes awarded to 8 lucky winners and 8 runners-up drawn from our prize draw on 15 September 2010. Details of the prizes can be found on the Connecting Classrooms Online Community at http://cc.britishcouncil.org/studentdialogues. The closing date for completing the survey is 31 August 2010. So make sure you do not miss the deadline!

INTRODUCTION: ABOUT YOU

Qa. Which country do you live in? UK

Qb. Gender Male Female Qc. How old are you? 11 12 13 14

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Indonesia

Japan

Korea

Malaysia

Thailand

Taiwan

Vietnam


15 16 17 or above

SECTION A: DIFFERENT LANGUAGES THAT PEOPLE LEARN

Q1a.

Which of the languages on this list is your mother tongue? Please select one language only. Arabic Chinese English French German Hindi Indonesian Japanese Korean Malaysian Russian Spanish Thai Vietnamese Other

Q1b.

Which of the languages on this list, if any, do you think is the most useful foreign language for young people like yourself to learn? Please select one language only. Arabic Chinese English French German Hindi Indonesian Japanese Korean Malaysian

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Russian Spanish Thai Vietnamese Q2.

How old were you when you first started learning a foreign language? Under 4

Q3.

4-5

6-8

8-10

11-12

12-13

13-14

15-16

16+

How important do you think it is to speak a foreign language for your future working life? Please select one answer Essential

Fairly important

Very important

Not very important

Not at all important

Don’t know

SECTION B: CONTACT WITH DIFFERENT COUNTRIES

Q4.

How many countries, apart from the one you live in now, have you visited? Please select one answer only

1

Q5.

3

4

5

6-10

10+

None

Thinking of the country you visited most recently, what was your main reason for visiting it? You may select as many answers as is appropriate.

Holiday

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2

Study

School trip

School exchange

We (my family and I) used to live there

Visiting other family/friends living there

Other


Q6.

How often, if at all, do you use the internet to communicate with young people in different countries? This could be via email, websites, chat rooms etc. Please select one answer only Every day

Most days

Several times a week

At least once a week

At least once a month

Less than once a month

Never

SECTION C: THE REST OF THE WORLD AND INTERNATIONAL ISSUES

Q7.

Which two or three of the following, if any, do you think are the biggest issues facing the world today? Please select up to three issues.

Terrorism Environment/climate change War/national and international conflict/ violence Famine/ starvation/ malnutrition/ hunger Health AIDS/HIV Poverty Drug abuse Too many people Religion/ religious fundamentalism Crime None of these Don’t know Q8

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Which, if any, global figures do you most admire? By global figures, we mean well-known people from around the world.


Q9

How interested are you, if at all, in understanding more about the world outside your own country? Very interested

Q10

Fairly interested

Not very interested

Not at all interested

Don’t know

How far do you agree or disagree with each of the following sentences? Please select one answer only for each sentence. Strongly agree

A

“I feel that I am more a citizen of the world than a citizen of my own country”

B

“I go out of my way to understand current events in the world”

C

“I think it is important to respect people from different cultures and backgrounds ”

D

“I think it is important that the leaders of my country do more to build friendly relations with other countries”

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Tend to agree

Neither agree nor disagree

Tend to disagree

Strongly disagree

Don’t know


SECTION D: THIS SECTION IS ABOUT LINKS BETWEEN SCHOOLS IN DIFFERENT COUNTRIES

Q11

How far do you agree or disagree with the following sentence? “It is a good idea for school countries” Strongly agree

Q12

s in my country to have links or partnerships with schools in other

Tend to agree

Neither agree nor disagree

Tend to disagree

Strongly disagree

Don’t know

Does your school have a link or partnership with one or more schools in any other countries? Yes

No

Don’t know

SECTION E: THIS SECTION IS ABOUT THE UNITED KINGDOM Q13

Can you tell us where each area is? Look at the map and then write the letter next to the name of the city, town or area.

Leicestershire

Southwark

Birmingham

West Lothian

Haringey

South Gloucestershire

Nottingham

Sefton

Kent

Bromley

Lewisham

Durham

Cardiff

Cumbria

Belfast

Norfolk

Cornwall

Northants

Portsmouth

Leeds

Devon

Derby

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SECTION F: THIS SECTION IS ABOUT EAST ASIA

Q14

Can you tell us where each country is? Look at the map and then write the letter next to the country name.

South Korea

Philippines

Q15

How much do you know about the following countries according to the topic given?

Australia

Japan

Taiwan

Indonesia

Thailand

Japan

Vietnam

Malaysia

New Zealand

China

The geography – towns, cities, climate, population, etc UK A lot Quite a lot A little Very Little Nothing

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Korea

Taiwan

Indonesia

Thailand

Japan

Vietnam

Malaysia


Q16

How much do you know about the following countries according to the topic given? Schools – timetable, subjects studied, uniform, meals, etc UK

Korea

Taiwan

Indonesia

Thailand

Japan

Vietnam

Malaysia

A lot Quite a lot A little Very Little Nothing Q17

How much do you know about the following countries according to the topic given? Money – Currency, cost of living, etc UK

Korea

Taiwan

Indonesia

Thailand

Japan

Vietnam

Malaysia

A lot Quite a lot A little Very Little Nothing Q18

How much do you know about the following countries according to the topic given? Culture – food, dance, clothes & costume, traditions, festivals, music, flags, etc UK

A lot Quite a lot A little Very Little Nothing

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Korea

Taiwan

Indonesia

Thailand

Japan

Vietnam

Malaysia


Q19

How much do you know about the following countries according to the topic given? Issues and problems – natural disasters, e.g. earthquakes or flooding, poverty, climate change or global warming, food shortages, social problems, ethnic problems, etc UK

Korea

Taiwan

Indonesia

Thailand

Japan

Vietnam

Malaysia

A lot Quite a lot A little Very Little Nothing Q20

In your own words, tell us what you think a Global Citizen is A Global Citizen is …..

Q21

Finally, how much would you agree with the following statement “I am a Global citizen” Agree Strongly

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Agree

Disagree

Disagree strongly

Don’t know


STUDENT FOCUS GROUP Global Citizenship: What’s it all about? This is a case study to help us to find out: -

what young people know and feel about local and international issues

-

the role young people feel they play in local and international society

-

what being a Global Citizen means and what they see as representing a ‘Global Dimension’

Connecting Classrooms is about helping schools, teachers and students develop a truly Global Dimension to teaching and learning, creating Global Citizens who feel empowered to contribute to change and are aware of and understand: -

issues of inequalities within and between societies

-

diversity of cultures and societies

-

interdependences between communities, cultures and nations

-

different political systems

-

different views of local & global economic and social development

-

causes and effects of conflict, locally & globally and relationships between conflict and peace

Through carrying out case studies amongst a cross-section of young people from different cultures and societies in the UK and the 7 participating East Asian countries now, and then helping our young people to engage in curriculum-based international school projects, we will continue to follow their progress. We hope that through guided classroom teaching & learning and peer-to-peer learning through dialogue, debate, multimedia presentation and other forms of collaborative learning, we will: -

broaden learners’ international horizons

-

change our young people’s perceptions

-

increase their knowledge of local and international issues

-

give young people a platform where they can challenge viewpoints which perpetuate inequality

-

take responsibility for the effects of our lifestyles on people and the environment

Thereby develop our young people into truly Global Citizens.

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Interview Format The recommended format for conducting the focus group interviews is as follows: 1. The interview should be with the same set of students who took part in the first student focus group interview in 2009 who are of mixed age, gender, race and ability wherever possible. 2. The interview will be filmed, so please gain parental consent before carrying out the interview. 3. Interview should take place as a group in an informal style where young people feel relaxed and able to speak openly and honestly. 4. Interview should offer equal opportunity for all students to offer their views. 5. Interview should be conducted solely in the students’ rst language. 6. Students should not be briefed on any of the interview questions before the interview and it should be made clear that they will not be judged or criticised for anything they say. 7. Teachers should not prompt students to help them answer, rather reformulate the question or ask additional probing questions. 8. Interview should be recorded either in audio format or video format for translation into English later. 9. A member of British Council staff should observe the interview to ensure instructions are followed.

Interview Questions: N.B. For most of the questions below, please also ask about the UK and the 3rd East Asian Country. Diversity 1. What is a typical (nationality) person like? 2. What do you think are the most important things about being (nationality)? 3. How do you think a person from another country would describe a typical (nationality)? 4. Do you think all people from (country) are the same? (Prompt for ethnicity ,dress, religion, culture, etc) 5. Do you think some people in (country) have problems? Who, what, why? Sustainable Development 6. What kind of a place do you live in? (Rural, town, village, urban, etc) 7. Is it a good place to live in? Why? Why not? 8. Is it the same now as it was 10 years ago? a. What’s chang ed? b. What role do we play in this change? c.

How do you think we can help to keep the good things from disappearing?

d. How would you like to see your place in 10 year’s time? Global Citizenship 9. What do you think are the most important things you need to do or have to be a Global Citizen? 10. Are you a Global Citizen? Tell us how …. 11. How do you think Connecting Classrooms can help you to become more of a ‘Global Citizen’? 12. What would you like to suggest Connecting Classrooms to do to help you more?

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in East Asia

Teachers’ Survey


TEACHERS’ COMPARATIVE SURVEY

A Global Dimension in the Classroom This comparative survey helps us to find out: -

How much you as a teacher feel your learners know and feel about local and international issues

-

To what extent you as a teacher are integrating a ‘Globa learning

-

To what extent you as a teacher feel your learners are able to communicate in real-life situations in English

-

How much you as a teacher are using ICT in your teaching & learning

-

What you as a teacher would like British Council Connecting Classrooms do to help in your professional development

l Dimension’ into your classroom teaching and

Connecting Classrooms is about helping schools, teachers and students develop a truly Global Dimension to teaching and learning, creating Global Citizens who feel empowered to contribute to change and are aware of and understand: -

issues of inequalities within and between societies

-

diversity of cultures and societies

-

interdependences between communities, cultures and nations

-

different political systems

-

different views of local & global economic and social development

-

causes & effects of conflict, locally & globally and relationships between conflict and peace

We hope that through guided classroom teaching & learning and peer-to-peer learning through dialogue, debate, multimedia presentation and other forms of collaborative learning, we will: -

broaden learners’ international horizons

-

change our young people’s perceptions

-

increase their knowledge of local and international issues

-

give young people a platform where they can challenge viewpoints which perpetuate inequality

-

take responsibility for the effects of our lifestyles on people and the environment.

Thereby develop our young people into truly Global Citizens.

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Survey Administration The survey will be in electronic format available on the British Council Connecting Classrooms Online Community at http://cc.britishcouncil.org At least 10% of the same set of teachers who took the baseline survey in 2009 should complete this survey. Teachers who did not complete the baseline survey are also invited to complete this comparative survey this year. The survey uses the same question as the baseline survey. This will give a comparison of the increase in the Global Dimension the teachers feel there is in their teaching and learning in their classroom and their school. The survey will be completed online between May and August 2010 (depending on your country) and the results will be published one month from the completion of the survey. The results of the baseline and comparative surveys will be analysed and finding from these will be published one month from the completion of the comparative survey. This will indicate how much Connecting Classrooms is helping to develop the Global Dimension in your school and your teachers.

Survey Questions: Diversity On a scale of 1-10 where 1 = nothing and 10 = a very deep knowledge, how much do you think your students presently know about the following criteria? 1. What a typical (nationality) person is like. 1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

1 0

6

7

8

9

1 0

2. The most important things about being (nationality) 1

2

3

4

5

3. The differences between people from (country) and (countries) (ethnicity ,dress, religion, culture, etc) 1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

1 0

6

7

8

9

1 0

4. The problems that people from (countries) face. 1

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2

3

4

5


Sustainable Development 5. The changes in the environment in which they live a. What’s changed? b. What role do they play in this change c.

How can they help to keep the good things from disappearing

d. How their environment might change in 10 years’ time 1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

1 0

Global Citizenship 6. What are the most important things they need to do or have to be a Global Citizen? 1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

1 0

5

6

7

8

9

1 0

7. Whether they are a Global Citizen 1

2

3

4

8. How British Council Connecting Classrooms can help them to become more of a Global Citizen? 1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

1 0

A Global Dimension in the Classroom To what extent are you as a teacher integrating a ‘Glo bal Dimension’ into your classroom teaching and learning? 1. When planning a lesson or series of lessons in my subject, I include reference to or focus on issues of diversity of cultures and societies Always

Frequently

Of ten

Sometimes

Rarely

Never

2. When planning a lesson or series of lessons in my subject, I include reference to or focus on issues of interdependences between communities, cultures and nations Always

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Frequently

Of ten

Sometimes

Rarely

Never


3. When planning a lesson or series of lessons in my subject, I include reference to or focus on local and global economic and social development Always

Frequently

Of ten

Sometimes

Rare ly

Never

Communication in English To what level do you as a teacher feel the learners you have selected to be part of the British Council Connecting Classrooms project are able to communicate their learning in real-life situations in English using the following skills? Extremely well

very well

well

quite well

not very well

not at all

Using ICT in Teaching & Learning How much are you as a teacher using ICT in your teaching & learning? 1. I feel confident in using ICT as a tool for teaching and learning Agree strongly

Agree

Slightly Agree

Disagree

Disagree Strongly

2. I use ICT to teach my subject with my class in my classroom Always

Frequently

Of ten

Sometimes

Rarely

Never

Rarely

Never

3. I use ICT to teach my subject with my class in the computer room Always

Frequently

Of ten

Sometimes

4. The ICT teacher uses ICT to teach my subject with my class in the computer room Always

Frequently

Of ten

Sometimes

Rarely

Never

Teachers’ Professional Development What would you as a teacher like British Council Connecting Classrooms do to help in your professional development? Please indicate on a scale of 1-10 where 1 = not at all interested and 10 = Extremely interested in attending either face-to-face or distance learning training on the following areas related to the British Council Connecting Classrooms project

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1. Classroom management 1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

1 0

2. Team Teaching & Lesson Planning 1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

1 0

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

1 0

6

7

8

9

1 0

3. Teaching with ICT 1

2

4. Adding a Global Dimension in teaching and learning 1

2

3

4

5

5. Child-centred learning & project-based integrated classroom activities 1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

1 0

6

7

8

9

1 0

6. Adapting text-book teaching to different learner styles 1

2

3

4

7. Any other suggestions or requests?

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5


in East Asia

Schools


IMPACT STUDY: STUDENT FACE-TO-FACE INTERVIEW

NOTES - This tool is designed to be administered by a researcher / British Council staff member. - It is designed to address the following outcomes, indicators and targets from M&E framework, but also addresses areas beyond these:

Outcome

Critical success indicator

Target

Learners have improved perceptions of other societies

Learners having a more positive approach toward other societies

By the end of three years, of those surveyed, 90% of learners directly involved in Connecting Classrooms, agree or agree strongly that their perceptions of other societies have improved

Learners demonstrate increased insight and understanding of their own culture, heritage, history and environment

Learners using their knowledge and understanding of culture, heritage, history and environment across different learning contexts

After two years’ participation in Connecting Classrooms learners demonstrate increased involvement in activities and events with a focus on culture, heritage, history or the environment

Learners demonstrate a critical understanding and knowledge of society, the world and their place in it

Learners using a critical understanding and knowledge of societies and the inter-relationship between them, across different areas of learning

After two years’ participation in Connecting Classrooms, learners demonstrate greater application of critical thinking and analysis on global issues

Learners demonstrate a motivated and active involvement in their own learning and development

Increasing learner interest and involvement in school activities and self development

After two years’ participation in Connecting Classrooms, learners are more proactive in questioning and expressive of their views in group activities

Learners demonstrate leadership and enterprise skills, particularly those for work in a global economy

Learners gaining Global Citizenship Award

After two years, 350 learners in Connecting Classrooms schools will have gained the Global Citizenship Award (where available)

Demonstrate leadership and enterprise skills, particularly those for work in a global economy

Learners gaining Global Citizenship Award

After two years, 350 learners in Connecting Classrooms schools will have gained the Global Citizenship Award (where available)

Institutions identify equality of opportunity for every young person to engage in learning through an international context

Schools fairly select pupils for participation in Connecting Classrooms

After the first year, all Connecting Classrooms schools can demonstrate a fair and transparent process for selecting pupils to engage in international work

Institutions work more closely with communities

Participation rates of schools in community action projects

Each year, Connecting Classrooms schools work with communities on one

LEARNERS

INSTITUTIONS

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and become more involved in community and social issues

project focused on challenging misconceptions, community cohesion or challenging attitudes and environments that may give rise to extremism

COMMUNITIES Communities recognise the value of increased engagement with other societies, both for schools and learners, and for society at large

Increasingly positive perceptions of Connecting Classrooms activities and intercultural dialogue across communities

20% of learners surveyed report parental support for their involvement in Connecting Classrooms activities

Give recognition to elements of the following agenda for schools and young people:

Involvement of communities in joint projects with schools

Each year, communities linked to Connecting Classrooms schools work with schools on one project focused on challenging misconceptions, community cohesion or challenging attitudes and environments that may give rise to extremism or negative impact on important social issues or environment

. .

community cohesion, challenging misconceptions,

challenging attitudes and environments that may give rise to extremism

Using This Tool

. . . .

Sampling

. . . .

This tool is to be used on a sample basis; with four students being interviewed per country. The aim should be to sample across different school types, so that, for example, there is a spread of public, private, religious schools, etc, which as far as possible, matches the balance of these school types across the population of schools participating in Connecting Classrooms in East Asia. The sample should seek to cover ages/grades across the range covered by the regional programme as a whole. For equal opportunities and diversity, the interview participants should represent the diversity of the country and people engaged. An equal or similar number of boys and girls should be engaged.

Interview administration The interview should be administered by an external researcher or member of British Council staff. Administration, in this case, involves leading and steering the interview and offering information to participants. The interview should be undertaken with 4 students individually. It should be filmed or recorded, for transcription purposes, with appropriate consent being gained. The administrator will play a key role in ensuring that the interview encourages open response, while also addressing the target outcomes. It is important that notes about the strength/degree of unanimity among the students for each question are kept, particularly as evidence from this tool is needed to support the achievement of numerical targets, in some cases.

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. . . .

Analysis and reporting The main focus of the analysis is to gather evidence relating to the target outcomes identified above. From the data, team should be able to report on students’ own account of their perceptions, attitudes and knowledge. The data should help to show the degree to which East Asia are meeting target percentages (as in the M&E framework), but will also help in assessing/ reconsidering targets. It is recommended that the administrator of the interview is required to allocate a category of agreement/response for each question, where relevant, so that the transcript of each interview includes data that is more immediately usable, alongside the detailed responses of participants. The processing of transcripts and quantitative and qualitative analysis for this tool could be allocated to an external contractor/researcher as regional team may lack the capacity to undertake this themselves.

STUDENT INTERVIEW QUESTIONS Name: Grade(s)/Year group(s): School: Country:

1. How many classes/numbers of students are involved in Connecting Classrooms in your school? (please estimate if you are not sure) How are students chosen? How were you chosen to take part? Is the process done in a fair way? Please explain, giving examples. 2. What activities, if any, have you enjoyed within Connecting Classrooms? Why? 3. What activities, if any, have you not enjoyed? Why? 4. What do you think are the most important things you need to do, or have, to be a global citizen? 5. How far has Connecting Classrooms helped you to become more of a global citizen? Please explain, giving examples. 6. Have you heard of the Global Citizen Award? Is your school involved / would you like to be involved in this award?

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7. How well have you got to know students from your partner country(ies)? How do you communicate? Please explain, giving examples. 8. How far has Connecting Classrooms changed your view of people from [country]? Why? Please explain, giving examples. 9. How far has your view of [country] become more positive since being involved in Connecting Classrooms? Please explain, giving examples. 10. How far has Connecting Classrooms helped you to learn more about, and take an interest in, your country? For example: -

Your country’s history

-

Culture (what people do, wear, eat, and aspects of music and art)

-

The environment within your country

Please explain, giving examples. 11. How far has Connecting Classrooms helped you to understand and analyse events across the world? (for example, conflict, poverty, global warming) Please explain, giving examples. 12. Have you taken part in discussions as part of your Connecting Classrooms work? Have you become more confident about expressing your ideas and opinions during discussions? Please explain, giving examples. 13. How much do your parents/carers know about Connecting Classrooms? How interested are they in what you are doing through the project? Please explain, giving examples. 14. How far has Connecting Classrooms involved you in work with the local community? If you have been involved in such work, does it address issues, for example: -

Misconceptions

-

Community cohesion

-

Environment

What effect, if any, has this had on you? What effect, if any, do you think this has had on the community? Please explain, giving examples.

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15. Connecting Classrooms is an intercultural dialogue programme. Intercultural dialogue aims to build trust and understanding between different countries and cultures. Is intercultural dialogue important for: -

You?

-

Your school?

-

Your teacher?

-

Your parents?

-

Your community?

Please give details. 16. Has Connecting Classrooms increased trust and understanding: -

In your own community of teachers, students, parents?

-

With other communities in your country?

-

With communities in other countries?

Please give details. 17. Do you have any other comments about Connecting Classrooms?

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IMPACT STUDY: TEACHER FACE-TO-FACE INTERVIEW

NOTES -

This tool is designed to be administered by a researcher / British Council staff member.

-

It is designed to address the following outcomes, indicators and targets from the M&E framework, but also addresses areas beyond these:

Outcome

Critical success indicator

Target

Participation of teachers and school leaders in range of Connecting Classrooms training activities

After 2 years, 90% of Connecting Classrooms schools readily release teachers and school leaders for Connecting Classrooms training activities

Practitioners have improved perceptions of other societies

Teachers having a more positive approach toward other societies

By the end of two years, of those surveyed, 80% of teachers directly involved in Connecting Classrooms, agree or agree strongly that their perceptions of other societies have improved

Practitioners demonstrate the ability to work comfortably in, and with people from, other countries

Teachers and headteachers are increasingly positive about their visits to, and interactions with, colleagues in partner countries

After two years, 80% of teachers and headteachers surveyed, agree or agree strongly that intercultural dialogue, during visits and in the process of partnership, has improved

Learners demonstrate increased insight and understanding of their own culture, heritage, history and environment

Learners using their knowledge and understanding of culture, heritage, history and environment across different learning contexts

After two years’ participation in Connecting Classrooms learners demonstrate increased involvement in activities and events with a focus on culture, heritage, history or the environment

As above

Outcomes for learners in the areas of culture, heritage, history and the environment are enhanced

After two years’ participation in Connecting Classrooms, learners perform better than previously predicted, in the areas of culture, heritage, history and environment

Learners demonstrate a critical understanding and knowledge of society, the world and their place in it

Learners using a critical understanding and knowledge of societies and the inter-relationship between them, across different areas of learning

After two years’ participation in Connecting Classrooms, learners demonstrate greater application of critical thinking and analysis on global issues

Learners demonstrate a motivated and active involvement in their own

Increasing learner interest and involvement in school

After two years’ participation in Connecting Classrooms, learners

INSTITUTIONS Institutions recognise the importance of teachers and school leaders developing their skills and competencies in an international environment PRACTITIONERS

LEARNERS

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learning and development

activities and self development

are more proactive in questioning and expressive of their views in group activities

Using This Tool

. . . . .

Sampling

. . . .

This tool is to be used on a sample basis; with three teachers per country. The aim should be to sample across different school types, so that, for example, there is a spread of public, private, religious schools, etc, which as far as possible, matches the balance of these school types across the population of schools participating in Connecting Classrooms in East Asia. The length of service/degree of teaching experience could also be taken into account when selecting a sample. For equal opportunities and diversity, the interview participants should represent the diversity of the country and people engaged. An equal or similar number of men and women should be engaged.

Interview administration

. .

The interview should be administered by an external researcher or member of British Council staff. Administration, in this case, involves asking the questions in the interview schedule, using the given prompts, and offering information to participants. The interview should be filmed or recorded, for transcription purposes, with appropriate consent being gained. The administrator will play a key role in ensuring that the interview encourages open response, while also addressing the target outcomes. While ‘ratings’ are included for many question responses (to support measurement of progress toward numerical targets), these should form a minor part of the interview overall, with space being given to the participants’ comments.

Analysis and reporting

.

The main focus of the analysis is to gather evidence relating to the target outcomes identified above. From the data, team should be able to report on teachers’ own perceptions, attitudes and knowledge, and their view of the perceptions and knowledge of students. They should also have evidence relating to school policy. The data should help to show the degree to which East Asia are meeting target percentages (as in the M&E framework), but will also help in assessing/ reconsidering targets. The processing of transcripts and quantitative and qualitative analysis for this tool could be allocated to an external contractor/researcher as regional team may lack the capacity to undertake this themselves.

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TEACHER INTERVIEW QUESTIONS Name: School: Country: Age group(s) taught (as part of Connecting Classrooms): Subjects currently taught: Partner country/ies: Teacher’s length of involvement with Connecting Classrooms:

Information about Connecting Classrooms in your school 1. Describe your involvement in Connecting Classrooms. Prompts: -

planning and teaching Connecting Classrooms activities

-

planning collaboratively with teachers in partner country(ies)

-

going on exchange visits

-

planning / taking part in Connecting Classrooms activities with the local community

-

taking part in training/ professional development

-

delivering training/ professional development

2. Within which lessons or subjects are Connecting Classrooms activities taking place? Prompts: -

geography

-

history

-

citizenship

-

first language

-

other language

-

arts (art, music, dance)

-

cross-curricular lessons

3. How would you summarise the aims of Connecting Classrooms in your school?

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Impact on your students 4. To what extent has your students’ knowledge and understanding of partner country(ies) increased as a result of Connecting Classroom? Very much Quite a lot A little Not at all Please give details. 5. To what extent have your students become more involved in activities focusing on culture, heritage and history, as a result of Connecting Classrooms? Very much Quite a lot A little Not at all Please give details. 6. To what extent have your students become more involved in activities focusing on the environment, as a result of Connecting Classrooms? Very much Quite a lot A little Not at all Please give details. 7. To what extent has Connecting Classrooms improved students’ performance in the areas of culture, heritage, history and environment? Give any examples of assessments and outcomes in different subjects. Very much Quite a lot A little Not at all Please give details. 8. To what extent has Connecting Classrooms improved students’ perceptions of partner country(ies)? Very much Quite a lot A little Not at all Please give details.

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9. To what extent has Connecting Classrooms increased students’ critical thinking about global issues? Very much Quite a lot A little Not at all Please give details. 10. To what extent has Connecting Classrooms increased students’ confidence in asking questions and expressing their views? Very much Quite a lot A little Not at all Please give details. 11. What would help to increase the impact Connecting Classrooms is having on students?

Impact on you 12. To what extent have your perceptions of your partner country(ies) improved during the time you have been involved with Connecting Classrooms? Very much Quite a lot A little Not at all Please give details. 13. To what extent have the processes of intercultural dialogue and communication with your partner country(ies) improved during the time you have been involved with Connecting Classrooms? Very much Quite a lot A little Not at all Please give details. 14. What impact is Connecting Classrooms having on your teaching skills?

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15. Please describe any training and professional development you have undertaken as part of Connecting Classrooms. Prompts: -

leadership skills

-

international / global awareness

-

language skills

-

ICT

-

Self-evaluation

-

Student voice / involvement

16. How easy has it been for you to attend training / professional development activities? Very easy Quite easy Quite difficult Very difficult Please give details. 17. Has your school allowed you to be released from teaching or given other support to help you attend training events? 18. What aspects of Connecting Classrooms training /professional development have been useful to you? Why? 19. To what extent has Connecting Classrooms increased your interest in further training and qualifications? Please give examples. Very much Quite a lot A little Not at all Please give details. 20. What do you know about the International Teacher Award? To what extent are you/ would you like to be involved in the International Teacher Award? 21. What do you know about the Global Citizen Award? To what extent are your students involved in the Global Citizen Award? / How appropriate do you think the Global Citizen Award would be for your students? 22. What do you know about the International School Award? To what extent is your school/ would you like your school to be involved in the International School Award?

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23. Connecting Classrooms is an intercultural dialogue programme. Intercultural dialogue aims to build trust and understanding between different countries and cultures. Is intercultural dialogue important for: -

You?

-

Your school?

-

Your students?

-

Your community?

Please give details. 24. Has Connecting Classrooms increased trust and understanding: -

In your own community of teachers, students, parents?

-

With other communities in your country?

-

With communities in other countries?

Please give details. 25. Do you have any further comments or suggestions about how to improve the Connecting Classrooms programme?

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IMPACT STUDY: HEAD TEACHER FACE-TO-FACE INTERVIEW

NOTES -

This tool is designed to be administered by a researcher / British Council staff member.

-

It is designed to address the following outcomes, indicators and targets from the M&E framework, but also addresses areas beyond these:

Outcome

Critical success indicator

Target

Institutions recognise the importance of teachers and school leaders developing their skills and competencies in an international environment

Participation of teachers and school leaders in range of Connecting Classrooms training activities

After 2 years, 90% of Connecting Classrooms schools readily release teachers and school leaders for Connecting Classrooms training activities

Institutions identify equality of opportunity for every young person to engage in learning through an international context

Schools fairly select pupils for participation in Connecting Classrooms

After the first year, all Connecting Classrooms schools can demonstrate a fair and transparent process for selecting pupils to engage in international work

Enable learners to better understand and negotiate their place in the world

Schools allocating curriculum time to global citizenship, active citizenship and intercultural dialogue.

By the end of year 2, timetabling and planning for Connecting Classrooms classes over a range of subjects shows work in the areas of global citizenship, active citizenship and intercultural dialogue

Give increased priority to internationalising the curriculum and create an institutional ethos that supports a global dimension

Profile of the global dimension in the school curriculum and related policies

After year 2, 20% of Connecting Classrooms schools have introduced, adopted or revised their policy or guidelines for the global dimension of the curriculum

Teachers and head teachers are increasingly positive about their visits to, and interactions with, colleagues in partner countries

After two years, 80% of teachers and head teachers surveyed, agree or agree strongly that intercultural dialogue, during visits and in the process of partnership, has improved

Involvement of communities in joint projects with schools

Each year, communities linked to Connecting Classrooms schools work with schools on one project focused on challenging misconceptions, community cohesion or challenging attitudes and environments that may give rise to extremism or negative impact on important social issues or environment

INSTITUTIONS

PRACTITIONERS Practitioners demonstrate the ability to work comfortably in, and with people from, other countries

COMMUNITIES Give recognition to elements of the following agenda for schools and young people – community cohesion, challenging misconceptions, challenging attitudes and environments that may give rise to extremism

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Using This Tool

. . . .

Sampling

. . . .

This tool is to be used on a sample basis; with two head teachers per country. The aim should be to sample across different school types, so that, for example, there is a spread of public, private, religious schools, etc, which as far as possible, matches the balance of these school types across the population of schools participating in Connecting Classrooms in East Asia. The length/degree of participation or involvement could also be taken into account when selecting a sample. For equal opportunities and diversity, the interview participants should represent the diversity of the country and people engaged. An equal or similar number of men and women should be engaged.

Interview administration

. .

The interview should be administered by an external researcher or member of British Council staff. Administration, in this case, involves asking the questions in the interview schedule, using the given prompts, and offering information to participants. The interview should be filmed or recorded, for transcription purposes, with appropriate consent being gained. The administrator will play a key role in ensuring that the interview encourages open response, while also addressing the target outcomes. While ‘ratings’ are included for many question responses (to support measurement of progress toward numerical targets), these should form a minor part of the interview overall, with space being given to the participants’ comments.

Analysis and reporting

.

The main focus of the analysis is to gather evidence relating to the target outcomes identified above. From the data, team should be able to report on head teachers’ own perceptions, attitudes and knowledge. They should also have evidence relating to school policy. The data should help to show the degree to which East Asia are meeting target percentages (as in the M&E framework), but will also help in assessing/ reconsidering targets. The processing of transcripts and quantitative and qualitative analysis for this tool could be allocated to an external contractor/researcher as regional team may lack the capacity to undertake this themselves.

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HEAD TEACHER INTERVIEW QUESTIONS

Name: School: Country: Partner country/ies: School’s length of involvement with Connec ting Classrooms:

1. Describe your involvement in Connecting Classrooms. Prompts: -

going on exchange visits

-

planning / taking part in Connecting Classrooms activities with the local community

-

taking part in training/ professional development

-

delivering training/ professional development

2. Within which lessons or subjects are Connecting Classrooms activities taking place? Prompts: -

geography

-

history

-

citizenship

-

first language

-

other language

-

arts (art, music, dance)

-

cross-curricular lessons

3. How many classes/numbers of students are involved in Connecting Classrooms in your school? (please estimate if you are not sure) How are students chosen? How were you chosen to take part? Is the process done in a fair way? Please explain, giving examples. 4. How would you summarise the aims of Connecting Classrooms in your school? 5. What impact is Connecting Classrooms having on your school? Please explain what kinds of evidence have you seen of the impact.

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6. To what extent is your school supporting Connecting Classrooms by releasing teachers to be released from teaching or given other support to help you attend training events? Very much Quite a lot A little Not at all Please give details. 7. To what extent your school’s policy/guideline has revised or adopt curriculum?

ed the global dimension into the

Very much Quite a lot A little Not at all Please give details. 8. To what extent your school has allocated curriculum time over a range of subjects to global citizenship, active citizen and intercultural dialogue? Very much Quite a lot A little Not at all Please give details. 9. Are you aware of the International Leader Award? What commitment to support and promote the International Leader Award is there in the national government? 10. Are you aware of the International School Award? To what extent is your school/ would you like your school to be involved in the International School Award? 11. Are you aware of the International Teacher Award? To what extent are you/ would you like to be involved in the International Teacher Award? 12. Are you aware of the Global Citizen Award? To what extent are your students involved in the Global Citizen Award? / How appropriate do you think the Global Citizen Award would be for your students?

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13. How far has Connecting Classrooms involved your school in work with the local community? If your school has been involved in such work, does it address issues, for example: -

Misconceptions

-

Community cohesion

-

Environment

What effect, if any, has this had on your school? What effect, if any, do you think this has had on the community? Please explain, giving examples. 14. To what extent have the processes of intercultural dialogue and communication with your partner country(ies) improved during the time your school has been involved with Connecting Classrooms? Very much Quite a lot A little Not at all Please give details. 15. Connecting Classrooms is an intercultural dialogue programme. Intercultural dialogue aims to build trust and understanding between different countries and cultures. Is intercultural dialogue important for: -

You?

-

Your school?

-

Your students?

-

Your community?

Please give details. 16. Has Connecting Classrooms increased trust and understanding: -

In your own community of teachers, students, parents?

-

With other communities in your country?

-

With communities in other countries?

Please give details. 17. Do you have any further comments or suggestions about how to improve the Connecting Classrooms programme?

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IMPACT STUDY: POLICY-MAKER FACE-TO-FACE INTERVIEW

NOTES -

This tool is designed to be administered by a researcher / British Council staff member.

-

It is designed to address the following outcomes, indicators and targets from the M&E framework, but also addresses areas beyond these:

Outcome

Critical success indicator

Target

Systems raise awareness amongst young people, adults and employers of the skills required for life in a global society and work in a global economy

Host governments having strategies to publicise collaborative projects, to a range of groups

All Education Ministries will have strategies in place to publicise successful collaborative projects in Connecting Classrooms, focusing on skills for life in a global society and work in a global economy

Systems encourage young people, practitioners and institutions to challenge misconceptions

Highlighting shows reworded indicators/targets

During the period of the programme, some relevant curriculum documents, policies and training programmes for schools include specific reference to challenging misconceptions about other countries/societies

SYSTEMS

Policy, curriculum content and training programmes include a focus on challenging misconceptions about other countries/societies

Systems provide opportunities to benchmark performance with other high performing education systems and to draw on good practice in other countries

Host governments making available information on high performing systems and examples of good practice

In each country, each Education Ministry will have publicised case studies from high-performing countries in Connecting Classrooms, focusing on global citizenship and intercultural dialogue.

Systems support the development of a philosophy, policy practice and process which will lead to sustainable and improved perceptions of, and relations with, other societies

Host governments implementing core aspects of intercultural dialogue in training programmes

30% of Ministries of Education (or other bodies) will have incorporated elements of training provided under Connecting Classrooms into aspects of their training programmes for practitioners.

Systems prioritise the knowledge, skills and understanding required to equip young people for life in a global society and work in a global economy

Host governments signing up as partners for awards programmes and contributing to policy dialogues

By the end of FY 2010, all participating countries’ Education ministries, District Education Offices actively support Connecting Classrooms by selecting schools to participate, releasing teachers for training and participating in policy dialogue events.

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Using This Tool

. . .

Sampling

. . . .

This tool is to be used on a sample basis; with one government official per country. The length/degree of involvement could also be taken into account when selecting a sample. For equal opportunities and diversity, the interview participants should represent the diversity of the country and people engaged. An equal or similar number of men and women should be engaged.

Interview administration

. .

The interview should be administered by an external researcher or member of British Council staff. Administration, in this case, involves asking the questions in the interview schedule, using the given prompts, and offering information to participants. The interview should be filmed or recorded, for transcription purposes, with appropriate consent being gained. The administrator will play a key role in ensuring that the interview encourages open response, while also addressing the target outcomes. While ‘ratings’ are included for many question responses (to support measurement of progress toward numerical targets), these should form a minor part of the interview overall, with space being given to the participants’ comments.

Analysis and reporting

.

The main focus of the analysis is to gather evidence relating to the target outcomes identified above. From the data, team should be able to report on government o cials’ own perceptions, attitudes and knowledge. They should also have evidence relating to education policy. The data should help to show the degree to which East Asia are meeting target percentages (as in the M&E framework), but will also help in assessing/ reconsidering targets. The processing of transcripts and quantitative and qualitative analysis for this tool could be allocated to an external contractor/researcher as regional team may lack the capacity to undertake this themselves.

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POLICY-MAKER INTERVIEW QUESTIONS Name: Position: Country: Partner country(ies) within Connecting Classrooms:

1. What do you see as the benefits of being involved in Connecting Classrooms for: [country]? [district]? teachers? students? 2. What do you see as the benefits of being involved in partnerships with: [partnership country 1]? [partnership country 2]? 3. What kinds of evidence have you seen of the impact Connecting Classrooms is having? 4. What information about Connecting Classrooms has been shared within national government? 5. What information about Connecting Classrooms have you shared with different groups? Prompts: -

local authorities

-

school boards

-

schools

-

universities / teacher training institutions

-

parents / communities

6. Are you aware of the International School Award? What commitment to support and promote the International School Award is there in the national government? 7. Are you aware of the International Leader Award? What commitment to support and promote the International Leader Award is there in the national government? 8. Are you aware of the International Teacher Award? What commitment to support and promote the International Teacher Award is there in the national government? 9. Are you aware of the Global Citizen Award? What commitment to support and promote the Global Citizen Award is there in the national government?

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10. To what extent is the national government providing training for teachers in the following areas: -

intercultural dialogue and global citizenship

-

challenging misconceptions about other countries/societies

-

leadership

-

skills for life/work in a global economy?

11. To what extent is the national government promoting best practice through providing case studies for schools/teachers in the following areas: -

intercultural dialogue and global citizenship

-

challenging misconceptions about other countries/societies

-

leadership

-

skills for life/work in a global economy?

12. To what extent is the national government gathering and using information about high performing school systems in other countries? 13. To what extent is the national government supporting Connecting Classrooms by releasing teachers from teaching or given other support to help them attend training events? 14. To what extent is the national government supporting Connecting Classrooms by selecting schools to participate in the programme? 15. To what extent is the national government supporting Connecting Classrooms by participating in policy dialogue events? 16. Do you have any further comments regarding the Connecting Classrooms programme?

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CLUSTER REPORT

Report Administration Who completes this report? This report should be completed by the cluster co-ordinator in collaboration with your local cluster. The report should be submitted electronically to your local British Council office. At least 80% of all clusters should complete this report. How to complete this report The annual cluster report must be completed collaboratively by your cluster and in consultation with your head teachers. We suggest a cluster meeting to discuss your response to the questions. Please refer back to your Project Plan for the year you are reporting on and make reference to how you are building work in next year’s Project Plan, which will be attached in a further email. Please use the checklist below and ensure you have submitted all necessary accompanying documents with this form. The purpose of this report This report asks you to reflect on what you have achieved this year which helps you as a cluster to ensure you get the most out of the project and for the British Council to be able to demonstrate the impact of Connecting Classrooms to its stakeholders. We ask about your project activities and impact. Please try to share at least one story from each school in your cluster that shows the impact of your partnership. Please remember to indicate which school you are describing.

Report submission date: School names: Co-ordinator name: Partnership name: Date:

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Checklist: Completed report Updated school development and self evaluation form Photographs or other attachments 1. Self evaluation and Project Impact Please consider the descriptors below, and give a rating for each school’s policy and practice following their participation in Connecting Classrooms. (These judgements should be made after consultation with colleagues in each school.) For each of the headings below, give your school a rating to show if you are: A: Not doing this B: Beginning C: Doing well, with room for improvement D: Doing this very well NAME OF SCHOOL 1

RATING: A, B, C, D

1. Using global learning materials 2. Providing a global curriculum 3. Promoting a global ethos NAME OF SCHOOL 2

RATING: A, B, C, D

1. Using global learning materials 2. Providing a global curriculum 3. Promoting a global ethos NAME OF SCHOOL 3

RATING: A, B, C, D

1. Using global learning materials 2. Providing a global curriculum 3. Promoting a global ethos NAME OF SCHOOL 4 1. Using global learning materials 2. Providing a global curriculum 3. Promoting a global ethos

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RATING: A, B, C, D


NAME OF SCHOOL 5

RATING: A, B, C, D

1. Using global learning materials 2. Providing a global curriculum 3. Promoting a global ethos NAME OF SCHOOL 6

RATING: A, B, C, D

1. Using global learning materials 2. Providing a global curriculum 3. Promoting a global ethos NAME OF SCHOOL 7

RATING: A, B, C, D

1. Using global learning materials 2. Providing a global curriculum 3. Promoting a global ethos NAME OF SCHOOL 8

RATING: A, B, C, D

1. Using global learning materials 2. Providing a global curriculum 3. Promoting a global ethos NAME OF SCHOOL 9

RATING: A, B, C, D

1. Using global learning materials 2. Providing a global curriculum 3. Promoting a global ethos NAME OF SCHOOL 10 1. Using global learning materials 2. Providing a global curriculum 3. Promoting a global ethos

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RATING: A, B, C, D


2. Project Plan Activity Summary Please use this section of the report to outline the activity that was carried out in your school(s) and to establish whether it has worked and if so how you have been able to measure the success of each project. Break the project down into individual activities, so class trips, workshops, celebration days and so on should be listed as individual activities. Please use as much space as you need. As well as completing this report please feel free to send us any digital photographs that you have of project activity taking place. Project Title/Theme (this should reflect what was in your Project Plan) Activity (What happened, e.g. visit to partner schools, environment day, themed school assembly) Who did it involve? (numbers of students, teachers, wider community) If you involved the wider community (e.g. parents, community groups, local businesses) then how did you do this? How was this activity linked to the curriculum in each school? What was the objective of this activity and how did it feed into the overall project? Who did you tell about this activity and how did you tell them? (Including press, other schools, sponsors, community, MPs) How did you know that this activity worked (in relation to your objectives) and how did you measure success? e.g. questionnaires; student discussions; products, such as presentations; performances. 3. Overall, how many people did your project reach, directly (e.g. students involved in the project) and indirectly (e.g. parents that saw a campaign?) Number of students involved (i.e. students actively involved in the project or in partnership communication)

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Number of teachers actively involved

Community involved, e.g. parents, local youth groups – give estimated numbers


4. What challenges did you face in the beginning and how did you overcome them?

5. What has been the highlight(s) of your project over the past academic year?

6. Which local partners did you work with and what was their contribution to the project (e.g. financial or in kind)?

7. Was there any project or planned activity in this year’s project plan which was not completed? If so, please explain why.

8. How has this project helped you to address social cohesion issues in your community?

9. Was this project deemed successful by your school(s) and local community? [Please provide evidence, e.g. quotes from students, teachers and local community, reports, photographs or questionnaire results. Please send attachments if necessary].

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10. Do you see potential for involving other parts of the community, partners or organisations in Connecting Classrooms in the future? If so please provide details in next year’s project plan.

11. Have your schools, and any students, teachers and head teachers in your schools, registered for/achieved the following awards?

International School Award Global Citizen Award International Teacher Award International Leader Award

Registered (add number if known)

Achieved (add number if known)

Please comment:

12. To what extent have project activities been integrated into the curriculum of each school? 1= to a very small extent 5= totally accomplished 1

2

3

2= to a small extent 4

3=to a high extent

4= to a very high extent

5

Please comment: 13. To what extent has participation in Connecting Classrooms had an impact on students’ knowledge of other countries and cultures? 1= very little impact; 1

2

Please comment:

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3= some impact; 3

4

5

5= very high impact


14. To what extent has participation in Connecting Classrooms broadened understanding of other countries’ cultures among students? 1= very little impact; 1

2

3= some impact; 3

4

5= very high impact

5

Please comment:

15. To what extent has participation in Connecting Classrooms led to an increased knowledge of other countries and cultures among teachers? 1= very little impact; 1

2

3= some impact; 3

4

5= very high impact

5

Please comment:

16. To what extent has participation in Connecting Classrooms broadened understanding of other countries’ cultures among teachers? 1= very little impact; 1

2

Please comment:

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3= some impact; 3

4

5

5= very high impact


17. What impact has Connecting Classrooms had on schools? 1= very little impact; Changes to the curriculum

3= some impact; 1

2

5= very high impact 3

4

5

Changes to organisation (e.g. grouping of students, timetabling) Changes to policies (e.g. incorporating the global dimension, diversity in school documents) Increased support for professional development/ training Increased co-operation/ collaboration among staff Increased co-operation/ involvement with communities Other, please specify

DATA PROTECTION ACT: The British Council is registered under the Data Protection Act. Some of the information provided on this form will be recorded on computer. Any information held in relation to your project activities may be accessed and inspected by you on request, in accordance with the Data Protection Act.

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in East Asia

Case Studies


Case studies Seeing the global dimension in action These case studies show the practical approaches di erent schools have taken to planning and integrating the global dimension into their curriculum. W hether yours is a primary, secondary or special school, these stories will o er inspiration and some practical tips for developing the global dimension in your curriculum. E ach case study illustrates the school’s answers to the three key curriculum questions:

1 2 3

W hat are you trying to achieve? How will you organise learning? How well are you achieving your aims?

Many of the schools featured share common aims. All are keen for their learners to make sense of complex global issues, to explore the interconnections between the local and the global, to share experiences with people from diverse cultures and to enable learners to participate in school and beyond as active and responsible global citizens. Schools have organised global learning in a range of ways. Some develop joint curriculum partnerships with schools in other countries, others organise separately timetabled global activity weeks, some revise their schemes of work to include a global dimension across subjects or topics. Despite these diverse approaches, schools report remarkable similarities in their achievements.

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Many schools report increased pupil ability to challenge their own perceptions about controversial issues and to explore diverse viewpoints. O thers describe the work as having a positive impact on learners’ outlooks and con dence. In particular, learners who are given the chance to speak out about important issues at school, at local and national level, develop a belief that they have a positive and important role to play in the wider world. Schools involved in long-term partnerships report increased ability in learners to communicate with people from a range of cultures, to consider issues from other people’s perspectives and to question their own beliefs. O thers have found that the direct and personal nature of school partnerships helps pupils to begin to see the world as one place, not separate parts, and to develop con dence in themselves as global citizens. These achievements do not come without challenges – as teachers in these schools have discovered. Some teachers nd that pupils respond to discussions around global issues by giving answers that they think are ‘right’, for example ‘we should all buy fair trade goods’. Pupils may feel overwhelmed by the sheer scale of issues being discussed, which can lead to a feeling of helplessness. An immediate response by learners to global problems may be to fundraise to help others. While fundraising can play an important role in developing learners’ life skills, it can also promote a simpl ed analysis of the need to throw money at problems, and lead to ‘us and them’ attitudes. G ood global learning involves pupils thinking critically about issues from a variety of perspectives, discussing a range of solutions and building awareness of positive change, how it occurs and how individuals can contribute.


Personal to global W hat did the school want to achieve? Deedmore is a special school for children with learning di culties including challenging behaviour, autism and Down’s syndrome. ‘Working with children with learning di culties presents many challenges as their lives revolve mainly around the concept of self,’ explains Assistant Headteacher Kalvinder Rai. ‘We wanted pupils to develop an understanding of the world beyond their own experiences.’ In addition, sta wanted to develop their own knowledge and con dence in how to plan and deliver global learning. They felt their existing schemes of work were limited and that they had little rst-hand experience o ife in other countries. Headteacher Yvonne McC all and her sta decided to bring a global dimension to existing schemes of work, audit their resources and take part in any external global activities that could extend and personalise experiences for children and sta . How did the school organise learning to meet its aims? Through Link C ommunity Development (LC D), Kalvinder spent ve weeks in 2005 at J eeja School in Uganda focusing on teaching literacy and numeracy in an interactive way. ‘I wanted to experience teaching in a

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di erent country and life in an African village. Then I aimed to bring my learning back, share it with sta , help create new resources and build pupils’ understanding of their role in the wider world‘, re ects Kalvinder. Before the placement, all sta took part in a review of current schemes of work. Schemes were redeveloped to include a global aspect to all topics. The new schemes particularly emphasised geography, music and art, and giving children sensory experiences of other cultures through use of artefacts, story telling and role play. Following an audit of resources, the school bought and created additional materials, including photographs, videos and artefacts from Uganda. ‘Artefacts worked really well,’ says Kalvinder, ‘particularly sturdy objects which pupils could handle such as masks, musical instruments, baskets. I also created presentations to accompany topics ranging from homes to journeys to school life. They all contained pictures of mysel n various settings in Uganda. This made it easier for pupils to engage with a di erent culture because they could relate to me being there.’ All year groups were involved and each class worked on di erent topics. Some children recorded songs to

send to their peers in Uganda. They made and exchanged postcards, pictures and resources. Reception and year 1 children worked on ‘My school, my local environment,’ comparing and contrasting Deedmore and J eeja at a very simple level. Year 5 investigated customs, habitats and clothes in di erent African countries. Simple starting points were used, including visually rich storybooks such as Handa’s surprise. C hildren were encouraged to taste fruits described in the story and then follow Ugandan recipes such Ugali cornmeal porridge. How well is the school achieving its aims? C ontinuous assessment shows that the children’s awareness of the wider world has increased. C hildren have also started asking questions about other places and developing thinking skills. However, the biggest lesson for sta has been to not underestimate the children because of their learning di culties. ‘At rst I thought that because Africa was so far away from C oventry the children would have di culty acquiring knowledge and the concepts I wanted them to grasp,’ says Suzanne Kavanagh, a year 5 teacher. ‘However, all the children


C A SE STUDY 1

Deedmore School Using artefacts and photographs as classroom resources brought A frica to life for children at Deedmore School.

African art

were excited and motivated. We can see a development in their vocabulary and their thinking skills. They have taken pride in their work and are delighted when visitors express an opinion about their work.’ W hat does the school plan to do next? N ext year Deedmore is looking to apply for the DC SF International School Award. Sta will continue to review schemes of work and introduce the global dimension through crosscurricular topics. They also intend to make links with other schools and the wider community and to keep parents and governors informed of new developments.

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Teacher tips C reating global learning resources Artefacts help develop pupils’ sensory experience of everyday life in other cultures. Use sturdy objects like masks, musical instruments and baskets that pupils can handle. G et pupils to take photographs of their own daily lives, school and local area. Work with pupils to create a ‘big photo book’ to send to the partner school. When visiting your partner school, take photographs of people’s homes, journeys and classrooms with yoursel n them. Use the photographs as a basis for developing presentations to introduce topic work.


Learning from new perspectives

Learner’s re ections

W hat did the school want to achieve? Hagley Primary School is in a largely a uent area. ‘We felt it was important for our children to appreciate what happens in other parts of the world and to view it positively,’ says Suzanne Shackleton, International Links C oordinator. Sta wanted the school to

set up a curriculum-focused partnership with a school in Africa. ‘We aimed to start with a manageable project involving a partner school in an unfamiliar place, to creatively use our similarities and di erences to help sta and children look at learning from new perspectives.’

evolve into a well-informed community with a balanced understanding of global issues. Hagley’s long-term aim was to become actively committed to reducing global poverty.

Hagley found a partner in J an J an Bureh Primary School in the G ambia. W ith support from the DFID G lobal School Partnerships programme, sta from Hagley visited J an J an Bureh early on to start building relationships. As Suzanne explains, ‘Personal contact is key, especially when schools are without electricity

How did the school organise learning to meet its aims? Headteacher Kevin Bailey decided to

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and the internet. O nce we visit each other, teachers feel a new level of commitment to the partnership.’ The school wanted a joint global learning curriculum to be the focus of the partnership. C hildren have been heavily involved in designing four curriculum resources that explore the similarities and di erences between life in the UK and the G ambia. The children are encouraged to become independent, responsible learners who think carefully and make connections between local and global issues, as the following quote from a child in year 4 illustrates: ‘J an J an


C A SE STUDY 2

Hagley Primary School C reating an equal, mutual partnership with a school in the G ambia has developed real global awareness in children at Hagley Primary School.

Bureh School is on an island in the River G ambia, and it keeps getting ooded. They say it’s because of global warming. We had oods in Worcester last month and we think it’s to do with the same thing. So, we’re going to send a text to the G ambia to see what we can do about it.’ Hagley has also set up a G ambia committee of 20 children from across the school. It recently had to deal with the tricky issue o undraising when some children wanted to raise money for J an J an Bureh – both schools have learnt that such activities need to be mutual. C hildren at Hagley knew that J an J an Bureh children did not have pens, pencils and paper so each child donated a pencil-case. In return, the G ambian children made dolls, models and everyday utensils for children to use in school. This allowed children at both schools to recognise that the others are just like themselves – people who give and want to learn and share. The partnership has inspired a cluster of other schools in Worcester and the G ambia to form links. Hagley and J an J an Bureh support these initiatives and o er tips. How well is the school achieving its aims? G lobal learning is now an integral part of Hagley’s identity. As O fsted recently reported, it ‘pervades the school’s dayto-day life [and] as a result, students’ cultural awareness is rst rate.’

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In an exercise set up by the University of Worcester to explore the impact of global partnerships, children from Hagley described the G ambia with positive words such as ‘friendly’ to balance negative words such as ‘poor.’ This was very di erent to the largely negative responses in schools without global partnerships. Hagley pupils also presented di erence in terms of what intrigued them rather than from the perspective o ear, for example, ‘I was surprised because they eat cereal in the mornings like I do’. Teachers have also bene ted, because the project encourages re ection and challenges values and

attitudes to education. Many have grown in con dence and demonstrated an ability to become involved in activities that would otherwise not have been possible. The wider community is also involved in the partnership: one parent re-created a G ambian town in the form of a huge piece of corridor art. W hat does the school plan to do next? Hagley intends to invite more Worcester schools to create partnerships with the G ambia. It believes that reaching outwards and creating new opportunities will help maintain momentum.

Teacher tips B uilding successful partnerships Start o with a small, manageable project. Work hard at developing a close and e ective working relationship with the headteacher or coordinator of the partnership. Be clear about expectations for both sides of the partnership (draw up an agreement early on). C ommunicate regularly with your link school (text is a wonderful way if email is not available). E ncourage sta , children, parents and the wider community to be actively involved. Plan activities and visits carefully but also have the exibility to enable new ideas to evolve.


Local to global W hat did the school want to achieve? Ingleby Barwick, in the leafy, suburban outskirts of Stockton, is said to be Europe’s largest private housing estate. As acting Deputy Headteacher Liz Shaller explains, it would be easy for a school in such an environment to become cut o from the wider world. ‘The nature of the area that we live in could encourage an insular world view,’ she says. ‘With few ethnic minority families here, we aim to broaden pupils’ horizons and encourage them to experience other people’s perspectives.’ Ingleby Mill Africa Week display

The school wanted links with the local and the global community to be an important part o ts mission and ethos, and sta decided to include learning about global issues as part of everyday teaching. How did the school organise learning to meet its aims? In 2001, as part of Link C ommunity Development’s (LC D) G lobal Teacher Programme, Liz went on a teaching exchange to Ayuusi-Yine Primary School in a remote part of northern G hana. After her return, a sta

Ayuusi-Yine pupils

working group planned the curriculum using the O xfam guide E ducation for global citizenship as a template. E ach year group now has a written scheme of work that builds and extends the children’s knowledge and understanding of global issues, and makes them re ect on their skills, values and attitudes. Frances Smith, a reception teacher, re ects: ‘At rst we felt that global

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C A SE STUDY 3

Ingleby M ill Primary School Linking with schools abroad makes learning about global issues more vivid and broadens pupils’ outlook.

issues would be too challenging for key stage 1 pupils, but we have addressed this through focusing on awareness of self and others, exploring similarities and di erences and listening to others’. By key stage 2, children are ready to move on to more challenging concepts. They look at the unfairness that exists in the world and investigate current global issues. As part of this, all children take part in Send My Friend to School activities each year. All the children are involved in the school’s link with G hana, which plays a key role in their global learning experiences. Liz believes that both northern and southern participants bene t from the link. ‘While it is very di cult to have an equal partnership with a school in such a remote, poverty-stricken area,’ she acknowledges, ‘it is what we all strive for. We develop activities and materials together which focus on our similarities as well as di erences’. A yearly postcard exchange, facilitated by LC D and focusing on topical issues, takes place between the schools. Three Africa Weeks have been held, incorporating global issues into every aspect of the curriculum from art and craft to maths and big business. How well is the school achieving its aims? Teachers feel the broad range of global learning opportunities they now provide across the curriculum has

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Ayuusi-Yine pupils receive letters from Ingleby Mill pupils

opened up learners’ minds and made them aware of their interdependence with the wider world. The direct links with another country have broken down stereotypes and made a big impact on both children and their parents. ‘C hildren here gain a huge amount from the link,’ re ects year 6 teacher G illian Forbes. ‘This includes greater knowledge and understanding of another culture, developing global citizenship skills and further insight into the geographical features of another country.‘ Participating in pupil-led activities such as Send My Friend to School has developed the children’s critical thinking and communication skills and has given them a sense of empowerment – particularly when their views are listened to and acted

on. Local MP Dari Taylor has visited the school three times, heard pupils’ views about children’s right to go to school, and delivered letters on their behalf to the prime minister. W hat does the school plan to do next? Sta plan to work with Ayuusi-Yine and LC D to develop a partnership agreement. The aim is to have an open dialogue between the two schools so that they understand the partner school’s expectations and can de ne their own contributions. Ingleby wants to set up links and share best practice with other schools in its local area that are also twinned with G hanaian partners. W ithin the school itself, the teachers plan to keep the work innovative by looking for new ideas and issues to use in the classroom.


G lobal problems, local solutions

Learners re ect on the di erence they have made

W hat did the school want to achieve? The Leigh C ity Technology C ollege was keen to give students a broader understanding of the world. Most of them are white British and, like many young people, their world view is limited to their local surroundings. ‘Students here can be very insular,’ explains Assistant Principal Karon Buck. ‘I wanted them to have more global understanding and to make the rest of the world real to them. To plant a seed and watch it grow into something bigger.’

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O verall, teachers at the school wanted students to be aware of their impact on people and environments locally and globally, to envisage their role in creating a sustainable future and to create innovative ways o inking their learning to responsible action. How did the school organise learning to meet its aims? Sta wanted to develop a participatory, student-led approach to learning. They decided to use vertical tutor time to give students the opportunity to really learn and investigate the roots of

important issues like climate change or fair trade. A vertical tutor group has


C A SE STUDY 4

The Leigh C ity Technology C ollege Using vertical tutor time to mix age groups and cross subject boundaries helped students at the Leigh C ity Technology C ollege get involved with schools and events around the world.

ve students from each year group, including the sixth form. All students receive ve 50-minute lessons a week in tutor time, one of which is devoted to global learning. Karon’s aim was for students to use this time to explore connections between their own lives and people living far away, and to investigate how they could make a di erence. At rst there was some resistance from both students and teachers to mixing age groups, but both have found positive outcomes. ‘The year 7s bring in new ideas from primary school, and we help to make them into bigger ideas,’ says a year 9 pupil. ‘And when some of the sixth formers in my class came back from a trip to India they told us what it was really like. We ended up getting involved with World Aids Day and World Water Day to link everything up.’ During tutor time, students used creative techniques such as ‘issues wheels’ to investigate global issues from di erent viewpoints and generate discussion about the part their school can play in nding local solutions to global problems like climate change. An issues wheel is an activity to categorise issues: whether they are economic, social or environmental; whether their impact is local, national or global. The activity generates discussion rather than de nitive answers. ‘The more I learnt, the more surprised I was about how little our school does for the environment,’ says a year 10 student.

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‘We leave computers on and the lights on and we use loads of gas in science. N ow, we’ve got recycling in every classroom.’

the paper wasted. As a result of student pressure, all classrooms now have paper-recycling bins. This increased awareness has also led to a hands-on interest in global issues and other cultures. Some post-16 students who visited India in 2006 are now organising a fashion show with the retail chain Monsoon to raise awareness o air trade within the local community.

Sta used ActionAid’s G lobal Action Schools project to explore di erent opinions and places, develop critical thinking and enquiry skills, and enrich students’ personal development. Students developed web pages and joined in online chats and forums to nd out what pupils in other countries were learning and doing. ‘We had a video conference with a Polish school,’ says one student. ‘I was surprised to hear about how di erent their school rules are to ours. We’ve all been learning about climate change and fair trade, and we realised we’d come up with similar ideas even though our cultures are quite di erent! ’ How well is the school achieving its aims? Since the project, teachers have noted an increase in students’ environmental and cultural awareness. Students began to think about the di erence they could make in their own school to contribute to sustainable development, for example reducing the amount of energy used, the food consumed and

Through the project, teachers have also developed a style that helps students learn independently. Vertical tutor time has given teachers the exibility to explore di cult issues that might normally be con ned to particular year groups or subjects. ‘Using vertical tutor time has prepared teachers for project-based learning,’ says Karon. ‘The process o etting the kids be in charge of their own learning has been very important.’ W hat does the school plan to do next? A move towards project-based learning during curriculum time is under way. The plan is to introduce a more coherent approach to curriculum planning with subjects like geography, citizenship and design and technology working together. The use of cross-curriculum dimensions such as ‘global dimension and sustainable development’ and ‘community participation’, as outlined in the new secondary curriculum, will support this.


G lobal citizenship school W hat did the school want to achieve? Sta at Deptford G reen School were looking for a sustainable, innovative and holistic way to address the speci c social issues the school’s demographic presents: the school is in an area of signi cant social deprivation, and many students are entitled to free school meals, come from minority ethnic backgrounds or have learning needs or disabilities. Deptford G reen was already a humanities specialist school, so sta decided to incorporate global citizenship across the school – and to campaign to be the rst UK school with citizenship specialist status. ‘We wanted to empower young people to become critical agents of change,’ explains Lee Faith, Head of C itizenship. ‘To develop a shared vision and ownership of the school based on human rights; to promote and advocate social justice within our wider community and the world. Including citizenship within our school’s specialism was essential to achieving this.‘ How did the school organise learning to meet its aims? Pupil participation and ownership of projects is crucial to the school’s citizenship aims. O ver the past two years pupils in years 7 to 9 have set

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up and run a fair trade tuck shop. W ith the support of the citizenship department they have developed this idea further by campaigning to become a fair trade school. Several pupils have set up a steering group and are working towards meeting the Fairtrade Foundation’s criteria, which include writing and adopting a whole-school fair trade policy and ensuring the school is committed to selling, promoting and using fair trade products. To foster students’ role as ‘critical agents of change’ Deptford G reen has pioneered using students as associate governors. ‘G etting pupil representation at the highest level is important to our philosophy, ethos and future,’ says Lee. Developing global links has also played an important role in the schools’ global citizenship programme. Since 2003 Deptford G reen has been involved in an

exhibition in Uganda. They chose sustainable development and transport as the theme, and produced a large piece of artwork that was presented at St Kizito school during an exchange visit in J une 2007. They then worked with the St Kizito pupils, comparing the art techniques used and discussing similarities and di erences in transport in both countries as depicted in the work displayed. In addition, ten year 10 students took part in a G lobal C itizenship Exchange with students from St Kizito in J une 2007. The students had a range of learning experiences including collaborative lessons on human rights, visits to an HIV/AIDS community project and an exploration of the local environment and issues facing local people. ‘This experience has changed my life! ’ says one of the students.

education partnership with St Kizito School in Uganda. The partnership develops students’ global citizenship skills through collaborative projects and exchange visits.

How well is the school achieving its aims? O fsted praised the school’s ‘pioneering citizenship programme,’ which ‘contributes signi cantly to students' outstanding spiritual, moral, social and cultural development’.

Year 9 pupils in both countries were asked to represent a global dimension theme through a collective piece of art to be displayed at an

The global dimension promotes a more cross-curricular approach by focusing on concepts and issues rather than subjects. The link with Uganda,


C A SE STUDY 5

Deptford G reen School G aining citizenship specialist status helped maximise pupil participation and develop global learning skills at Deptford G reen.

E xpressing sustainable development through art

for example, incorporated global issues into art. ‘It made me think about the di erent facilities open to people in various parts of the world,’ says one pupil. ‘We understood how our actions a ect others.’

Headteacher Wendy Bisiker. ‘I believe all who have been involved so far at Deptford G reen and St Kizito in the curriculum project and the youth exchange have changed the way they think in some way.’

‘Linking with others from di erent cultures and backgrounds helped the students learn more about others, widen horizons and expectations, but most of all it taught students about themselves,’ re ects Assistant

W hat does the school plan to do next? Deptford G reen will host a return visit for St Kizito students in J une 2008. The programme will mirror the visit to Uganda, with classroom time on

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global citizenship themes, a trip out of London to see the E nglish landscape and a range of cultural experiences. The citizenship team is planning global learning for other curriculum areas, including music and the new science for the 21st-century curriculum. Above all, Deptford G reen will continue to emphasise participation, giving students ownership of their work.


The world in our classroom W hat did the school want to achieve? Back in 2003, Hornsey School for G irls was concerned that many o ts learners, 90 per cent of whom are from minority ethnic backgrounds, were unsure of their place in the world. International links coordinator E leni Karaoli explains: ‘Many of our students had an identity crisis. They weren’t sure of their roots and felt displaced. Refugee and asylum seekers especially felt lost because they’re disconnected.’ Attendance and behaviour were also problems. Hornsey decided to bring the world into the classroom, introducing global perspectives through links with other schools. The long-term

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goal was for students to appreciate other cultures, be aware of the wider world and participate in the global community. How did the school organise learning to meet its aims? O ver the past ve years sta have made links with schools all over the world and have introduced global learning across all areas of the curriculum. Students have done work experience in France, attended seminars in G ermany and e-twinned with a school in Turkey through the E C 's eTwinning programme. Teachers have participated in a range of international curriculum visits. However, it is Hornsey’s partnership with a Peruvian school in a remote part

of the rainforest that has really brought global learning alive for students. Hornsey rst heard about La Pastora School in 2003 when a Peruvian N onG overnment O rganisation contacted the school about raising money for a well. ‘Many children were too sick to go to school because their water supply was contaminated with poisons from a nearby mine,’ says Eleni. ‘We decided to organise a one-o Peru Day with year 8. We had no expectations of this evolving into a whole-school cross-curricular linking project! ’ Since then, global learning with a Peruvian emphasis has been integrated across all year groups and several curriculum areas including modern foreign languages, enterprise education, PSHE and citizenship, IC T and English. During an enterprise week students came up with innovative ways of raising money to help sustain the Hornsey–La Pastora link. They funded a new school building for La Pastora, sold Peruvian jewellery to buy a school minibus for Hornsey, and joined up with nearby schools to create ‘O peration Peru C hild,’ which sends gift boxes to La Pastora. They studied Peruvian poetry in English, investigated water issues in geography and even tried to crack the Inca code in maths. G C SE food


C A SE STUDY 6

Hornsey School for G irls A one-o Peru Day turned into a fruitful long-term relationship for sta and students at Hornsey School for G irls.

G rade two pupils (6–7 years old) at La Pastora school

technology students even turned their classroom into a Peruvian restaurant for a day, serving the Peruvian cultural attaché and local councillors. The event received local press coverage and sparked donations from local businesses for La Pastora. Language learning played an important role in pupils’ experiences. Hornsey introduced pupils to Spanish, which enabled them to start comparing their lives with their peers in a Spanish-speaking country. Students chose to communicate via letter writing. ‘It’s a big deal when one [a letter] arrives,’ says a pupil in year 8. ‘We get really excited and it becomes like an artefact.’

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How well is the school achieving its aims? Hornsey won a DC SF International School Award in 2004, and was described by O fsted as having ‘exemplary international links’ in 2007. The school is a member of the N orth London Schools International N etwork, with a seat on the council of management. The link with La Pastora has helped students labelled as ‘disa ected.’ ‘They’ve drawn on profound empathetic skills and talk of seeing something of themselves in their Peruvian friends,’ says E velyn Forde, Head of Year 8. ‘Lots of girls have found a meaning for themselves

through the link, and a belief that they can make a di erence.’ W hat does the school plan to do next? In the future, Hornsey and La Pastora intend to create learning centres in both schools with educational resources from di erent countries. Students will manage fundraising e orts and work alongside sta to plan cross-curricular activities. Hornsey has developed new links with two schools in N epal and a rural school in Rwanda, and is also participating in the US/UK Fulbright teacher exchange programme, administered by the British C ouncil.


Case study 7

Nottinghamshire/Taiwan/Korea

Broadening Horizons What did the school want to achieve? Meden School is a large comprehensive in the former coalfield area of north Nottinghamshire. The intake of pupils is predominantly white British, with some significant socio-economic challenges existing in the catchment area. During the school year 2008-2009 students in Years 7 and 8 and sta participated in a Connecting Classrooms which was also linked to other school initiatives such as SEAL. We held an International Week to introduce students to the project, and to stimulate interest in Asian culture. Activities included tai chi, calligraphy, lantern-making and using chopsticks. Students enjoyed interacting with the two Chinese teaching assistants who helped with the event, and we also made use of the Connecting Classrooms web portal to engage students. Photos and written reactions to the event were published on the school website. The aim of being part of the Connecting Classrooms programme is to broaden the horizons of the young people by interacting and working with young people from other countries and undertaking joint curriculum projects with partner schools.

How did the school organise its learning to meet its aims? In April 2009, three teachers from Meden travelled to Taipei to meet with sta and students from two of our partner schools in Taipei County, and the co-ordinator for the Korean arm of the project. The visit was funded by the DCSF and managed by the British Council. We exchanged information about our schools and discussed ways to carry the project forwards as well as observing lessons and sharing best practise in meetings with the cluster of schools involved. How well is the school achieving its aims? It was agreed that while all the schools involved in the partnership will share learning and experiences, Meden School will form a more direct link with San Chong High School. Teachers discussed how closer communication and contact with our Taiwanese partner schools could help to break down possible racist and prejudiced views about a part of the world most of the students at Meden School don’t know much about and have not experienced directly. Building friendships with the Taipei students will also aid a deeper understanding of each country’s unique cultural aspects, as well as those that students share – such as school life, sport, religion, and favourite types of entertainment.

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It was decided that the students will learn about and exchange ideas on health and wellbeing issues, including healthy living, diet and recreation. Another focus will be environmental issues and students’ roles in environmental protection and sustainability. At Meden School, teachers will ensure that the project is inclusive within the school plan and schemes of work and involves all students within particular year groups. The school also plans to run more International Weeks, this time with more of a focus on our links with Taipei County and Incheon. Teachers agreed with partners that much of the project can be undertaken online. Materials will be shared via the production of an online magazine, and we have also suggested the use of ‘e-languages’ for disseminating materials and ideas between schools. Another plan is to explore the possibility of some Meden students contributing to an English language radio programme on National Education Radio in Taipei. What does the school plan to do next?

The cluster of schools hopes that students from both Nottinghamshire and Taipei will be able to visit partner schools to further strengthen the links between them. Furthermore, a range of teaching and support sta will gain experience, enjoyment and professional development through involvement with the project by adding value to and enhancing the school curriculum with contextualised learning through involvement in the Connecting Classrooms project.

Case study 8

Cornwall/Vietnam/Indonesia

Climate Change and a Global Perspective What did the school want to achieve? Cornwall is developing a Connecting Classrooms partnership with schools in Bali, Indonesia and Quang Ninh, Vietnam to provide students with a greater understanding of other cultures so that they can become more responsible global citizens. One of the topics is to improve students’ understanding of the impact of climate change and how they can make a di erence. In April 2009 two teachers and a local authority representative from Cornwall paid a DCSF-funded study visit to two partner schools in Ha Long City, Quang Ninh Province, Vietnam. The aim was to gain some knowledge of the Vietnamese culture and education system, and to explore the use of climate change as a basis for sharing information with a global perspective. How did the school organise its learning to meet its aims? A series of four lessons linked to climate change, based on resources readily available in the UK through the Pupil Researcher Initiative and 21 st Century Science packs, and materials on plants developed by the Eden Project, were taught in two schools in Cornwall to Key Stage 3 students. At the schools visited by the Cornish delegation, several intensive days were spent teaching the lessons to students of KS3 age and talking with English teachers and head teachers. The Vietnamese students’ responses, along with information on the local environment and culture, were taken back to Cornwall for Science, Food Technology and Citizenship activities.

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A useful meeting with the deputy directors of education at the regional education authority was held in Hanoi on the last day of the visit. We discussed possible ways of moving the link forward and how we might cooperate at local authority level on professional development to improve teaching and learning within the Connecting Classrooms community. How well is the school achieving its aims?

On return to the UK, a meeting of all the Cornwall schools involved in our Connecting Classrooms partnership was held to share the outcomes of the visit and discuss improving links for all the schools involved. First-hand knowledge from the visit and the opportunities for personal contact have inspired both the teachers who took part and those in other partnership schools. There is a strong desire to succeed and students are being registered ready for the next year of activity. However, there are some challenges to be overcome. Language was a key issue for us, as English is not spoken by the majority of teaching sta in Vietnam apart from language teachers, and the students were mostly at an intermediate or good standard. Communication is with the English teachers, but fortunately we were able to get contact details of these from most of the Vietnamese schools involved in the link – important if they are to develop project activities for the future. Access to computers varied from school to school in Vietnam, with most schools having limited access to the Internet. A lot of the students were, however, able to access the Internet out of school and will still be able to contribute to discussions. Using a combination of email, mobile phones, the website and post will be the way forward for the exchange of information in the future. What does the school plan to do next? As a next step the cluster of schools in Cornwall will meet to undertake further training on using the online VLE to communicate with partners in Vietnam and Indonesia as well as accessing the Climate Change lesson plans and resources available on Connecting Classrooms Online as a means to continue to the collaborative projects and enhancing the curricula of each participating school by sharing ideas and learning from one another.

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Case study 9

Portsmouth/Vietnam

International Partnerships within the Context of Art and Design What did the school want to achieve? In April 2009 sta from Milton Cross School, Springfield School and Admiral Lord Nelson School in Portsmouth paid a Connecting Classrooms study visit to three partner schools in Vietnam which was funded by the DCSF. The aim was to demonstrate how international partnerships can help to deliver the national curriculum within the context of Art and Design.

The Vietnamese students were shown images of artworks by a British artist alongside work that Year 7 students from the Portsmouth school had created – all on the theme of ‘identity’. The Portsmouth students had studied the work of di erent portrait artists, looking at how a portrait can show character through gesture, background, expression, clothes and colour. They also studied Peter Blake’s work, particularly his 1954 painting ‘Children Reading Comics’, and then produced an artwork using colour and descriptive words that explored their own identity. Videos were made of some of the students who described themselves and their work in more detail. Around 200 students from each school in Vietnam were shown these videos and the work of Peter Blake. They then discussed what identity meant to them, and what the children had said about themselves and their work, focusing particularly on colour to show mood and feelings. They were then invited to create their own artworks using colour, words, expression and background to express themselves. Formal elements such as proportion, shade and tone were discussed, and some students volunteered to be videoed so that students back in England could learn more about them. The Portsmouth students’ artworks were donated to the school so that they could incorporate them in their teaching.

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Students in Vietnam were extremely excited about the visit and appreciated the opportunity to put their English-speaking skills into practice. They were able to gain an insight into just who it was they had been speaking to on the Connecting Classrooms website, and felt very encouraged to continue with the partnership scheme. Students learnt about some of the formal elements of drawing used in their textbooks and put it into practice. They were able to think about the audience they were creating their artworks for and respond in a creative way about their own identity. How did the school organise its learning to meet its aims? On the schools return to Portsmouth, students were keen to see what their partners had created and were interested in the many similarities between their lives, as well as some of the di erences. They were eager to learn how the Vietnamese students had responded to their artworks and gave a critical and emotional response to what they saw on the videos, as well as the artworks that were brought back. How well is the school achieving its aims? It’s now envisaged that the ‘identity’ scheme of work will continue for year 7 at Miltoncross School and the theme of ‘Connecting Classrooms’ will also be incorporated within the school year plan. The aim is to help students think more about the audience they are creating the work for and what they want people to think when they see their artworks. What does the school plan to do next? Students will post their artworks onto their Connecting Classrooms website for discussion, and students from the partnerships in Vietnam and Indonesia will also post artworks of their own on the same theme. The aim is that students will be undertaking work within the school curriculum that is being enhanced by the international partnership rather than an add on or after school activity. This has led to increased motivation from pupils and teachers alike who have been involved to date.

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Case study 10

Cumbria/Taiwan

Online Collaboration and Communication What did the school want to achieve? In April 2009, teachers from three Cumbrian schools – each with a diverse and di erent catchment – participated in a Connecting Classrooms study visit to Hualien County in eastern Taiwan funded by the DCSF and managed by the British Council.

Our focus was to look at the ways our three partner schools in Hualien use ICT and Virtual Learning Environment (VLE) platforms to enable communication and collaboration, and achieve our project goals. Currently, the main method of communication between us has been via the Connecting Classrooms Portal and its various teacher and student forums. We have also made use of video conferencing, which allows for a dynamic development of ideas and collaboration, and can be an exciting and e ective tool for crossing the cultural divide. How did the school organise its learning during the visit to meet its aims? On arrival in Taiwan, we held a meeting with our Hualien colleagues to discuss how we could move the partnership forward. With regard to our shared communication platform, we agreed that while the Connecting Classrooms Portal is useful, it is rather too ‘chaotic’ to be used quickly and easily. Postings on the

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forums frequently went without response or reply if addressed to a particular individual. While videoconferencing is a positive communication tool, platforms for delivery can be variable and communicating across time zones problematic. We agreed that we would not be able to overcome our language barriers if we did not have an instant easy-to-use online interactive area where partners could share communicate. To tackle some of these difficulties, the Cumbrian teachers had earlier agreed to develop and host a separate VLE platform specifically for the partnership project, adopting the same security as the Connecting Classrooms Portal, but without the ‘traffic’. This went live just in time for our visit, and received very positive feedback. How did the school organise its learning to meet its aims? We also spent time observing lessons. Prior to our visit, a food-based theme had been agreed as the starting-point for our collaboration, and Hualien colleagues had designed a short unit looking at the types of food in students’ lunchboxes. We witnessed students learning key terms relating to food types and tastes, and moving towards putting together work to be shared with partner schools. How well is the school achieving its aims? As a whole-school initiative, we felt this unit would fit very well with the Every Child Matters ‘Be Healthy’ outcome and dovetail into work our schools had already undertaken in Food Technology, PSHE (PD), Science and ICT. Throughout our visit we were provided with activities to help us to understand the culture and education system of Taiwan. Each school treated us to stunning performances of traditional songs, dancing and short plays that demonstrated the importance the Korean education system places on these areas. It was clear that celebrating the island’s aboriginal heritage is a key focus here.

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What does the school plan to do next? Teachers were greeted with excitement and warmth by all the students, teachers and officials we met and were constantly impressed with the enthusiasm for the Connecting Classrooms project. We returned to our schools with a much more coherent idea of how we can proceed, and a clearer understanding about the mutual benefits to be gained. As a next step the school has focused on further communication and online project work on the VLE and has begun to share students work on the platform including the creation of Bento lunchboxes which enabled students to learn crosscurricular themes including healthy eating and design.

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in East Asia

Annexes


ANNEXES

I. Connecting Classrooms in East Asia M&E Framework Core outcomes The framework for the M&E of Connecting Classrooms is built around the five key stakeholder groups for the product: systems, institutions, practitioners, learners and communities. In broad terms, these intermediate outcomes represent the aims and areas of focus for Connecting Classrooms programme in East Asia.

Success indicators and targets Running alongside the outcomes for Connecting Classrooms are the critical success indicators that define the areas in which evidence of change and impact can be sought. These indicators are used to develop targets related to each outcome.

Regional Outcomes SYSTEMS Support the development of a philosophy, policy practice and process which will lead to sustainable and improved perceptions of, and relations with, other societies

Prioritise the knowledge, skills and understanding required to equip young people for life in a global society and work in a global economy

INSTITUTIONS Enable learners to better understand and negotiate their place in the world

Critical success indicators

Targets

Host governments implementing core aspects of intercultural dialogue in training programmes

After 3 years, 60% of Ministries of Education (or other bodies) will have incorporated elements of training provided under CC into aspects of their training programmes for practitioners. By the end of three years, all participating countries’ Education ministries, District Education Offices actively support CC by selecting schools to participate, releasing teachers for training and participating in policy dialogue events.

Host governments signing up as partners for awards programmes and contributing to policy dialogues

Schools allocating curriculum time to global citizenship, active citizenship and intercultural dialogue.

Give increased priority to internationalising the curriculum and create an institutional ethos that supports a global dimension

Profile of the global dimension in the school curriculum and related policies

Recognise the importance of teachers and school leaders developing their skills and competencies in an

Participation of teachers and school leaders in range of CC training activities

By the end of three years, timetabling and planning for CC classes over a range of subjects shows work in the areas of global citizenship, active citizenship and intercultural dialogue After three years, 40% of CC schools have introduced, adopted or revised their policy or guidelines for the global dimension of the curriculum After 2 years, 90% of CC schools readily release teachers and school leaders for CC training


international environment Work more closely with communities and become more involved in community and social issues

PRACTITIONERS Demonstrate the ability to work comfortably in, and with people from, other countries

Demonstrate the leadership skills necessary to support the instilling of a strong global dimension into the learning experience of young people

activities Participation rates of schools in community action projects

Each year, CC schools work with communities on one project focused on challenging misconceptions, community cohesion or challenging attitudes and environments that may give rise to extremism

Teachers and head teachers are increasingly positive about their visits to, and interactions with, colleagues in partner countries

After two years, 80% of teachers and head teachers surveyed, agree or agree strongly that intercultural dialogue, during visits and in the process of partnership, is an important aspect of teaching and learning and they feel more confident in its application in the classroom 60% of Teachers collaborate on at least one curriculum-based project with a global dimension in Years 1-2.

Teachers instil a stronger global dimension into the curriculum

In Year 2, 500 teachers design & deliver at least three lesson plans/activities with a global dimension. In Year 3, 1000 teachers design & deliver at least five lesson plans/activities with a global dimension. LEARNERS Learners have improved perceptions of other societies

Learners having a more positive approach toward other societies

Demonstrate a critical understanding and knowledge of society, the world and their place in it, contributing to positive social change

Learners using a critical understanding and knowledge of societies and the inter-relationship between them, across different areas of learning

Demonstrate leadership and enterprise skills, particularly those for work in a global economy

Learners gaining Global Citizenship Award

COMMUNITIES Give recognition to elements of the following agenda for

Involvement of communities in joint projects with schools

After three years, of those surveyed, 90% of learners directly involved in CC, agree or agree strongly that their perceptions of other societies have improved After three years, learners in CC schools demonstrate greater application of critical thinking and analysis on global issues, than at baseline, contributing to positive social change After three years, 10% of learners in CC schools will have gained the Global Citizenship Award (where available). Each year, communities linked to CC schools work


schools and young people –  community cohesion,  challenging misconceptions, challenging attitudes and environments that may give rise to extremism

with schools on one project focused on challenging misconceptions, community cohesion or challenging attitudes and environments that may give rise to extremism or negative impact on important social issues or environment


II. Responsibilities of Consultant/Researcher for M&E 2010 N.B. These are broad responsibilities of countries’ consultant only. Fine details are up to each country project manager to discuss with your consultant e.g. additional M&E tools that country would like to use depending on its needs, exact dates to conduct interviews and report etc.

Analyse results of the comparative students’ survey and draw conclusions providing insights into common themes and differences emerging; highlighting programme impact in comparison with the baseline survey

Analyse results of the comparative teachers’ survey and draw conclusions providing insights into common themes and differences emerging; highlighting programme impact in comparison with the baseline survey

Conduct one student focus group

A summary analysis of the student focus group discussion, providing insights into common themes and differences emerging; highlighting programme impact in comparison with the baseline student focus group (last year)

Conduct 10 face-to-face interviews (impact studies) of individuals engaged with the programme; providing insights into individuals’ experiences, knowledge, perceptions, and attitudes

A summary analysis of the 10 face-to-face interviews, providing insights into common themes and differences emerging; highlighting programme impact

A summary analysis of the cluster reports, providing insights into common themes and differences emerging; highlighting programme impact

Summarise findings of the student focus group, students’ comparative survey, teachers’ comparative survey, face-to-face interviews and cluster reports on the question of whether Connecting Classrooms increases trust and understanding between different countries and cultures, helps embed the ‘Global Dimension’ in education, and what impact the programme has had

A summary analysis of whether Connecting Classrooms meets the target outcomes identified in the M&E framework highlighting on evidence of the success or challenges

N.B. All analysis and summary findings should contain/demonstrate both quantitative and qualitative data


III. Guidelines for Commissioning Monitoring and Evaluation Activities N.B. Countries should spare up to 5K for consultancy cost out of your allocated budget.

External agencies have been commissioned to undertake evaluation research in several regions (e.g. IOE research for SSA, IER at the University of Dhaka for CSA), and have the advantage of allowing teams to set the parameters for evaluation without the difficulties of carrying this out themselves, with limited staff resource. The involvement of external experts in monitoring and evaluation can also build capacity within CC teams. The approaches used in the IOE and Dhaka evaluations demonstrate an interest in using and developing capacity within the regions/countries, with local researchers and organisations being involved. Such evaluations can valuably supplement a core of evaluation activity planned and undertaken by CC teams themselves. In CSA, the approximate balance is 70% of indicators being addressed by BC staff, and 30% by external agencies. Some specific aspects of data collection and analysis (such as coding text responses, processing quantitative data) can be routinely contracted out. Commissioning of research needs to take place against the background of CC teams having access to, and knowledge of, any tools that already exist with the CC programme– a process that will be supported by the framework of core monitoring and core tools. Customisation of existing tools will maintain a level of commonality across regions and support the process of reporting. If an agency is commissioned to develop a new specific tool, the CC team concerned will need to be aware of the precise aims and benefits of a new tool.

Some key points for commissioning research are summarised below: 1. Ensuring that contracted research contributes to core monitoring. Agencies need to undertake research that will clearly address CC priorities and, where possible, provide robust evidence of impact. Where agencies are asked to support aspects of the core monitoring programme, there should be clear specification of what is required. For example, if a university team is asked to undertake a questionnaire survey of teachers, the degree of flexibility to probe areas beyond the core target outcomes for Connecting Classrooms, needs to be agreed in advance. 2. Ensuring that the terms of contracted research are established clearly in advance. Key aspects of the contractor’s role need to be specified in appropriate detail: administration, analysis, reporting, quality assurance, timelines, fees and travel costs. 3. Ensuring that the proposed research (and agency contracted) is focused on building capacity for research and support of CC in each local area where possible, research should involve working with teams or individuals from universities or other suitable local organisations. Clear guidance on protocols and standards for the research should be provided to them and there should also, where possible, be a focus on extending the audience for any research through publication and dissemination – this would enhance the profile of CC and be a motivating factor for researchers involved. 4. Ensuring that the advantages and practicalities of conducting research in each partner country are considered while there is much value in working with agencies in particular countries to exploit local knowledge, when planning their work with others, teams need also to focus on gathering data from all countries in a way that maximises consistency.


5. Identifying a clear need for any additional research beyond core monitoring. Once core M&E activity is established, teams must have a clear sense of why additional enquiry is needed. Is there a need for more evidence? Why? What will it add? What capacity is there to follow-up and act on any additional evidence? 6. Ensuring that additional M&E will not ‘overload’ stakeholders calling on additional time from headteachers, teachers, students and others, needs to be balanced against the need to maintain good will and focus on CC activities that have already been planned. How will additional research activities affect participants? Can they be built into training events and processes, so that the benefit to participants is clear? 7. Clarifying the ownership of research processes, tools and products. Part of the value of external input into M&E will be its contribution to the development of tools and expertise within CC teams. It will be important for any contracting process to make this clear so that, for example, successful tools might be added to the toolkit that teams can select from for their core/additional M&E.


IV. International School Award The International School Award (ISA) is a prestigious accreditation scheme, managed by the British Council. The Award recognises and celebrates schools that are committed to good practice in international work and developing international partnerships which enrich the curriculum and help young learners to become global citizens. Connecting Classrooms is designed to enable participating schools to achieve the ISA, by providing the structure and experience needed to satisfy the criteria for application. ISA Accreditation in the UK The ISA has been running successfully since 1999 and has accredited around 4000 schools in the UK. In England, where the scheme is funded by the Department for Education. In Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland, the scheme is supported by the devolved government departments for education. ISA Accreditation in East Asian Countries Connecting Classrooms schools in East Asian countries are eligible for the British Council International School Award, which applies the same rigorous standards and criteria as the scheme in the UK but is funded by the British Council and delivered in partnership with key education bodies in each country.

Application Process The process of working towards the award should provide you with a framework to identify your school’s priorities for international work, to set targets and to analyse the outcomes of your work. The process usually takes about 18 months to complete. There are three steps in the application process:

.

. .

You will produce an action plan for international work, which will draw on the activity you have identified in your Connecting Classroom project plan as well as other crosscurricular work. Please see the selection criteria below. Once your plan has been approved you will go on to compile a portfolio of evidence of international activities. If your portfolio is approved Connecting Classrooms International School Award adjudication panel you will be granted the Connecting Classrooms International School Award for three years.


Selection Criteria Your action plan will need to show a range of international activity in and across your school. Your planned international activities should meet the following criteria: 

International policy being written or reviewed

International co-ordinator appointed or post reviewed

Curriculum based activity

Range of year groups involved

Range of subject areas covered

Year-round activity

Activities are evaluated

Collaborative work with partner schools in other countries

Please find more information about the Award and apply online at:


V. International School Leader Award

The International School Leader Award (ILA) is part of British Council Connecting Classrooms with aim to celebrate the contribution of leaders in schools across the world to the development of international and global citizenship. It is open to head teachers and school leaders who can demonstrate exemplary practice in establishing an international dimension to the curriculum and promoting global citizenship in their schools. The Award recognises leadership which has a significant impact on the school, its community and on its international partners.

Standards The Award is based on three key, non-hierarchical areas which represent the standards required to meet the leadership criteria. These are: 1. Shaping the school’s global vision 2. Leading the school’s international dimension and promoting global citizenship 3. Securing community cohesion and sustainable international partnerships. Within each area are set out: 

The knowledge requirements

The professional qualities and attributes expected of the school leader

The actions needed to demonstrate compliance with the standard

Assessment Assessment is by application, which is supported by a mentor or adviser (this could be a colleague who already holds the award, a supervisor or local ministry official, for example). Mentoring, support and guidance for candidates is provided by this mentor moving towards formal assessment and builds on the self evaluation tool applicants are invited to use in considering the standards to be met.

Application Process The ILA is awarded on the basis of evidence that the standards described have been met by the school leader. The award will provide international recognition for the leadership of global citizenship and the international dimension in the school curriculum. There are five steps in the application process: 

Stage 1 – Complete and submit the on-line self-evaluation which allows you to review your eligibility for this award. Self-evaluation is a useful way of learning and this process should be carried out in collaboration with your mentor or adviser who will discuss and validate your judgements at this stage.

Stage 2 – An electronic assessment will be sent to you, indicating your own perceived strengths and areas for development.

Stage 3 – During this development period, you should discuss the actions needed to meet the standard with your support colleague.

Stage 4 – Further conversations with the mentor will be used to consider progress in reaching the standards and providing evidence where requested. When the mentor is satisfied that those standards have been met and evidence is available, the school leader will go forward for formal assessment.


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Stage 5 – Candidates will repeat the online self assessment in light of progress with support from the mentor or adviser as before.

Please find more information about the Award and apply online at: http://cc.britishcouncil.org/node/542


VI. International Teacher Award

The International Teacher Award (ITA) is part of British Council Connecting Classrooms with the aim to celebrate the contribution of individual teachers in schools across the world to the development of international and global citizenship. It is open to teachers who can demonstrate exemplary practice in establishing an international dimension to the curriculum in their subject or classroom and in promoting global citizenship with their classes. The Award recognises teachers whose work helps to create an international ethos in their schools.

Standards The Award is based on three key areas which represent the standards required to meet the international teacher criteria. These are: 4. Developing a well-planned international dimension to the curriculum in a subject specialism or with a class group 5. Providing opportunities for pupils to become active, globally aware citizens 6. Sustaining school links through exchanges and communication with overseas communities. The success factors within each area are set out to enable candidates to evaluate their work and carry out self assessment.

Assessment Assessment is by application, which is supported by the head teacher or senior teacher from within the school in which the teacher works. Guidance for candidates moving towards formal assessment builds on self evaluation tools which applicants are invited to use in considering the standards to be met. The process is designed to be simple and easy to use, supporting progress and recognising achievement.

Application Process The ITA is awarded on the basis of evidence that the standards described have been met by the teacher. The Award will provide international recognition for the teaching of global citizenship and the international dimension in the school curriculum. There are five steps in the application process: 

Step 1 – Complete and submit the Online Self-Evaluation which allows you to review your eligibility for this award.

Step 2 – An assessment will be sent to you electronically, indicating your own perceived strengths and areas for development.

Step 3 – Your mentor will work with you on an action plan to develop the areas you have identified as needing work. A timescale will be agreed for applicants to implement any actions within the standards for which there is insufficient evidence.

Step 4 – Further conversations with your mentor will be used to consider progress in reaching the standards and providing evidence where requested. When the mentor is satisfied those standards have been met and evidence is available, you will go forward for formal assessment.

Stage 5 – Candidates will repeat the online self assessment in light of progress with support from the mentor as before.

Please find more information about the Award and apply online at: http://cc.britishcouncil.org/node/547


VII. Global Citizen Award

The Global Citizen Award (GCA) is part of British Council Connecting Classrooms with the aim to celebrate the contribution of young people in schools across the world to the development of international understanding through sustained communication and exchanges with counterparts in other countries. It is open to young people who can demonstrate the impact of activities they have led or been involved in which help them and their communities to learn about, respect and understand cultures other than their own. The Award recognises those young people whose involvement sustains direct communication and interaction with partner schools and their communities, helping to create an international ethos in their schools.

Standards The Award is based on two areas which represent the standards required to meet the global citizenship criteria. These are: 7. Leading or taking part in activities which allow you and other young people and their communities to connect with each other across the world. 8. Demonstrating what you as a young person have learned through international links, exploring other cultures and reflecting on your attitudes, beliefs and values.

Assessment This process should be carried out in collaboration with your school’s International Coordinator who will act as your mentor through the process. The online Assessment Form will invite you to assess yourself against the standards below on a four point scale. 

Strong and varied evidence of action

Sufficient evidence of action

Some but incomplete evidence of action

Insufficient evidence of action.

Application Process A requirement is that the school to which the student belongs has the International School Award (ISA); or a senior leader holds the International Leader Award (ILA); or the teacher supporting the young person making application holds the International Teacher Award (ITA). 

If you are interested in registering for this Award, please discuss your activities with your school’s International Co-ordinator or the member of staff who deals with international projects in your school

Consider the standards set out in the two areas. These are: (1) leading and involvement; and (2) personal learning

There are some prompts to help you think about your contribution

You will find a list of possible sources of evidence you might use

Read the statements listed which describe the qualities and actions of a global citizen

Think about areas where you are already strong and meet the standard.

Use the prompts to analyse the areas where you may need to do more

Take some time to develop what you do, gather your evidence and learn more about what is expected of a global citizen

Make sure that you have documentation, on paper or electronically, to support the judgements for each standard.


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When you and your teacher feel you are ready, complete the online application form for assessment

Please find more information about the Award and apply online at: http://cc.britishcouncil.org/node/550


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in East Asia

Contact Information Indonesia mia.annisa@britishcouncil.or.id

Taiwan lisa.luo@britishcouncil.org.tw

Malaysia sunitha.janamohanan@britishcouncil.org.my

Thailand wibhawinee.chommuangboon@britishcouncil.or.th

Japan chihiro.kawai@britishcouncil.or.jp

Vietnam chi.nguyen@britishcouncil.org.vn

Korea hyunjung.oh@britishcouncil.or.kr

UK CC_EA@britishcouncil.org

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Connecting Classrooms Monitoring and Evaluation Toolkit  

Connecting Classrooms Monitoring and Evaluation Toolkit

Connecting Classrooms Monitoring and Evaluation Toolkit  

Connecting Classrooms Monitoring and Evaluation Toolkit

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