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There are more than 750,000 Iraqi refugees in Syria, displaced by the Iraq war. Of those, only a small proportion are registered as refugees by the U.N. High Commission for Refugees (UNHCR) and less than 20% are part of the food distribution program. The refugees arrive with unique needs after being forced to leave Iraq. Some of those needs can be served by the U.N., but many needs are left unmet. For example, U.N. food distribution happens in downtown Damascus, under huge white U.N. tents under a busy highway. The waiting refugees are nervous as qualifying criteria continuously change to target the most food insecure. Every time the food distribution expanded, the need was still greater. Bridgette, a friend and cofounder of A Plate for All encountered some of the people slipping through the cracks as she photographed refugees in Damascus for the UNHCR. While recognizing the complexity of refugee experiences and needs, A Plate for All are finding their niche serving about 350 Iraqi refugee families in the northeast, in the towns of Hassakeh and Qamishli. A Plate for All aims to have distribution every three months. Thus far, there have been three distributions. The small size of the distribution means it can quickly assess and adapt to the needs of the families: by providing a relatively expensive product like milk powder, for example. The distribution is overseen in partnership with an established agency in the region, the Greek Orthodox Patriarchate of Antioch (GOPA).

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Conferre 01  

Our goal is to profile men and women from around the world who are not only seeking innovative solutions to social and economic problems but...

Conferre 01  

Our goal is to profile men and women from around the world who are not only seeking innovative solutions to social and economic problems but...