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Alex Klickstein Glazier Class of 1989

Human Impact Saving lives through the New England Organ Bank

CON CORD AC A DEM Y M AG A ZINE FALL 2015

“I

f you’d told me early in my career that I would someday be CEO of a bank, I would never have believed you,” joked Alex Klickstein Glazier ’89. “But put that one word, organ, before bank—then maybe.” In fact, though, being CEO of New England Organ Bank (NEOB), the position to which she was named last April, may have seemed almost equally improbable to Glazier back when she was a newly minted attorney at the top-drawer global

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law firm of Ropes & Gray. It was the late ’90s, and “like everyone else, I was doing mergers and acquisitions,” Glazier recalled. But always on her mind was a fascination with bioethics. It was a passion that first took hold in an ethics class at Concord Academy taught by Kevin Jennings. Glazier went on to major in bioethics at Brown University and obtained her master’s degree in public health while at law school. At Ropes & Gray, she expressed interest in projects involving bioethics, and the

firm responded by giving her opportunities, including in the emerging field of stem cell research. The New England Organ Bank was a client of Glazier’s firm, and eventually hired her as vice president and general counsel. Even so, it was a big transition when the board of trustees tapped her to be CEO last spring. “The work I do on a daily basis and the types of decisions I’m responsible for are different, but knowing what an incredible organization it is with the ability to impact a public health need made me sure that taking on the job was the right decision,” she said. “Our mission is to save lives through donation and transplant. It’s life or death, or actually death and life, every day. An organization doesn’t get more missiondriven than that.” Part of her individual mission as CEO is to find ever more powerful ways to get the message out about organ donation. Polls show that most Americans support organ donation, Glazier said, but “it’s about action as much as awareness. If you want to be an organ donor, it’s critical that you take the step of registering to be a donor.” In fact, the number of registered organ donors in New England has doubled in the past eight years, Glazier said, from about 3 million to 6 million. But demand continues to exceed supply, because only certain medical circumstances allow for the possibility of organ donation at death, and because with the increase of diseases such as diabetes, the need for organs is ever-increasing. Despite the challenges, Glazier never doubts that the role is right for her. “There are a lot of great days in this job,” she reflected. “Recently at NEOB we received a letter that an organ recipient had written to thank his deceased donor. It was incredibly moving to be reminded of what the human impact is of saving one life as we read about the meaning it had for his family, for his professional life, for his future. The circle is so much bigger than any one recipient.” To register to be a donor, go to www.donatelifenewengland.org.

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Profile for Concord Academy

CA Magazine Fall 2015 Issue  

This special issue spotlights create + innovate: The Centennial Campaign for Concord Academy, including a campaign impact report and coverag...

CA Magazine Fall 2015 Issue  

This special issue spotlights create + innovate: The Centennial Campaign for Concord Academy, including a campaign impact report and coverag...

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