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THE CHINESE UNIVERSITY OF HONG KONG

COMPOUND VS FRAGMENT

PAUSE CITY Dia: Hong Kong_Art Foundation

PWFEERRETTO STUDIO ARCH_5112_DESIGN STUDIO_M1 GRADUATE CLASS_TERM 02_14/15


PWFERRETTO STUDIO CUHK 02


CONTENT

01_PROLOGUE Compound vs. Fragment 02_INTRODUCTION Pause City_Dia: Hong Kong- Art Foundation 03_THREE SECTIONS Section 1 - What is a Museum? Research / Analysis / 4 Tasks Section 2 - The Concept of the Museum Site / Programme / 6 Themes Section 3 - Project Representation Process / 2 Models / 4 Panels 04_SCHEDULE Week by Week Course Outline 05_MODUS OPERANDI Presentation Lexicon Book / Panels / Model 06_BIBLIOGRAPHY References and Reading List

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SERGEI EISENSTEIN MONTAGE SKETCH 04


PROLOGUE

COMPOUND / FRAGMENT Almost everything we know about the past comes from physical and narrative fragments. Yet a fragment is not simply the static part of a once-whole thing. It is itself something in motion over time, manifesting successively or variously as object, evidence, concept, and condition. Adorno, Theodor W.

An idea is a thought. It’s that thought that holds more than you think it does when you receive it. But in that first moment there is a spark. Ina comic strip, if someone gets an idea, a light bulb goes on. It happens in an instant, just as in life. It would be great in the entire film came all at once. But it comes, for me, in fragments. That first fragment is like the Rosetta stone. It’s a piece of a puzzle that indicates the rest. It’s a hope puzzle piece. In “Blue Velvet”, it was red lips, green lawns, and the song – Bobby Vinton’s version of Blue Velvet. The next thing was an ear lying in the field. And that was it. You fall in love with the first idea, that little tiny piece. And once you’re got it, the rest will come in time. David Lynch

The shot is by no means an element of montage. The shot is a montage cell. Just as cells in their division from a phenomenon of another order, the organism or embryo, so, on the other side of the dialectic leap from the shot, there is montage. By what, then, is montage characterized and, consequently, its cells – the shot? By collision. By the conflict of two pieces in opposition to each other. By conflict. By conflict. In front of me lies a crumpled yellowed sheet of paper. On it is a mysterious note: ‘Linkage—Page’ and ‘collision—E’. This is a substantial trace of a heated bout on the subject of montage between P (Pudovkin) and E (myself). Sergei Eisenstein

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PAUSE CITY COMPOUND/FRAGMENT 06


INTRODUCTION

PAUSE CITY_ DIA: HONG KONG - ART FOUNDATION “Light is meaningful only in relation to darkness, and truth presupposes error. It is these mingled opposites which people our life, which make it pungent, intoxicating. We only exist in terms of this conflict, in the zone where black and white clash.” “Paris Peasant” by Louis Aragon MUSEUM We live in an era where the Museum has become a default cultural commodity, indispensable piece of the urban jigsaw for any self-respecting “contemporary/ modern/en-vogue” 21st Century city. Often situated in segregated cultural districts they no longer follow the institutional system “collect to display” rather the organism has been inverted to follow the dictum “display to collect”; the collection referring to the endless merchandise which is rapidly replacing the “original” artifacts themselves. This semester the studio will challenge these notions and speculate whether the Museum can be returned to the city; an institution that celebrates urban life the expressions of time and place that inspire our everyday, leading to alternative architectural strategies that assemble fragments and celebrate a city that is beautifully incomplete. Our approach will be empirical, interpreting the city through direct contact, sampling and exploring the notion of “Pause”. Our challenge is to attempt to define what makes up a New Museum for Hong Kong today, as an antithesis to the Guggenheim and MOMA ventures that have engulfed so many cities today, and in the process reveal the layers of complexity that define Hong Kong’s urban condition.

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DIA: BEACON EXISTING FACTORY 08


FOUNDATION Dia Art Foundation is a nonprofit organization that initiates, supports, presents, and preserves art projects. It was established in 1974 as the Lone Star Foundation by Philippa de Menil, the daughter of Houston arts patronDominique de Menil and an heiress to the Schlumberger oil exploration fortune; art dealer Heiner Friedrich, Philippa’s husband; and Helen Winkler, a Houston art historian. Dia wanted to support projects “whose nature or scale would preclude other funding sources.” The name “Dia”, taken from the Greek word meaning “through”, was chosen to suggest the institution’s role in enabling artistic projects that might not otherwise be realized. Dia holds a major collection of work by artists of the 1960s and 1970s, on view at Dia:Beacon opened in the Hudson Valley in 2003. Dia additionally maintains long-term site-specific projects in the western United States, New York City, and on Long Island. Dia’s permanent collection holdings include artworks by artists who came to prominence during the 1960s and 1970s, including Joseph Beuys, Dan Flavin, Donald Judd, Agnes Martin, and Andy Warhol. The art of this period represented a radical departure in artistic practice and is often large in scale; it is occasionally ephemeral or site-specific. Currently, Dia commissions, supports, and presents site-specific installations and long-term exhibitions of work by these artists, as well as those of younger generations. DIA: HONG KONG The foundation you will design focuses on Contemporary Chinese Art after the Cultural Revolution of 1966 to present. Students will be asked to analyze one specific artist and track their background both theoretically and physically, i.e. the thinking behind the work as well as the physical properties of the art pieces themselves.

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PAUSE CITY STAGNANT MOMENT 10


PAUSE CITY At times architects, in their egotistical pursuit to erect buildings, lose track of the city and the elements that constitute the fabric of the urban surroundings. This semester we will focus on the pauses that make up the city, the vacant spaces that arise out of situations that both architects and planners cannot control. Cities, when perceived and experienced as spatio-material artifacts that developed over time, often appear to us as accumulations of ‘effects’. Effects’ of which the ‘causes’ are mostly unperceivable. You might call these places the pauses of understanding. Pauses that embody a position of waiting and procrastination, so characteristic of situations about which we have yet to shape our own conceptions, situations which we have not yet been able to summarize. The places that are brought about as physical realities in between the incidents of understanding. Such pauses are found everywhere in every city. Nobody has conceived them or willed them into being. They have turned up by themselves, through collisions, like holes or sites of oblivion. They are always found at the boundaries of thinking. The Architecture of the Pause deals with the obscure transitions and pauses in between places in the city which are culturally and socially saturated with meaning. But these pauses in the urban space are only seemingly empty. If one focuses in on them, they reveal unexpected secrets and thus provide a completely different way of interpreting the concepts of site and space. ‘Causes’ that even for its citizens are often unknown or lost. Streets have directions but what caused their direction? Urban blocks have a shape but what caused their shape? Buildings have heights but what caused their height? There are colors, materials, textures but what caused their choice? Were it geomorphological circumstances, factors of ground ownership, political decisions, urbanistic solutions, technical possibilities or economical reasons that caused the spatio-material elements of the city to be as they are? These pauses are often referred to as urban voids and discarded as empty spaces that have to be recharged in order to be activated.

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01_Noguchi Museum, New York 02_Whiteney Museum, New York 03_Soane Museum, London 04_Kolomba Museum, Cologne 05_Miro Foundation, Barcelona 06_Barnes Collection, Philadelphia 07_Dia: Beacon, New York 08_798 District, Beijing 09_Biennale Giardini, Venice 10_Warsaw Museum Kerez, Warsaw 11_Contemporary Art Museum, Santiago 12_Kimbell Art Museum, Fort Worth 13_Perm Museum XXI, Olgiati, Moscow 14_Bregenz Museum, Bregenz 15_Water Museum, Nishizawa, Teshima 16_Towada Art Center, Towada 17_V&A, London 18_Museum Insel Hombroich, Dusseldorf 19_Mimesis, Seoul 20_National Gallery, Berlin

MUSEUMS PRECEDENTS 12


THREE SECTIONS

SECTION 1_WHAT IS A MUSEUM? Research / Analysis / 4 Tasks Duration 4 Weeks / 4 Tasks, 1 Task/Week. Presentation on February 05, 2015. Tasks Task 01_ Contemporary Chinese Artist Taxonomy Select a Chinese Artist who has been working since 1966 The Artists should work in different media: Fine Art, Sculpture, Video, Conceptual Art, Photography , Performance, etc‌ Include artists such as: Cai Guoqiang, Yue Minjun, Ai Weiwei, Zhang Xiaogang, Zeng Fanzhi, and others Output 01_2 Diagrams 01_Syntax diagram describing the artist work, for reference use Ai Wei Wei’s method. 02_Physical Diagram illustrating the scale and properties of each piece, for reference consult Prada Foundation Milan book by OMA. Task 02_ Museum Plan Select ONE Museum from the given list and produce using ONLY Plans at 1:100, drawings that explain how they work, considering: Public/Private, Areas of Galleries, Circulation, Light, Logistics, Programme, Back of House. Output 02_Black and White Plans 1:100 The plan should read as clear as possible and all have to be redrawn and edited in Illustrator. Task 03_Museum Light Continuing with your selected museum construct a 1:50 white sectional model to show how the light enters the galleries. Output 03_ White Model 1:50 Once the model is complete you are required to take a photograph showing how the light enters the space. Task 04_Composite Space Make a cast model (fragment) in plaster, of a gallery space to house the work of the artist you have analyzed. Output 04_ Cast Model scale 1:50 White plaster model. Situate the work within the model and recreate the experience of the space in a photograph. 13


CONCEPT PROCESS 14


SECTION 2_THE CONCEPT OF THE MUSEUM Site / Programme / 6 Themes Duration 5 weeks (Including Chinese New Year) Site The site visit to the site will happen after the first review and will be coordinated to a field trip to Shenzhen. The site is located in the Kwun Tong district of Hong Kong. The proposed Foundation building will have to address the existing complexity of the context, specifically the condition of Operating City/Pause/Infrastructure/Residential, each component will have to be addressed. Progarmme 01_Permanent Galleries: dependent of the artist and ambition of the concept. The scale of the spaces and the resulting building will have address both the integrity of the art piece and the urban context. 02_Temporary Galleries: 2000 m2 of gallery space with natural light 03_Garden: This element of the design will have to address the existing park, complementing or disregarding it. 04_Auxiliarry programmes: are to the discretion of the student and may include, car-park, educational facilities, etc., but will have to be coherent with the overall concept. Theme Students will be asked to address the following themes: A) Whole/Fragment B) Boundary/Threshold C) Edge/Wall D) Light/Solid E) Inside/Outside F) System/Element Output Strong emphasis will be given to the following design elements: Plan: Clear and strong graphics; consistency of representation vital Section: Drawings that describe and analyze the light entering the spaces Model: Working models to demonstrate concepts and reciprocities.

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REPRESENTATION FINAL PRESENTATION 16


SECTION 3 - PROJECT REPRESENTATION Process / 2 Models / 4 Panels Duration The final 6 weeks of the project will focus on the final presentation. Tasks The will be a total of 3 deliverables 01_Process The whole story of your project will be recounted in your book. The format of the book will be given to you 02_Models Only two final models will be required Scales: 1:500 and 1:50 to explain the 3D qualities of the spaces. Both models will have to be made in white wood and finished professionally You will be required to work in the workshop and spray finish them to look pure white Please allow minimum of two weeks for these models. Laser cutter models are not allowed. 03_Panels 4 large panels are required, size 1000x2000mm These will make a total length of 4000x2000mm per student The panels will only show plans/sections, no perspective renderings

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FINAL MODEL SPACIAL FRAGMENT 18


SCHEDULE

SCHEDULE FOR THE SEMESTER WEEK 1_050115

INTRODUCTION

WEEK 2_120115

TASK 1_CHINESE CONTEMPORARY ARTIST

WEEK 3_190115

TASK 2_MUSEUM PLAN

WEEK 4_260115

TASK 3_MUSEUM LIGHT

WEEK 5_020215

TASK 4_COMPOSITE SPACE REVIEW_050215

WEEK 6_090215

CONCEPT 1_SITE_Site visit

WEEK 7_160215

CONCEPT 2_SITE CHINESE NEW YEAR_18-250215

WEEK 8_230215

CONCEPT 3_ PROGRAMME

WEEK 9_020315

CONCEPT 4_PROGRAMME

WEEK 10_090315

CONCEPT 5_THEME REVIEW_120315

WEEK 11_160315

PROJECT 1

WEEK 12_230315

PROJECT 2

WEEK 13_300315

PROJECT 3

WEEK 14_060415

PROJECT 4

WEEK 15_130415

PROJECT 5

WEEK 16_200415

PROJECT 6 FINAL REVIEW_230415

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20


MODUS-OPERANDI

WORKING PROCESS All material will be in Black and White All fonts will be Minion Pro All CAD and pencil drawings will have to be edited in AI All layouts will have to be made in ID The book format, layout and size will be given. The reviews will be conducted as follows: Monday Group presentation Thursday Individual Tutorial PUBLICATION Through the semester all process work will be geared towards a final publication. The format and the graphics of the book will be selected and chosen at the start of the semester, from which point all students will have to work with this format. All students have an obligation to respect the layout. FINAL PRESENTATION 4 PANELS 2 MODELS 1 BOOK

1000 x 2000mm x 4 1x (1:500) final; 1x (1:50) final Fixed format

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BIBLIOGRAPHY

MANFREDO TAFURI The Sphere and the Labyrinth MIT Press Chapters 1 and 2 ANTHONY VIDLER Architecture of the Uncanny MIT Press

JOHN HEJDUK Soundings

JANE ALISON The Surreal House Exhibition Catalogue, Yale Press Barbican Art Gallery LOUIS ARAGON “Paris Peasant” Translated by Simon Watson Taylor

MANACORDA, F. Maurizio Cattelan Milan 2006 SOLA-MORALES Terrain Vague – “Anyplace” MIT Press 1995 ROBERT SMITHSON A Tour of Passaic ArtForum 1967 RICHARD SERRA “Process sculpture and Film in the Work of Rich ard Serra” by Benjamin H.D. Buchloh OCTOBER FILES, MIT Press, 2000

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THE END

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Arch 5112 Design Studio M1 – Pause City Term 2 2014-2015 Instructor: P.W. Ferretto

ARCH 5112 DESIGN STUDIO M1 PAUSE CITY 2014-2015 2nd Term Instructor:

Peter W. Ferretto Office: TBC

Online course Student Assistant

TBC TBC

T: TBC

E: peter.ferretto@gmail.com

DESCRIPTION At times architects, in their egotistical pursuit to erect buildings, lose track of the city and the elements that constitute the fabric of the urban surroundings. This semester we will focus on the pauses that make-up the city, the vacant spaces that arise out of situations that both architects and planners cannot control. We live in an era where the Museum has become a default cultural commodity, an indispensable piece of the urban jigsaw for any self-respecting 21st Century city. Often situated in segregated cultural districts they no longer follow the institutional system “collect to display” rather the structure has been inverted to follow the dictum “display to collect”. This semester we will speculate whether the Museum can be returned to the city; as an institution that celebrates urban life, leading to alternative architectural strategies that assemble fragments and celebrate the city that is beautifully incomplete. Our approach will be empirical, interpreting the city through direct contact, sampling and exploring the notion of “Pause”. Themes Pause Cities, when perceived and experienced as spatio-material artifacts developed over time, often appear to us as accumulations of ‘effects’. Effects of which the ‘causes’ are mostly unperceivable. You might call these places the pauses of understanding. Pauses that embody a position of waiting and procrastination, so characteristic of situations about which we have yet to shape our own conceptions, situations which we have not yet been able to summarize. Museum Our challenge is to attempt to define what makes up a New Museum for Hong Kong today, as a counter position to the Guggenheim and MOMA ventures that have engulfed so many cities today, and in the process reveal the layers of complexity that define Hong Kong’s urban condition. Space To design is to think of the space you are creating. Think of space as a solid (not as a void) and how you could make a mold to cast a space. Space isn’t necessarily and an enclosure, open fields can also generate space like an open landscape. The more you contemplate the word “space” the more you realize its richness; it is both specific and vague at the same time: space is a paradox.

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Arch 5112 Design Studio M1 – Pause City Term 2 2014-2015 Instructor: P.W. Ferretto

OBJECTIVES The course will pursues the development of the project as the material consequence of a spatial idea, by experimenting and verifying the project itself through models on a large scale and using different materials. Brief Site The site will be a 100 x100 m block within Hong Kong, the exact site will be announced at the start of the semester. After analyzing the site students will be asked to select a suitable site no bigger than 1200m2 (30x40m) within the given block. All students will have to select a different site, within the square. Programme Here follows an outline Programme which students are requested to follow but are free to alter and amend to suit their concept and site conditions. The museum should not exceed 8, 000 m² and be subdivided as follows:           

Lobby Temporary Galleries Permanent Galleries Auditorium Restaurant Library Education Store Offices Art Storage Loading Area

400 m² 2,000 m² 1,300 m² 450 m² 300 m² 350 m² 200 m² 300 m² 1,000 m² 600 m² 300 m²

ORGANIZATION The studio will address one project for the duration of the semester. The studio will follow a fixed methodology The studio works with a set of tasks which the students are requested to follow Methodology Model Starting from a cast space, students will be requested to constantly work with models during the course of the semester. The final proposal will be represented with a 1:50 cast plaster model. Drawings Drawing will be the medium to analyze and understand the spaces you have created in model. Sectional drawings will be our focus, where students will engage in activating and designing 3D spaces Presentation Throughout the semester all work will be geared to a final publication. Pause City will be published on completion of the semester. The format and the graphics of the book are to be selected and chosen at the start of the semester, from which point all students will have to work with this format.

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Arch 5112 Design Studio M1 – Pause City Term 2 2014-2015 Instructor: P.W. Ferretto

Graphics All material will be in Black and White (Drawings and Images) All fonts will be Minion Pro All CAD and pencil drawings have to be edited in AI All layouts will have to be made in ID Photography This design studio puts a high importance on the photography of spaces from models. Photography is seen as a medium to explore space. All photographs have to be taken using a tripod and studio conditions Tasks All design studio tutorial will be taught collectively as a group session, all students are requested to attend all sessions. We will meet twice a week: where one session will be collective presentation and the second individual, but all students will be asked to work collectively during the class The 13 week semester will be divided into 5 tasks: Task 1_Cast Pause_1 Week Deliverables:  Cast model in plaster Define what ‘pause’ means. Relate your thinking to both physical and abstract definitions of the word. Don’t relate your exploration to simply urban and architectural manifestations Explore the following conditions: Vacant, empty, behind, hidden, in-between, interstitial, discontinuity, boundaries, void, boundaries, transitions.

Task 2_Site Analysis_2 Weeks Deliverables:  1:500 Physical Model  Rhino Model of the site  Analytical Drawing: Plan 1:1000 Select a suitable “pause” site Make a 1:500 model of the 100x100 m square - Team Construct a Rhino Model of the site - Team Drawings (Plans. Sections) analyzing the site properties: buildings, topography, infrastructure, etc. Task 3_Space Models_ 3 Weeks Deliverables:  5 models at 1:200 scale (white) Working exclusively in 1:200 scale models, in one material (white), students are to develop their project from as a series of spaces.

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Arch 5112 Design Studio M1 – Pause City Term 2 2014-2015 Instructor: P.W. Ferretto

Think about the atmosphere and character of the space – in terms of compression or release, high or low, bright or dark, etc… Models have to follow an evolutionary process, starting off as approximations and gradually becoming “real” scaled spaces. Conceptually students are to address the issue of Mass and Void, focusing on how various functions belong to either the Private or Public domain Week 6_Midterm Review Task 4_Architectural Definition_3 Weeks Deliverables:  1:100 Model,  1:100 Plans,  1:100 Sections Having conceptually fixed the framework of your project you have to now define the tectonic, circulation and layout of your building. Working with Models and Drawings in parallel and importantly loyal to your “Conceptual DNA” students will develop a working model of the whole project. Items to consider:  Structural logic of the building (Concrete/Steel Frame)  Materiality Interior/Exterior  Circulation/Access  Orientation/Sustainability Task 5_Architectural Representation_4 Weeks Deliverables:  Final Publication,  Final Panels,  Final Model 1:50 During the last 4 weeks of the semester we will focus on two items: Final Publication: InDesign document where all student work is to be collated into one publication. Final Representation Students will be asked to produce final:  Renderings x3, using both Rhino/Vray and model Photographs  Overall Model Photo in Context  Plans and Sections 1:200, 1/100  Model 1:50 of whole project

ASSESSMENT Design Project: 70% Book/Publication team work: 20% Studio Performance (process/attendance/etc.) 10%

COURSE FORMAT Page | 4    


Arch 5112 Design Studio M1 – Pause City Term 2 2014-2015 Instructor: P.W. Ferretto

Studio critiques, lectures, site visits, and in-class presentations by students. Attendance required. Monday & Thursday 13:30 – 18:30

FIELD TRIPS Visits to sites/buildings in Hong Kong and the region, if scheduled, will take place during regular class meeting times. If necessary, transportation will be provided.

REFERENCES

10 Urban Museum References: 1_Whitney Museum (New York, USA), Marcel Breuer 1966 2_Soane Museum (London, UK), Sir John Soane 1813 3_Columba Museum (Cologne, GER), Peter Zumthor 2010 4_CaixaForum (Madrid, SPA), Herzog & de Meuron 2007 5_CastelVecchio (Verona, ITA), Carlo Scarpa 1973 6_Mimesis museum (Seoul, KOR), Alvaro Siza 2012 7_Museo del Faro (Cascais, POR) Aires Mateus 2007 8_Noguchi Museum (New York, USA), Isamu Noguchi 1985 9_Asian Society Museum (Hong Kong), Tod Williams Billie Tsien Architects 2012 10_Sao Paolo Museum of Art (Sao Paolo, BRA), Lina Bo Bardi 1968

SCHEDULE The Schedule will be organized in Tasks, each consisting of an Assignment, a working period and a Review. A detailed outline of each week is here attached as an appendix to this brief.

ACADEMIC HONESTY Attention is drawn to University policy and regulations on honesty in academic work, and to the disciplinary guidelines and procedures applicable to breaches of such policy and regulations. Details may be found at the following website: http://www.cuhk.edu.hk/policy/academichonesty/ With each assignment, students will be required to submit a statement that they are aware of these policies, regulations, guidelines and procedures.

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Arch 5112 Design Studio M1 – Pause City Term 2 2014-2015 Instructor: P.W. Ferretto

SCHEDULE 2015 Week 1_12 Mon – 15 Thr January M> Introduction to Studio M> Task 1 issued T > Task 1 Studio crit (group) Week 2_19 Mon – 22 Thr January M> Task 1 Presentation M> Task 2 issued T > Site Visit Week 3_26 Mon – 29 Thr January M > Task 2 Studio crit (group) T > Task 2 Studio crit (group) Week 4_02 Mon – 05 Thr February M > Task 2 Studio crit (group) T > Task 2 Presentation and Review Week 5_09 Mon – 12 Thr February M > Task 3 Issued T > Task 3 Studio crit (group) Week 6_16 Mon – 19 Thr February Lunar New Year (18th > 24th February) M > Task 3 Studio crit (group) Thursday 19th No Class Week 7__23 Mon – 26 Thr February Lunar New Year (18th > 24th February) Monday 23rd No class T > Mirterm Presentation of Tasks 1/2/3 Week 8_02 Mon – 05 Thr March M > Task 4 Issued T > Task 4 Studio crit (group) Week 9_09 Mon – 12 Thr March M > Task 4 Studio crit (group) T > Task 4 Presentation Week 10_16 Mon – 19 Thr March M> Task 5 Issued - Representation T > Task 5 Studio crit (group) Week 11_23 Mon – 26 Thr March M > Task 5 Studio crit (group) T > Task 5 Studio crit (group) Week 12_30 Mon – 02 Thr April M > Task 5 Studio crit (group) T > Task 5 Studio crit (group) Week 13_06 Mon – 09 Thr April

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Arch 5112 Design Studio M1 – Pause City Term 2 2014-2015 Instructor: P.W. Ferretto

Easter & Ching Ming Holidays (3rd > 7th April) Monday 6th No class Final Review April 23rd 2015

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Profile for Condition_Lab

ARCH_5112 2014-15  

Course Brief MArch Year 1 Design Studio Taught by Prof. Peter W. Ferretto 2014-2015

ARCH_5112 2014-15  

Course Brief MArch Year 1 Design Studio Taught by Prof. Peter W. Ferretto 2014-2015

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