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Girls and moms participatedin the Women's March on Saturday, Jan. 21, the day after President Donald Trump was inaugurated. Marches were held around the world with about 425 peoplejoining the cause in Pendleton. Among those were, from left, EllaMae Looney and her mother, Eva Looneyin back, Audrey Shippentower, Keannah Bill and her mom, Wendy Bill. The marchers gathered near City Hall and snaked along Dorion and Court avenues, and down Main Street.

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PENDLETON — Pat Walters stood on the porch at Sundown Bar & Grill taking photographs of nearly 400 people gathered across Southeast Fourth Street at the Umatilla County Courthouse. About halfway through their trek, the group listened to remarks about human rights before it turned west toward Main Street in Pendleton's version of the 2017 Women's March on Jan. 21. Walters was one of many natives taking part in the March, which represented a worldwide protest to protect women's rights and other causes including immigration reform, health care reform, protection of the natural environment, racial j u s t i ce, f reedom of r e l i g i o n , workers' r i g h ts, and the rights of L G BTQ citizens. T he r a l l i e s w e r e a ime d a t D o n a l d Trump, who th e day b efore wa s i n a u g u rated as the 45'" PresiI'I SOOY YIY CIIOICE dent of the United State — calling attention to I O'I'I' IS COYE OEI' Trump' s st at ements SlX OAI. A YSAOEI' lSEO I and positions, which many consider as antio men, or m o t h Maureen au ee Minthorn's o s ssign g said sa a sad all ways inexcusable, acbut one thing. She wants health cording to reporting by care, too. Reuters news agency. B efore the Pendleton March began, as women and men and children — gathered in front of the Vert Auditorium, Walters offered a succinct reason for her participation: "I'm here as a concerned native woman, but mostly I'm here to verify that there still is hope in this world." Tribal member Patty Ball was inspired to walk in Pendleton by her daughter, Olivia Simpson, who is attending Oregon Institute of Technology in Klamath Falls on a full-ride Gates Millennium scholarship. Ill IA BYI I

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"She's not struggling school, but with what she sees," said Ball. "She's new off-the-reservation and she's seeing an entirely different reality. It's culture shock." B all s ai d h e r d a u g h t e r i s c o n c e r n e d a b o u t w ha t c o u l d h a p p e n w i t h T r u m p i n o f f i ce . "I'm doing this for her," said Ball, wiping away tears. Michelle Van Pelt, the post secondary and career counselor at Nixyaawii Community School, said she marched to be part of a unified effort. "It's been disheartening to see all the negative actions taking place," Van Pelt said. "The transition should be positive, but we' re all nervous." Van Pelt said her main concerns are health care, particularly for elders, and education. "Right after the election I started to wonder about the future. When you think about Native American issues, money, and equality — those are overlooked and lt s seal'y.

Van Pelt waved down Teata Oatman, a 2016 graduate of NCS, who was driving by as the marchers were organizing. "It was a last minute thing," Oatman said. "I saw all the people who are just asking to be treated equally and not even the President can stop that." Like most others, Oatman read about the March on social media. "I saw that people were doing this, coming together, and then Michelle waved me over," she said. There as a native woman, her children in tow, Eva Looney said she participated to set an example for her daughters. "I love my girls and I don't want them to go through this," she said. "I want them to stand up for their rights. I'm scared of what this change will do for tribes and other peoples of color." Maureen Minthorn said she was participating as a

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Hundreds of people gathered outside the Umatilla County Courthouse to hear remarks from several speakers. Rallies around the world were aimed at Donald Trump, who the day before was inaugurated as the45ro President of the United State — calling attention to Trump's statements and positions, which many consider as anti-women, orin other ways inexcusable.

Confederated Umatilla Journal

February 2017


Confederated Umatilla Journal 02-01-2017