__MAIN_TEXT__
feature-image

Page 1

CONDITION / HONG KONG III


CONDITION / HONG KONG III


CONDITION / HONG KONG III


Condition

Condition

CONDITION / HONG KONG III The combination of Hong Kong’s political and economic system, combined with its exceptional topography and large population make it one of the densest urban environments in the world. Originally composed of scattered villages, Hong Kong officially became a British colony after the First Opium War in 1842. The British established the city of Victoria which today is still considered the political and financial center. The colonial territory further expanded twice in 1860 and 1898. Rapid population growth did not take place until the end of the Second World War, when the communists took over China, resulting in thousands of refugees fleeing to Hong Kong. Satellite towns were set up 1950’s onwards in the New Territories, in an attempt to alleviate the problems brought by increasing population and densification (Shelton, Karakiewicz, & Kvan, 2011). As a consequence of this urban intensity, a counter urban form of inhabitation has developed that relies on a network of by-product spaces in opposition to the vertical city we typically associate with Hong Kong. Again, I would like to refer to the work of another German photographer, there definitely seems to be a school of thought here, Michael Wolf who in his book 6

7


Condition

Condition

CONDITION / HONG KONG III The combination of Hong Kong’s political and economic system, combined with its exceptional topography and large population make it one of the densest urban environments in the world. Originally composed of scattered villages, Hong Kong officially became a British colony after the First Opium War in 1842. The British established the city of Victoria which today is still considered the political and financial center. The colonial territory further expanded twice in 1860 and 1898. Rapid population growth did not take place until the end of the Second World War, when the communists took over China, resulting in thousands of refugees fleeing to Hong Kong. Satellite towns were set up 1950’s onwards in the New Territories, in an attempt to alleviate the problems brought by increasing population and densification (Shelton, Karakiewicz, & Kvan, 2011). As a consequence of this urban intensity, a counter urban form of inhabitation has developed that relies on a network of by-product spaces in opposition to the vertical city we typically associate with Hong Kong. Again, I would like to refer to the work of another German photographer, there definitely seems to be a school of thought here, Michael Wolf who in his book 6

7


Condition

“Informal Solutions” (Wolf, 2016) generates a taxonomy of Hong Kong’s informal habitation, where local inhabitants generate utility and function in spaces that appear to offer no possibility. Wolf ’s pictures capture the DNA of Hong Kong’s background, informal solutions developed by residents that allow city dwellers to cope with the density of Hong Kong. Nothing is ever wasted in this temporary form of architecture, design is constantly driven by two factors: functionality and the need to resist. Rather than form, we are here dealing with “Active Form” (Esterling, 2012, p. 44), a temporary architecture practice that allows residents to reclaim their own space within the everdensifying urban fabric. “While architects are best trained to craft singular masterpiece buildings, most of the architectural enclosures that the world inhabits are by-products of formulas considered to be outside the discipline.” (Esterling, 2012, p. 41) In her article “Stones in Water” (Esterling, 2012), Easterling highlights a critical consideration vis-àvis how we acknowledge cities today. According to Easterling “Form” represents the standard notion 8

Condition

of building as static object version of architecture, while “Active Form” establishes a set of parameters or capacities for what the organization will be doing over time, they are available as an enhancement to object form. These active forms have time-related powers to introduce unfolding relationships or a contagious component into a population of buildings. They allow architects to shape an ongoing set of spatial relationships without being confined to a single object. Active forms which are conceptually so difficult for architects, are quite ordinary and practical for many other practitioners who have an enormous effect on cities. Before highlighting three Hong Kong episodes of “Active Form” within the context of the background city it is important to briefly discuss the methodology of the research in question. Firstly, the research study relies on an “emic” as opposed to “etic” research approach; in anthropological terms there are two forms of research: an “emic” account is from the point of view of the observer who is outside the culture, as opposed to an “etic” account produced from within the culture (Lucas, 2016, p. 10). Secondly, the research has been carried out over a two-year period at The Chinese University of Hong Kong, School of Architecture, together with a series of Masters Students as part of a Topical Elective 9


Condition

“Informal Solutions” (Wolf, 2016) generates a taxonomy of Hong Kong’s informal habitation, where local inhabitants generate utility and function in spaces that appear to offer no possibility. Wolf ’s pictures capture the DNA of Hong Kong’s background, informal solutions developed by residents that allow city dwellers to cope with the density of Hong Kong. Nothing is ever wasted in this temporary form of architecture, design is constantly driven by two factors: functionality and the need to resist. Rather than form, we are here dealing with “Active Form” (Esterling, 2012, p. 44), a temporary architecture practice that allows residents to reclaim their own space within the everdensifying urban fabric. “While architects are best trained to craft singular masterpiece buildings, most of the architectural enclosures that the world inhabits are by-products of formulas considered to be outside the discipline.” (Esterling, 2012, p. 41) In her article “Stones in Water” (Esterling, 2012), Easterling highlights a critical consideration vis-àvis how we acknowledge cities today. According to Easterling “Form” represents the standard notion 8

Condition

of building as static object version of architecture, while “Active Form” establishes a set of parameters or capacities for what the organization will be doing over time, they are available as an enhancement to object form. These active forms have time-related powers to introduce unfolding relationships or a contagious component into a population of buildings. They allow architects to shape an ongoing set of spatial relationships without being confined to a single object. Active forms which are conceptually so difficult for architects, are quite ordinary and practical for many other practitioners who have an enormous effect on cities. Before highlighting three Hong Kong episodes of “Active Form” within the context of the background city it is important to briefly discuss the methodology of the research in question. Firstly, the research study relies on an “emic” as opposed to “etic” research approach; in anthropological terms there are two forms of research: an “emic” account is from the point of view of the observer who is outside the culture, as opposed to an “etic” account produced from within the culture (Lucas, 2016, p. 10). Secondly, the research has been carried out over a two-year period at The Chinese University of Hong Kong, School of Architecture, together with a series of Masters Students as part of a Topical Elective 9


Condition

Condition

Research Course.

References

The following episodes recount urban scenes, fragments of Hong Kong’s background. Each situation characterized by a singular, invisible moment of inhabitation. As to represent a cross section through the diverse territory, each instance is taken from a distinct area: Hong Kong Island, Kowloon and New Territories. The three moments also recount diverse urban narratives, much in the manner of the Japanese graphic master Hokusai who spent his life tirelessly recording the biggest city in the world at the time, Edo (now Tokyo).

Esterling, K. (2012). Stones in Water: Architecturte in the flow of Infrastructural Space. In D. Chipperfield, K. Long, & S. Bose, Common Ground: A critical reader (pp. 41-47). Venice: Marsilio.

Hong Kong, 20th June 2017.

Lucas, R. (2016). Research Methods for Architects. London: Laurence King. Schama, S. (2017, 05 26). Simon Schama on the tirelessly versatile Hokusai. Retrieved from Financial Times: https://www.ft.com/content/36329b06-4068-11e7-9d5625f963e998b2 Shelton, B., Karakiewicz, J., & Kvan, T. (2011). The Making of Hong Kong: from Vertical to Volumetric. London: Routledge.

Peter W. Ferretto Associate Professor, School of Architecture The Chinese University of Hong Kong

10

Wolf, M. (2016). Informal Solutions: Observations in Hong Kong Back Alleys. Hong Kong: We Press Company Limited.

11


Condition

Condition

Research Course.

References

The following episodes recount urban scenes, fragments of Hong Kong’s background. Each situation characterized by a singular, invisible moment of inhabitation. As to represent a cross section through the diverse territory, each instance is taken from a distinct area: Hong Kong Island, Kowloon and New Territories. The three moments also recount diverse urban narratives, much in the manner of the Japanese graphic master Hokusai who spent his life tirelessly recording the biggest city in the world at the time, Edo (now Tokyo).

Esterling, K. (2012). Stones in Water: Architecturte in the flow of Infrastructural Space. In D. Chipperfield, K. Long, & S. Bose, Common Ground: A critical reader (pp. 41-47). Venice: Marsilio.

Hong Kong, 20th June 2017.

Lucas, R. (2016). Research Methods for Architects. London: Laurence King. Schama, S. (2017, 05 26). Simon Schama on the tirelessly versatile Hokusai. Retrieved from Financial Times: https://www.ft.com/content/36329b06-4068-11e7-9d5625f963e998b2 Shelton, B., Karakiewicz, J., & Kvan, T. (2011). The Making of Hong Kong: from Vertical to Volumetric. London: Routledge.

Peter W. Ferretto Associate Professor, School of Architecture The Chinese University of Hong Kong

10

Wolf, M. (2016). Informal Solutions: Observations in Hong Kong Back Alleys. Hong Kong: We Press Company Limited.

11


Condition

Conditions Parasitic Residual Interim Buried Improvised Totem Invisible Hide Illegal Community Urban Illegal Lost Contrast Trap Sealed Scar Settled Bloom Soften Conform Temporary Continuity

p. 15 p. 19 p. 23 p. 27 p. 31 p. 35 p. 39 p. 43 p. 47 p. 51 p. 55 p. 59 p. 63 p. 67 p. 71 p. 75 p. 79 p. 83 p. 87 p. 91 p. 95 p. 99 p. 103

Demarcation Infringement Redundany Domestic Reclaim Non-traditional Engineering Puff Seam Parasite

13

p. 107 p. 111 p. 115 p. 119 p. 123 p. 127 p. 131 p. 135 p. 139 p. 143


Condition

Conditions Parasitic Residual Interim Buried Improvised Totem Invisible Hide Illegal Community Urban Illegal Lost Contrast Trap Sealed Scar Settled Bloom Soften Conform Temporary Continuity

p. 15 p. 19 p. 23 p. 27 p. 31 p. 35 p. 39 p. 43 p. 47 p. 51 p. 55 p. 59 p. 63 p. 67 p. 71 p. 75 p. 79 p. 83 p. 87 p. 91 p. 95 p. 99 p. 103

Demarcation Infringement Redundany Domestic Reclaim Non-traditional Engineering Puff Seam Parasite

13

p. 107 p. 111 p. 115 p. 119 p. 123 p. 127 p. 131 p. 135 p. 139 p. 143


Choi Hung

Sham Shui Po

Parasitic Temporary Stores lining up with linear building blocks and streets is a site-specific condition in Kowloon. Those spaces are officially granted to the shop owners to have business activities on the streets, co-existing with the ground floor shops inside the buildings. Since they are usually aligned with the streets signs, sometimes they will make good use of it.One of the road sign in Pei Ho Street is being blocked by the clothings of the temporary store next to it. It is indeed being covered by the clothes on the steel hangers extended from the store to the road sign. They are originally developed from a still frame, and from time to time the additional pipes are extended to them, creating a parasitic substructure. There are a few contradictory features shown, such as the expansion of store area and the alternative use of government properties. Such kind of activities could be deemed illegal, but somehow it demonstrates a certain degree of tolerance from the officials. As long as they do not disturb the neighbourhood, these mutual consensus could be seen as a way to gain collaboration in between the officials and the inhabitants.

14

15


Choi Hung

Sham Shui Po

Parasitic Temporary Stores lining up with linear building blocks and streets is a site-specific condition in Kowloon. Those spaces are officially granted to the shop owners to have business activities on the streets, co-existing with the ground floor shops inside the buildings. Since they are usually aligned with the streets signs, sometimes they will make good use of it.One of the road sign in Pei Ho Street is being blocked by the clothings of the temporary store next to it. It is indeed being covered by the clothes on the steel hangers extended from the store to the road sign. They are originally developed from a still frame, and from time to time the additional pipes are extended to them, creating a parasitic substructure. There are a few contradictory features shown, such as the expansion of store area and the alternative use of government properties. Such kind of activities could be deemed illegal, but somehow it demonstrates a certain degree of tolerance from the officials. As long as they do not disturb the neighbourhood, these mutual consensus could be seen as a way to gain collaboration in between the officials and the inhabitants.

14

15


Sham Shui Po

Sham Shui Po

16

17


Sham Shui Po

Sham Shui Po

16

17


Choi Hung

Shek Tong Tsui

Residual The scattered and organic cityscape of Hong Kong Island has made roads to be narrow, most of them could only allow single way, while the space for pedestrians were sometimes not even wide enough for a person to walk on. Therefore, unlike Kowloon, temporary stores in Hong Kong Island , especially in the central and western districts, usually lie scatteredly on the steppings, in which not much of them were alongside the road.An exceptional case is found in the South Lane of Shek Tong Tsui. Formerly a hub of business and entermainments, there was once a outdoor market in the 1970s and 80s, however many of the, were relocared to the community complex nearby in the 1990s. Nonetheless, two of them were found remained there, in between the Housing Mansion and the unusally offseted double yellow line. With reference to the legal documents, the small area there was a permitted place for hawkers. Therefore the yellow line has to be offseted for the stores even there is no walkable space and limited width for vehicles. Recently the old apartments of South Lane were demolished and re-constructed to be high-rise apartment buildings for high income groups. The sharp contrast further sets off the 2 temporary stores to be a survival in the course of history. 18

19


Choi Hung

Shek Tong Tsui

Residual The scattered and organic cityscape of Hong Kong Island has made roads to be narrow, most of them could only allow single way, while the space for pedestrians were sometimes not even wide enough for a person to walk on. Therefore, unlike Kowloon, temporary stores in Hong Kong Island , especially in the central and western districts, usually lie scatteredly on the steppings, in which not much of them were alongside the road.An exceptional case is found in the South Lane of Shek Tong Tsui. Formerly a hub of business and entermainments, there was once a outdoor market in the 1970s and 80s, however many of the, were relocared to the community complex nearby in the 1990s. Nonetheless, two of them were found remained there, in between the Housing Mansion and the unusally offseted double yellow line. With reference to the legal documents, the small area there was a permitted place for hawkers. Therefore the yellow line has to be offseted for the stores even there is no walkable space and limited width for vehicles. Recently the old apartments of South Lane were demolished and re-constructed to be high-rise apartment buildings for high income groups. The sharp contrast further sets off the 2 temporary stores to be a survival in the course of history. 18

19


Shek Tong Tsui

Shek Tong Tsui

20

21


Shek Tong Tsui

Shek Tong Tsui

20

21


Lau Fau Shan

Lau Fau Shan

Interim Lau Fau Shan, a flatland with single to triple storey housing clusters, massive container yards, is famous for seafood restaurants. Although in general the masterplanning was highly exclusive for the rural parts, there are still some elements of government-planned spaces found in between these clusters. Inside the Lau Fau Shan Seafood Village, there is a massive space outside the path connecting to different restaurants, with tile pavements, seatings and decorated railings. However, the space is very scarced with people flow, meanwhile there is a well-designed space with different sorts of furnitures in between the railings and the main circulation. It is shaded by transitory metal roofs and plastic clothes. The south side was open to the public space with shading towels, while the chairs are placed right at the railing for the elderly to enjoy sunshine. It acts well as a interim space for people to rest and gather, and it seems to be much more user-friendly and considerate in terms of spatial design to the local residents. In terms of its location and context, it is also miniature of how the indigenous people react with the invasion of new town development and adapted to it through the alternative between the two seemingly opposing trend. 22

23


Lau Fau Shan

Lau Fau Shan

Interim Lau Fau Shan, a flatland with single to triple storey housing clusters, massive container yards, is famous for seafood restaurants. Although in general the masterplanning was highly exclusive for the rural parts, there are still some elements of government-planned spaces found in between these clusters. Inside the Lau Fau Shan Seafood Village, there is a massive space outside the path connecting to different restaurants, with tile pavements, seatings and decorated railings. However, the space is very scarced with people flow, meanwhile there is a well-designed space with different sorts of furnitures in between the railings and the main circulation. It is shaded by transitory metal roofs and plastic clothes. The south side was open to the public space with shading towels, while the chairs are placed right at the railing for the elderly to enjoy sunshine. It acts well as a interim space for people to rest and gather, and it seems to be much more user-friendly and considerate in terms of spatial design to the local residents. In terms of its location and context, it is also miniature of how the indigenous people react with the invasion of new town development and adapted to it through the alternative between the two seemingly opposing trend. 22

23


Lau Fau Shan

Lau Fau Shan

24

25


Lau Fau Shan

Lau Fau Shan

24

25


Choi Hung

Mongkok

Buried In the past, the front and back of the city were one, as sewage runs along its discharge channel in parallel to pedestrians on the street. The city was overlaid with an extensive drainage network, much of it directly exposed at street level, bringing smell and hygienic ... Soon people buried the unwanted infrastructure underneath, with the history of the place altogether Later, the city ran short of land for infrastructure, so they built a petrol station. Sooner, they wanted more space for people, and that’s how this place ends up as a strip of landscape right at the centre of traffic. No matter what, people of the city have long forgotten why the street is named Nallah Road, just the same as their ignorance of how the city. They would rather enjoy a false, reengineered beauty.

26

27


Choi Hung

Mongkok

Buried In the past, the front and back of the city were one, as sewage runs along its discharge channel in parallel to pedestrians on the street. The city was overlaid with an extensive drainage network, much of it directly exposed at street level, bringing smell and hygienic ... Soon people buried the unwanted infrastructure underneath, with the history of the place altogether Later, the city ran short of land for infrastructure, so they built a petrol station. Sooner, they wanted more space for people, and that’s how this place ends up as a strip of landscape right at the centre of traffic. No matter what, people of the city have long forgotten why the street is named Nallah Road, just the same as their ignorance of how the city. They would rather enjoy a false, reengineered beauty.

26

27


Mongkok

Mongkok

28

29


Mongkok

Mongkok

28

29


Choi Hung

Sai Ying Pun

Improvised Sai Ying Pun, just like other districts on eastern Hong Kong Island, is built on leveled slope connected with hundreds of alleys with staired alleyways. Since the small British colony was founded in the 19th century, this old town had been the home of poor Chinese class, crowded with low industries and trades. However, as these industries grew with the city, they were blended in the fabric so well that a system of trade had developed particularly for the site. In the documented condition, a wood material shop occupies a staired alley between two old tenement houses, leveling two side of the stairs for storage with local materials available, wood, metal plate etc. Goods are loaded/unloaded on the upper level, transported to the stairs for storage until being processed in the shop on the lower level. The way this trade operates sticks with the urban condition that one may see unprivileged.

30

31


Choi Hung

Sai Ying Pun

Improvised Sai Ying Pun, just like other districts on eastern Hong Kong Island, is built on leveled slope connected with hundreds of alleys with staired alleyways. Since the small British colony was founded in the 19th century, this old town had been the home of poor Chinese class, crowded with low industries and trades. However, as these industries grew with the city, they were blended in the fabric so well that a system of trade had developed particularly for the site. In the documented condition, a wood material shop occupies a staired alley between two old tenement houses, leveling two side of the stairs for storage with local materials available, wood, metal plate etc. Goods are loaded/unloaded on the upper level, transported to the stairs for storage until being processed in the shop on the lower level. The way this trade operates sticks with the urban condition that one may see unprivileged.

30

31


Sai Ying Pun

Sai Ying Pun

32

33


Sai Ying Pun

Sai Ying Pun

32

33


Tin Shui Wai

Tin Shui Wai

Totem One can hardly associate the urban condition in Tin Shui Wai with its poetic name, literally meaning the Village of Sky and Water. It was once a place where fish ponds were concentrated, but has now been completely torn down and engineered to a bedroom community. Massive transport network links the residents to the city centre for work day by day, and its numerous housing estates inhabit no living other than accommodation. The original agricultural, rural identity has been completely lost. In front of a public transport interchange which also links the main road to a public housing estate, a truss frame is boldly erected, recalling the image of the red gate linking to a Japanese shrine. We can see the attempt to recreate an identity, yet an engineered identity.

34

35


Tin Shui Wai

Tin Shui Wai

Totem One can hardly associate the urban condition in Tin Shui Wai with its poetic name, literally meaning the Village of Sky and Water. It was once a place where fish ponds were concentrated, but has now been completely torn down and engineered to a bedroom community. Massive transport network links the residents to the city centre for work day by day, and its numerous housing estates inhabit no living other than accommodation. The original agricultural, rural identity has been completely lost. In front of a public transport interchange which also links the main road to a public housing estate, a truss frame is boldly erected, recalling the image of the red gate linking to a Japanese shrine. We can see the attempt to recreate an identity, yet an engineered identity.

34

35


Tin Shui Wai

Tin Shui Wai

36

37


Tin Shui Wai

Tin Shui Wai

36

37


Choi Hung

Shek Kip Mei

Invisible The hair salon is hidden under the hoarding of a construction site. Before the construction, the barber opened the store on the street and now the he needed to move into the narrow corridor to serve the neighbours. The barber puts a wood panel between the steel columns for his equipment and he works within the spacing between the concrete blocks of the hoarding. It is uncertain whether the salon will still be there next time, the barber would lose his “shop� when the construction work is finished.

38

39


Choi Hung

Shek Kip Mei

Invisible The hair salon is hidden under the hoarding of a construction site. Before the construction, the barber opened the store on the street and now the he needed to move into the narrow corridor to serve the neighbours. The barber puts a wood panel between the steel columns for his equipment and he works within the spacing between the concrete blocks of the hoarding. It is uncertain whether the salon will still be there next time, the barber would lose his “shop� when the construction work is finished.

38

39


Shek Kip Mei

Shek Kip Mei

40

41


Shek Kip Mei

Shek Kip Mei

40

41


Choi Hung

Sheung Wan

Hide This Temple opens for 3 days every year to celebrate the god’s birthday. It is not always open to the public but temporarily. The owners of the temple need to do preparations before opening the temple. Because the temple is built along a narrow a slope, the owners need to build a temporary platform with steel structure and the wood deckings in the alley for the visitors during its opening period.

42

43


Choi Hung

Sheung Wan

Hide This Temple opens for 3 days every year to celebrate the god’s birthday. It is not always open to the public but temporarily. The owners of the temple need to do preparations before opening the temple. Because the temple is built along a narrow a slope, the owners need to build a temporary platform with steel structure and the wood deckings in the alley for the visitors during its opening period.

42

43


Sheung Wan

Sheung Wan

44

45


Sheung Wan

Sheung Wan

44

45


Lau Fau Shan

Lau Fau Shan

Illegal The car park is opened everyday but it is illegal because of the outline zoning plan. These area is provided for the residential area but now opens as a car park . Therefore people just put plastic boxes to circle the area.

46

47


Lau Fau Shan

Lau Fau Shan

Illegal The car park is opened everyday but it is illegal because of the outline zoning plan. These area is provided for the residential area but now opens as a car park . Therefore people just put plastic boxes to circle the area.

46

47


Lau Fau Shan

Lau Fau Shan

48

49


Lau Fau Shan

Lau Fau Shan

48

49


Choi Hung

Sham Shui Po

Community In between the busy streets of Sham Shui Po, restaurants with temporary structures are commonly found. Their extended set ups towards the pedestrians have created a “Pause� within the fast-paced community. It has become a culture for residents from the neighborhood to gather and social in these restaurants. Also, the co-existence relationship with the buildings behind them is a unique phenomenon which can only be found in this district. The restaurants bring potential customers to the onstreet shops in exchange of electricity and ventilation facilities.

50

51


Choi Hung

Sham Shui Po

Community In between the busy streets of Sham Shui Po, restaurants with temporary structures are commonly found. Their extended set ups towards the pedestrians have created a “Pause� within the fast-paced community. It has become a culture for residents from the neighborhood to gather and social in these restaurants. Also, the co-existence relationship with the buildings behind them is a unique phenomenon which can only be found in this district. The restaurants bring potential customers to the onstreet shops in exchange of electricity and ventilation facilities.

50

51


Shum Shui Po

Sham Shui Po

52

53


Shum Shui Po

Sham Shui Po

52

53


Choi Hung

Sheung Wan

Urban The selected area is a relatively high-end residential district at inner Sheung Wan. Due to the hard accessibility, the shops and cafes in this area have to utilize the space on the pedestrians in front of them in order to drive visitors into the cul de sacs. They are usually weekend temporary markets or product launching activities which allows customers to gather around their shops. As their locations are usually dead ends with shading from trees above, the urban “Pause� they created provide nice shaded spaces for people to relax and enjoy.

54

55


Choi Hung

Sheung Wan

Urban The selected area is a relatively high-end residential district at inner Sheung Wan. Due to the hard accessibility, the shops and cafes in this area have to utilize the space on the pedestrians in front of them in order to drive visitors into the cul de sacs. They are usually weekend temporary markets or product launching activities which allows customers to gather around their shops. As their locations are usually dead ends with shading from trees above, the urban “Pause� they created provide nice shaded spaces for people to relax and enjoy.

54

55


Sheung Wan

Sheung Wan

56

57


Sheung Wan

Sheung Wan

56

57


Tin Shui Wai

Tin Shui Wai

Illegal Tin Shui Wai, as a new town with strict planning, many activities are banned from public areas. For example, smoking and gambling are not allowed in public areas like parks and outdoor plazas. These chairs which are built under bridges on pedestrians therefore created dark corners for people from the neighborhood to gather. Although they are built by the government, they are used to conduct “Illegal” activities often due to their nature of hard to be noticed. The “Pause” turned an abandoned zone into a community space in a paradoxical way.

58

59


Tin Shui Wai

Tin Shui Wai

Illegal Tin Shui Wai, as a new town with strict planning, many activities are banned from public areas. For example, smoking and gambling are not allowed in public areas like parks and outdoor plazas. These chairs which are built under bridges on pedestrians therefore created dark corners for people from the neighborhood to gather. Although they are built by the government, they are used to conduct “Illegal” activities often due to their nature of hard to be noticed. The “Pause” turned an abandoned zone into a community space in a paradoxical way.

58

59


Tin Shui Wai

Tin Shui Wai

60

61


Tin Shui Wai

Tin Shui Wai

60

61


Choi Hung

Sai Ying Pun

Contrast The tenement houses were all built at different time, but work well with each other. In the past, these kind of mixed used buildings successfully created the sense of belonging to the residents as they provided all the things they needed and a place to gather. On the other hand, although there were many new shops at the ground level, the redeveloped estate failed to show the energy which it supposed to represent. More important, it also destroyed the original dynamicity within the community as it does not response to the buildings surrounding it. What it is trying to do is to separate it from the past and the aging community without any respect. The redevelopment scheme which was used as a resort to save the aging community is in fact a weapon to kill it.

66

67


Choi Hung

Mongkok

Lost In the past, the prostitution was mainly happening in the nightclub which was prevalence in Hong Kong before 2000. However, when the government tried to fight against the eroticism business, most of the nightclubs have closed. Prostitution became individualized and scattered afterwards. In area around Mong Kok, which have many night clubs in the past, units in residential building become the working places of sex workers. When more sex workers moved into these building, the usage of the building has also been changed. The entrance become their signature board to attract people. At the same time, as prostitution is illegal in Hong Kong, they would find ways to attract people but not that conspicuous at all, which create a subtle situation. We can see that how the government’s policies and actions could lead to changes in society.

62

63


Mongkok

Mongkok

64

65


Mongkok

Mongkok

64

65


Choi Hung

Sai Ying Pun

Contrast The tenement houses were all built at different time, but work well with each other. In the past, these kind of mixed used buildings successfully created the sense of belonging to the residents as they provided all the things they needed and a place to gather. On the other hand, although there were many new shops at the ground level, the redeveloped estate failed to show the energy which it supposed to represent. More important, it also destroyed the original dynamicity within the community as it does not response to the buildings surrounding it. What it is trying to do is to separate it from the past and the aging community without any respect. The redevelopment scheme which was used as a resort to save the aging community is in fact a weapon to kill it.

66

67


Choi Hung

Sai Ying Pun

Contrast The tenement houses were all built at different time, but work well with each other. In the past, these kind of mixed used buildings successfully created the sense of belonging to the residents as they provided all the things they needed and a place to gather. On the other hand, although there were many new shops at the ground level, the redeveloped estate failed to show the energy which it supposed to represent. More important, it also destroyed the original dynamicity within the community as it does not response to the buildings surrounding it. What it is trying to do is to separate it from the past and the aging community without any respect. The redevelopment scheme which was used as a resort to save the aging community is in fact a weapon to kill it.

66

67


Sai Ying Pun

Sai Ying Pun

68

69


Sai Ying Pun

Sai Ying Pun

68

69


Choi Hung

Sai Ying Pun

Contrast The tenement houses were all built at different time, but work well with each other. In the past, these kind of mixed used buildings successfully created the sense of belonging to the residents as they provided all the things they needed and a place to gather. On the other hand, although there were many new shops at the ground level, the redeveloped estate failed to show the energy which it supposed to represent. More important, it also destroyed the original dynamicity within the community as it does not response to the buildings surrounding it. What it is trying to do is to separate it from the past and the aging community without any respect. The redevelopment scheme which was used as a resort to save the aging community is in fact a weapon to kill it.

66

67


Tin Shui Wai

Tin Shui Wai

Trap Originally, there was water features within the Tin Say Road Park for people to enjoy, which is quite impossible to create danger to children as the water depth is only 600mm. However, in order to make the park easier to manage, the officer placed pots around the water, later on to the lawn and the boundary of the park so as to keep people away from the water as well as the lawn. The design which was aim at bringing different features into the park for people to enjoy became a trap which disallowed people from various functions which the park should has performed. Both planting pots and parks were designed to Unfortunately, due to the inappropriate management, design has become a trap to people.

70

71


Tin Shui Wai

Tin Shui Wai

72

73


Tin Shui Wai

Tin Shui Wai

72

73


Choi Hung

Sham Shui Po

Sealed In Sham Shui Po, most of the aged residential units have a “discoloration” at the wall near the window. It is due to the government policy and the change of habits of the users. Between 1981 to 2001, the Buildings Department have issued an enforecement policy against unauthorized building works (UBWs). The residents used to have a “cage window” which they removed the street-facing wall and created their very own balcony. People in the past would like to disclose directly to the street where sound, smell and even snacks can enter their home. Hawkers threw candy into the air and the buyer caught them near their window. However, in the modern standard, the open-air window are considered unhygienic and uncomfortable without air-conditioner being installed. These kind of street activity can no longer happened.

74

75


Choi Hung

Sham Shui Po

Sealed In Sham Shui Po, most of the aged residential units have a “discoloration” at the wall near the window. It is due to the government policy and the change of habits of the users. Between 1981 to 2001, the Buildings Department have issued an enforecement policy against unauthorized building works (UBWs). The residents used to have a “cage window” which they removed the street-facing wall and created their very own balcony. People in the past would like to disclose directly to the street where sound, smell and even snacks can enter their home. Hawkers threw candy into the air and the buyer caught them near their window. However, in the modern standard, the open-air window are considered unhygienic and uncomfortable without air-conditioner being installed. These kind of street activity can no longer happened.

74

75


Sham Shui Po

Sham Shui Po

76

77


Sham Shui Po

Sham Shui Po

76

77


Choi Hung

Central

Scar Central has long been the administrative centre of Hong Kong, in which the city hall used to be the first cultural centre in the region. The main facade of the City Hall was marked with the colony Armorial Bearings. A lion on the left and a dragon on the right. The lion symbolised the British Council while the dragon represents China. After the Hangover of Hong Kong, the original bearing was removed but nothing is being replaced. It leave a awkward scar on the main wall. It somehow represents the identity of Hong Kong nowadays, the position of this special region on the international stage remains uncertain.

78

79


Choi Hung

Sham Shui Po

Sealed In Sham Shui Po, most of the aged residential units have a “discoloration” at the wall near the window. It is due to the government policy and the change of habits of the users. Between 1981 to 2001, the Buildings Department have issued an enforecement policy against unauthorized building works (UBWs). The residents used to have a “cage window” which they removed the street-facing wall and created their very own balcony. People in the past would like to disclose directly to the street where sound, smell and even snacks can enter their home. Hawkers threw candy into the air and the buyer caught them near their window. However, in the modern standard, the open-air window are considered unhygienic and uncomfortable without air-conditioner being installed. These kind of street activity can no longer happened.

74

75


Central

Central

80

81


Central

Central

80

81


Choi Hung

Central

Scar Central has long been the administrative centre of Hong Kong, in which the city hall used to be the first cultural centre in the region. The main facade of the City Hall was marked with the colony Armorial Bearings. A lion on the left and a dragon on the right. The lion symbolised the British Council while the dragon represents China. After the Hangover of Hong Kong, the original bearing was removed but nothing is being replaced. It leave a awkward scar on the main wall. It somehow represents the identity of Hong Kong nowadays, the position of this special region on the international stage remains uncertain.

78

79


Tin Shui Wai

Tin Shui Wai

Settled The whole Tin Shui Wai region is developed by reclaiming the wetland. This place didn’t have a trace of living in the past and all the infrastructure was stood up by then. In a main route leading to a huge resodential estate housing 21,000 residents or more, the pedestrian path is designed to be very narrow. The residents and primary school children can barely pass through it. It has been done in the way so as to obey the guidelines for the turnaround of ambulance service. The developer has taken an easy path to place the supporting unit in the main road instead of considering the real user experience. The worn-out road surface with traces of sugar gums and heavy trolley passby showed the tiny road is hugely populated while the wide traffic road becomes excessive. There isn’t a sense of identity to the place as all the building elements are monotomous. The facade, the ramps, the window ... The onerous design choices leave no room for tin shui wai to develop the characteristic of the district.

82

83


Tin Shui Wai

Tin Shui Wai

84

85


Tin Shui Wai

Tin Shui Wai

84

85


Choi Hung

Sham Shui Po

Bloom Situated outside an electrical equipment store, blooming electrical equipment from a column transforms the cityscape into surrealist fantasy. Advertising the goods sold by the shop, it becomes a 3D decorative shed made up of meaningful objects, covering up the traits of oblivious shop and historical building and becoming an explicit advertisement. The column exemplifies a common practices of decorating every inch of shop with merchandises in Hong Kong. Tiny shrine on the column relates to local worship to the God of sky for the prosperity. This column condenses multi-faceted of Hong Kong, commercial, historical and cultural dimensions, in a surreal way.

86

87


Choi Hung

Sham Shui Po

Bloom Situated outside an electrical equipment store, blooming electrical equipment from a column transforms the cityscape into surrealist fantasy. Advertising the goods sold by the shop, it becomes a 3D decorative shed made up of meaningful objects, covering up the traits of oblivious shop and historical building and becoming an explicit advertisement. The column exemplifies a common practices of decorating every inch of shop with merchandises in Hong Kong. Tiny shrine on the column relates to local worship to the God of sky for the prosperity. This column condenses multi-faceted of Hong Kong, commercial, historical and cultural dimensions, in a surreal way.

86

87


Sham Shui Po

Sham Shui Po

88

89


Sham Shui Po

Sham Shui Po

88

89


Choi Hung

Sai Ying Pun

Soften Topography prevails in shaping urban fabric on the Hong Kong Island and ways of mitigating topography becomes a fundamental response upon habitation. As the steepest street on the Island, Centre Street offers different solutions to this challenges. While omnipresent solution of stairs and escalators offer practical responses to topography, inhabitants also offer a surreal answer from practicality-cum-playfulness: a slide of mattresses. Mattresses are slided down from the top of the slope, and subsequently delivered to a new service apartment. Hard topography is softened by the malleable mattresses. Habitation and topography creates unexpected surreal cityscape and fantasy.

90

91


Choi Hung

Sai Ying Pun

Soften Topography prevails in shaping urban fabric on the Hong Kong Island and ways of mitigating topography becomes a fundamental response upon habitation. As the steepest street on the Island, Centre Street offers different solutions to this challenges. While omnipresent solution of stairs and escalators offer practical responses to topography, inhabitants also offer a surreal answer from practicality-cum-playfulness: a slide of mattresses. Mattresses are slided down from the top of the slope, and subsequently delivered to a new service apartment. Hard topography is softened by the malleable mattresses. Habitation and topography creates unexpected surreal cityscape and fantasy.

90

91


Sai Ying Pun

Sai Ying Pun

92

93


Sai Ying Pun

Sai Ying Pun

92

93


Tin Shui Wai

Tin Shui Wai

Conform Marshes are used to stretching kilometers in Northwest New Territories yet development in the recent decades conquered the land by concretized surface. In the urban environment, nature struggles with and conforms to artificial landscape, creating a surreal dynamic between the antagonistic elements. Rigid brick pavement conforms the growth of Banyan Tree’s root, yet nature strives for its way within the grid and creates a hybrid condition of engineered nature, which roots dive between mortar to strive for its living and perhaps for the lost nature underneath. Surreal rectangular roots are nature’s answer to our engineered city, as both a natural and unnatural response.

94

95


Tin Shui Wai

Tin Shui Wai

Conform Marshes are used to stretching kilometers in Northwest New Territories yet development in the recent decades conquered the land by concretized surface. In the urban environment, nature struggles with and conforms to artificial landscape, creating a surreal dynamic between the antagonistic elements. Rigid brick pavement conforms the growth of Banyan Tree’s root, yet nature strives for its way within the grid and creates a hybrid condition of engineered nature, which roots dive between mortar to strive for its living and perhaps for the lost nature underneath. Surreal rectangular roots are nature’s answer to our engineered city, as both a natural and unnatural response.

94

95


Tin Shui Wai

Tin Shui Wai

96

97


Tin Shui Wai

Tin Shui Wai

96

97


Tin Shui Wai

Tin Shui Wai

Conform Marshes are used to stretching kilometers in Northwest New Territories yet development in the recent decades conquered the land by concretized surface. In the urban environment, nature struggles with and conforms to artificial landscape, creating a surreal dynamic between the antagonistic elements. Rigid brick pavement conforms the growth of Banyan Tree’s root, yet nature strives for its way within the grid and creates a hybrid condition of engineered nature, which roots dive between mortar to strive for its living and perhaps for the lost nature underneath. Surreal rectangular roots are nature’s answer to our engineered city, as both a natural and unnatural response.

94

95


Choi Hung

Sham Shui Po

Temporary In Mong Kok, there are a lot of temporary occupations on street. Different tools found on street with different scales including stall, food cart, trolley and carpet are choose to represent this area. Stall: sell different kinds of goods ranging from clothes to electrical appliances; Food cart: sell local food like stirfried chestnuts and roasted sweet potatoes; Trolley: for transport and temporary storage on the street; Carpet: sell second-hand goods like used clothes and toys This reflects the condition in this area where land rent is too high and a part of habitants could not bear it. They use their own methods to conduct commercial activities on street to make a living. Scales of tools increase with the economic power they have. Stall, the biggest tool is the only legal occupation while the owner has a license for it. The smallest one is the carpet for those with less resources.

98

99


Sham Shui Po

Sham Shui Po

100

101


Sham Shui Po

Sham Shui Po

100

101


Choi Hung

Shek Tong Tsui

Continuity The Hill Road Flyover was started to use in 1981. It is a one-way flyover started from Pok Fu Lam Road near HKU to Connaught Road West with 4-5m high. It was the highest flyover in the town and relieved congestion of Pok Fu Lam Road in Sai Ying Pun. However, it also brought noise and air pollution there and prices of residential buildings nearby fell. The flyover is now as the express from Pok Fu Lam to the Route 4. Every year during Hungry Ghost Festival, there is a bamboo theatre below the flyover and people perform traditional Chinese dramas there. On typical days, people exercise and wander around the leftover space. I named it “Continuity� because the flyover crosses over Shek Tong Tsui and it acts as a continuous guidance to provide a leading path. Moreover, the by-product, leftover space below provides a space for traditions to maintain.

102

103


Choi Hung

Shek Tong Tsui

Continuity The Hill Road Flyover was started to use in 1981. It is a one-way flyover started from Pok Fu Lam Road near HKU to Connaught Road West with 4-5m high. It was the highest flyover in the town and relieved congestion of Pok Fu Lam Road in Sai Ying Pun. However, it also brought noise and air pollution there and prices of residential buildings nearby fell. The flyover is now as the express from Pok Fu Lam to the Route 4. Every year during Hungry Ghost Festival, there is a bamboo theatre below the flyover and people perform traditional Chinese dramas there. On typical days, people exercise and wander around the leftover space. I named it “Continuity� because the flyover crosses over Shek Tong Tsui and it acts as a continuous guidance to provide a leading path. Moreover, the by-product, leftover space below provides a space for traditions to maintain.

102

103


Shek Tong Tsui

Shek Tong Tsui

104

105


Shek Tong Tsui

Shek Tong Tsui

104

105


Choi Hung

Shek Tong Tsui

Continuity The Hill Road Flyover was started to use in 1981. It is a one-way flyover started from Pok Fu Lam Road near HKU to Connaught Road West with 4-5m high. It was the highest flyover in the town and relieved congestion of Pok Fu Lam Road in Sai Ying Pun. However, it also brought noise and air pollution there and prices of residential buildings nearby fell. The flyover is now as the express from Pok Fu Lam to the Route 4. Every year during Hungry Ghost Festival, there is a bamboo theatre below the flyover and people perform traditional Chinese dramas there. On typical days, people exercise and wander around the leftover space. I named it “Continuity� because the flyover crosses over Shek Tong Tsui and it acts as a continuous guidance to provide a leading path. Moreover, the by-product, leftover space below provides a space for traditions to maintain.

102

103


Lau Fau Shan

Lau Fau Shan

Demarcation In Lau Fau Shan, there are foam boxes placed on the road to differentiate area for car parking. According to the outline zoning plan, it is not possible to make the car park permanent. Therefore, habitants use foam boxes to mark the boundary and then put heavy things like bricks inside to fix them from being blew away by wind. Small and light foam boxes form a great contrast with huge and heavy cargos and trucks. Though the material is fragile, foam boxes still stand there and help to demarcate the boundary. Foam boxes occupy the road with an illegal function, but no one stop the occupation in this area since it is remoted and near the boundary of HKSAR. Foam boxes are local materials which can be easily obtained from the wet market nearby. It is a special condition which could find in this district only with less traffic and control.

106

107


Lau Fau Shan

Lau Fau Shan

108

109


Lau Fau Shan

Lau Fau Shan

108

109


Choi Hung

Mongkok

Infringement Public space in private space is very common in Hong Kong. This condition has two requirements to fulfill. Overcrowding and overregulation make this condition happen. Overregulation make the building boundary to set back the site boundary and to create the back alley, it is because of each building should have enough daylight and ventilation. However, back alley is the private area of two side of building. Overcrowding allow people to move into the public space, but the regulation is not allowing people use the pedestrian area, which make people to occupy the back alley.

110

111


Choi Hung

Mongkok

Infringement Public space in private space is very common in Hong Kong. This condition has two requirements to fulfill. Overcrowding and overregulation make this condition happen. Overregulation make the building boundary to set back the site boundary and to create the back alley, it is because of each building should have enough daylight and ventilation. However, back alley is the private area of two side of building. Overcrowding allow people to move into the public space, but the regulation is not allowing people use the pedestrian area, which make people to occupy the back alley.

110

111


Mongkok

Mongkok

112

113


Mongkok

Mongkok

112

113


Choi Hung

Mongkok

Infringement Public space in private space is very common in Hong Kong. This condition has two requirements to fulfill. Overcrowding and overregulation make this condition happen. Overregulation make the building boundary to set back the site boundary and to create the back alley, it is because of each building should have enough daylight and ventilation. However, back alley is the private area of two side of building. Overcrowding allow people to move into the public space, but the regulation is not allowing people use the pedestrian area, which make people to occupy the back alley.

110

111


Choi Hung

Sheung Wan

Redundancy Hong Kong government is more consideration on the data and regulation. This park is try to fulfill enough public space for each person in this district area. However, the park design wasn’t considering the architectural space and the human relationship. 40% inaccessible space, fence and two types of plantation are the regulation for the public park, but these regulations are limited the architectural space inside the park.

114

115


Sheung Wan

Sheung Wan

116

117


Sheung Wan

Sheung Wan

116

117


Tin Shui Wai

Tin Shui Wai

Domestic The average age of the New Territories is around 30-50 years old and the countryside is around 40-60 years old, so the average age is slightly older than the city people. This bus stop only have two buses pass through in an hour. The duration of the waiting bus is too long for the older and the government didn’t use the money to develop the better bus stop, so people start to make the domestic furniture to the bus stop. Thus, it makes this condition happen.

118

119


Tin Shui Wai

Tin Shui Wai

Domestic The average age of the New Territories is around 30-50 years old and the countryside is around 40-60 years old, so the average age is slightly older than the city people. This bus stop only have two buses pass through in an hour. The duration of the waiting bus is too long for the older and the government didn’t use the money to develop the better bus stop, so people start to make the domestic furniture to the bus stop. Thus, it makes this condition happen.

118

119


Tin Shui Wai

Tin Shui Wai

120

121


Tin Shui Wai

Tin Shui Wai

120

121


Choi Hung

Shek Kip Mei

Reclaim This footbridge connects the street and the Shek Kip Mei Estate. It located on the south side of Mei Shan House. Under the bridge is a pedestrian crossing. The ground floor of Shek Kip Mei Estate is using for different kinds of shops. On the other side of the road is a school. The old lady occupied a small part under the footbridge to sell some small products. Unlike other footbridges in this area. The government builds flowerbeds to occupied the area under the staircase to prevent people make it for other use like storage or parking their bikes. And only leave the space for people to walk through. In this condition, under the staircase, an electrical box is also set there, so space is not fully occupied and the old lady can make use of this small area. If the old lady set back for a half meter the space between the columns will form a space for people to see her products, and Keep Clear of the walking system.

122

123


Choi Hung

Shek Kip Mei

Reclaim This footbridge connects the street and the Shek Kip Mei Estate. It located on the south side of Mei Shan House. Under the bridge is a pedestrian crossing. The ground floor of Shek Kip Mei Estate is using for different kinds of shops. On the other side of the road is a school. The old lady occupied a small part under the footbridge to sell some small products. Unlike other footbridges in this area. The government builds flowerbeds to occupied the area under the staircase to prevent people make it for other use like storage or parking their bikes. And only leave the space for people to walk through. In this condition, under the staircase, an electrical box is also set there, so space is not fully occupied and the old lady can make use of this small area. If the old lady set back for a half meter the space between the columns will form a space for people to see her products, and Keep Clear of the walking system.

122

123


Shek Kip Mei

Shek Kip Mei

124

125


Shek Kip Mei

Shek Kip Mei

124

125


Choi Hung

Sheung Wan

Non-traditional The Taisui is a hypothetical planet, which cycle is twelve years, so people use twelve animal zodiacs to represent each year. The Taisui temple in Sheung Wan is unlike the traditional temple, which is mainly for religious use for the people. The nontraditional Taisui Temple is focused on commercial use. Besides that, the Temple also utilize the street to be the part of it to extend its space for the people who want to go in, so the boxes set by the owner in front of the doors and in the middle of the street do not only have its traditional use like contribution and burning incense, it also function as a kind of advertisement to attract people who walk by. Despite using the inconspicuous advertisement to attract people, the owner of the temple also set some traditional advertisement on the facade of the building to attract people. People can also watch the introduction video on the Utube. And its service range contains increasing good fortune for people, calculating the best day to do something and even teaching people how to be a specialist in Feng Shui. For its inside space, due to the inadequate room, various of gods are occupied each wall of the room like products that people can find the god that they believe and spend money to burn incense for the gods and pray for them. 126

127


Choi Hung

Sheung Wan

Non-traditional The Taisui is a hypothetical planet, which cycle is twelve years, so people use twelve animal zodiacs to represent each year. The Taisui temple in Sheung Wan is unlike the traditional temple, which is mainly for religious use for the people. The nontraditional Taisui Temple is focused on commercial use. Besides that, the Temple also utilize the street to be the part of it to extend its space for the people who want to go in, so the boxes set by the owner in front of the doors and in the middle of the street do not only have its traditional use like contribution and burning incense, it also function as a kind of advertisement to attract people who walk by. Despite using the inconspicuous advertisement to attract people, the owner of the temple also set some traditional advertisement on the facade of the building to attract people. People can also watch the introduction video on the Utube. And its service range contains increasing good fortune for people, calculating the best day to do something and even teaching people how to be a specialist in Feng Shui. For its inside space, due to the inadequate room, various of gods are occupied each wall of the room like products that people can find the god that they believe and spend money to burn incense for the gods and pray for them. 126

127


Sheung Wan

Sheung Wan

128

129


Sheung Wan

Sheung Wan

128

129


Lau Fau Shan

Lau Fau Shan

Engineering This condition is located in Lau Fau Shan road. They are built by a mainland company to improve the problem of flooding in this area. The whole system contains trees drainage pipe and the road. This area is outskirt of Hong Kong. The residents want to have a large paved ground for them to use. So large area of natural ground(covered by the plants) are paved by the cement, so during the rainy season. The water can not absorb by the ground and cause the problem of waterlogging even its quite near the sea. Some of the residents start to realize it is too paved in this area and try to plant some plants in front of their house. But it doses not solve the problem. So the HK government intervenes this problem and hold a competition. However the company who win the bid to handle this problem did not use the more natural way to solve the problem like demolish some paved ground, they choose a more engineered way to build a drainage system together with a pump station in this area. In order To decorate this engineering system, the designer of the drainage system try to make it be a part of nature, but leave labels on the each of the trees they planted. That make me have a strong sense of engineering nature. 130

131


Lau Fau Shan

Lau Fau Shan

Engineering This condition is located in Lau Fau Shan road. They are built by a mainland company to improve the problem of flooding in this area. The whole system contains trees drainage pipe and the road. This area is outskirt of Hong Kong. The residents want to have a large paved ground for them to use. So large area of natural ground(covered by the plants) are paved by the cement, so during the rainy season. The water can not absorb by the ground and cause the problem of waterlogging even its quite near the sea. Some of the residents start to realize it is too paved in this area and try to plant some plants in front of their house. But it doses not solve the problem. So the HK government intervenes this problem and hold a competition. However the company who win the bid to handle this problem did not use the more natural way to solve the problem like demolish some paved ground, they choose a more engineered way to build a drainage system together with a pump station in this area. In order To decorate this engineering system, the designer of the drainage system try to make it be a part of nature, but leave labels on the each of the trees they planted. That make me have a strong sense of engineering nature. 130

131


Lau Fau Shan

Lau Fau Shan

132

133


Lau Fau Shan

Lau Fau Shan

132

133


Lau Fau Shan

Lau Fau Shan

Engineering This condition is located in Lau Fau Shan road. They are built by a mainland company to improve the problem of flooding in this area. The whole system contains trees drainage pipe and the road. This area is outskirt of Hong Kong. The residents want to have a large paved ground for them to use. So large area of natural ground(covered by the plants) are paved by the cement, so during the rainy season. The water can not absorb by the ground and cause the problem of waterlogging even its quite near the sea. Some of the residents start to realize it is too paved in this area and try to plant some plants in front of their house. But it doses not solve the problem. So the HK government intervenes this problem and hold a competition. However the company who win the bid to handle this problem did not use the more natural way to solve the problem like demolish some paved ground, they choose a more engineered way to build a drainage system together with a pump station in this area. In order To decorate this engineering system, the designer of the drainage system try to make it be a part of nature, but leave labels on the each of the trees they planted. That make me have a strong sense of engineering nature. 130

131


Choi Hung

Prince Edward

Puff When the old buildings in the inner city are redeveloped into commercial towers, the hideouts such as back alleys or staircases disappeared. The Building Regulation requires the doors of the fire escape staircase to be opened outwards while the door swing has to stay inside the site boundary. These rooms of about 1.5m x 1.5 m are hence created. The by-product of the building codes becomes the perfect escape from the busy street. These urban capsules provide privacy and shelter from rain and sun. The ambiguity between inside and outside becomes “hotspots� for smoking or making phone calls.

134

135


Prince Edward

Prince Edward

136

137


Prince Edward

Prince Edward

136

137


Choi Hung

Sai Ying Pun

Seam The land plots in Hong Kong Island are small in size and fragmented due to its long history of development and topography. Small alleys are created among the dense yet small-scale fabric. In Sai Ying Pun, a residential district with peaceful street life, small business take over the alley and operate within. The alley provides the perfect dimension for the tailor store, all of the tailor’s working tables and storage are placed along one side. Together with the “tailor-made� plastic-sheet shelter, the level difference between the alley and the street offers the tailor a pleasant working environment with privacy.

138

139


Choi Hung

Sai Ying Pun

Seam The land plots in Hong Kong Island are small in size and fragmented due to its long history of development and topography. Small alleys are created among the dense yet small-scale fabric. In Sai Ying Pun, a residential district with peaceful street life, small business take over the alley and operate within. The alley provides the perfect dimension for the tailor store, all of the tailor’s working tables and storage are placed along one side. Together with the “tailor-made� plastic-sheet shelter, the level difference between the alley and the street offers the tailor a pleasant working environment with privacy.

138

139


Sai Ying Pun

Sai Ying Pun

140

141


Sai Ying Pun

Sai Ying Pun

140

141


Choi Hung

Sai Ying Pun

Seam The land plots in Hong Kong Island are small in size and fragmented due to its long history of development and topography. Small alleys are created among the dense yet small-scale fabric. In Sai Ying Pun, a residential district with peaceful street life, small business take over the alley and operate within. The alley provides the perfect dimension for the tailor store, all of the tailor’s working tables and storage are placed along one side. Together with the “tailor-made� plastic-sheet shelter, the level difference between the alley and the street offers the tailor a pleasant working environment with privacy.

138

139


Lau Fau Shan

Lau Fau Shan

Parasite Hong Kong Governement planned to develop the New Territories in 1970s to solve the housing problem. In order to get the support from the local residents, the government proposed the “New Territories Small House Policy” in return. The policy states that each male offspring of the local resident can build a house (with a height limit of 3-storey and 700 sq. ft. per floor max.) on the land he owns regardless of the land use. These small houses (known as Ding House 丁屋) become the common typology in the New Territories. Illegal modifications to these houses are usually resulted after the occupation permit is obtained to claim more usable space out of the restricted dimension. In this case in Lau Fau Shan, the ground floor of the house was converted to a seafood restaurant. The orginal staircase was demolished and replaced by a tiny one at the exterior of the house.

142

143


Lau Fau Shan

Lau Fau Shan

144

145


Lau Fau Shan

Lau Fau Shan

144

145


Community

Community

148

149


Community

Community

148

149


Contrast

Contrast

150

151


Contrast

Contrast

150

151


Interim

Interim

152

153


Interim

Interim

152

153


Invisible

Invisible

154

155


Invisible

Invisible

154

155


Non-traditional

Non-traditional

156

157


Non-traditional

Non-traditional

156

157


Redundancy

Redundancy

158

159


Redundancy

Redundancy

158

159


Sealed

Sealed

160

161


Sealed

Sealed

160

161


Seam

Seam

162

163


Seam

Seam

162

163


Soften

Soften

164

165


Soften

Soften

164

165


Temporary

Temporary

166

167


Temporary

Temporary

166

167


Totem

Totem

168

169


Totem

Totem

168

169


Condition

Condition

170

171


Condition

Condition

170

171


Location

Location

Lau Fau Wan Tin Shui Wai

Shum Shui Po Prince Edward Mongkok

Sai Ying Pun Shek Tong Tsui

172

Sheung Wan Central

173


Location

Location

Lau Fau Wan Tin Shui Wai

Shum Shui Po Prince Edward Mongkok

Sai Ying Pun Shek Tong Tsui

172

Sheung Wan Central

173


Location

22°19’33.1”N 114°09’49.7”E Bloom

Location

22°19’23.6”N 114°10’08.9”E Buried

“22°28’08.7””N 113°59’58.3”E Community

22°19’35.2”N 114°09’44.8”E Continuity

22°17’10.1”N 114°08’34.5”E Contrast

隧道口

22°27’37.9”N 114°00’09.1”E Conform

YI

U

22°20’53.9”N 114°03’20.4”E Hide

“22°27’43.5””N 113°59’59.3”E Illegal

22°28’00.1”N 113°59’48.5”E Illegal

22°17’13.2”N 114°08’38.6”E Improvised

22°27’41.4”N 113°59’49.0”E Infringement

22°28’02.9”N 113°58’59.9”E Interim

22°19’00.2”N 114°10’06.5”E Lost

22°17’06.0”N 114°08’52.7”E Non-traditional

TU

NG

ST

RE

ET

22°28’01.7”N 113°59’02.2”E Demarcation

22°15’15.1”N 113°51’46.0”E Domestic

174

22°27’53.7”N 113°59’09.5”E Engineering

22°18’41.6”N 114°10’07.2”E Invisible

175


Location

22°19’33.1”N 114°09’49.7”E Bloom

Location

22°19’23.6”N 114°10’08.9”E Buried

“22°28’08.7””N 113°59’58.3”E Community

22°19’35.2”N 114°09’44.8”E Continuity

22°17’10.1”N 114°08’34.5”E Contrast

隧道口

22°27’37.9”N 114°00’09.1”E Conform

YI

U

ST

RE

22°15’15.1”N 113°51’46.0”E Domestic

174

22°27’53.7”N 113°59’09.5”E Engineering

“22°27’43.5””N 113°59’59.3”E Illegal

22°28’00.1”N 113°59’48.5”E Illegal

22°17’13.2”N 114°08’38.6”E Improvised

22°27’41.4”N 113°59’49.0”E Infringement

22°28’02.9”N 113°58’59.9”E Interim

22°19’00.2”N 114°10’06.5”E Lost

22°17’06.0”N 114°08’52.7”E Non-traditional

TU

NG

22°28’01.7”N 113°59’02.2”E Demarcation

22°20’53.9”N 114°03’20.4”E Hide

ET

22°18’41.6”N 114°10’07.2”E Invisible

175


Location

Location

22°28’04.2”N 113°58’58.0”E Parasite

22°19’51.3”N 114°09’47.5”E Parasitic

22°19’22.2”N 114°10’07.6”E Puff

22°19’55.2”N 114°09’56.2”E Reclaim

“22°14’51.0””N 114°09’09.7””E” Redundancy

22°17’07.5”N 114°08’05.2”E Residual

22°16’57.5”N 114°09’42.8”E Scar

22°19’47.2”N 114°09’41.9”E Sealed

22°17’12.2”N 114°08’37.6”E Seam

176

22°27’50.3”N 113°59’59.5”E Settled

22°17’04.4”N 114°08’31.6”E Soften

22°19’45.0”N 114°09’40.6”E Temporary

22°27’43.5”N 113°59’56.2”E Totem

22°27’59.2”N 114°00’04.6”E Trap

22°17’04.0”N 114°08’54.2”E Urban

177


Location

Location

22°28’04.2”N 113°58’58.0”E Parasite

22°19’51.3”N 114°09’47.5”E Parasitic

22°19’22.2”N 114°10’07.6”E Puff

22°19’55.2”N 114°09’56.2”E Reclaim

“22°14’51.0””N 114°09’09.7””E” Redundancy

22°17’07.5”N 114°08’05.2”E Residual

22°16’57.5”N 114°09’42.8”E Scar

22°19’47.2”N 114°09’41.9”E Sealed

22°17’12.2”N 114°08’37.6”E Seam

176

22°27’50.3”N 113°59’59.5”E Settled

22°17’04.4”N 114°08’31.6”E Soften

22°19’45.0”N 114°09’40.6”E Temporary

22°27’43.5”N 113°59’56.2”E Totem

22°27’59.2”N 114°00’04.6”E Trap

22°17’04.0”N 114°08’54.2”E Urban

177


Authors

Authors

Chan Cheuk Kiu, Jefferson

Chan Wai Sum, Sam

Chiu Mei Ying, Ashley

Chow Sze Hei

Ho Kwan Ho, Dennis

Kwok Hoi Lam, Helen

Lam Joshua Wai Hon

Tam Sea Yan, Celia

Vong Ting Hin, Woody

jeffersonchanck@gmail.com

szeheijennychow@gmail.com

joshua.waihon.lam@gmail.com

samsc2008@gmail.com

hkhdennis@gmail.com

tamseayan@gmail.com

178

meiying0104@gmail.com

Wang Yi

bryanw@foxmail.com

Wong Fai Nam Arthur wfnarthur@gmail.com

kowkneleh@gmail.com

vong0420@hotmail.com

179

Peter Ferretto

peter.ferretto@cuhk.edu.hk


Authors

Authors

Chan Cheuk Kiu, Jefferson

Chan Wai Sum, Sam

Chiu Mei Ying, Ashley

Chow Sze Hei

Ho Kwan Ho, Dennis

Kwok Hoi Lam, Helen

Lam Joshua Wai Hon

Tam Sea Yan, Celia

Vong Ting Hin, Woody

jeffersonchanck@gmail.com

szeheijennychow@gmail.com

joshua.waihon.lam@gmail.com

samsc2008@gmail.com

hkhdennis@gmail.com

tamseayan@gmail.com

178

meiying0104@gmail.com

Wang Yi

bryanw@foxmail.com

Wong Fai Nam Arthur wfnarthur@gmail.com

kowkneleh@gmail.com

vong0420@hotmail.com

179

Peter Ferretto

peter.ferretto@cuhk.edu.hk


CONDITION / HONG KONG III © 2017 All rights reserved, including the right of reproduction in whole or in part in any form First published in 2017 Authors: Peter Winston Ferretto Chan Cheuk Kiu, Jefferson Chan Wai Sum, Sam Chiu Mei Ying, Ashley Chow Sze Hei Ho Kwan Ho, Dennis Kwok Hoi Lam, Helen Lam Joshua Wai Hon Tam Sea Yan, Celia Vong Ting Hin, Woody Wang Yi Wong Fai Nam Arthur

School of Architecture The Chinese University of Hong Kong AIT Building Shatin, New Terretories Hong Kong SAR, China T +852 3943 6583 E architecture@cuhk.edu.hk W www.arch.cuhk.edu.hk/

ISBN Printed in Hong Kong


CONDITION / HONG KONG III © 2017 All rights reserved, including the right of reproduction in whole or in part in any form First published in 2017 Authors: Peter Winston Ferretto Chan Cheuk Kiu, Jefferson Chan Wai Sum, Sam Chiu Mei Ying, Ashley Chow Sze Hei Ho Kwan Ho, Dennis Kwok Hoi Lam, Helen Lam Joshua Wai Hon Tam Sea Yan, Celia Vong Ting Hin, Woody Wang Yi Wong Fai Nam Arthur

School of Architecture The Chinese University of Hong Kong AIT Building Shatin, New Terretories Hong Kong SAR, China T +852 3943 6583 E architecture@cuhk.edu.hk W www.arch.cuhk.edu.hk/

ISBN Printed in Hong Kong


Profile for Condition_Lab

Condition/ Hong Kong III  

Book made by students from class ARCH5131b Taught by Prof. Peter W. Ferretto School of Architecture, CUHK 2017

Condition/ Hong Kong III  

Book made by students from class ARCH5131b Taught by Prof. Peter W. Ferretto School of Architecture, CUHK 2017

Advertisement