Issuu on Google+

MINSTREL GUIDE AND JOKE BOOK

I. & M. OTTENHEIMER Publishers BALTIMORE

MARYLAND Printed in U S A.


What Your Dream Meant BY MARTINI 'Author of Palmistry and How to Know Your Future A collection of dreams based OE modern Psychology and the work째 ings of the subjective mind. Not & lot of stuff drawn from the imag째 ination of some fantastic mind but dreams that have actually been verified in hundreds of cases. This book is so arranged that when a dream occurs, it can be easily interpreted as one knows just where to flook for it. With this wonderful book from the ipen of the great Martini, you can easily foretell your own future as any medium. 200 large* images. Attractive Paper Cover Sent Postpaid Upon Receipt of 5 0 c

I. & M. OTTENHEIMER, Publishers BALTIMORE

-

-

MARYLAND


THE MINSTREL GUIDE AND JOKE BOOK A COMPREHENSIVE GUIDE TO THE ORGANIZATION AND CONDUCTING OF A MINSTREL SHOW, AND HOW TO MAKE UP, CONTAINING A DIVERSIFIED COLLECTION OF THE LATEST MIRTH-CREATING JOKES, GAGS, CROSS-FIRE AND MONOLOGUES PASSED OVER THE FOOTLIGHTS BY THE MOST CELEBRATED ARTISTS IN BURN" CORK ON THE AMERICAN STAGE

Edited by

PAUL E. LOWE

I. & M. OTTENHEIMER Publishers BALTIMORE

MARYLAND Printed fn U S A.


Copyright MCMXII by I. & M, Ottenheimer


SUGGESTIONS When organizing a minstrel show select some member to act as stage-manager. It should be his duty to regulate the hours of rehearsals, arrange for the proper "settings" of the stage, make up the order of the programme and settle any misunderstandings that may arise in matters concerning the stage. One hour each evening should be taken for the vocalists who, with the musical conductor, should rehearse all solos and choruses in the order they are to be given until sufficient headway has been made to call the entire orchestra into requisition, which should not be necessary until an evening or two before the date of the performance. Devote an hour each evening for the overture and finale of first part, that the musica* conductor may instruct the singers in the choruses and the comedians in their performance on the bones and tambourines. Then devote the rest of the evening to the after-piece and specialties.


4

T H E MINSTREL GUIDE AND JOKE BOOK

A dress rehearsal is always advisable to insure a perfect performance, and should occur the evening before the opening entertainment, when, every one taking part should dress for each character they are to assume and make themselves up precisely as they intend to do at the regular performance, so that any defects, if they exist, may be corrected. After the rehearsal it is well to correct the faults immediately, while they are fresh in the minds of the actors. Arrange your circle of chairs, starting with a man of some prominence for the interlocutor or middleman. Have the second row of chairs on a staging high enough so that those sitting on them can rest their feet on the rounds of the chairs in the first row, and the third row in the same manner. When organizing a minstrel show and lacking a professional "coach," some good musician or pianoplayer may be substituted. Have some practice in order to classify the voices. Select the end men, and if you decide to have a quartette, or even a double quartette, have them practice their "turns" or songs together, in addition to the regular rehearsals. If there are six end men, four of them will no doubt be good singers; the others can get along by talking the songs. To make a hit with an amateur show, have it short and run it like lightning. Start the show right on time, the first part taking about one hour and the second part finishing. Rehearse with the properties


THE; MINSTREL GUIDE AND JOKE BOOK

5

to be used, and see that they are all in their places the night of the show. The end men should be selected with great care. The jokes should be practiced over and over again. The interlocutor, or middle-man, is a most important part. He should be a man with a dignified manner, always taking plenty of time and working up the joke until it is ready for the point which the end man gives in his answer. He should have the entire programme and "cues" for the jokes and songs on his fan or paper. A minstrel show can be given with anywhere from ten to fifty people in the circle with two or three good lively men for the tambos and the same number for the bones. Local jokes often get the best laughs, such as inoffensive jokes relating to some prominent citizen. HOW TO MAKE UP For costume the modern dress suit is the most appropriate. The singers should wear full evening dress with white vests, black ties and standing collars, white gloves and boutonniere, and black dress wigs. The end me,n should wear colored ties and costumes, funny wigs—anything to make them look odd. In making up the face, use prep?red burnt cork. Moisten the hands, take a small quantity of the cork, rub it in the palm of your hands until it becomes a


6

T H E MINSTREL GUIDE AND JOKE BOOK

thin paste, then apply to the skin; when it dries, brush the surface gently with some soft material. Never mix the burnt cork with anything but water. The cork washes off perfectly well by the use of plenty of soap and water. Do not scrub too hard, as it will irritate the skin. To represent an old darkey, use white chalk or grease paint under the eyes and for the wrinkles, and iron gray hair for the eyebrows and beard. Have the burnt cork even around the mouth and eyes. To have the lips a deeper red, or larger for the end men, use carmine grease paint. SAMPLE PROGRAMME NAME OF THE COMPANY FIRST PART

Opening Chorus Song (Title Song (Title Song (Title Song (Title Song (Title

, Jokes by of song) Jokes by of song) Conundrums of song).; Jokes by of song) Jokes by of song) Conundrums

Entire Company end man John Doe end man Harry Roe by end man Quartette end man Wm. Bloe end man John Doe by end man


Pages from the minstrel guide and joke book