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Published by Tuttobene, commissioned by NL Agency, Ministry of Economic Affairs, Agriculture and Innovation

Connecting the Dots showcases all Dutch presentations at the London Design Festival 2011


THE DOTS +50 Dutch Designers at LDF p58

— Interview Studio Glithero

p72

p8

— Why good designers are good lovers too p22

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London Tube & Street Maps

10 Studio Portraits p19

p38


New: Terra Tones

Iris van Herpen NL Architects Wim Crouwel Irma Boom Rem Koolhaas OMA Jongerius Lab

Paul Mijksenaar UN studio Marlies Dekkers Studio Wieki Somers G-Star Marcel Wanders

2012 Architects Philips Claudy Jongstra Alexander van Slobbe Piet Hein Eek MVRDV

SILVER

Dutch Profiles is a series of short documentaries about architects, graphic, product and fashion designers in the Netherlands. Dutch Profiles focuses on the conceptual and research-based background of well-known icons of Dutch design. More profiles will be added over the coming years. Dutch Profiles has been commissioned as part of the Dutch Design Fashion Architecture program, which aims to strengthen the international position of these sectors through a joined-up approach.

Mosa. Tiles. visit our website www.mosa.nl

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www.dutchdfa.nl


Colophon

Foreword

Connecting the Dots Dutch Design Yearbook in London Representing all Dutch presentations during the London Design Festival 17 – 25 September 2011 The magazine Connecting the Dots is published by Tuttobene Tuttobene, Damrak 70 - studio 5.63 1012 LM Amsterdam The Netherlands www.thedots.nl connecting@thedots.nl +31 (0)20 89 32 886

Editor in Chief David Heldt david@thedots.nl +31 (0)6 155 107 27 Contributing editors Anna Bates, Wouter Keuning, Kees de Haan, JaapJan Berg, Victor le Noble, Jan van Weijen (Head of Public Diplomacy, Press & Culture – Dutch Embassy, London), Rob Huisman (director Association of Dutch Designers), Frederik Roijé, Tim Vermeulen (Premsela) Translator Peter Mason Graphic design Koehorst in ‘t Veld Thanks to Anna Kraus www.koehorstintveld.nl Contributing photographers Boudewijn Bollmann www.twistedstreets.nl (photo reportage) André Penteado www.andrepenteado.com Dale Grant www.dalegrantphotography.com Contributing Illustrator Miguel Tanco www.migueltanco.com Printed by VNV Mediaprinting www.vnvmediaprinting.com Communication & Press Luc Deleau luc@thedots.nl +31(0)6 524 729 90 Advertising David Heldt & Victor le Noble +31 (0)6 246 685 69

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Dutch Lovers

Commissioned by NL Agency, Ministry of Economic Affairs, Agriculture and Innovation Supporting partners BNO - Association of Dutch Designers Embassy of the Kingdom of the Netherlands With thanks to Annet Lundebye, Valentina Jaen Malmsheimer, Morf magazine

© Tuttobene 2011 All rights reserved. Copyrights on the photographs, illustrations, drawings, and written material in this publication are owned by the respective photographer(s), the designer(s) and the author(s). No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying or otherwise, without permission of the publisher and designers, photographers and authors involved.

, ‘To design is to make love  , Kees de Haan writes in his essay on page 22 ‘Great artists and designers fertilize design with beautiful, strong and healthy , children.  How does a designers achieve this? According to De Haan, by knowing your history, drawing inspiration from great works of the past: ‘Being in love is more intense for anyone who has , ever heard a Tinguely machine creak   . This delightful essay turns designers into passionate lovers.

The magazine also looks into the future, including Tuttobene itself. As a result of the recent cuts in Dutch government spending, organisations in the design sector in the Netherlands will have to change in the years ahead. The crisis forces organisations to take to the market more, and Tuttobene is no exception. In an interview with Victor le Noble and myself, the founders of Tuttobene, we look into the future and discuss the importance of cultural entrepreneurship (page 42). When I took another look at Boudewijn Bollmann’s Rob Huisman, director of the Association of photo report (scattered through the magazine) after Dutch Designers, also offers a perspective on the , reading De Haan  s essay, I suddenly saw a series of future of the Dutch design branch in his column Dutch Lovers instead of Dutch Designers. The (page 28). He refers to the great advantages of the designers look distractedly into the lens, they are British system with its Design Council that stimulates thinking about something different from what they both the cultural and the economic side of design. are working on at that moment. They are in love. What were they thinking about? The fruit of their This year the number of Dutch firms presenting love can be seen during the London Design Festival. themselves in London is up on previous years by Bollmann managed to give the photos that dreamy more than one third. That is an enormous increase. touch by taking them with an analog medium-format Several designers I talked to mentioned the advancamera with 6 x 7 cm negatives. tages of doing business with London: no language barrier, a large and concentrated market, a congeConnecting the Dots opens this first edition for the nial commercial mentality, and above all, great fun! London Design Festival with an in-depth interview London is the metropolis where it happens, where with the design duo Sarah van Gameren and Tim finding inspiration and doing business go hand in Simpson from the London Studio Glithero. Van hand. Gameren, the Dutch half of the duo, studied at the Design Academy in Eindhoven before she met David Heldt Simpson at the Royal College of Art. She knows Editor in Chief very well how to put what she learned there into words and why London is the right place for their studio. A particular aspect of the work of Studio Glithero is the attention they pay to the makingprocess of their designs. Making that process visible is just as important as the final result itself and is carefully recorded on video (which can be seen on their website). Just as Kees de Haan points in his essay to the importance of history, they try to record that moment at which a change takes place and in which the product becomes what it has to be. Their aim is for the product to show the process itself, or, as Van Gameren puts it in the interview: ‘We want to merge that moment of pure creation with the outcome. […] This is the riddle we want to solve – , and we are still trying to solve it. 

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Presentations

Photo Documentary by Boudewijn Bollmann

100% Design London

Shoreditch Design Triangle

p58  —

p62  —

Formafantasma p19

1 MID Carpets  /  p58 2 Royal Mosa  /  p59 3 Natweave / p59 4 NotOnlyWhite / p59 5 Versaflex / p59

12 Studio Jo Meesters  /  p62 13 Kranen/Gille / p62 14 Scholten & Baijings  /  p63 15 Studio Glithero / p63 16 Studio Lawrence / p63 17 Old Spitalfields Market  /  p64 - Mirjam Nuver - Nina Führer 18 Tuttobene / p65 - Bam-doo / p65 - Studio Dave Keune  /  p65 - De Vorm  /  p65 - Doreen Westphal  /  p66 - JOINE / p66 - Laurien Oversier  /  p66 - Royal Mosa  /  p67 - PeLi Design  /  p67 - Pou-Belle Design  /  p67 - Atelier Schelling & Borsboom  /  p67 - Shades of Wood  /  p68 - Studio-Re-Creation / p68 - Tristan Frencken  /  p68 - YLdesign / p68

Alexander Pelikan p30

Brompton Design District p60  — 6 Arco, OKAY Studio  /  p60 7 Emmanuel Babled  /  p60 8 Henny van Nistelrooy  /  p61 9 Methods of Imitation  /  p61 10 Mint Explores / p61 11 Study O Portable  /  p61

Concrete p18

Vij5 p31 Sjoerd Jonkers p40 Scholten & Baijings p41 Studio Lawrence p50

p69  — 19 Brand van Egmond  /  p69 20 Moooi / p69 21 Maaike Schoorel / p70 22 Formafantasma / p70 23 Concrete Architectural Associates / p70 24 De Vorm / p70

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Foreword

Dutch Lovers by David Heldt p5  — Interview

Studio Glithero Freezing the Moment of Transformation Interview with Studio Glithero by Anna Bates p8  — Essay

Mirjam Nuver p51

A Pagan Fertility Goddess

Studio Vroonland p54

by Kees de Haan p22  —

Jo Meesters p55

Elsewhere in London

Articles & Columns

Article

That’s Great, Becoming a Green Designer. But How? by Wouter Keuning p32  — Interview

Tuttobene Takes Stock Interview with David Heldt & Victor le Noble by JaapJan Berg p42  — Advertorial Rabobank

Art Is the Barometer of Society p52  —

Column

Dutch Design, Something to Be Handled with Care by Rob Huisman p28  —

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Column

Creative Diplomats Are Great Dancers by Jan van Weijen p56  —


Text Anna Bates    Photos André Penteado

“We are great at failure,” says Dutch designer Sarah van Gameren, one half of studio Glithero, with half a smile.

“We have really been on stage with failure,” emphasises her British co-founder Tim Simpson.

Studio G l i t h e ro F r e ez i n g t h e Moment of Tr a n s f o r m a t i o n —

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First, Van Gameren explains, was her installation Burn Burn Burn, a line of flammable paint drawn over furniture and across walls, to be travelled by a small flame. Designed with help of a chemist, the piece was selected to wow an audience of journalists, curators and visitors at Milan Furniture Fair, where it rather publicly failed to do the one thing it was supposed to do: set alight. Then was the duo’s Blueware collection for Craft Punk another live event. The pair set about using photosensitive chemicals to capture the impression of flowers on earthenware, creating blue vases decorated with the “ghost” of petals. But the blue lasted only a few hours before fading to white – a disaster they thought they solved, but which was repeated on a client’s wall tiles a few years later. Recounting the last story, Van Gameren looks at her feet: “It was terrible – we had to take the tiles off and do the wall again. It took us a long time to figure out why the blue was disappearing - but we are now experts at the process.”

Studio Glithero. Photo — André Penteado

Such honest declarations are not often heard in the design world, where designers are encouraged to slap a thick layer of gloss over any problems a project encounters, and keep those that failed to themselves. But the Anglo-Dutch duo accepts hiccups are part of the design process; because they don’t just design products, they design the process of making a product. For them, it is not enough to present an object with no trace of how it was made. In the same way that we want food products to

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communicate the journey from farm to shelf, Glithero believes objects have some explaining to do. As designers, they aren’t alone in this sentiment, but what marks their work out is the fun they like to have; their work celebrates the spectacle – the theatre – of how stuff is made. So whether they’re re-modelling an envelope-folding machine so that it punches out paper planes, or building a machine to make candelabras – in the shape of a giant candelabra – their goal is to find the “essence of a process”, “that moment of a thing’s transformation” and take it to a wider audience, to “move people.”

‘T hey don’t just design products, they design the process of making a product’   Anna Bates

In this sense, they are striving towards a new value system for consumerism. “We think the way we buy will change – it happens first with designers and artists, when they realise they aren’t satisfied buying a new colour every season, then it happens to the consumer,” says Van Gameren. By focussing on process, Glithero gives value to their products – even the mistakes add to the story. The turbulent two-year journey of their Blueware project, for example, saw them nominated for the Design Museum’s Designs of the Year prize. And the client who watched her blue bathroom turn white overnight recently commissioned an even larger installation by the duo. Such achievements mean Glithero must be doing something right. But is it enough for designers just to focus on process? The studio states in its manifesto that ‘the process is more important than the product’, but separated from process, can their products hold their own on the shop floor? We meet at the duo’s workspace in North London, a former hot air balloon workshop, littered with prototypes, practice runs and half-baked concepts. My eyes fall on a cluster of miniature red tubes bent in all manner of directions: “This summer has been about ideas,” says Simpson, by way of explanation. The duo met studying for an MA in design at the Royal College of

studio glithero

The Long Drop

Standing high on a ladder, a point is defined where it all begins. The substance flows like lava and marks a permanent path. The long drop is a poly-concrete table, cast in a wooden chute that resembles a roller-coaster. Buckets of fluid ma-

Poured bar

A bar top made by pouring. Layers of fast-hardening enforcements are added to brace the giant slab, the first concrete fluid are poured in 6 metre long runs across an pours becoming buried under its foundations. immaculate surface. As the viscous material hardens,

Blueware Tiles and Vases

Blueware is a collection of ceramics with cyanotypes, a process of capturing direct impressions of botanical specimens (found on inner London borough pavements) on earthenware, using photosensitive chemicals. From one of the earliest prin-

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terial are poured down and set rock-hard. When it is filled, the chute is dismantled leaving a table that is forever married with its pouring channel spiralling up through the air. Concrete drips and spills are frozen in the moment.

ciples of photography, to the historic affinity between ceramics and the colour blue, it is a project built upon the inventions of their Anglo-Dutch predecessors, shattered into small fragments, and kaleidoscopically rearranged. www.glithero.com


Art in London. Van Gameren was paired with Simpson, in the year above, to assist with his graduation show, “and from then on, we always worked behind the scenes on each other’s work,” says Simpson. But it was a wider preoccupation that drew the duo to collaborate further. Both were fascinated by machines, and by-gone processes, so they started writing a booklet ‘Miracle Machines and the Lost Industries’, which turned into a manifesto of sorts, and saw the duo slowly funnel their independent practices into one that was united. They set up studio in 2008 – combining Van Gameren’s “risky, hands-on experimentalism” with Simpson’s “more methodical, conceptual” approach. “Sarah is definitely more in the moment than me,” says Simpson, turning to look at her: “You have no preconceived way of knowing what you will learn from an experiment you’re trying out,” he pauses – a fraction longer than comfortable - “and that’s really strong to have.” Van Gameren laughs. “Yeah - Tim all the time has this fantastic overview and understands when what I’m doing is a complete waste of time.” It’s interesting that as a BA graduate of Design Academy Eindhoven – a school renowned for its focus on conceptual design – Van Gameren takes the more applied approach. In fact, the designer sites her father, who works in physics, as a bigger influence than her time at DAE: “He must have kicked some genes in me,” she says. “Because to get ideas, I just throw random things together and see what happens.”

‘I learned that right from the very first stages of doing something, you make it look good.’

“The whole philosophy is very different,” says Simpson. “I think creativity can exist in two states; in a blank void where there is enough room to be creative, or in chaos, and it shows in the work produced. London is chaotic, and you have to be different to stand out. But Eindhoven…”

Big Dipper

Big Dipper creates candle-wax chandeliers by repeatedly dipping wicks into molten wax. Inspired by the traditional technique of candle making, the machine resembles a chandelier with two ring-shaped tiers that are counter-balanced to move up and down using a pulley system. On each large ring, twelve smaller rings are suspended creating a framework for configurations of looped of wick, which are one-by-one dip-

“Is pure,” Van Gameren interrupts. “There is no distraction whatsoever, and so no real difference. You get this situation where someone designs an object, and then someone else designs the same object but improves it. Over time, the school ends up

Big Dripper, Studio Glithero.

with a really strong, honed aesthetic. There are a lot of tricks we all use, that have been used over and over again. They always work, and they’re handy to know!”

So it’s no surprise that Van Gameren attributes the duo’s aesthetic prowess to her time at DAE: “I learned that right   Sarah van Gameren from the very first stages of doing something, you make it look good.” This might Van Gameren moved to London to sound whimsical, but it has a lot to do with distance herself from the Dutch pack, the studio’s success. By aestheticising their finding the remit of what “design” stands processes, they can trade on them – so as for in The Netherlands too narrow. “It’s much effort goes into designing the films difficult to be interdisciplinary there,” she that narrate their processes, as their says. “The people who give us work are in products. Click online, and you’ll see London; they’re the kind of people that perfectly staged performances of the Big believe in things that most people think are Dipper slowly dipping wicks into molten impossible.” wax, with suitably evocative music playing in the background, or a close up of Van

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studio glithero

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ped into drums of melted wax, forming layers until they grow into a chandelier of eight candles. Because the process is unpredictable, each chandelier is unique. With Big Dipper, an audience can witness the complete life of a product, from the moment the chandeliers are conceived until the moment they burn and perish. www.glithero.com


Gameren’s hands, delicately attaching flowers to earthenware before a sharp UV light beams the surface into a vibrant blue. In a sense, these films compensate for the fact that the studio has yet to achieve its ultimate goal: “We want to merge that moment of pure creation with the outcome,” says Van Gameren, meaning that they want the moment of materialisation to be completely communicated in the final product. “This is the riddle we want to solve – and we are still trying to solve it,” she says. Their most recent attempt is Running Mould, a plaster bench made using techniques perfected by cornice makers, for a gallery in Belgium.

‘T he transformation of the material became the thing we wanted to magnify and bring to a much bigger audience.’   Sarah van Gameren

Burn Burn Burn

A flame moves slowly over the wall, dances on the floor, up the chairs, down the table legs, where a trace of charred black remains. Inspired by Fred Astaire’s Ceiling Dance, the flame traces a dancing path across the room, connecting and unifying objects. www.glithero.com

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studio glithero

“There’s this moment where you scrape a hard piece of zinc through the plaster, and the form goes from an organic, blobby shape to this sharp profile. The transformation of the material became the thing we wanted to magnify and bring to a much bigger audience.” But while the process of making the piece looks like an enormous amount of fun (albeit it challenging), the final piece bares little obvious trace of how it was made process. To someone walking by after the event, the piece simply looks like what it is: a cornice in a semi-circular shape. The duo displayed the tooling they used – the plaster mixing station, the 3-metre long running mould and the pivot point bolted to the gallery room in the centre – providing clues as to how the piece materialised. And of course, they displayed a film of the process running on a loop. But if anything, the paraphernalia of the process does as much to demonstrate the difficulties of the duo’s mission: to communicate that moment of transformation in the finished product. But then it can take the duo time to communicate an idea successfully; and to their credit, they have convinced previous cynics. “Our projects are such overall

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Studio Glithero. Photo — André Penteado


concepts, they are such a big story that it can take us two years to get it right,” says Van Gameren. “Then people who were not enthusiastic at the beginning suddenly are because we finally managed to communicate.”

‘We think it is possible to reach different markets while staying close to a conceptual idea’   Tim Simpson

The draw back is that when it comes to buying, only a limited few can take these ideas home. The very nature of their process-led work makes mass-production difficult; and here their ideology of a new consumerism becomes problematic – but not impossible, the duo argues: “We think it is possible to reach different markets while staying close to a conceptual idea,” says Simpson, citing the studio’s Pique candles as an example. These self-supporting candles for Artecnica are a sibling of the Big Dipper chandeliers, and made using traditional techniques of handdipping. Delicately resting on a layer of wax droplets, they might not have the narrative charm of the originals, but they certainly bare reference to how they were made. But it’s actually in the ephemeral nature of this product that the duo’s message for a new consumerism is at its loudest. The candles, like the studio’s Paper Planes, are “anti objects – the candles disappear, and the planes are just folded from a piece of paper – they’re almost nothing,” says Simpson. “They exist to tell their story,” says Van Gameren. Even on the shop floor, the studio is asking consumers to buy into their philosophy – to enjoy the spectacle of process, to be curious about how stuff is made – rather than buy a product, in the traditional sense of the word.

Paper Planes As part of the Wallpaper* Handmade exhibition in Milan 2011, Glithero present the fruits of an original collaboration with Baddeley Brothers; five expertly crafted paper airplanes. Using traditional print press techniques and an unorthodox appropriation of an envelope-folding machine, the project is presented alongside a making-of film that pays homage to the faithful relationship between the printers and their machines. www.glithero.com

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studio glithero


Concrete Architectural Associates Rob Wagemans  23    page 70

Formafantasma Andrea Trimarchi & Simone Farresin 22    page 70


Ahrend Revolt chair, 1953, Friso Kramer

Noblesse Coffee Service, 1957, G.M.E. Bellefroid

Chair 116, 1952, Wim Rietveld

Fauteuil butterfly, 1979, Gerard van den Berg

www.marktplaats.nl, July / August 2011

Wobble, 1991, Ton Haas

www.marktplaats.nl, July / August 2011


Essay by   Kees de Haan    Illustrations  Miguel Tanco

, ‘To design is to make love  , someone might say who does not necessarily know much about either subject, and you would believe them too. If I say that design is essentially a very erotic affair and that designers are sex-crazed hunters desperately searching for a way of propagating themselves, in which incest, necrophilia and forgotten contraceptives are no exception, I , would run up against more opposition. So let me explain why it  s nevertheless true and why design actually does boil down to making love.

A Pa g a n Fer tility Goddess —

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This is the winning essay in the Morf Essay Competition 2011. It was previously published in Morf 14, tijdschrift voor vormgeving. Morf is a publication for design students of Premsela, Dutch Platform for Design and Fashion.


Objects seem to be possessed of eternal youth, at least in the dreams of many designers. It’s a world in which everything is fresh and beautiful, without kitsch and tedium. Only dull designers want to achieve this with cheese-slicer products, and they do not make it either. To start with, a genuine designer must be randy and eternal youth a very wet dream in which art and design dance before your eyes in the moonlight like naughty naked girls, a dream from which you awake panting with your fingers burning and itching to grab her, the holy virgin, design. You see, eternal youth is the product of nothing other than a constant desire for novelty, because the girl who is young today is the middle-aged single mother in a couple of years’ time, as jaded as the cheese slicer. And I assume that you prefer to see a fertile young girl in the moonlight than a bored housewife. Only fertility is eternal and design is mature, ripe to give birth.

“Someone who thinks he lives for a stunning woman only wants the Venus of Botticelli after all”

which designers make love. In the propagation of the artist, his partner is simply the history that others write, those orgiastic climaxes from the turbulent sex lives of the great masters. We view their past like a man or women we would like to please, because we think that it is bound to produce a sound offspring. Of course, inspiration comes from other things too, but I see that merely as the décor of the wedding night. Anyone who is inspired by a beautiful landscape lies in it to screw with Monet, someone who says that he is so moved by the night sniffs at the beard of Van Gogh, and even someone who thinks he lives for a stunning woman only wants the Venus of Botticelli after all. As I’ve said, eternal youth consists only of a shared desire for something new, but that does not mean that eternal youth is out of the question. The marble statues of the Renaissance no longer even faintly resemble the young nymphs for whom we fall by the dozen, but all the same they have certainly grown to become mature beauties, charismatic goddesses who make us feel like shy adolescents again. The work of Andy Warhol may not be the rebel rock star who wears leather jackets and breaks every rule any more, but it is at least as attractive as an intelligent and experienced philosopher.

Designers look ahead and focus their gaze on their offspring. What they leave behind is more important than what they have, just as a memory is sometimes more beautiful than the actual moment. I sometimes experience things more intensely if I look forward to remembering them, the point at which I can look back with a smile, however beautiful or terrible it may have been. The same applies to design: it is the future that gives history meaning. While we are designing we think about the smile of looking back, your own or other people’s, and hope that it will be one of admiration. There are some things I prefer not to look back on, and the same is true of design. There are people who regard design as a cheap whore available to all. That does not produce children. It is a handful of semen that no one wants to know about. Great artists and designers fertilize design with beautiful, strong and healthy children. They are the works that dance in the dreams of artists, that inspire and motivate, that make you randy and with

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a pagan fertility goddess

Design is linked to time, and the fruits that are born, grow up and mature through the way we look at them. For example, if you want to be provocative today, you should take a look at Marcel Duchamp, but there’s no point in coming up with another urinal. History is important as a sort of guideline for whoever wants to achieve a particular effect. Anyone who propagates himself with the work of another can count on a similar reaction if potent enough.

explain my use of erotic language in this essay: my Platonic randiness, the exciting urge to multiply myself with my muses, my models in art and design. I once saw an artist in a gallery who made paintings with his own sperm, each work aimed at women that he had never been able to have. By applying the colour to the canvas and mixing his vital juices with it, he confirmed his fertile existence and lived on in his design. He had got the message.

Jean Tinguely understood it too, when his ultimate love Niki de Saint Phalle told him “I sometimes experience that she didn’t want any more children things more intensely from him. Tinguely’s offspring are more magnificent, better and livelier than they if I look forward to would ever have been if they had been of remembering them” flesh and blood. Tinguely and Niki were always in a state of mutual inspiration, a sort of ongoing cross-fertilization from which the most beautiful monuments were A few words about myself. Physically born. Niki’s work represents a woman’s speaking, I’m as fertile as a gherkin. I’ve world, her ‘Nana’ is the symbol of fertility known it ever since a few months ago a and the feminine element in people. You doctor told me so after a thorough exami- see the opposite in the aggressive machines nation of my sperm, which was remarkably of Tinguely, which radiate a masculine lumpy recently. So I can’t have children. strength. At the world expo in Montreal in You understand how design has suddenly 1967, this confrontation resulted in a become much more important for me. number of large sculptures that referred to their own relationship as lovers. The If I want to propagate myself and give any eternal struggle between the sexes was meaning to this existence, I shall have to here represented as something beautiful face up to history by designing. It may and joyful. At an earlier exhibition in

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Stockholm, Tinguely and Niki made the ‘Hon’, a sort of pagan fertility goddess. This gigantic, voluptuous woman, who occupied the entire space, could be entered via the vagina and was filled with paintings, a cinema and a bar. Tinguely and Niki represented design literally as a child-bearing woman. They showed that love is the first and only starting point for a good creation. Money was not Tinguely’s motivation, he never wanted to be dependent on subsidies. All the income derived from his work went straight into new projects. As a result, his almost maniacal urge to create remained alive. Tinguely hated museums, which he believed destroyed the essence of the work. Essence, being occupied, procreation itself – he proved it with his Cyclops. This monument in a wood outside Paris was begun in secret and paid for by Tinguely himself. Niki produced the drawing, Tinguely devised the construction, and they worked on it for almost twenty-five years with a group of artist friends. The Cyclops was raised like a child through the constant building work and need for new modifications. Tinguely’s objective was not remembrance after his death – he would have preferred all his work to be destroyed – but art itself, the celebration of fertility. In my view, this is a fundamental idea by which every designer should live, that leaving your work for posterity should never be the final goal, but the act of propagation itself. It’s the randiness I so much want to talk about.

“Pain becomes more bearable if you know Goya’s drawings, calm is more calming if you have been in a building by Tadao Ando” Tinguely and Niki are remembered for their work, but wrote history through how they lived. It should be clear that I’m a sculpture fan, but that I’m much more inspired by their ideas, the vision of Jean Tinguely. It shows that you shouldn’t try design, just as you shouldn’t try to give birth. Only pregnancy exists, giving birth

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a pagan fertility goddess

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follows as a matter of course. It takes history with it, but even life itself is not far behind. Tinguely may have stayed with his Niki until his death, that did not alter the fact that he had the women for the taking. The eroticism of creativity is infectious and engages in an ongoing interaction with reality. A good example is Picasso, who first proves that impotence certainly need not always be the reason to become a designer. The different stylistic periods in Picasso’s enormous oeuvre are directly connected with his love life, the many women he had. It is sometimes said that every change in his style was the result of a new surge of passion, a new muse. It shows how important desire, the urge to reproduce is, and how closely design is connected with the real world. History has meaning for me because it is an example of how this life can have a meaning. You may find that an almost intellectual statement, but anyone who calls himself a designer must know what I’m talking about: the beauty of a woman is enhanced if you’ve seen the Botticelli Venus, the excitement of the nude is more intense if you can recall that Olympia of Manet, being in love is more intense for anyone who has ever heard a Tinguely machine creak, or been overwhelmed by a Picasso painting. Pain becomes more bearable if you know Goya’s drawings, calm is more calming if you have been in a building by Tadao Ando, the simplest line in a teacup can be a miracle if you have touched La Chaise by Charles and Ray Eames. If you don’t consider history, you don’t procreate, you are just masturbating. There’s nothing wrong with that, but it will never lead to a lively creation. From now on you can calmly take on trust anyone who says that to design is to make love. A lover sees history as his muse and designs to quench his desire, to satisfy the thirst for innovation. And however difficult it may be, show respect for the past. Be afraid to touch her from uncertainty and shame, but above all stay in love and gradually get closer, learn to know her and she will show you what beauty really is. The wedding night will not be far away. January 2011, Eindhoven


Dutch Design, Something to Be Handled with Care Dutch Design… Those in the know abroad are still beginning to give us jealous looks. Nowhere in the world are there more designers living and working per m2 than in the Netherlands. Nowhere are there more design courses, and nowhere else has every piece of land been redesigned so often as here. And nowhere else in the world is design as good as , in the Netherlands! At least… that   s what we think, , and let   s above all keep on thinking that way!

across to the world of industry and commerce. But how many companies in the Netherlands work with , qualified designers? At a guess, I  d say between around 5 and 10 per cent. Is that little? Is that a lot?

, Of course you can say it  s never enough. Welldesigned products and services make the world more valuable and contribute to an open and humane society. I once studied sociology because I thought that it could make a valuable contribution to , , , But there  s a danger lurking around the corner. On ‘improving  the world (it  s true, but then I studied all sides you can hear voices saying that design sociology in the 1970s!). At the same time, however, courses are no longer in tune with the actual situasociology also became the grease that keeps the tion. The vast majority of design courses are still social machine running smoothly. By thinking and located in art academies, especially in the field of acting in a sociological way, fossilised bureaucratic communications and spatial design. Fresh graduates institutions could act as though they were hip and in design lack knowledge of marketing, technical bent on change. Design has taken over something of knowledge, and an understanding of the client. Of the position of sociology. It can contribute to a course not every young designer has to be entirely better and more beautiful world, but it can also at the beck and call of the client. Autonomous disguise abuses and unpleasant things. design is a wonderful discipline! But it is just slightly too often that you can hear clients complaining that Everything changes. For that reason alone, desig, , designers don   t listen to what they want. ners shouldn   t think that what is now appreciated as Dutch Design will stay that way. One moment of inattention and we will be overtaken on both sides by, say, designers from the Far East.

“Design has taken over something of the position of sociology”

The art and culture sector in the Netherlands is being pitilessly penalised by a deputy minister who claims not to know anything about art and culture. At the same time the creative industry is the govern, ment s favourite. The creative industry is a Top So we do everything a bit differently in the Nether- Sector of great importance for the Dutch economy. lands. So far so good, but will it stay that way? Why So you might say that things are going in the right , do we have a Premsela Foundation here that is direction and I  m getting more of my way. More 100% financed by the Ministry of Culture? And why attention will be paid to the economic side of , don   t we have something like the British Design design. But if on the other hand the cultural side no Council, an organisation that also tries to develop longer receives any support from the government, the economic aspect of the design branch? Why is we will be moving in exactly the opposite direction. there such a thing as Design Flanders in Belgium, And Dutch Design might become something about even if that institute is backed by the Ministry of which we will later say that its demise began in , Economic Affairs too? In my view, it   s because here 2011. were are so used to well-designed products and , services that we think we don  t need an institute to Rob Huisman, Director BNO get the message of the added value of design

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column


PeLiDesign Alexander Pelikan  18  

page 67

Vij5 Arjan van Raadshooven & Anieke Branderhorst  10    page 61


Text   Wouter Keuning 

A drastic change in behaviour on the part of designers, clients, consumers and the government is needed to turn sustainable design from an exception into the standard. The platform de Groene Offerte (The Green Tender) which was launched at the end of last year wants to help to achieve that , goal. ‘Designers don  t just want to show beautiful things , themselves, but also to be inspired by colleagues.

,

T h a t   s G r e a t, Becoming a G r e e n D e s i g n e r. B u t H ow? — 32

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In a private capacity he had already been interested in sustainability and making deliberate choices in the field of consumption, but sustainability had not yet found a permanent place in his work, states communication designer Arjan Hilgersom. ‘In the communication branch we are often primarily concerned with making as many beautiful and nice things as possible. As long as the budgets allow it, we prefer to go our own way without any restrictions, often unaware of the enormous contributions that we are making to the pile of refuse and the waste paper basket. I started to feel awkward about that.’ At the moment when he decided that he wanted to become an aware (or green) designer a few years ago, he was immediately confronted by a major question. How do you do it? He discussed the issue with colleagues he knew from the Autobahn graphic design agency. ‘We wondered how you put that into practice.’ After some brain-racking, a number of surprisingly specific matters came up. The first was that it is tricky to get a client interested in a story about sustainability if the client is not particularly interested in it. ‘Clients simply aren’t just waiting to be taught a lesson by the designer. They already often find designers stubborn anyway’, Hilgersom claims. A second conclusion that the designers drew was that there is an enormous lack of knowledge about sustainable design on the part of designers. The final conclusion was that they themselves knew of few good examples of specific sustainable designs, let alone the processes that had led to them.

start to think about it.’ The site was launched at the end of 2010. But the minds behind the platform contacted the Association of Dutch Designers (BNO) first. ‘The people with whom we thought this up are all in the graphic sector’, Hilgersom explains. ‘Our idea was to give this theme much broader attention in the design world. A project like this only has a chance of succeeding if the whole branch takes it on board. Besides, it’s a fine thing that designers actually have a lot of power and influence in this area. They are involved in everything right from the start and always have their fingers on the buttons.’

Thies Timmermans Wooden guard rail The operational principle of the wooden crash barrier is based on the resilience of wood. It thereby pays for itself by reducing expenses for repairs and related economic loss caused by traffic jams after a repair.

‘W hile I was studying industrial design it was always emphasized that as the designer you are the hub in the design process. But in everyday practice you are primarily working to the specifications of the client’   Thies Timmermans Femke Glas Groeneofferte.nl

Hilgersom’s phone call to BNO met with a warm response, Femke Glas explains. The project manager of the association, who in the meantime has also become editor-inchief of the Groene Offerte website, had already been trying to put sustainability on the BNO agenda for some time. ‘There was a growing interest in this theme on the part of our members, and within BNO we It did not take long for the designers to ourselves also consider it to be an importurn these three points into the plan for the tant issue. So Arjan’s phone call came at Groene Offerte, an online and offline exactly the right moment.’ platform for designers and clients to obtain information about sustainable design, for Six months after the launch, Glas regards good examples implemented by colleagues, the site as a success. ‘We’ve only just and to establish contacts and exchange started and we already have around 250 information. ‘And’, Hilgersom emphavisitors a day. At various discussion sizes, ‘to draw up a green tender.’ The idea evenings on the topic I’ve heard that behind the online checklist for the making people know about us, and that is also clear of an alternative green tender is aimed at from the fact that an increasing number of clients who still need to be convinced of designers find their way to our site.’ The the value and necessity of sustainable biggest success to date, Glas considers, is design. ‘We think that it is possible to the fact that more and more designers take convince clients like those by showing the trouble to work out their own design them an alternative tender. If they have a cases in detail and to describe them on the specific alternative, they will at any rate site. ‘They explain how a case has gone

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how to become a green designer

Arjan Hilgersom Book GVB The assignment was to design a photobook for GVB to show its relations what the Amsterdam Transport Corporation does to keep the city on the move. Every book is unique: the cover is made from the trial print run. These sheets are normally thrown away, but Team Hilgersom thought of a way of folding this waste paper to create a cover: ‘We have saved a lot of material and no two books are alike.’

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from A to Z: what the objectives were, how they were reached, what has been learnt, that kind of thing. It’s crucial, because designers don’t just want to show beautiful things themselves, but also to be inspired by colleagues.’ In spite of the success of the site and the offline lectures and meetings organised under the name of the Groene Offerte, Glas and Hilgersom emphasize that this is only the start of a much longer process; one whose speed will depend on the involvement of stakeholders in their efforts to further develop sustainable design. The challenge is no less for the fact that designers do not operate entirely on their own, but are partly dependent on clients, the political climate and the wishes of the consumer. Thies Timmermans, industrial designer with Ideal&Co that has been specialised in sustainable product design for fifteen years, confirms that picture when he discusses the role of clients. ‘Clients often find it all pretty interesting, but in the end the question that always comes up is: “What’s in it for me?” They will often opt for the sustainable variant if they can use it as a marketing instrument or to save costs.’ Timmermans thinks aloud about how much influence designers can have on making design processes more sustainable. ‘Can you as a designer change the behaviour of consumers through sustainable design, or does the demand have to come from them?’ His own answer to the second part of that question is: ‘You can certainly change consumer behaviour, but if the consumers do not ask for it, a client will be slow to jump onto the bandwagon.’ Consumers, Timmermans just wants to say, play a crucial role in the process of increasing sustainability. But designers themselves can also do a lot, Timmermans and Hilgersom claim, partly by conducting a lot of research and running up against all kinds of situations in practice. ‘You first have to realise that every step you take in the design process and every choice that you make eventually has an impact on the environment later in the trajectory. And once you know and understand that, you have to try to find out what that effect looks like and what you as a designer can do about it to reduce that impact.’ It calls for a more scientific approach to the design process, Hilgersom

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believes. ‘You take on a different role as a designer. If a client asks you to make a book, you can say: “Oh, I’ll make a stack of paper with a cover around it”, but you can also say – and I think this is the task of a designer –: “What exactly does my client want and is that book necessary for that?” In my opinion we have to redefine the discipline, as it were, and reconsider the existing conventions. A designer is the right person to raise these questions and to come up with answers to them.’

‘In the Netherlands we are always very good at bitching and being critical of people with ideals. That’s needed too, but you must also tell enthusiastic stories about people with a vision, without immediately starting to split hairs’   Femke Glas

Glas notes in discussions with designers that making the design process more sustainable also implies that you think about very different business models. ‘You can design an attractive desk chair that can be completely dismantled at the end of its life-cycle and whose components can be reused, but if the chairs are not returned to the manufacturer at the end of their life-span and are not recycled, it is not much use. I think that the Groene Offerte can contribute to the development of that kind of knowledge by bringing designers into contact with one another.’

association, Glas believes. BNO is trying to develop knowledge in this field in conjunction with the universities. ‘And it is up to us to translate that knowledge for design practice and to make designers enthusiastic about it.’ In addition, Glas sees an important task for her organisation in winning the support of designers by bringing heroes to their attention. ‘We are looking for heroes of that kind, but fortunately we also see examples in practice. Designers like Niels van Marle van Pezy, Ingrid de Pauw from IDEAL & CO, Andreas Knol from Bluelarix and Ruud Boer from BTM are examples of designers who dedicate themselves to sustainability in their profession in a successful and inspiring way and think and act further than the clients ask them to. And they have a drive that they share with their colleagues.’

‘Clients simply aren’t just waiting to be taught a lesson by the designer. They already often find designers stubborn anyway’   Arjan Hilgersom

‘In the Netherlands we are always very good at bitching and being critical of people with ideals. That’s needed too, but you must also tell enthusiastic stories about people with a vision, without immediately starting to split hairs.’

Timmermans: ‘While I was studying industrial design it was always emphasized that as the designer you are the hub in the design process. But in everyday practice you are primarily working to the specifications of the client. Sustainable design requires us to take over that role as coordinator of the whole much more. In that way we can attune the different partners in the chain to one another.’ Besides politics, which can play a role particularly in providing financial support for innovation and development, there is also an important task awaiting the branch

how to become a green designer

Hilgersom is convinced that sustainable design will eventually become the standard, but that it may be some time before that actually happens. ‘Above all else, it takes time. But if all of us keep taking small steps ahead and continue to learn from and with one another, it will work out. It’s just like smoking. Less than ten years ago smoking was a completely accepted normal phenomenon. Smokers were fun, cool, relaxed people. By now smokers even have to go outside at parties and smoking has become looked down upon rather than cool. You can still see biscuits in a shop that have been wrapped separately in plastic. I’m sure we will see the time when people who make things like that will be given a talking to by consumers and clients. They will say to a designer like that: “What on earth are you up to?”’

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Tongue Chair F 577, 1967, Pierre Paulin, Artifort

Chair Oase, 1959, Wim Rietveld

Fauteuil 560, ca. 1980 (design 1959), Pierre Paulin, Artifort

www.marktplaats.nl, July / August 2011

www.marktplaats.nl, July / August 2011

BR027-sofa, 1958, Martin Visser, Spectrum Arspect


Sjoerd Jonkers  10    page 61

Scholten & Baijings Carole Baijings & Stefan Scholten 14   page 63


Text  JaapJan Berg

An interview with David Heldt and Victor le Noble, founders and coordinators of Tuttobene

Tu t t o b e n e Ta k e s S t o c k —

Photo — Dale Grant

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Tuttobene has developed at a steady rate over the last eight years. It has achieved many objectives during that period and introduced more variety into the rang of its activities. The publication of a new edition of Connecting the Dots is a good occasion for an interview with the two founders and coordinators of Tuttobene, David Heldt and Victor le Noble. The interview covers not only the results achieved, their cooperation and image, but also new ambitions and plans for the immediate future and eventually leads to the question of what Tuttobene would like to be doing in five years’ time.

explicitly acting on behalf of the government. Our principal client is Agentschap NL, an agency of the Ministry of Economic Affairs, Agriculture and Innovation. Furthermore, in the last few years we have been invited to design exhibitions and we have worked on a website where design is sold under the flag of Tuttobene. further.

‘We’re also both idiosyncratic in a positive way, and the tension that sometimes produces has repeatedly led to new ideas and projects’   David Heldt

How do you work together? Victor — We have different characters and qualities that complement David Heldt and Judith van Kranendonk one another very well. I see David presenting Connecting the Dots at the Dutch Consulate in Milan 2011. primarily as someone who follows Photo — Barbara Bonomelli his intuition and gut feeling, with a good eye and sensibility for recognising and developing something What is Tuttobene at the moment? beautiful. I pay more attention to Victor — Tuttobene is in the first the commercial potential of a place intended to put young design or designer. designers on the international map David — What I personally admire and help to promote their career, in Victor is the courage with which but in practice the last eight years he tries things out. He has got have been above all proof that we ideas, isn’t afraid to run serious are an organisation that arranges risks for them, and is prepared to things well and capably. That is put time into them. So he’s more of concentrated to a large extent on a an entrepreneur than I am. I’m a number of major moments and bit more cautious, choosy and often products, of which the most too focused on content. They’re all important are the annual presenta- qualities in themselves, but not so tion at the Salone del Mobile in easy to combine with running an Milan and the publication of the enterprise. We’re also both idiosynmagazine Connecting the Dots. In cratic in a positive way, and the addition, we have recently taken tension that sometimes produces steps to extend our role as has repeatedly led to new ideas and matchmaker. projects. So the way we work David — We have proved that we together is productive but not are a professional organisation that always predictable. I think that is is recognised by the branch. That what keeps the excitement going. can also be seen from the fact that We’ve become sadder but wiser in the last few years we have been over the years. We’ve had our ups

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tuttobene

and down, both for Tuttobene and within the branch. Now that offers us the required knowledge and above all the confidence we need to develop.

Do you have a clear-cut division of labour? David — We divide up the different tasks for each project. That division is actually different each time, depending on the other activities we’re involved in. We ended up with an equal division of labour for the forthcoming presentation in London, while I was more involved in the most recent presentation in Milan. It makes an enormous difference that in spite of our preferences and different qualities, we are actually both all-rounders who can each support and implement any part of a project. It has to be like that because we are a small and flat organisation.

that at Tuttobene sustainability is flanked by a number of other qualities that are equally valuable, such as, in the first place, our proven eye for quality. David — Over the years we have nevertheless shown that we have a good eye for young or undiscovered talent. Moreover, reliability is a factor of importance. A significant percentage of all the designers we have presented in the past have gone on to achieve success. I see it as proof that we can demonstrably contribute to establishing a name and promoting an international career for designers.

Arnout Visser at the exhibition THKTNK Designers of today, design of the future in KunstFort Asperen 2010. Photo — Ilco Kemmere

Victor le Noble guiding the City of Eindhoven through the presentation in Milan 2008. Photo — Boudewijn Bollmann

You often play the sustainability card. How important is that aspect really in your philosophy? Victor — In terms of content it’s noticeable that the sustainable character of the design we present has become more pronounced over the years. All the same, sustainability is no longer the most important distinguishing factor for us. That’s connected with the fact that many others have jumped on the sustainability bandwagon too by now. It’s become a mainstream concept. Still, sustainability still plays just as big a role in our approach, for example in our ideas about the usefulness of design. I just think

Has Tuttobene actually missed any opportunities? Victor — I think that the development of Tuttobene can be characterised above all as fast and orientated towards a target. We were pretty quick at finding a modus that proved to be successful and was relatively easy to repeat and extend afterwards. In fact, it all ran very smoothly. That favourable course prevented us from achieving proper structural development. We just moved on from one project to another and as a result had too little time and attention for certain strategic considerations. It’s a luxury problem if you look at it like that. But current trends, especially in the field of subsidies, are now forcing us to think carefully about our further course and development and to plot that course more precisely. I find that a healthy state

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of affairs. After all, renewal is a first step towards improved quality. David — There is a great deal of potential in the network that we have built up in the course of time. We can still get a lot more out of it, we need to reap the benefits, but not from a purely commercial perspective. In the past we’ve occasionally bitten off more than we could chew in our commercial ambitions. Our expertise lies elsewhere, more in the field of communications and the promotion of interaction between different parties. We must make far more use of those qualities. In the light of the present situation, we have no other choice when it comes to the economic and coordinatory aspects. Like other parts of the design branch, Tuttobene has to be able to stand on its own two feet.

‘A key element in our way of thinking and working is the conviction that design must have a relation with social trends if it is to be sustainable’   Victor le Noble

Is Tuttobene going to change direction or sharpen is contours? David — To be perfectly honest, a lot of what we do with Tuttobene could be done by other people too. The distinctive element lies in the quality, which is expressed in the selection, the process and the final result. That’s why I focus so much on that aspect. It enables us to distinguish ourselves from others in a fundamental way. A clear vision is essential if that quality is to be preserved and above all strengthened. If it’s not there, the foundation of the whole thing collapses. So for me it’s important that any change of direction or sharpening

Frederike Top at Tuttobene Milan 2010. Photo — Tuttobene

of contours has a foundation based on a vision. If I have to name one of the components of that vision at the moment, I would say selection. Tuttobene has proved that it gains in strength through a limited and thus clear selection of designers and designs. Victor — It’s very clear to me that Tuttobene is the result of the sum of the qualities and visions of both of us. You can’t change much in that basis, that’s the people we are. So it will be more a question of finding new ways of being able to carry on doing what we already do at the moment. Sharpening contours or explicitly accentuating are more in line with that.

continue reading on page 50


• What will Tuttobene be like in five years time? David and Victor — We hope that we will then be an organisation that operates as a cultural entrepreneur and still makes the right ethical and financial decisions against the background of the image of Tuttobene that has been consolidated and in the light of contemporary developments in the field of design. It will thus be a combination of a well considered, steadily consolidated base without losing sight of the flexibility and dynamism required. Tuttobene will be an organisation that, partly in conjunction with other parties, serves the Dutch design sector and sustains it with matchmaking and product supervision, as well as with consultancies, the publication of a magazine, and the organising of conferences. The overarching slogan for all this: Good design helps to find the market. Three members of the branch, namely Rob Huisman (Director bno), Frederik Roijé (designer) and Tim Vermeulen (Premsela programme manager) were asked to state their views on what the future and further development of Tuttobene might look like.

Christien Meindertsma with Urchin Poufs at the exhibition THKTNK - Designers of today, design of the future in KunstFort Asperen 2010. Photo — Ilco Kemmere

• Rob Huisman David Heldt and Victor le Noble are Tuttobene. They are the driving force behind this initiative. Thanks to their commitment it will continue to develop and perhaps find new spearheads besides sustainability and social design. After all, they both have an extremely good feeling for quality, young talent and what the market is ready for. I do think, however, that it is important to find new forms of funding, because the government instruments are drying up. Many schemes are drawing to a close and Tuttobene has not yet attracted enough other strong financial partners. From the conviction that mutual influence is very important, it may have interesting effects on content if cooperation is sought with similar initiatives abroad in order to attract young designers to the Netherlands. In that case Tuttobene will not only take Dutch design abroad, but also bring more foreign design to the Netherlands.

• Frederik Roijé Over the years Tuttobene has become a well organised and permanent part of the Salone del Mobile in Milan as a site where Dutch design displays its talent. It is a platform that in the future can probably expand in the direction of more major international design events in other countries. Besides presenting new Dutch design, Tuttobene could also act in the future in an advisory role and mediate between designers and productive companies, the government and other exhibitions in the field of design – in other words, Tuttobene as a matchmaker and advisory body, a non-subsidised organisation led by design professionals for the development of Dutch design. Tuttobene Milan 2008. Photo — Boudewijn Bollmann

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Top Tuttobene Milan 2008. Photo — Boudewijn Bollmann

Down Tuttobene Milan 2010, opening party. Photo — Ilco Kemmere

• Tim Vermeulen , I ve known Tuttobene right from the start as a small organisation that helped designers during the Salone in Milan with a lot of dedication and enthusiasm. The charm was partly due to their underdog position vis-à-vis the big capital of the furniture industry. Thanks to clever communications, they have now themselves become a top dog with growing ambitions. The growth scenario of presenting ready-made Dutch design talent on international platforms involves risks too. Tuttobene has itself become a strong brand that has to be constantly recharged by strong designers. How do you get them to become committed to you and above all to stay committed to you? Besides its role as presenter, Tuttobene should perhaps also target economic matchmaking and market exploration – linking designers to a market. This entails an investment in specific knowledge that gives Tuttobene designers a clear advantage in the new markets vis-à-vis designers who want to make it under their own steam. It is also important to make the move from platform to developer in the field of sustainability, where Tuttobene has developed a clear profile. What is the best and most distinctive way of presenting yourself?


You are thinking of placing your bet on matchmaking. What do you take the term to mean? Victor — A key element in our way of thinking and working is the conviction that design must have a relation with social trends if it is to be sustainable. It must resonate with a clear echo of a sense of responsibility. So design must have an explicit ethical side in addition to the obvious aesthetic one. On the basis of that conviction we have been increasingly moving towards matchmaking, in other words, actively mediating to establish a relation between designers and producers. There are many possibilities in that field. Every year hundreds of design students graduate who have limitless ambitions and all want ‘something’. For some of them, Tuttobene can offer a direction and tangible form as a step towards further development by forging a link with a producer.

‘So the design is as central as ever, but we will probably have to investigate more possibilities in recognising that it is also about commercial products’   Victor le Noble

David — Seen in that light, Tuttobene is changing from a one-off presentation platform to a design and product facilitator that is constantly active and involved with the design and the designer over a much longer period. In fact it’s a shift from presentation platform to product developer. Another advantage of that approach is that we no longer confine ourselves to a number of moments in the year. After all, one of the disadvantages of trade fairs is that everyone is there and they all

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want all kinds of things from one another. You may be able to achieve much more success by spreading your activities in time and being active at other moments too. So we want to distinguish ourselves by working on the basis of a clear commitment. The designer must stand to gain from it.

Gijs Bakker and Jeanne Tan at the launch of the first Connecting the Dots, Milan 2010. Photo — Ilco Kemmere

Victor — If we more explicitly opt for that course, the relation will be different from when we present designers at the Salone in Milan. It will be less of a matter of a one-off selection and presentation of products. If we develop matchmaking further, designers will be connected with Tuttobene in a different way and above all over a longer period. In that connection it’s also logical to work with contracts in which both parties – designer and Tuttobene – benefit from the results. It has a lot of advantages, such as demand-driven design and the possibility of working on a product development for longer. In our view, matchmaking offers advantages to both the designer and the producer. The designer is less dependent on that single design, and the producer has a better grip of what he wants. So the design is as central as ever, but we will probably have to investigate more possibilities in recognising that it is also about commercial products. I have in mind, for example, selling products on commission.

So does that change anything in your relation with the designers? David — We continue to focus on presentations of the work of beginning designers. We still believe profoundly in that platform func tion that has proved to be an added value for Dutch design time after time. But besides the contacts connected with those presentations, we are going to develop other forms too. In fact, the main change in Tuttobene will be that it will become more versatile.

‘T he charm was partly due to [Tuttobene’s] underdog position visà-vis the big capital of the furniture industry. Thanks to clever communications, they have now themselves become a top dog with growing ambitions’   Tim Vermeulen

tuttobene


Studio Lawrence Bart Eijking & Patrick de Louwere  16    page 63

Mirjam Nuver  17    page 64


Advertorial Rabobank

Art Is the Barometer of Society Art is the barometer of society The Rabobank is traditionally a cooperation that is committed. The design and art sector inside the Netherlands and abroad is no exception: the bank supports the branch in the form of cultural sponsoring, and the Rabobank has an art zone in its new head office where both artists and passers-by can reap the benefits.

Making art accessible That commitment to the design and art sector is no novelty. For many years the Rabobank has been an active sponsor in the cultural sector. The Rabobank tries to make culture more accessible for all through intensive cooperation with leading cultural partners in the Netherlands and farther afield. Ella van Zanten, Head Rabobank Art Department: ‘Art stimulates imagination and creativity; it can also be provocative. It is a barometer of society because it shows what times we live in. What is going on in our society, and how does that affect us? Art offers a window onto the world around us. And that is appropriate for a bank that is smack in the middle of society, because the choices that are made match , the bank.

A life in art For the past twenty-five years the bank has been selecting leading art for most of the offices in the forty-eight countries in which it is active. Colleagues, business relations and passers-by can now enjoy the A large area of the ground floor in the new head collection in the Netherlands, which is accessible to office of the Rabobank in Utrecht has been conver- everybody. Just what characterises the Rabo Art ted into a gallery that is open to the public. The Collection? Van Zanten: ‘Once we have chosen an , building itself is also an eye-catcher. ‘The telescope , artist, we follow his or her further progress – and as the head office has been nicknamed, ensures that thus purchase art from them structurally. In this way the gaze of the bank is always focused on the we guarantee a long-term commitment. Besides, outside world: the world as scope. every half a year we have a solo exhibition of an important artist from the collection. In that connec, The bank  s commitment does not stop at the Dutch tion we invite the artist to produce new work in border either. Tessa Kits, International Desk Mana- partnership. In that way we invest in talent and , ger United Kingdom & Ireland for the Rabobank in successively present the première. ‘A life in art  London: ‘Design and art are important sectors for acquires a double meaning: living among art, and , us. That is why we are supporting the London making a contribution to art.  Design Festival as well. If firms in that sector have set their sights on the UK for investment, import or Through its acquisitions the Rabobank helps to export, our desk can support them with funding, preserve certain works of art for posterity. For trade, lease or cash management if necessary. instance, it is thanks to a contribution from the bank Moreover, we introduce them to our network and to that a work by Karel Appel made of scrap material other (Dutch) companies. It is a kind of matchmaking has now been cast in bronze ‘so that people can still , which sometimes leads to highly interesting transac- admire it a hundred years from now  , as Van Zanten , tions. Furthermore, we can offer a local network of puts it. Appel  s work will shortly be on display in the intermediaries and local government bodies to help head office. , firms further. 

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Vroonland Arjan Vaandrager & Sjoerd Vroonland  20    page 69

Jo Meesters  12    page 62


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Portfolio Pieke Bergmans

Design/Ruimtelijk

Tentoonstellingsontwerpen worden Museale verhalen

Design/Games

Nederlandse game-industrie – Bij rood: schieten!

Design/Mode

Nieuwe technologie in kledingtextiel is voorhanden.

BP # 2 2011 € 13,50

BP

over design

Portfolio Pieke Bergmans | Tentoonstellingsontwerpen | Nederlandse gameindustrie | Tech-textiel en mode

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Design / Grafisch

# 2 2011

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Design/Product

Portfolio Job Wouters | Lezen | Het perfecte boek | Ruimtelijke stripverhalen | Scholten & Baijings

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In Shanghai I started cooperation with the Shanghai International Creative Industry Week (SICIW) in December 2005. Working together with Dutch designers already active in Shanghai we could strategically place them and new entrants into the Shanghai spotlight for relatively little money. Now most stepping stones in China are provided through the Dutch Design Fashion Architecture (DutchDFA) programme which aims to strengthen the international position of the most prominent sectors of the Dutch creative industries – design, fashion and architecture – through a joined-up approach.

Richard Sennett: “Wanneer je iets tekent, maakt de hand een reis”

wim crouwel

# 3 2011

Jan van Weijen Head of the Department of Dutchness – Dutch Embassy London

Portfolio Erik Kriek | Wim Crouwel | Nutteloosheid | Spelen | Ed Fella | Richard Sennett

Eventually on the design floor it is not the diplomats , that lead, it s the designers. Take me for a swing – anytime!

# 4 2011

“Know how is nice but know who is so much better ”

In a mature market like London my approach was surprisingly similar. Create a platform, stepping stones together with a local coalition of the willing. Since 2009 the Embassy has gathered the stones and represented the Dutch design community at the heart of the London Design Festival, the V&A but , also at places like Sotheby  s and Selfridges. Our latest example is the jointly organized Marlies Dekkers & Selfridges sweepstake. Another Dutch design stone in the London Pond is NL the Dutch Cultural Pop Up Space, run for the Embassy by an independent intendant focusing during the different festivals & fashion weeks Dutch design, Fashion and Architecture as part of the international calendar. , I m very happy that Tuttobene is now providing the stepping stones, connecting the dots, in London, together with us diplomats.

Design/Ambacht

over design items

Creativity and diplomacy are not often talked about in the same breath. Creativity needs acknowledgement from others. Diplomacy is the art of letting the , other party have things your way. A diplomats light is best when hidden under a bushel while a designer thrives on letting it shine in every nook and cranny of life. So, both the designer and the diplomat have to be creative, one behind and the scenes and the other in front of the curtain. , A diplomat  s tool is his network; know how is nice but know who is so much better. You never know when you might need somebody so better know a lot of people in the right places. Second comes his reputation, reliability, and discretion. I have been working with designers for the better part of my career as a diplomat. It takes two to tango and one has to take the lead. In new markets embassies and consulates provide valuable stepping stones for Dutch business. Every designer can write or meet their diplomatic representative to be taken for a swing along important people and places.

Design/Illustratie

Portfolio Erik Kriek: “Ik kan reële vrezen verwerken in fictie.”

Items App : The English Issue! Items is a Dutch language design magazine – until now. During Dutch Design Week in Eindhoven, this October, we will launch the zero-issue of Items’ first English publication, Items App. With our annual selection of Dutch design graduates – the electronic version of Items #5 – and much more. Later this year, we will also launch the English version of our website. See www.itemsmagazine.com for more information! Subscribe to Items : 6 issues : € 77,50 € 58,- for Dutch students and BNO members. www.items.nl/word-abonnee


100% Design London

03 • Natweave

Earl's Court Exhibition Centre Warwick Road, Earl's Court London, SW5 9TA

04 • NotOnlyWhite

Earl's Court

About  Natweave is a specialised supplier of broadloom carpet and rugs for indoor and outdoor use. We supply a new range of outdoor rugs in different structures and colours. Custom made, with high-end finished borders made of leather, nubuck, linen, cotton and pvc. For every individual interior and exterior there is a matching, luxurious Natweave carpet.

Designer • Natweave design team www.natweave.nl www.natweave.co.uk Contact •Daan Goris Industriestraat 15 8281 BN Genemuiden The Netherlands e • daan.goris@natweave.nl t • +31 (0)388518700

About  NotOnlyWhite is a Dutch design brand. We aim to provide distinctive and flexible bathroom product solutions for both the residential and the commercial markets. NotOnlyWhite strives to be a transparent organization. This will be reflected in the way we communicate, whether through our website or whilst personally advising our clients on their projects

District

Presentation  The new Stoore and Grid are both flexible cabinet collections with purity as the essence of its design. Instead of a visible grip or handle, a push-system (touch latch) is used. This timeless design is applicable in all kinds of bathroom environments, from private houses to hotels.

01 • MID Carpets

Location • 100% Design London Stand: B50 Designer • Marike Andeweg www.notonlywhite.com Contact • Marike Andeweg Bertelmanplein 138 1075 LS Amsterdam The Netherlands e • info@notonlywhite.com t • +31 (0)204277947

05 • Versaflex About  M.I.D. Carpets is dedicated to provide the very best in custom woven Wilton carpet. We bring together an unique blend of craftmenship, fibre and colour. Creating a high quality piece of custom woven Wilton carpet for residential and commercial applications around the globe.

About  Versaflex Systems takes great care to select materials from readily available and sustainable resources. With the invention of the Versaflex, a sustainable and adhesive-free modular flooring system with porcelain top surface has become a reality.

Location • 100% Design London stand: F21 Designer • MID Carpets design team www.mid.nl www.midcarpets-usa.com Contact • Daan Goris Industriestraat 15 8281 BN Genemuiden The Netherlands

Presentation  Versaflex is the new flooring system with a push, clip and go feature. Unlike other clip tile systems, Versaflex allows for vertical tile lifting giving immediate access to under floor cables or quick tile changes. No grouting, no cementing, and no messy drying time make installations typically 6 times faster to lay than traditional wet lay porcelain floors.

e • daan.goris@mid.nl t • +31 (0)388518700

02 • Royal Mosa

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Location • 100% Design London stand: F21

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About  Royal Mosa is a Cradle to Cradle certified international tile manufacturer from the Netherlands that produces 8 million square metres of tiles every year. Royal Mosa is specialised in tiles for the international project market and has many innovative tile products in its spectrum. Mosa won various international design prizes.

Location • 100% Design London Stand: C85

Presentation  In a temporary ceramic tile museum, Mosa presents new ceramic tile collections. Mosa keeps pushing boundaries within the ceramic tile industry with new distinctive innovative collections, all Cradle to Cradle certified.

e • info@mosa.nl t • +31 (0)43 368 92 29

100% design

Presentation • Mosa Tiles presents Terra Tones Designer • Mosa Design Team www.mosa.nl Contact • Mosa Sales Support Meersenerweg 358 6224 AL Maastricht The Netherlands

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Location • 100% Design London Stand: D118 Company • Versaflex Systems BV www.versaflexsystems.com www.stratatiles.co.uk Contact • Versaflex Systems BV Toustruwe 5 6218 XX Maastricht The Netherlands e • richard@versaflexsystems.com t • +31 (0)626204394


Brompton Design District South Kensington

8 •  Henny van Nistelrooy

South Kensington About  Henny Van Nistelrooy is a Dutch born London based designer. He studied product design in the Netherlands and at the Royal College Art in London. His studio balance commercial projects with self-initiated projects and has curated several acclaimed exhibitions. Presentation  A basement occupied by an unusual collection of objects and furniture. The junction between the flat and the works is a precarious yet delicate conversation that challenges how we relate to and understand the particular function and gesture of each.

9   • Methods of Imitation

District Circle Piccadilly

Location • Flat 1A, 1a Cromwell Place South Kensington, London, SW7 2JE Presentation • The Ground Floor Arrangement Band Designers • Among others Henny van Nistelrooy www.studiohvn.com Contact • Henny van Nistelrooy Unit 6 Sunbury workshops Swanfield Street London, E2 7LF e • info@studiohvn.com t • +44 (0)20 7739 8242

South Kensington About  Workshop For Potential Design is a platform for speculative and collaborative design practice. We organise exhibitions, workshops and other events related to design. Presentation  Making references, borrowing and appropriating is commonplace in design, but there seem to be moments when the new proposal affects our old perspective. The exhibition considers the works on show as speculative reviews of objects both significant and mundane that propose new narratives for the old and familiar.

Location • Methods of Imitation Paper Tiger, 10-12 Exhibition Road London, SW7 2HF Company • Study O Portable, Workshop For Potential Design Presentation • Methods of Imitation Designers • Bernadette Deddens, Tetsuo Mukai, Markus Bergström & Karin Peterson, Daniel Eatock, Paul Elliman, Peter Marigold, Liliana Ovalle www.studyoportable.com www.methodsofimitation.com www.workshopforpotentialdesign.com Contact • Bernadette Deddens Studio 50, 3-5 Shelford Place London, N16 9HS, United Kingdom e • b@studyoportable.com t • +44 7 914265548

06 • Arco, OKAY Studio

South Kensington About Dutch furniture producer Arco cherishes the value of designers presenting their personal views on the kind of products that it could make in the near future. The company assigned eleven designers of the London based OKAY Studio collective to develop new products in specially organized workshops.

Location • The Garage 1 North Terrace, London, SW3 2BA

Presentation  Ten OKAY Studio designers were challenged to create something out of wood that is completely different from the products in the existing collection - so not , tables, cupboards or chairs - taking Arco s production facilities into account.

Contact • Jorre van Ast Parallelweg 2/III 7102 DE Winterswijk The Netherlands

About  After 22 successful years in Paris and Milan, EBS landed in Amsterdam. EB (France 1967) masterly crafts the industrial design of objects in glass, marble, wood and composites. EBS works as an adviser in product design, graphics and art direction.

Location • Michelin House - Conran Shop 81 Fulham Road London, SW3 6RD

10 • Mint Explores

South Kensington

Company • Arco, OKAY Studio Presentation • Arco/Okay Designers • Shai Akram, Shay Alkalay & Yael Mer, Tomas Alonso, Jorre van Ast, Mathias Hahn, Andrew Haythornthwaite, Peter Marigold, Eelko Moorer, Oscar Narud, Hiroko Shiratori. www.arco.nl www.okaystudio.org

e • j.vanast@arco.nl t • +31(0)641369898

About  Mint is a world-renowned interiors shop famous for its cutting edge selection in contemporary design, being in the forefront presenting new talent, and for its unique and distinctive curating style.

Location •Gallery Mint 2 North Terrace, London, SW3 2BA

Presentation  This year Mint explores the unconventional, representing designers from Mexico to Beirut via Milan, materials and forms set out to tease and surprise! This concept will be carried further through jewellery, examining the “Adornment of the Body” with artworks, which do not present themselves as jewellery unless seen worn.

www.sjoerdjonkers.viewbook.com www.jolandavangoor.com www.Vij5.com www.mintshop.co.uk

About  Study O Portable is a designing practice for accessories and other portable objects based in London, founded by Bernadette Deddens and Tetsuo Mukai in April 2009. Our work evolves around the idea of portability and questions functionality in objects. We take great interest in methods of designing.

Location • 2 Cromwell Place Brompton, London, SW7 2JE

Presentation • Mint Explores Designers • Arjan van Raadshooven, Anieke Branderhorst, Breg Hanssen, Mieke Meijer, Sjoerd Jonkers, Jolanda van Goor

Contact • Jodi Moss 2 North Terrace London, SW3 2BA United Kingdom e • info@mintshop.co.uk t • +44 207 225 2228

Photo Lucas Hardonk.

07 • Emmanuel Babled

South Kensington

Presentation  Emmanuel Babled, who has been able to give the Murano glass a more sexy and playfull appeal, will present recent work in limited editions. Babled continues elaborate on specific local traditions, extending his activity from glass installation to plexiglass lights in Como and american walnut table in Cantù. Digit Linear, Modular wall light system. Photo Edland Man.

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11 • Study O Portable

South Kensington

Company • Emmanuel Babled Studio, Metea, Patrick Brillet Fine Arts Presentation • Superdesign Highlights Designer • Emmanuel Babled www.babled.net

Presentation  Study O Portable presents a story within a story; a small collection of horse paraphernalia.

Contact • Emmanuel Babled Studio 1053 BB Amsterdam The Netherlands e • info@babled.net t • +31 6 29059291

Presentation • Vera, Chapter One Designers • Bernadette Deddens, Tetsuo Mukai www.studyoportable.com www.verachapterone.com Contact • Érika Muller 35 Bentley Road London, N1 4BY United Kingdom e • bonjour@erikamuller.com t • +44 (0)7813131737 Press contact • Kirsty Minns e • kirstyminns@gmail.com t • +44 (0)7737094242

Press contact • Mauro Martinuzzi e • press@babled.net t • +31 20 3316462

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Shoreditch Design Triangle

14 • Scholten & Baijings

Old Street / Angel About  Scholten & Baijings combine minimal forms and balanced use of colour with traditional craft techniques and industrial production in a distinctive, almost un-Dutch design style. They build a bridge between designer, artisan and manufacturer. Their close involvement in the production process results in design with both a perfect finish and a personal signature. Presentation  Established & Sons is a uniquely positioned British design company focused on producing and representing all that is innovative in contemporary design. The presentation at their showroom shows the Amsterdam Armoire, Colour Lights and the Butte series designed by Scholten & Baijings.

Amsterdam Armoire.

Old Street

Northern

Angel

Northern

Notting Hill Gate

Circle Central District

Shoreditch High Street

15 • Studio Glithero

Location • Showroom Established & Sons 5-7 Wenlock road London, N1 7SL Presentation • Scholten & Baijings Designers • Carole Baijings, Stefan Scholten www.scholtenbaijings.com www.establishedandsons.com Contact • Carole Baijings Westerdoksdijk 597 1013 BX Amsterdam The Netherlands e • info@scholtenbaijings.com

Old Street About  Gallery FUMI, based in the vibrant Shoreditch area of London, aims is to provide a platform for talented emerging designers and artists. Since 2008 FUMI has become a significant presence on the design scene for the remarkable works of the designers it shows, and for the bold attitude of its owners.

London Overground

Presentation  Studio Ware; articles made in the studio for domestic use. An exhibition of new studio work by a select group of artists and designers who share a passion for manipulating materials by hand, including Max Lamb, Studio Glithero and Johannes Nagel.

Location • Gallery FUMI 87-89 Tabernacle Street London, EC2A 4BA Company • Studio Glithero Presentation • Studio Ware Designers • Sarah van Gameren, Tim Simpson www.studioglithero.com www.galleryfumi.com Contact • Valerio Capo / Sam Pratt 87-89 Tabernacle Street London, EC2A 4BA United Kingdom e • info@galleryfumi.com t • +44 (0) 20749 02366

Running Mould Mirror. Photo Petr Krejci

12 • Studio Jo Meesters

a

Shoreditch High Street

About  Studio Jo Meesters creates concepts and products based on the keywords of matter and craftsmanship. The ongoing search for innovation in materials and techniques is the major drive of the design studio, which is considered a laboratory for product concepts. A laboratory focused on the research of new ways of material handling and the exploration of the boundaries of the intersection of craftsmanship and mass production techniques. Presentation  For the second time during London Design Festival Aesop will host Studio Jo Meesters . The design studio will install two lighting installations across two locations creating a temporary work of art.

13 • Kranen/Gille

Notting Hill Gate

16 • Studio Lawrence

Shoreditch High Street About  Studio Lawrence design and produce quality contemporary furniture with craftsmanship and authenticity, creating pieces of enduring value. As a subsidiary of architecture practice eijkingdelouwere, the award-winning Dutch design duo Bart Eijking and Patrick de Louwere ensure technical rigour and creative fervour form the kernel of Studio Lawrence’s products.

b Aesop Notting Hill 227A Westbourne Grove, London, W11 2SE Designer • Jo Meesters www.jomeesters.nl www.aesop.com Contact • Indi Davis 91 Mount Street London, W1K 2SU United Kingdom

Presentation  To celebrate landing in London, Studio Lawrence will exhibit their sculptural creations; UK premiere of modular sofa system To Gather and Wonky chairs alongside the new Raising Lantern design and GOOD DESIGN Awardwinning wall hanging Along These Lines.

e • indi.davis@aesop.com t • +44 (0)207 409 2358

Old Street About  Kranen and Gille always seek to combine various disciplines, craftsmanship and their own particular aesthetics into appealing design objects. All their pieces breathe industrial revolution with a whiff of natural structures reminiscent of the photography of Karl Blossfeldt. Presentation  Kranen/Gille will show a new stage of their ongoing project 00:00.00 at Lux Craft, to be held at Old Spitalfields market. Invited by the Crafts Council and Nokia design the studio will explore the intuitive industrial form language found in their mass produced and recently launched “Luftschiff” lamp.

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Locations • a Aesop Shoreditch Redchurch Street 5A, London, E2 7DJ

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shoreditch

Location • Shoreditch Town Hall 380 Old Street London, EC1V 9LT Presentation • Lux Craft Designers • Johannes Gille, Jos Kranen www.kranengille.com Contact • Jos Kranen Sint Josephstraat 20 5211 NJ 's-Hertognebosch The Netherlands e • info@kranengille.com t • +31 (0)646241910

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Locations • The Annexe The Brick Lane Gallery 93-95 Sclater Street London, E1 6HR Company • Studio Lawrence Presentation • Landing In London Designers • Bart Eijking, Patrick de Louwere www.studiolawrence.com Contact • Kate le Versha 6 Ellerslie Road London, W12 7BW United Kingdom e • info@studiolawrence.com t • +44 (0)7903135479


17 • Location • Old Spitalfields Market

18 • Location • Tuttobene

Old Spitalfields Market 65 Brushfield Street London, E1 6EW

Aubin Gallery 64-66 Redchurch Street London, E2 7DP

Shoreditch High Street

London Overground

Liverpool Street

Hammersmith & City Circle Metropolitan

Aldgate East

Hammersmith & City Circle Metropolitan

17 • Mirjam Nuver • Old Spitalfields Market

London Overground

Old Street

Northern

www.tuttobene.nl Contact • Victor le Noble & David Heldt Damrak 70, studio 5.63 1012 LM Amsterdam The Netherlands e • info@tuttobene.nl t•+  31 (0)6 24668569 (Victor) +31 (0)6 15510727 (David)

18 • Bam-doo • Tuttobene

About  Mirjam Nuver started her company in 1991. She designs and produces hats in unusual, graphical styles. She uses classical materials and innovative techniques. This results in different but wearable hats for all (special) occasions.

Location • Old Spitafields Market 65 Brushfield Street London, E1 6EW

Presentation  Mirjam Nuver shows her new winter collection 2011/12 .The main materials are wool, felt and canvas. Zipps buttons and buckles are used as well as functionally as just for fun. Some hats have several wearing possibilities. Color and style refer to the sixties.

Contact • Mirjam Nuver J.O.vaillantlaan 103 1086 XZ Amsterdam The Netherlands

About  Bam-doo stands for conscious design. Aware of user and environment, Bam-doo creates multifunctional products, using sustainable materials such as bamboo. The concept of the studio, a collaboration of Dutch artists Lode, Bruins and Carine Holties, is ‘clean design : no screws, pins or glue.

Company • Mirjam Nuver hat designer Designer • Mirjam Nuver www.mirjamnuverhoeden.nl

Presentation  This table is like a friend: reliable, intelligent, responsible, warm and... capable of keeping a secret. The Ami is likeable in all respects: smart, with its (secret) storage room between the two tabletops, accessible by two hatches, easy to assemble, strong, sensual and conscious, as it is made of sustainable bamboo.

e • nuver@xs4all.nl t • +31 (0)653786505

17 • Nina Führer • Old Spitalfields Market About  My knitted accessories are in parts figurative or sculptural but wearable and functional. The creations can be combined with more basic items of my collection or my woolly coats and jackets. Items are knitted with a domestic brother knitting machine in my atelier, hand finished and from the highest quality material, like merino wool and cashmere. I’m settled at the border triangle of NL/ D/ B. In addition to create my collection I am docent at the Academy of Fine Arts and Design, Maastricht.

Shoreditch High Street

Tuttobene London 2011

Location • Aubin Gallery 64-66 Redchurchstreet London, E2 7DP Company • Bam-doo Designers • Lode Bruins, Carine Holties www.bam-doo.com Contact • Lode Bruins Valckenierstraat 66 1018 XE Amsterdam The Netherlands e • lodebruins2@gmail.com t • +31 (0)617232454

18 • Studio Dave Keune • Tuttobene About  Making aesthetics function: the spatial design of studio Dave Keune enhances usability and durability in the field of interior, exhibition and product design. By applying skilled craftsmanship to the production process, he delivers high-quality results in design, function and durability.

Location • Old Spitafields Market 65 Brushfield Street London, E1 6EW Company • Nina Führer Presentation • Mint Explores Designer • Nina Führer www.ninafuehrer.com

Presentation  Standard Primitives, is the new collection of modular furniture-objects by Dave Keune. The work consists of different bright and pure, interchangeable elements. Standard Primitives , doesn’t prescribe how things ‘should be  but , allows for a plural and personal ‘could be  . On show are several examples of personalised combinations of these pure and primitive elements.

Contact • Nina Führer Koperstraat 22 6291 AJ Vaals The Netherlands e • info@ninafuehrer.com t • +31 (0)43 3064093

Location • Aubin Gallery 64-66 Redchurchstreet London, E2 7DP Company • Studio Dave Keune Presentation • Tuttobene Designer • Dave Keune www.davekeune.com Contact • Dave Keune Krelis Louwenstraat 1 B29 1055 KA Amsterdam The Netherlands e • info@davekeune.com t • +31 (0)619864573

18 • De Vorm • Tuttobene About  De Vorm creates and produces high-quality design furniture - eco-friendly, durable and suprising. Young designers from Europe ensure diversity and contemporariness and yet sustain the key values and the unique character of De Vorm. Presentation  This year, De Vorm presents its newest products; the Pod by Benjamin Hubert and the Clip chair by Sebastian Herkner. Both designs are environmentally friendly and offer surprising features. The shell of the Pod is made of felt from pressed plastic bottles. The Clip chair is classic and yet rich in contrast, just like De Vorm!

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Location • Aubin Gallery 64-66 Redchurchstreet London, E2 7DP Company • De Vorm Presentation • Tuttobene Designers • Benjamin Hubert, Sebastian Herkner www.devorm.nl Contact • Jeroen ter Hoeven Uitmeentsestraat 19 6987 CX Giesbeek The Netherlands e • jeroen@devorm.nl t • +31 (0)313696158 Press contact • Theresa Kriese e • theresa@devorm.nl


18 • Doreen Westphal • Tuttobene

18 • Royal Mosa • Tuttobene About  Simple, poetic, beautiful - these are the designs of Doreen Westphal. Inspired by architecture and science she is committed to make unique and timeless, high quality furniture and living accessories produced in small series. Socially conscious and ethical sustainable, all her designs are made with care and devotion. Presentation  For her recent collection of small furniture and living accessories Westphal collaborated with innovative cement developer G.tecz. Together they take new high-tech ceramic concrete Quantz to its borders and beyond. Producing comfort and atmosphere, the new designs radiate a spirit of soulful innovation. Intimate, humanist and elegant - the new line of products truly brings concrete home. Location • Aubin Gallery 64-66 Redchurchstreet London, E2 7DP

About  Royal Mosa is a Cradle to Cradle certified international tile manufacturer from the Netherlands that produces 8 million square metres of tiles every year. Royal Mosa is specialised in tiles for the international project market and has many innovative tile products in its spectrum. Mosa won various international design prizes. Presentation  One by One are tiles in the new, gigantic Mosa size of 100 x 100 cm. Sleek ceramic tiles in the unique and natural Mosa matte finish. Available in the most popular colours from the original Terra line. One by one, a gigantic size for an imposing floor.

About  PeLiDesign is an international design studio and a producer of great concepts and extraordinary products. With our team we are ready to embark on your projects! Apart from serving our clients we initiate design research projects. PeLiDesign is about truth: we love to show the inner beauty of things.

www.doreenwestphal.com Contact • Doreen Westphal Pioenroosstraat 83 5644 CB Eindhoven The Netherlands e • contact@doreenwestphal.com t • +31 (0)624240989

Presentation  Alexander Pelikan created a series of 3D printed door handles from stainless steel and titanium, by 3D-scanning handles and exploiting the ,errors of the scan-file, as if the scanner s perception was severely impaired or altered. This research was done in cooperation with TNO Eindhoven, Studio Ludens and i.materialise.

Photo Bas Berends.

www.mosa.nl Contact • Mosa Sales Support Meersenerweg 358 6224 AL Maastricht The Netherlands e • info@mosa.nl t • +31 (0)43 368 92 29

Location • Aubin Gallery 64-66 Redchurchstreet London, E2 7DP Company • PeLi Design Designer • Alexander Pelikan www.pelidesign.com Contact • Alexander Pelikan Frankrijkstraat 110 5622 AH Eindhoven The Netherlands e • peli@pelidesign.coml t • +31 (0)641403687

18 • Pou-Belle Design • Tuttobene About  Maarten Baptist creates a world for you to use. Designs products for everyday scenery’s. The products are particularly related to food & interior and can be mass-produced; such as cutlery, dinner services, glasswork, coat stands, chairs, sofas. On commission and on our own initiative. Presentation  Maarten Baptist will present in London a new line of oak wood furniture and new glass objects. Aside the single sofa.

Locations • Aubin Gallery 64-66 Redchurchstreet London, E2 7DP Designer • Maarten Baptist www.joine.nl Contact • Maarten Baptist Pisanostraat 126 5623 CE Eindhoven The Netherlands e • maarten@joine.nl t • +31 (0)402572258

18 • Laurien Oversier • Tuttobene

Index

About  Inspired by the beauty of packaging material designer Elze van den Akker started to re-use plastic waste as the base material and inspiration of her handmade, sustainable products under the name of Pou-Belle Design.

Location • Aubin Gallery 64-66 Redchurchstreet London, E2 7DP

Presentation  Pou-Belle Design presents the total-verwandlung , of milk jerry cans into the ‘RawCutJerry . Instead of putting the jerry cans in a melting pot, the raw material is cut in different shapes and knitted together in circular lampshades. Lace and electrical wire are available in different colors and every piece is handmade.

Contact • Elze van den Akker Henriëtte Ronnerplein 3-IV 1073 KS Amsterdam The Netherlands

Company • Pou-Belle Design Designer • Elze van den Akker www.pou-belle-design.nl

e • info@pou-belle-design.nl t • +31 (0)652042182

18 • Atelier Schelling & Borsboom • Tuttobene Presentation  The expanTable is a dynamic piece of furniture that with a simple movement can be adjusted to its surroundings which creates another atmosphere with every shape or dimension. With the expanTable all aspects with respect to extraordinary functionalities are achieved, almost without limitation. One can actually expand the table to an unlimited size and give it the shape as desired from simply straight to bending it into C or S-curves. By doing so the appearance of the table top gets all kinds of different, almost imaginary patterns.

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Presentation • Terra XXL One by One Designers • Mosa Design Team

18 • PeLi Design • Tuttobene

Presentation • Tuttobene Designers • Doreen Westphal

18 • JOINE • Tuttobene

Location • Aubin Gallery 64-66 Redchurchstreet London, E2 7DP

shoreditch

About  ‘Because my time on earth is limited, my work is limited too,‘ a statement by Onno Schelling. Being fully involved in the design and construction process he believes a holistic attitude adds to the identity of the work. Schelling & Borsboom also collaborates with various companies and designers, working on exclusive furniture or prototypes.

Locations • Aubin Gallery 64-66 Redchurchstreet London, E2 7DP Designer • Laurien Oversier www.laurienoversier.nl Contact • Laurien Oversier Sleijerweg 3 6174 RW Sweikhuizen The Netherlands e • laurien@laurienoversier.nl t • +31 (0)6 52000894

Presentation  “ A la recherche... ” One of a natural limited edition of reframed early 17 th century cabinets, raising questions about sustainability and the way we value new design and art.

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Location • Aubin Gallery 64-66 Redchurchstreet London, E2 7DP Company • Atelier Schelling & Borsboom Designers • Onno Schelling, Marjolijn Borsboom www.schellingborsboom.nl Contact • Onno Schelling Bontekoekade 19 2516 LA The Hague The Netherlands e • info@schellingborsboom.nl t • +31 (0)704450532


18 • Shades of Wood • Tuttobene Presentation  Shades of Wood is a floor lamp made of ash wood. The lamp shade consists of ash veneer that becomes translucent when the lamp burns, thus lighting up the wood grain and creating a warm glow. Although Shades of Wood has a classic form, it has a contemporary look and feel.

Location • Aubin Gallery 64-66 Redchurchstreet London, E2 7DP Company • Shades of Wood Designers • Reinder Bakker, Hester van Dijk, Jorn van Eck www.shadesofwood.nl Contact • Hester van Dijk Middenweg 22-I 1097 BN Amsterdam The Netherlands e • hester@overtreders-w.nl t • +31 (0)645764861

18 • Studio-Re-Creation • Tuttobene About  While functioning on the grey borders of interior design and art, Studio-ReCreation does more then re-cycle or re-use materials, it helps to preserve belongings and memories. Your most cherished or surplus products become embedded with an extra layer of emotions that manifest in iconic sculpture representing the vision of your company. Presentation  Studio-Re-Creation will , be presenting, ‘The Glass Rider  and ‘The Glass Lamps . The Glass Rider symbolizes the fragility of the, current speed of life , and its consumption s. It s meaning forms, an intricate dialogue with ‘The Glass Lamps that are created from the same discarded materials.

Location • Aubin Gallery 64-66 Redchurchstreet London, E2 7DP Company • Studio-Re-Creation Presentation • Tuttobene Designer • Nikola Nikolov

Elsewhere in London Green Park

Piccadilly Victoria Jubilee

Hatch End

London Overground

Queensway

Central

Ladbroke Grove

Circle Hammersmith

Google Street

Northern

Piccadilly Circus

Piccadilly Bakerloo

Victoria

Circle District Victoria

www.studio-re-creation.com Contact • Nikola Nikolov Krommenieerpad 88 1521 HB Wormerveer The Netherlands e • nikola@studio-re-creation.com t • +31 (0)627046676

18 • Tristan Frencken • Tuttobene

19 • Brand van Egmond About  Dutch designer Tristan Frencken graduated with honours from the Design Academy Eindhoven in 2004. During his studies, Tristan started his own design studio. In his work, he constantly explores endless possibilities , and always strives for the ‘wow effect  . His products distinguish themselves through exceptional aesthetic value and high-end usability. , Presentation ‘Twister is more than just a lamp; it is an extraordinary ornament that fills every space with a warm and glowing light and with it's outstanding design.

Locations • Aubin Gallery 64-66 Redchurchstreet London, E2 7DP Company • Tristan Frencken Designer • Tristan Frencken www.tristanfrencken.com Contact • Tristan Frencken Kerkstraat 33 5154 AM Elshout The Netherlands e • info@tristanfrencken.com t • +31 (0)4 163 833 55 Press contact • Marloes Wolfs e • info@tristanfrencken.com

18 • YLdesign • Tuttobene

Green Park

About  In her designs Yvette Laduk always maintains a strong focus on the original idea. Applying that same focus when realising these ideas, leads to products of high quality with exceptional commercial qualities. Presentation  Bestselling carpets Woody Wood and Turn , the Season, both included in Tuttobene s temporary selection, easily adapt to any type of interior. Both are produced within a Cradle to Cradle certified production process.

Contact • Yvette Laduk Magnoliastraat 8 2404 VT Alphen aan den Rijn The Netherlands

Index

shoreditch

b

Hatch End

c

Queensway

About  Lighting design studio BRAND VAN EGMOND, founded by William Brand and Annet van Egmond, is specialised in making unique and sensual lighting sculptures that truly capture the imagination.

Locations • a Hotel The Dorchester Park Lane, London, W1K 1QA b Chaplins Furniture Ltd 477-507 Uxbridge Road Hatch End, Pinner, Middlesex, HA5 4JS c Kensington Palace State Apartments Kensington Gardens, London, W8 4PX

Presentation  While BRAND VAN EGMOND will this year not be at a single fixed location, their chandeliers can be seen at places ranging from the recently renovated Dorchester Hotel till the showroom of Chaplins. For those managing to jump the fence of Kensington Palace , to see our ‘Diamonds from Amsterdam chandelier for Prince William and Princess Kate; tell them BRAND VAN EGMOND says hi!

Designers • William Brand, Annet van Egmond

About  Founded in 2001 by Marcel Wanders & Casper Vissers, Moooi offers an exclusive mix of lighting, furniture & accessory design which outlast everyday interiors. During the last years Moooi has expanded its horizons at a rapid pace, opening showrooms in strategically located key-cities: Amsterdam, London, Antwerp, New York and Milan.

Location • Moooi - The White Building Portobello Dock, 555 Harrow Road London, W10 4RH

20 • Moooi Locations • Aubin Gallery 64-66 Redchurchstreet London, E2 7DP

www.brandvanegmond.com Contact • Anne Wolters Nikkelstraat 41, 1411 AH Naarden The Netherlands e • annewolters@brandvanegmond.com t • +31 (0)630774679 Press • Sarah Olsen

 e • sarah@brandvanegmond.co.uk
 t • +44 (0)7795107 300

Ladbroke Grove

Company • YLdesign Designer • Yvette Laduk www.yldesign.nl

, Presentation Moooi  s London Showroom will be re-styled and sunk to the bottom, of the ocean, where Marcel Wanders Mermaids will guide you through Moooi’s collection. Moooi has teamed up with Tom Dixon, for an exciting programme of events and activity during LDF.

e • info@yldesign.nl t • +31 (0)655751315

Heracleum, Bertjan Pot.

68

a

69

Index

Designers • Bertjan Pot, Rooms, Studio Job, Sjoerd Vroonland, Marcel Wanders www.moooi.com Contact • Alison Stafford The White Building - 555 Harrow Road W10 4RH London, United Kingdom e • alison@alisonclaire.com t • +44 (0)20 8962 5691 Press contact • Laura Ramos Bello e • laura@moooi.com t • +31 (0)765780098

LonDON Elsewhere


21 • Maaike Schoorel

Goodge Street About  Maaike Schoorel (born 1973) is an artist based in London. Schoorel was born in Santpoort, The Netherlands. She makes paintings based on photographs, using traditional genres such as landscape, portrait and still-life.[1] She favours pale colours and minimal detail. Presentation  Dutch Design will be, shown in conjunction with the Collectors Items III exhibition, showcasing privately owned works form the Dutch artist Maaike Schoorel - in a typical Dutch design interior.

22 • Formafantasma

Location • NL the Dutch Cultural Pop Up Space London 40/42 Riding House Street, London, W1W 7ET

th 10 Anniversary

Presentation • COLLECTORS' ITEMS III Designers • Maaike Schoorel www.nlpopup.co.uk Contact • Ambassade Londen 38 Hyde park gate London, SW75DP

2001-2011 Dutch Design Week

e • lon-ppc@minbuza.nl t • +44 20759 03269

Goodge Street ,

About  After four years of ‘popping up in temporary locations internationally, Gallery Libby Sellers will launch its permanent gallery space in Berners Street, W1 this September. Presentation  Alongside their acclaimed , ceramic series, ‘Moulding Tradition , the Italian-born, Eindhoven-based designers, will present their new textile series, ‘Colony  , specifically commissioned by Gallery Libby Sellers and the Audax Textielmuseum, in Tilburg. Both projects take as their starting point such geo-political (and prescient) issues as migration, assimilation and the historical cross-flow of cultural currents between North Africa and Italy.

23 • Concrete Architectural Associates

Designer • Andrea Trimarchi, Simone Farresin www.formafantasma.com www.libbysellers.com Contact • Libby Sellers 41-42 Berners Street London, W1T3NB, United Kingdom e • gallery@libbysellers.com t • +44 (0)7774113 813

Piccadilly Circus

, About Concrete s entire team consists of about 32 professional people. Visual marketeers and interior designers, product designers and architects work on the projects in multidisciplinary teams. Concrete develops total concepts for businesses and institutions. Presentation  The world according to Concrete, including 2 highlights: • W Hotel London: a public and private tour guides you through the day and night life of a quintessential Englishman and woman. • Canal House (Amsterdam): a luxury boutique hotel which offers the service you expect from a five star plus hotel combined with the warm feeling from a home.

Photo Ewout Huibers

Location • Gallery Libby Sellers Ground Floor, 41-42 Berners Street London, W1T 3NB

24 • De Vorm

Location • W Hotel Leicester Square 10 wardour street, London, W1 D6QF Presentation • The world according to Concrete Founder/creative director • Rob Wagemans www.concreteamsterdam.nl Contact • Sofie Ruytenberg Oudezijds Achterburgwal 78a 1012 DR Amsterdam e • info@concreteamsterdam.nl t • +31 (0) 205200200

Victoria About  De Vorm creates and produces high-quality design furniture - eco-friendly, durable and suprising. Young designers from Europe ensure diversity and contemporariness and yet sustain the key values and the unique character of De Vorm.

Location • Tramshed (The Lawrence Hall, Royal Horticultural Society) Greycoat Street, London, SW1P 2QD

Presentation  Clamp-a-Leg by Jorre van Ast consists of a wooden furniture leg threaded into a simple metal clamp, allowing people to quickly transform any flat surface into a functional work table. Clamp-aLeg uses less material than a trestle and is easy to ship, store, and assemble.

www.devorm.nl

Dutch DesignWeek

Company • De Vorm Designers • Benjamin Hubert, Sebastian Herkner, Jorre van Ast

Eindhoven 22-30 Oct 2011

Contact • Jeroen ter Hoeven Uitmeentsestraat 19 6987 CX Giesbeek The Netherlands e • jeroen@devorm.nl t • +31 (0)313696158

MAIN SPONSOR:

70

index

LonDON Elsewhere

MADE POSSIBLE BY:

MEDIAPARTNERS:

PRODUCED BY:

Concept_Volle-Kracht / Photography_Lisa Klappe / People in this portrait_ Joep Verhoeven, Erik Sjouerman, Piet Hein Eek, Max Bruinsma, Marcel Sloots, Eric de Haas, Nacho Carbonell, Marc Maurer, Josef Blersch, Hans Robertus, Mander Liefting, Freek Lomme, Maarten Baptist, Floris Hovers, Olav Slingerland


12 – Studio Jo Meesters   14 – Scholten & Baijings   19 – Brand van Egmond  20 – Moooi  24 – De Vorm     Bakerloo Line  Central Line  Circle Line  District Line  Hammersmith & City Line  Neasden Jubilee Line Metropolitan Line  Northern Line  Dollis Piccadilly Line  Victoria Line  Hill Waterloo & City Line

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Shoreditch Design Triangle   12 – Studio Jo Meesters   13 – Kranen/Gille   15 – Studio Glithero  16 – Studio Lawrence  17 – Mirjam Nuver, Nina Führer  18 – Tuttobene        Old Street – Northern   Liverpool Street – Central Circle Hammersmith Metropolitan  Cre me r S treet  Shoreditch High Street – London Overground

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100% Design London

Shoreditch Design Triangle

|Sa |Su |Mo |Tu |We |Th |Fr |Sa |Su |  1 – MID Carpets |17 |18 |19 |20 |21 |22 |23 |24 |25 |  September 22 Sept. 10.00 — 21.00 23 Sept. 10.00 — 19.00 24 Sept. 10.00 — 18.00

|Sa |Su |Mo |Tu |We |Th |Fr |Sa |Su |  12 – Studio Jo Meesters  |17 |18 |19 |20 |21 |22 |23 |24 |25 |  September a 17 Sept. 12.00 — 17.00 18 Sept. closed 19 Sept. 11.00 — 19.00 20 — 23 Sept. 10.00 — 18.00 24 Sept. 12.00 — 17.00 b 17 Sept. 11.00 — 17.00 18 Sept. closed 19 Sept. 10.00 — 18.00 20 — 24 Sept. 11.00 — 17.00

 2 –

Royal Mosa  22 Sept. 10.00 — 21.00 23 Sept. 10.00 — 19.00 24 Sept. 10.00 — 18.00 25 Sept. 11.00 — 17.00

|17

|18

|19

|20

|21

|22

|23

|24

|25

|  September

 3 –

Natweave  22 Sept. 10.00 — 21.00 23 Sept. 10.00 — 19.00 24 Sept. 10.00 — 18.00

|17

|18

|19

|20

|21

|22

|23

|24

|25

|  September

NotOnlyWhite  22 Sept. 10.00 — 21.00 23 Sept. 10.00 — 19.00 24 Sept. 10.00 — 18.00 25 Sept. 11.00 — 17.00

|17

 4 –

 13 –

Kranen/Gille 22 sept. 11.00 — 20.00 23 — 27 sept. 11.00 — 19.00 28 sept. 11.00 — 17.00

|17

|18

|19

|20

|21

|22

|23

|24

|25

|  September

 14 –

Scholten & Baijings  

|17

|18

|19

|20

|21

|22

|23

|24

|25

|  September

 15 –

Studio Glithero  17 — 25 Sept. 10.00 — 20.00

|17

|18

|19

|20

|21

|22

|23

|24

|25

|  September

 16 –

Studio Lawrence  |17 |18 |19 |20 20 Sept. 10.00 — 21.00  Cocktails, Invitation Only  18.00 — 21.00 21 — 25 Sept. 10.00 — 18.00

 17 –

Old Spitalfields Market  22 — 28 Sept. 11.00 — 19.00

|18

|19

|20

|21

|22

|23

|24

|25

|  September

  5  – Versaflex |17 |18 |19 |20 |21 |22 |23 |24 |25 |  September 17 — 21 Sept. 09.00 — 17.00

Brompton Design District

|17

|18

|19

|20

|21 |22 |23 |24 |25 |  September

|21

|22

|23

|24

|25

|  September

  18  – Tuttobene |17 |18 |19 |20 |21 |22 |23 |24 |25 |  September 22 — 25 Sept. 10.00 — 20.00 23 Sept  Cocktails, Invitation only  20.00 — 24.00

|Sa |Su |Mo |Tu |We |Th |Fr |Sa |Su |  6 –

Arco, OKAY Studio  |17 |18 17 — 25 Sept. 10.00 — 18.00  22 Sept  Cocktails, Free Entrance  18.00 — 22.00

|19

|20

|21

|22

  |23 |24 |25 |  September

Elsewhere in London

 7 –

Emmanuel Babled  |17 17 — 25 Sept. 10.00-18.00  22 Sept  Cocktails, Free Entrance  18.00

|18

|19

|20

|21

|22

  |23 |24 |25 |  September

|Sa |Su |Mo |Tu |We |Th |Fr |Sa |Su |

 8 –

Henny van Nistelrooy  |17 |18 21 — 25 Sept. 11am — 6pm  22 Sept  Cocktails, Free entrance  18.00 — 21.00

|19

|20

|21

|22

  |23 |24 |25 |  September

Methods of Imitation  |17 |18 18 — 25 Sept. 11.00 — 18.00    22 Sept  Cocktails, Free Entrance  18.00 — 20.00

|19

 19 –  9 –  10 –  11 –

|20

|21

Mint Explores  |17 |18 |19 |20 17 — 21 Sept. 10.30 — 18.30 18 Sept. closed  22 Sept. 10.30 — 19.30  Cocktails, Invitation Only  19.00 — 22.00 23 — 24 Sept. 10.30 — 18.30 25 Sept. 12.00 — 18.00

|21

Study O Portable |17 |18 18 — 25 Sept. 11.00 — 18.00  22 Sept  Cocktails, Free Entrance  18.00 — 20.00

|21

|19

|20

|22

|22

|22

  |23 |24 |25 |  September

Index

|17

|18

|19

|20

|21

|22

|23

|24

|25

|  September

  20  – Moooi |17 |18 |19 |20 |21 |22 |23 |24 |25 |  September 17 Sept. 10.00 — 18.00 18 Sept. 10.00 — 16.00 19 — 25 Sept. 10.00 — 18.00  21 –

Maaike Schoorel 17 — 21 Sept. 12.00 — 18.00

|17

|18

|19

|20

|21

|22

|23

|24

|25

|  September

 22 –  

Formafantasma 17 Sept. 11-6 18 Sept. 11-4 19 — 24 Sept. 11-6

|17

|18

|19

|20

|21

|22

|23

|24

|25

|  September

  |23 |24 |25 |  September

  |23 |24 |25 |  September

 23 – Concrete Architectural Associates |17 |18 |19 |20 |21 |22 |23 |24 |25 |  September 19 or 20 sept. 16.00-18.00

78

BRAND VAN EGMOND 

OPENING DAYS & Hours

  24  – De Vorm |17 |18 |19 |20 |21 |22 |23 |24 |25 |  September 22 — 25 Sept. 10.00 — 18.00

79

Index

OPENING DAYS & Hours


Index by Company name

Arco 6 Atelier Schelling & Borsboom  18 Bam-doo 18 Brand van Egmond  19 Concrete Architectural Associates  23 De Vorm 18 24 Emmanuel Babled Studio  7 Formfantasma 22 JOINE 18 Kranen/Gille 13 Metea 7 Methods of Imitation  9 MID Carpets  1 Mint Explores  10 Mirjam Nuver hat designer  17 Moooi 20 Natweave 3 NotOnlyWhite 4 OKAY Studio  6 Patrick Brillet Fine Arts  7 PeLi Design  18 Pou-Belle Design  18 Royal Mosa 2 18 Scholten & Baijings  14 Studio Dave Keune  18 Studio Glithero  15 Studio Jo Meesters  12 Studio Lawrence  16 Studio-Re-Creation 18 Study O Portable  9  11 Tristan Frencken  18 Versaflex Systems BV  5 YLdesign 18

Index by Designer

Index by Location

Alexander Pelikan  18 Andrea Trimarchi  22 Anieke Branderhorst  10 Annet van Egmond  19 Arjan van Raadshooven  10 Bart Eijking  16 Benjamin Hubert 18 24 Bernadette Deddens 9 11 Bertjan Pot  20 Breg Hanssen  10 Carine Holties  18 Carole Baijings  14 Daniel Eatock  9 Dave Keune  18 Doreen Westphal  18 Elze van den Akker  18 Emmanuel Babled  7 Henny van Nistelrooy  8 Hester van Dijk  18 Jo Meesters  12 Johannes Gille  13 Jolanda van Goor  10 Jorn van Eck  18 Jorre van Ast  24 Jos Kranen  13 Karin Peterson  9 Laurien Oversier  18 Liliana Ovalle  9 Lode Bruins  18 Maaike Schoorel  21 Maarten Baptist  18 Marcel Wanders  20 Marike Andeweg  4 Marjolijn Borsboom  18 Markus Bergström  9 Mieke Meijer  10 Mirjam Nuver  17 Nikola Nikolov  18 Nina Führer  17 Onno Schelling  18 Patrick de Louwere  16 Paul Elliman  9 Peter Marigold  9 Reinder Bakker 18 Rob Wagemans  23 Rooms 20 Sarah van Gameren  15 Sebastian Herkner 18 24 Simone Farresin  22 Sjoerd Jonkers  10 Sjoerd Vroonland  20 Stefan Scholten  14 Studio Job  20 Tetsuo Mukai 9 11 Tim Simpson  15 Tristan Frencken  18 William Brand  19 Yvette Laduk  18

100% Design London 1 2 3 4 5

MID Carpets  /  p58 Royal Mosa  /  p59 Natweave / p59 NotOnlyWhite / p59 Versaflex / p59

Brompton Design District 6 Arco, OKAY Studio  /  p60 7 Emmanuel Babled  /  p60 8 Henny van Nistelrooy  /  p61 9 Methods of Imitation  /  p61 10 Mint Explores / p61 11 Study O Portable  /  p61

Shoreditch Design Triangle 12 Studio Jo Meesters  /  p62 13 Kranen/Gille / p62 14 Scholten & Baijings  /  p63 15 Studio Glithero / p63 16 Studio Lawrence / p63 17 Old Spitalfields Market  /  p64 - Mirjam Nuver - Nina Führer 18 Tuttobene / p65 - Bam-doo / p65 - Studio Dave Keune  /  p65 - De Vorm  /  p65 - Doreen Westphal  /  p66 - JOINE / p66 - Laurien Oversier  /  p66 - Royal Mosa  /  p67 - PeLi Design  /  p67 - Pou-Belle Design  /  p67 - Atelier Schelling & Borsboom  /  p67 - Shades of Wood  /  p68 - Studio-Re-Creation / p68 - Tristan Frencken  /  p68 - YLdesign / p68

Elsewhere in London 19 Brand van Egmond  /  p69 20 Moooi / p69 21 Maaike Schoorel / p70 22 Formafantasma / p70 23 Concrete Architectural Associates  /  p70 24 De Vorm / p70

80

Index


Connecting the Dots - London 2011  

#3 September 2011. Distributed during the London Design Festival 2011. Connecting the Dots magazine publishes Dutch designers and design-cul...