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t) A collection of ten card tricks that don't involve sleight-ofhand and which anyone can learn1

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Published by THE ASSOCIATION OF AMERICAN PLATING CARD MANUFACTURERS 420 Lexington Avenue, New York 17, New York

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any of the material in this book is hereby granted, provided acknowledgement is made to the Association of American Playing Card Manufacturers.

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FOREWORD FOREWORD

During the war years the following simple card tricks were shown and taught to men in military hospitals. Because many of the men were physically handicapped, sleight-ofhand was purposely avoided. Patient participation was encouraged and the degree of elaboration given to each trick depended on the shovnnanship ability of the individual pupil. The general response was so overwhelmingly enthusiastic that we were inspired to prepare this booklet for use by men, women, and children everywhere. We are indebted to Albert Ostrow, author of "The Complete Card Player," for assistance in the explanation of the tricks and to Miss Elise Healy for the preparation of diagrams and sketches.

NOTE: The following explanations are largely concerned with the mechanical aspects of the tricks—that is, they describe how to do the tricks but don't attempt to instruct the reader in the additional flourishes, patter, and distractions that do so much to make a demonstration effective. It is believed that each trickster can supply the kind of "trimmings'1 best suited to his own personality and his audience.

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THREET DEEP

CARD1

CARD I

CARD 3 CARD 5

3 CARDS OP SAME DEATOMIMATIOAT

STOCK

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THREE DEEP This trick is an effective ice-breaker and is simple to execute. FIRST STEP: Use a full deck of cards. Fan through them casually, face up, as though you are checking to see that the deck is complete. BUT NOTE THE THIRD CARD FROM THE LEFT.

Leave that card in its place but remove from the deck the other three cards of the same denomination. Thus, if the third card from the left happens to be a 4, remove the three other 4'sj i-f it is a Jack, remove the three other Jacksj etc. (For purposes of this explanation, let's say the third card is a King and you've removed the three other Kings.) SECOND STEP: Show the three Kings face up briefly; now place them face down on the table. Put the remainder of the deck (the stock) face down alongside of the Kings. Remove the top card of the stock and place it face down to one side. On this card put a King from the pile of three, also face down. Then add a card from the stock, then another King, then another card from the stock and the last King - all of these, of course, face down. You have now stacked up six cards, alternately mixing those from the stock and the Kings. Apparently the three Kings have been broken up and mixed with the top three cards of the stock. Now pick up all six cards and place them on the top of the stock pile. CLIMAX: Turn up the three top cards on the pile of six. They will all be Kings and the beholder, who had expected the Kings to be "sandwiched" in between the cards from the stock pile, will be amazed. THE EXPLANATION: The three Kings you turn up at the end are not the same Kings which you removed from the deck. To see just how it works take a deck of cards right now and follow the steps given above. The light will dawn before long. SUGGESTIONS: Shuffle the deck thoroughly after each demonstration so that the key card - third from left - is a different one each time. When you show the three cards of the same denomination you've removed from the deck don't let your audience study them too closely, otherwise a sharp observer will notice that the three cards you turn up at the end are not the same as the ones with which you started!

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