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FACULTY R ETIR EMENTS

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CO N CO R D AC A D EM Y M AG A ZI N E S PR I N G 2014

he walls of Sandy Stott’s small office are papered with maps: of New Hampshire’s White Mountains, the Wapack Trail, and a poster-sized nautical map of the waters of Penobscot Bay, off Stonington, Maine. They represent paths Stott already knows well, but “given some luck,” he looks forward to spending more time along their routes, whether on foot or by kayak, after he leaves CA at the end of the year. As every day delivers him a step closer to those explorations, Stott says his reflections have evolved. “I’m sure I’ll feel sentimental about it, because that’s my nature,” he says. “But mainly, right now, I’m grateful for the time I’ve had here.” It will be difficult to go without the daily interactions—quiet talks with advisees and the satisfying work with students on their writing, “their most personal fingerprint,” he says. Of his colleagues, Stott says, “You come to work alongside people who are asking spirited questions all the time. That will be hard to leave behind.” The work has suited him well, beginning in 1983, when he started coaching tennis and soccer. He transitioned from athletic director into the English department in 1993 and served as dean of faculty from 1999 to 2008. Over the years, he developed courses that reflect his interests outside the classroom, from creative nonfiction to Henry David Thoreau. His own writing has always been a “fits and starts” affair, so retirement offers the opportunity to write more regularly. But he and wife Lucille have promised one another “not to replace this job with another before we really get a feel for what it’s like to have the luxury of time,” he says.

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Sandy Stott English Department

CA Magazine Spring 2014 Issue  
CA Magazine Spring 2014 Issue  
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