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State College, our close-knit campus environment provides students the opportunity to succeed demic community that feels like family.campus We offer an education of students exceptional value with more AtAt Nevada NevadaState State College, College, our our close-knit close-knit campus environment environment provides provides studentsthe theopportunity opportunity toto succeed succeed At Nevada State College, our close-knit campus environment provides students the opportunity to succeed ininanan academic academic community community that that feels feels like like family. family. We We offer offer aneducation education ofexceptional exceptional value value with with more more areer-driven majors and minors to choose from, and the broad viewsof from our newly in an academic community that feels like family. We offeran an education ofextending exceptional value with more than than 45 45career-driven career-driven majors and and minors minors to toto choose choose from, andthe thebroad broad viewsextending extending from from our our newly newly d campus illuminate the majors Las Vegas valley and the from, world beyond. Weviews invite you to from explore our than 45 career-driven majors and minors choose from,and and the broad views extending our newly expanded expanded campus campus illuminate illuminate the the Las Las Vegas Vegas valley valley and and the the worldbeyond. beyond.We Weinvite invite you you toto explore explore our our expanded campus illuminate the Las Vegas valley and theworld world beyond. We invite you to explore our dynamic institution that focuses on inclusion, accessibility, and empowerment. dynamic dynamic institution institution that that focuses focuses onon inclusion, inclusion, accessibility,and andempowerment. empowerment. dynamic institution that focuses on inclusion,accessibility, accessibility, and empowerment.

Be bold. BeBegreat. Begreat. State. Be bold. bold. BeBe great. BeBe State. State. Be bold. Be great. Be State.

AHispanic-Serving Hispanic-Serving AAHispanic-Serving A Hispanic-Serving Institution Institution Institution |

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1300 Nevada State Drive 1300 1300 Nevada Nevada State State Drive Drive

1300 Nevada State Drive Henderson, Nevada 89002 Henderson, Henderson, Nevada Nevada 89002 89002 | nsc.edu Henderson, Nevada 89002 702.992.2000 702.992.2000 702.992.2000 | | nsc.edu nsc.edu 702.992.2000 | nsc.edu


THE POWER OF GOOD We Put Our Energy IS ALWAYS ON. Into Community. At NV Energy we are committed to operating nvenergy.com/powerofgood

our business in a way that’s good for our customers, our community, our environment and the state of Nevada. Some may refer to it as corporate social responsibility, but we like to call it the Power of Good. And at NV Energy, it’s always on.

NV Energy has been giving back to the communities in which we live and do business for more than 100 years. In 2016 alone, our company and the NV Energy Foundation provided nearly $5.5 million to 335 nonprofit organizations throughout Nevada that support education and youth, the environment, arts and multicultural outreach, and health and human services.

See in what other ways the power of good is always on at NV Energy in our 2016 Corporate Social Responsibility Report at nvenergy.com/csr.

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A Concilio Hispano Media Publication Publisher: El Concilio Hispano Media

General Manager Miguel Barrientos

Business Manager Angeles Renteria

Production and Design: Communication through Design by Polanco

We are now working on the 2017 Nevada Hispanic Heritage Edition. If you are interested in contributing as a writer, advertise or join our marketing team, please send your request to swhispanic@yahoo.com or call 702-575-0353 You will also find this publication at: RadioLaVozDeNevada.com

MUUUCHIIISSSIIIMAS GRACIAS!!! El Concilio Hispano Media Group would like to extend our appreciation to our community partners. For many years these friends of the community are the force behind our agency providing great community events (4 th of July Musical and Food Celebration and Hispanic Heritage Month Latino Business Mixer), produce a daily Latino Talk Radio Show on Keno 1460AM-A Lotus Broadcasting Station, Monday to Friday 8:30AM, we are able to publish Nevada Hispanic Magazine, a publication where we recognize those outstanding individuals in our communities, help small business, report on important issues , provide a guide to link consumers with our supporters and to show the Pride and Honor of being Latino in the USA. Inclusion, we are now developing our websites with much improvements and our newest project is our Internet TV network to produce programs of interest to the growing Latino communities across the United States. The Latino communities are big players at all levels, we provide recognition to those that put them self on the front and are able to work on unifying the community as a whole. El Concilio Hispano is committed to continue to serve our clients with new and better ways to reach the Latino population. We appreciate the support of our community partners. We look forward to an exciting 2018, which in now underway. The Latino community is not the same as it was 10 years ago. El Concilio Hispano works inside the community and we invite your business to join us and reach the fastest growing population in Southern Nevada. Miguel Barrientos El Concilio Hispano Media Group elconciliohispanomedia@gmail.com RadioLaVozDeNevada.com

by Polanco

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NO RIEGUES L O S D O M I N G OS .

Durante el verano, solo se permite el riego de lunes a sábado. Así todos ponemos nuestro granito de arena y conservamos agua para nuestro futuro, ayudando a ahorrar hasta 900 millones de galones de agua. Para más información sobre las restricciones de riego obligatorias visita SNWAenespanol.com. SNWA es una entidad pública no lucrativa


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LATINOS IN POLITICS

THE GROWING Latino Political Clout in Nevada

Recently, our community has decided to not just put allies into power to represent our needs but to also make sure lawmakers are from Latino communities. Clockwise from top left: Catherine Cortez Masto, Ruben Kihuen, Irene Bustamante and Olivia Díaz By Leo Murrieta

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ith about 28 percent of the population, Nevada has always had a considerable number of Latinos. And we know how to use our weight. By simply coming out, our vote has been a driving force for the last three presidential elections as well as various senate and congressional races throughout the years. Recently, our community has decided to not just put allies into power to represent our needs but to also make sure lawmakers are from Latino communities. Whether it’s protecting immigrants’ rights or fighting for access to a fair wage, we needed lawmakers who could think about these issues - these policies - through our lens. We needed more Latinos in power, and that’s what we’ve been working toward. Just seven years ago, the Nevada Legislature had two Latinos. Today, we have a better representation in both the senate and the assembly with nine Latino lawmakers - a significant increase with room to grow to better reflect the state’s Hispanic population. Some of those lawmakers have even been placed in influential positions such as Assemblywoman Teresa BenitezThompson, who is the Assembly Majority Floor Leader. We’ve even been able to raise up newer and younger lawmakers such as first-term state Sen. Yvanna Cancela and second-term Assemblyman Nelson Araujo. They are beginning to root themselves within the political system in order to really impact the future of Latinos in the state. The result of having more Latinos at the legislature has already shown with the 79th Legislative Session. Latino lawmakers proposed legislation such as Assembly Bill 122, which would make undocumented immigrants eligible for the state victims of crime program that provides financial benefits to those injured as a result of criminal activity. They have also introduced bills such as Assembly Bill 142 to clarify a Nevada law to allow unaccompanied minors seeking federal status as special immigrant juveniles and Senate Bill 186 to create the Office for New Americans in the Office of the Governor, which would require the creation of an online resource for immigrants on how to obtain professional licenses.

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Latina leaders such as Assemblywoman Irene Bustamante-Adams helped lead Democrats to a majority in the State Assembly, and Assemblywoman Olivia Diaz, whose helped usher in funding for our state’s English Language Learners. We have many legislative champions working on our behalf in Carson City, and we have more room to grow. We also set our eyes on larger goals. In 2016 alone, we changed the dialogue on who we want to speak for us nationally when we chose U.S. Sen. Catherine Cortez Masto, the first Latina ever to be in the United States Senate, and U.S. Rep. Ruben Kihuen, Nevada’s first Latino congressman. Both have been a driving force when it comes to looking at national policies such as healthcare and immigration reform through the eyes and perspective of the Nevada Latino community. That’s a prime example of our rising clout. While we’ve been focusing on expanding on a larger scale, we’ve also made significant gains on a hyper local level in recent years. In 2016, we elected Felicia Ortiz to represent our families and students on the State Board of Education, making her roughly the only Latina in elected office in the education sector. In 2013 North Las Vegas elected its first Latino City Councilman Isaac Barron to serve a ward that was 78 percent Latino - he also became the first Latino mayor pro-tem for the city in 2016. Joining his colleagues, Councilman Bob Coffin from Las Vegas and Councilman Oscar Delgado from Reno, to lead local politics for our community. So what does that mean for our future? With 2018 coming, Latinos have to assess what we’ve done and where we want to go. Already, Latinos made significant gains by having lawmakers who reflect the community. That should inspire us to put more in power. That should encourage us to keep our current representatives accountable. We also shouldn’t settle with the progress we’ve made. Instead, we should also work to find more candidates to increase our presence for the 80th Legislative Session. While continuing to keep the people we have in power there, Latinos should look at strengthening our clout through city and county elections as well as judicial races to make sure we are better acknowledged at a hyper local level. This is how we continue to make progress. This is how we make ourselves, and our power, known.


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Hispanic Kitchens By Alexander Zapata

Determine to Win,

The David of Restaurants is back

After a litigation that lasted years, today La Cabaña faces a promising future. But the road was not made of smiles, as said by Williams Jacobs, its owner. He runs from here to there all around the construction. He looks for details and does not want any mistakes. As he walks, he explains what each area will be. At the moment of our visit, we were able to see a work halfway, but the words of those who describe the future, speak about the vision of a man convinced to succeed in the new stage of his great and beloved project, La Cabaña Mexican Restaurant.. Gone are the years of struggle, litigation, meetings, and anguishing times that William Jacobs lived, a man who witnessed how his business former headquarters fell before the unstoppable Las Vegas growth after many years of history in the city, specifically due to the well-known Neon Project. “9 years of projections by the Nevada Department of Transportation (NDOT) and more than 23 months of negotiations,” were part of Jacobs‘ experience. However, and according to his comments, it was a “David vs. Goliath“ battle, a modest businessman versus an allpowerful state, and although there are still processes to close, the result seems to aim to be positive.

Jonathan Warren

La Cabaña Mexican Restaurant Returns, After a Long Battle The beginnings Born in the United States, raised in Bolivia and “domesticated” in Mexico (a sentence he says with a smile on his face), Jacobs proudly shows his Hispanic heritage. His life has always revolved around the food and beverage industry. “I have two bachelor’s degrees in Business Administration and Culinary Science. In 2001 I had a turnaround to other areas and although I did quite well, I finally said to myself ‘to render to every man his due’, and in 2006 I decided to go back to the restaurant business and bought La Cabaña”. La Cabaña is a Mexican food restaurant that was located

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on Martin Luther King for many years, very close to the Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department Headquarters, but had to cede its space to the construction of Project Neon, for the expansion of highway 15 (I-15) which is expected to be completed by 2019. “As I mentioned before, it was a long process. NDOT spent 9 years planning, and when they made the decision, there were 23 months of negotiations,” explained Jacobs while adding there are still details to be settled. The negotiation was a long battle because “they wanted CONTINUED ON PAGE 13


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to give me very little money for my company. They (the government) tried to protect their own interests, which is understandable, and I have to defend mine, which is also easy to understand”, said the owner. He adds “my decision to wait for the deadline to exert more pressure was fruitful”. “We reached a favorable agreement. There are things that are still being negotiated and solved, so it is too early to speak about a final conclusion. Many people who did not have money to pay a lawyer or who did not want to negotiate just had the lowest price. I think the government was very unfair in that matter. Many people who did not know the law and did not exactly know their rights, gave up their properties for nothing. “ And for that very reason, Jacobs believes his knowledge of certain legal processes ended up paying off. “One must be educated, that is essential. I did it in what is known as the Uniform Act (URA), where you can find the conditions and rights at Federal level, regarding relocating a person because of a government construction. The government can not get you out of your place and tell you “see you later”. They should offer you a business with comparable conditions to the one you have. I read the URA a lot to be able to demand my rights. We were no longer talking about the David who knew nothing, versus the Goliath who knows everything. I had the knowledge to confront the government and that helped me a lot.” Jacobs added that “when the government discovers you know your rights, they become more flexible when negotiating” so he recommends studying the laws to all the people who live in a similar situation.

Calm and new projects While the negotiation is still in process, you would be able to see more calm on this Hispanic businessman’s face. Its new restaurant, which will be located on Sahara Avenue, has more space, will have a more detailed decoration and much more to offer to the public: from patios with windows that will open or close according to the weather, kitchen displays to watch the entire process; to takeaway service with a more traditional style. Jacobs’ experiences, troubles, and the need to get ahead, led him to start new projects. “Apart from the restaurant we have the catering service. And it has grown faster than we thought in this moving process. Since we closed, we

have managed to close with eleven new companies for this catering service.” He added they will introduce a manufacture of tortillas for this new restaurant (up to 3 thousand per hour), with a liquor license and many Mexican products to keep the authenticity of the dishes. “We performed a demographic study and we found that about 60% of those living near our restaurant are Hispanic,” explained Jacobs, so that is the reason why they want to have more than just a restaurant. “We want to create an environment like Mexico where you can buy whatever you want to go. I remember when I lived in Mexico, on weekends we wanted “Menudo”, so you took your pot and they filled it. You bought it and that’s it, ready to eat. We are recreating that concept for our people.” “Our sauce also has variety. We are introducing 5 new lines that are going to be sold on display at our counters, and there are projects that will take our products to the supermarkets, but I can’t say much more than that, it is just something that is coming.“

Proud to be Hispanic “I always say the eyes can not see when the brain is empty. Unfortunately, we can see that a lot in this country. So many people still see us as a simple minority when we are not. In fact we will be a majority in 10 years,” said Jacobs when he was consulted about the challenges the community face in these times. “They think our intellect and understanding is inferior and that is a very big mistake. If you analyze what Latin America and Mexico have brought to the United States you would be surprised. The color TV was invented by a Mexican as well as the Caesar Salad. Mexico has contributed a lot to this country and they refuse to recognize it. “ He finally had a message for the Latino community. “The most important thing is persistence, working hard for what we want. We must inform ourselves about what is happening around us. We have to continue to demonstrate what we are, what we are worth.” “We are waiting for you. You are all welcome to enjoy the Mexican culture and gastronomy,” Jacobs said before getting lost in his rough diamond. His work: this new Cabaña, the ambitious project he describes with such passion.

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HISPANIC LEADERSHIP

Hispanic Political Power

Grows In North Las Vegas

We talked to city officials with Hispanic origins. They talked about their challenges, projects and what pushed them to get where they are now. This Article is written by La Firma

For some people it is the “dark side”, “better not to go there”, the “less privileged” area of Las Vegas, and sometimes is “the most dangerous.” This can be heard from many valley’s inhabitants, but the goal is clear for a handful of leaders: to change the image that has been projected for years around North Las Vegas. With over 200 thousand inhabitants, founded in 1946, the city of North Las Vegas looks at its sister from the south with mistrust. Less than a mile from the heart of entertainment, not only from Nevada, but from the United States, its elegant casinos and majestic shows; North Las Vegas is looking for its own ways to get ahead, and on the way, on the trail that is traced, the presence of Latinos plays a vital role.

Teacher and politician The teacher addresses his students at Rancho High School. His lectures in this institution are already two decades old. Many young people who are now contributing to the development of the country have attended his classrooms and conferences. Isaac Barrón was born in Las Vegas, and from an early age his family moved north, where he has always lived. “My dad is from Chihuahua, Mexico, and came to the United States when he was young to work as a ‘bracero’. And here I am, doing everything I can to help the community, “explained Barron. He was also a student at Rancho and completed his university studies in the College of Southern Nevada and UNLV, in order to become a professor of his former house of studies. “I already have 20 years as a teacher,” he says with

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When I decided to run for office and get started in politics, I felt that many decisions were not the best for our residents. Some of them were counterproductive to people.

Councilman Issac Barrón

certain pride, but what stands out most is his role as a counselor in the Hispanic Student Union, where young people “are dedicated to community service, leadership and political activism work.” It was exactly this job, and closeness to the community, which led him to politics. “It was the year 2013 when I applied to be a councilman and I have been in charge since then.” Issac Barrón 2017 was a victorious year in politics, being ratified in office “with 82% of the votes of District 1”, a population with a Hispanic majority (78%). “I am the first Hispanic to hold such a position in North Las Vegas and I am the only one who speaks Spanish,” explained Barrón. “When I decided to run for office and get started in politics, I felt that many decisions were not the best for our residents. Some of them were counter-productive to people. I am interested in the community, the direction in which my people are going. And those things were not going well, it was something that I could not stand, so many missed opportunities to move forward. “ But he found the biggest surprise when he arrived to office. “When I finally arrived I realized the situation was even worse than I had imagined. We were about to lose the license to be a city in Nevada. “ However, and despite coming from the well-known 2008 crisis, the city has moved forward. “We managed to solve those economic problems. When I arrived, we were 129 million dollars below the city budget. We had a big deficit. By working with Mayor Lee and making deals with unions in the city, we managed to reduce that negative number.” He also explained there are other projects in which they are focusing in order to look for economic development. “The growth of the North Las Vegas downtown which is the oldest place, is a priority,” he said. However, there are still several challenges. “The community is not well-informed about what we are doing in North Las CONTINUED ON PAGE 15

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We must all work hard, this career requires a lot of effort. Was it harder for me? I do not know. What I do know is that I’ve always worked hard. Harder than someone else? I do not know, I just know that if you want to succeed, you must work.” Alex Perez

Alex Perez, Chief of the North Las Vegas Police Department

Vegas, the fear from the undocumented community to contact authorities, getting the funds. When the nation’s economy collapsed, North Las Vegas was one of the cities which suffered the greatest loss of housing, we were one of the two cities where most homes were lost. As a homeowner, it was very hard to see how people lost almost everything.” Barrón insisted that there is a lot to do, but community support is essential. “The community is the one who see the problems first. You have to report them; you have to talk to the authorities, because our duty is to solve problems.”

A policeman very close to the community Losing a partner is the hardest thing he has ever experienced and something he is afraid to live again. Approaching the community and making the city a safe place, are its main goals. However, at age 47, Alex Perez never imagined as a teenager that he would end up in the position he is in today. “When I was young I tried not to run into the police and avoid contact with the authorities, especially in North Las Vegas.” According to the Chief of the North Las Vegas Police Department, “there was not much communication or relationship with the community. I did not see that when I was young back in the late 80’s.” Coming from Mexican parents who emigrated to the United States, Perez was born and raised in North Las Vegas. He decided to start a career in police well into maturity, after a counselor showed him that he had qualities to perform the profession. “I took the idea into account and applied in 1990, I passed the tests, the interview, and I considered it as a possible reality. When I started the academy, I was not completely sure if this was for me. The interest started 4 weeks later.” From then on, he would begin a career of almost 30 years. “The first 5 or 6 years I did not recognize the value of that rapprochement with the community that I had. I decided to struggle first with knowing the job, learning to be a cop, and lost some years doing that.” But suddenly something changed. “The focus was on and I understood that we could have a stronger impact on the community by approaching neighborhoods and establishing a trust relationship with them. This was how the relationship

grew and began to advance with the community. We are talking about 1997 or 1998.” That connection has strengthened according to Pérez. “Yes, it has changed. And I’ve seen it over the years. We were very few Latinos in the department of a city where almost half of its population is Hispanic.” As Director of the North Las Vegas Police Department, his goal is to have officers close to the community. “Community work is important for me, establishing communication and a fluid dialogue with citizens is essential. And I want to hire officers who represent our people, and we are succeeding in all aspects. My target is to reflect our community on the officers who serve and improve the interaction and trust between them and the citizens. And to reach this goal, the first step is the addition of new members to the police corps. “After six years without hiring we have added 67 new officers. In addition, we have 22 in the academy and we intend to hire up to 25 in July and 20 in January 2018”. However, another key aspect is the diversity among officers. “The percentage of Hispanic origin of the ones in the academy and the ones we are going to hire goes from 40% to 50%,” Perez explained, while adding that “we estimate 20% of our active officers are Hispanic. But that number is increasing. I would like to believe that is increasing due to the fact the police chief is Hispanic. Now they see that a Latino can not only be an officer, but can also go further. “ When asked if he felt that it had been harder to reach the position in which he is now for being Hispanic, his answer was very direct. “We must all work hard, this career requires a lot of effort. Was it harder for me? I do not know. What I do know is that I’ve always worked hard. Harder than someone else? I do not know, I just know that if you want to succeed, you must work.” He also took a space to send a message to the undocumented community. “In this political environment we live in today, it is very important for the community to trust the police and for the police to gain that trust. I do not remember a moment where I felt so much tension and so much fear in my community and I understand them. But through groups and interviews like this, we give our word that we do not act against the undocumented community. We do not ask about immigration status. “ Finally, he sent a message to all of those who live in the city. “Take your officers into account. We are not perfect, we are wrong sometimes, but we ask for a chance to be better every day. If something not positive happens, report it, that is very important. We want to reach a better level of service. My officers take great care of our community, there is a lot of work to do, but improving the streets is a daily commitment. The war on crime does not stop, and it takes a lot of effort and joined work.” NEVADA HISPANIC MAGAZINE 2017

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Nevada Hispanic Business Group

Will Hispanics be prepared to meet the construction and work force demands coming to Las Vegas!

Las Vegas will face many proposed construction projects waiting to start in 2017.

By Joe Hernandez, President of The Nevada Hispanic Business Group

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ot since 2007 have we seen the opportunities and challenges that Las Vegas will face with the many proposed construction projects waiting to start in 2017. The projects include, the new $2 billion, Raiders Domed Football Stadium. Wynn’s $1.6 billion, Paradise Park Project, that will be built where the

current Wynn golf course is located on the strip. Genting’s, $4 billion, Resorts World Las Vegas will be built at the site of the former Echelon Project and have an Asian theme. We also have the $1.4 billion Convention Center Expansion Project and finally the $1.4 billion AllNet Arena being built on the former Wet & Wild site next to the SLS, in an effort to attract a professional NBA team. These projects will generate millions of dollars in CONTINUED ON PAGE 17

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NHM Most of the major construction projects have a diversity component and set aside 5% to 30% of their contracts for minority and women owned businesses. If we are not prepared the demand will be met by out of state contractors and laborers which will take some of the money earned out of our communities.

revenue to the local economy as well as creating thousands of seasonal and full time jobs. The challenges that we as Hispanics will face is to be prepared to take advantage of the many opportunities these projects will create. We encourage you to consider the construction industry. There will be a great demand for laborers and contractors. If you have construction experience we encourage you to apply for your contractor’s license. Typically, most of the major construction projects have a diversity component and set aside 5% to 30% of their contracts for minority and women owned businesses. If we are not prepared the demand will be met by out of state contractors and laborers which will take some of the money earned out of our communities. The Nevada Hispanic Business Group has been conducting training classes and providing resources for

those looking to do business in the construction industry. I serve on the Nevada State Contractors Board and we are prepared to help answer questions and expedite licensing for those who meet the requirements. For small businesses that provide products and services, the workforce that will be coming to Las Vegas will be looking for businesses that meet their needs. Our organization can help you to connect with those individuals who will be part of your communities.

For information on the many benefits Nevada Hispanic Business Group can provide you, please visit our website www.nvhbg.com or contact us at (702) 857-8066.

NVHBG board members

Joe Hernandez, President

Laura Nowlan,

Executive Director

Martha Gonzalez, Vice President

Lupe Trujillo, Treasurer

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El Concilio Hispano and Chicanos Por La Causa came together to organize the first Chicano/Latino Musical Festival to Celebrate Independence Day in Las Vegas, Nevada. Thank You to our sponsors and supporters who attended the Celebration. A special thanks to Little Joe Hernandez, Arturo Rodriguez and Raul Aguirre for the special surprise.


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Entrepreneurs

From farmer to the empire of the tacos

The American Dream still exists By Carmen Cortez

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oberto Robledo never grew tired of cultivating plants under the Santa Rosa sun in order to sustain his seven kids at the time and wife Dolores in San Luis Potosi, Mexico. Roberto’s eyes saw prosperity in the American soil. That was enough motivation for him to decide to bring his whole family to the north side of the border. Many people say that the tirelessly tenacity of a man is proved through his own work when it comes to support his family. For years, millions of immigrants have left their country to come to the United States looking for the socalled ‘American Dream’. But not everyone who starts the race to conquer that dream is lucky enough to reach the goal. For Roberto it did not mean something difficult, it was a risk he was willing to take. It might seem irrational for many that a Mexican farmer working in the California fields in the late 1950s would be the founder of one of today’s biggest business empires ever imagined. Reynaldo Robledo, the twelfth of thirteen kids, says his father Roberto never got tired of harvesting because he knew he was doing it for his family. Today, “Roberto’s Taco Shop,” his father creation, is one of the most prosperous, biggest and renowned family businesses on the U.S. pacific coast. The story began in the summer of 1964, in San Ysidro, California. After working the fields for many years, Roberto and his wife had a vision. They wanted to be their own boss and wanted to provide their children a better life. With effort and dedication they started their way into the very competitive food industry. The couple opened their own

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Reynaldo Robledo with his mother and co-founder of Roberto’s Taco Shop Dolores R. Robledo

The story of Roberto’s Taco Shop began in the summer of 1964, in San Ysidro, California... With their own tortilla factory... tortilla factory to supply tortillas to stores and restaurants. Their work, name and ethic became known rapidly in San Diego, California. They were helping other businesses while growing their own. Soon after opening the tortilla factory, friends convinced them to open up their own restaurant. The same year they went on to expand the venture and open a traditional style taco shop. Roberto began operating San Diego’s first taco shop. In less than a five-year span, the Robledo’s family had opened three more restaurants they had acquired from previous owners. But it was not until the fifth establishment that they decided to launch their own brand. So they called it “Roberto’s Taco Shop”. Reynaldo remembers he was 10 when he started helping his father in the restaurants. “I wasn’t technically working because I was still a kid but I would go and help out on the weekends. I would help clean the tables, chairs and count tortillas along side my other brothers. I feel glad my father introduced my siblings and I to work from a very young age. This way you learn to appreciate things.” But it was not until the 1990s that the family started opening restaurants in Las Vegas. Between laughs, Reynaldo CONTINUED ON PAGE 23


Roberto’s Taco Shop has been a family business that has created hundreds of jobs.

NHM

“Roberto’s Taco Shop,” is one of the most prosperous, biggest and renowned family businesses on the U.S. pacific coast. The growing Robledo family, owners of Roberto’s Taco Shop. The fasted growing Mexican Fast Food Restaurants.

jokes about his ‘easy job’ as he calls it. He is in charge of more than 50 restaurants in the state of Nevada. But, how is it that a Mexican immigrant family was able to succeed in the American world? Reynaldo believes it was all about the hours his mother and father put into their business that paved the road to a favorable outcome. ‘I do strongly feel that the vast majority of people who come to this country is looking for a better life. You can only make that happen with hard work.” Reynaldo said. “There is nothing stopping you from accomplishing all of your dreams. The United States is about that. It is a nation about immigrants, immigrants who want to make a positive difference.” Something that not everyone much knows about is the size of the heart of the Robledo family. Reynaldo makes sure they give back to the community that made them who they are today. The Robledo family started the “Roberto Taco’s Shop Scholarship.” The program is aimed to help Nevada students currently going through financial need. Roberto’s Taco Shop grants five $2,000 scholarships to Nevada State College students each year. “These dollars help the students supplement other financial hardships that sometimes stop them from continuing their career paths.” Kevin Butler, Vice President for Finance and Business Operation for Nevada State College, said when talking about the strong need for more corporations to take the initiative to help with the state education. “For instance, the majority of these students hold part time jobs and full time jobs because they can’t afford to pay for their books or classes. Most of them are trying to figure out how to pay for their own bills at home. Instead, this scholarship money helps them focus on their studies.” Reynaldo said he and his family are extremely happy to bring aid to local students who want to excel in their lives. “We are in business thanks to the Las Vegas community. There is no better way to give back than contributing to help our young people accomplish their goals. They are the

future of our state and nation.” Also, for more than 10 years Reynaldo has made monthly donations to the Las Vegas Rescue Mission. “There may be no better example of a local, family business sharing with their community than Roberto’s Taco Shop. Every month for the past several years Roberto’s Taco Shop has been giving generously to the Las Vegas Rescue Mission to help feed men, women and children in need.” John Fogal, director of community relations at the Las Vegas Rescue Mission, added. The Mission serves over 1,000 hot meals each day to those who are homeless and hungry, including many families with children. “The Roberto’s family does so much to partner with the Mission to make sure these hot meals are available to those who need them 365 days a year, we cannot do it without partners like this. It is so great to see that not only does Roberto’s feed so many happy guests at each of their locations, but that they also care enough to help feed those who are most in need here in our valley as well. The Las Vegas Rescue Mission is so proud to partner together with Roberto’s Taco Shop to help our community.” Fogal mentioned. Since the beginning Roberto’s Taco Shop has been a family business that has created hundreds of jobs. Therefore, helping men and women, mostly Hispanic immigrants, bring food to their tables at home. Currently there are 51 restaurants in Las Vegas and one in Reno. This year two more taco shops will open in Nevada, one in Las Vegas and another one in Reno. The family also owns more than 20 restaurants in San Diego. Reynaldo assures their commitment, as a family is to share their blessings with the people who made them who they are today. He said he runs his business with no agenda, but he is sure that whoever comes after him will maintain his family name as a symbol of inspiration for other families.

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H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H

Congratulations to

H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H

on the first annual Independence day MusIcal celebratIon in las Vegas, nV.

Proud to be suPPorters

H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H


NHM

SERVICE & COMMUNITY

A man made of struggle and honesty

IGNORANCE IS INDEFENSIBLE IN COURT Flavio Jimenez | Photo Courtesy

“I have never been so afraid, as the day my son told me he wanted to be like me”

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By Viridiana Vidal

hen Flavio Jimenez started working in the real estate business he was one out of more than 23,000 people working in the house market in Las Vegas, almost 20 years ago, but he had something that no one had- a personal experience. It was 1997 when Flavio moved back to the United States, like plenty of people who come here, Jimenez was pursuing happiness and the “American Dream” but first, he found his nightmare. “Less than a year after I moved to the United States, back in 1998, I found out that ignorance is indefensible in court. I was a victim of real estate fraud.” A Fraud that broke his first dream but not his spirit. CONTINUED ON PAGE 27

NEVADA HISPANIC MAGAZINE 2017


NHM

Flavio Jimenez knows that knowledge is power and has made it his mission to educate the Hispanic community in regards of buying homes and acquiring wealth. Currently, Flavio is working tirelessly through his radio show, free conferences and a book in process to teach people make smart decisions.

The Fraud And The True Calling

‘I didn’t know the system, I trusted too much and I was a victim of my own ignorance.” Said Flavio Jimenez when I asked “Why Real Estate?” I mean Jimenez graduated as a Civil engineer from the National Autonomous University of Mexico. “I wanted to help others in the same situation that I was. Our people are too noble. They want to succeed in this country, work hard and own their home, but need some guidance someone to trust. ” As a victim of a real estate fraud, Jimenez learned that the only one to be blame was himself because his own ignorance of the system made him sign paper he didn’t understood. “They falsified my income, the time that I had been living here, almost everything was falsified but I signed it.” Jimenez decided that he would get himself out of that situation and started reading and studying about loans and real estate while working at a casino; and it was through that experience that Flavio Jimenez found his true calling in life. In the very same year that he was a victim, Jimenez became a loan officer with only one thing in mind- help other Latinos achieve their dreams. Between 1998 and 2011 he helped many families obtain loans for homes but the way Jimenez was doing business was already different “I was doing loans but I was brutally honest, I didn’t care if I would hurt your feelings, I wanted to make sure my clients knew exactly what they were getting into. I told them if they could qualify for a house in that moment or if buying even a T-shirt wasn’t an option for them”

The “Mojado” And The Truck Of Hay

Flavio has been 17 years in the real estate business, has had his own radio show for 14 years and is a known his community conferences in Las Vegas but only a few people know that he was undocumented. “I was also a mojado,” said

Flavio laughing “but in Mexico.” Jimenez was born in Long Beach, California but at the age of 3 his parents decided that they would be better of rising Flavio in the little town of El Limon, Jalisco, Mexico a place that gave Flavio his first great lesson in life. “When I was 11 years old we were going through a hard time and I heard my mom saying that we had nothing to eat. The next day I woke up and went to the little store in the corner and ask for a job, the owner of the store told me that I could help him unload the truck of hay that has just arrived, but that I needed to run because he had also promised the job to “Roke” the town drunk. I ran so fast and pushed Roke out of my way that I got to the truck first and started unloading it. The only thing I had in my head was that I needed to bring food home. After a long day of work the owner of the store gave me food and money that I brought home. My mom was so proud, that look in my mother’s eyes changed my life” Flavio admits that is precisely that episode in his life that made him competitive but also an honest fighter.

Give To Receive

“I have never been so afraid, as the day my son told me he wanted to be like me.” That is the day Flavio points out as the day he knew he wanted to make a difference and help others. Jimenez knows that knowledge is power and has made it his mission to educate the Hispanic community in regards of buying homes and acquiring wealth. Currently, Flavio is working tirelessly through his radio show, free conferences and a book in process to teach people make smart decisions. “If I can give, make a difference and help, why not? I believe that anything you give it multiplies.” Flavio assures his greatest achievement is his family and is because of them that lives every day helping others achieve their “American Dream” in the right way. Finally, he gave us this advice “There is no stupid questions but, stupid people that do not ask questions” NEVADA HISPANIC MAGAZINE 2017

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NHM

AMERICANS FOR PROSPERITY

Q&A

Interview with Juan Martinez Nevada State Director Americans For Prosperity By Miguel Barrientos, Nevada Hispanic Magazine

My goal is to work with all Nevadans to promote policies that will empower taxpayers, business owners, and families to improve everyone’s economic opportunities. Juan Martinez

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NHM

AMERICANS FOR PROSPERITY

Nevadans should have every opportunity to voice their concerns about how their city, county, or state government is operating. If we can help empower Nevadans, or help amplify their voice in an important policy battle, then that’s where we need to be.”

NHM: Most people know you as the grassroots organizer in Nevada with The LIBRE Initiative. Now we see you are with AFP. What are you doing and how is AFP different from LIBRE? JM: Americans for Prosperity has allowed us to expand our message to promote the principles of an open and free society. Our partners at The LIBRE Initiative are focused on outreach among the Hispanic community. My goal is to work with all Nevadans to promote policies that will empower taxpayers, business owners, and families to improve everyone’s economic opportunities. HHM: AFP is known for being conservative. Do you get any negative responses from Liberals in the neighborhoods you are visiting? JM: Our message has the ability to transcend traditional political lines. We believe that taxpayers’ dollars should be protected and used for their most critical needs. We oppose corporate welfare that puts taxpayer dollars in the hands of well-connected private companies. We support expanding education choice policies to empower students to receive the best education possible. We believe that government has a role to play, but it should be limited to the framework it was founded on. We enjoy working with Nevadans from all sides of the spectrum, and we hold all elected officials accountable regardless of what party they identify with. NHM: There are some Latinos in leadership who have spoken against new Grassroots Organizations such as LIBRE and AFP. What do you see people say about this. JM: Nevadans should have every opportunity to voice their concerns about how their city, county, or state government is operating. If we can help empower Nevadans, or help amplify their voice in an important policy battle, then that’s where we need to be. Tens of thousands of latinos believe, like we do, in the power of free market policies. Some of the policies our critics stand by have hurt our community, and it’s our mission to shine a light on a better path forward. A lack of ESAs and over barring regulation are examples of the sort of policies that limit opportunities in the state, and especially for the latino communities. Together, we can rise up and become more prosperous. NHM: As a grassroots organizer, you visit and meet with thousands of families, What do you see that is common among

the Latinos you meet with. As far as Community concerns. JM: Nevadans, like most Americans, are concerned with the economy, making sure their kids get a good education, and job growth. We believe there’s a path that government can take where critical services are met, infrastructure can be addressed, and that can empower entrepreneurs to innovate, create, and expand opportunities for themselves and Nevada families. NHM: Latinos are the fastest growing population, how do you see our education system responding to today’s challenges in the market place? JM: Lawmakers need to realize that not all students learn the same way. We need to modernize our education system and empower families to choose the best education options for their kids to succeed. The legislature missed a great opportunity this year by not funding ESA’s. However, we should commend them for funding the Opportunity Scholarship program with $20 million dollars. It’s proven that families that take part in School Choice options are more satisfied with their result. The legislature needs to focus on ways to let the money follow to the student and not simply tie a child to a zip code or imprison them into a failure factory. NHM: We see more Latinos getting involved to be heard on issues they defend in helping their community, How can they get involved with AFP.? JM: We have offices in Reno, Pahrump and Las Vegas. Our staff and our volunteers are passionate about making Nevada a great place to live, work, and raise a family. So if you want to engage on important policy decisions, or you just want to learn about what’s happening around the state we want to meet you. Join us at americansforprosperity.org or email me at jmartinez@afphq.org NHM: What can we expect to see with AFP under your Leadership in Nevada. JM: I am humbled to lead this great team. We have an incredible group of staff, activists, and volunteers. My goal is to make sure they have the tools they need to be successful and we will measure success by the impact we can have on the major policy discussion we engage in and the growth we’ll see across the state in the coming years. NEVADA HISPANIC MAGAZINE 2017

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NHM

MEDIA & COMMUNITY

La Firma, creating

strategies to position their message in media

Left to rigth: Viridiana Vidal, Alexander Zapata and Johali Carmona

“La Firma” began in 2016. Since then, the team has been able to work with several non-profit organizations and has positioned their messages in national and local media in the state of Nevada.

By LA FIRMA

A

ndrea Ruffino.- A former senior producer, News Anchor and reporter for Univision and Telemundo in Nevada; an international and local producer (Telemundo Las Vegas); and a former reporter and news anchor, get together to start the job. It is around 9 o’clock in the morning and a very long debate begins. They evaluate the issue and the message. Ideas fly from one side to another. They look for ways to turn an issue or concept into a newsworthy element. After a few hours, what started as an idea, has become a pitch CONTINUED ON PAGE 31

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NEVADA HISPANIC MAGAZINE 2017


NHM In our newsrooms, we respect balance and try to give voice to both sides of the spectrum, so people can decide.

More details about the work of this group of journalists visit www.lafirmanv.com sector, they say there are aspects of ethics that still rule and a potential story for the media. their work. “It’s not about working for everyone. We have However, the team does not stop. Meetings are repeated always worked for an educational journalism, one that will over and over again while they apply the formula they have be at the service of the community. That is something we learned through the years working in media. Now, outside maintain, it is part of our essence. Before assuming a client the newsroom, they are moved by the same passion: or start working on any project, we evaluate its message, Journalism. how it can impact the community and only if it is positive “La Firma Communications and Creative Solutions” and has the potential to be news, we accept it.” Vidal or just “La Firma,” is a group of Hispanic journalists with explains. more than 30 years of combined experience in media who decided to create a consulting group to help organizations and companies reach a bigger audience. Journalism with “ethics” “We are a company created by passionate journalists who understand how a newsroom works”, says CEO As we explained earlier, the team at La Firma is no longer Viridiana Vidal. “The main idea behind our company is to linked to traditional media, however, they have designed make sure your company’s message reaches a strategies to stay active in journalism. broader audience.” “After the success we lived with La Firma “Sometimes organizations and we decided to take advantage of that “La Firma companies want to reach the media. momentum to reach the radio and create However, the only way they know is www.politicaparati.com” Alexander Communications advertising. Our approach is different, Zapata, Chief Operations Officer, and Creative Solutions” and in order to do this we study explains. “Every Tuesday from 8:30 message and products, along with a.m. to 10:00 a.m. on Radio La Voz or just “La Firma,” is a group our clients. We carry out a complete de Nevada, as well as in articles of Hispanic journalists with evaluation and then we create an from Política para ti, we explain effective earned media strategy the issues in the agenda but with more than 30 years of combined for their message and company a different approach. We want experience in media who decided to position itself. It’s not just experts to explain to the Hispanic to create a consulting group creating an advertising campaign, community, how they are impacted we give it a news perspective,” Vidal by topics being discussed in the state to help organizations and added. of Nevada and the country.” companies reach a “La Firma” began in 2016. Since When asked about a possible then, the team has been able to work conflict of interests between the media bigger audience. with several non-profit organizations and and the work of La Firma, Zapata stressed has positioned their messages in national that “as journalists we take positions. The and local media in the state of Nevada. honest thing is to let your audience know “In the first months after we started (2016) we managed where you are. In our newsrooms, we respect balance and to put at least 3 stories per day in the media. We are talking try to give voice to both sides of the spectrum, so people about 2 and a half minutes stories, in well-known Spanish can decide. We do not take positions or allow any economic and English media outlets with audiences that exceed 50 or political interest to be imposed in our agenda. For us thousand people” Chief Communications Officer, Johali it is about serving the community and informing with Carmona, added. transparency “. “At that time our approach was linked to politics. I think He also endorsed Vidal adding that “La Firma” will not our secret to success is simple: we know how newsrooms position messages which may affect the community. We are work and we have strengthened our relationship with the very aware of this. If your message has the potential to be all the media for years. We still see ourselves as fellow useful to society and have that newsworthy element we will journalists, identified with bringing quality content to our work with you to spread it, to make it massive. “ communities”. If you want to know more details of the work done by Although their client portfolio includes the private this group of journalists, you can visit www.lafirmanv.com. NEVADA HISPANIC MAGAZINE 2017

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NHM

Education Savings Accounts

ESA

SCHOOL CHOICE NOW! Nevada’s public schools continue to rank among the last in the nation. Our Children need more options now. The Nevada Education Savings Account (ESA) provides public funds to pay for online learning, home-based schooling, private tuition, tutoring, therapy, among other educational services.

BY VALERIA GURR

F

or several years Nevada has ranked almost last in K-12 education achievement and while many new programs and policies have been put in place some children just can’t wait for these programs to be fully implemented. And access to a quality education shouldn’t be limited to families that live in certain zip codes or based on the ability to pay for a private school. Every parents should be empowered to choose the best educational experience for their own children. That is why two years ago the Nevada Legislature created two programs to do just that. The Nevada Opportunity Scholarship and the Education Savings Account (ESA) programs put our state at the top in the nation for educational choices for every parent. The Nevada Opportunity Scholarship Program mirrors other successful tax credit programs which have been available for over 10 years in various states. This program provides up to $7,755 in scholarship funds directed to help low to mid- income families to pay for private school tuition

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and fees. The funds are provided by Nevada companies which get a tax-credit in return for donating to this program. The Opportunity Scholarship program is available now and you can find more information on the State of Nevada Department of Education’s website here: http://bit.ly/1NSXsev. The Nevada Education Savings Account (ESA) legislation was passed in 2015 and created the nation’s most expansive school choice program at that time. It provides public funds to pay for online learning, home-based schooling, private tuition, tutoring, therapy, among other educational services. The ESA is available to any Nevada public, magnet or charter school student who has attended a public school for at least 100 days. Children entering kindergarten or children from an active military duty household are exempt from the 100-day rule cited above. Under the ESA program K-12 students are eligible for approximately $5,100 per year/per child. If the student has a disability or the family qualifies for the free or reduced-price lunch program, they are eligible for about $5,800 per year. After facing two lawsuits, the ESA program was ruled constitutional. Today, the ESA is simply waiting to be funded CONTINUED ON PAGE 33

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Education Savings Accounts

NHM

ESA

For the last two years, parents and ESA supporters have been tirelessly fighting to make the ESA a reality in Nevada. Many of the supporters have sent emails, written letters, made phone calls and recorded personal testimony videos about the difference the ESA can make in their lives, and the lives of their children.

by the Legislature since the court’s ruling stated that the ESA funds must come from an account separate from the one used to support public schools. To comply with this ruling, Governor Brian Sandoval has introduced Senate Bill 506 to fund the program from general revenue dollars. Once this bill passes, the ESA program will become a reality for the thousands of families who applied. For the last two years, parents and ESA supporters have been tirelessly fighting to make the ESA a reality in Nevada. Many of the supporters have sent emails, written letters, made phone calls and recorded personal testimony videos about the difference the ESA can make in their lives, and the lives of their children. The interest shown in support of ESAs is enormous. Currently, there are over 10,000 ongoing applications submitted by families who believe in the program. Debunking the myth contrived by the opposition, The Las Vegas ReviewJournal reported that 66% of completed ESA applications were originated by parents whose household income is less than $50,000 per year (January 31, 2017). Proving that the Education Savings Account program has become a solution not for the rich, but for the families who would not be able to afford to pay for educational options without this program. The Nevada education system has many challenges. Persistently overcrowded classrooms, lingering teacher shortages, thousands of instances of bullying continue to persist at the expense of our children. Nevada’s public schools continue to rank among the last in the nation. Our Children need more options now. For some families choosing a school for their children can be a very stressful decision. Without having the financial resources to pay for a different alternative, Nevadans have no other choice than to send their children to the schools

assigned to them by virtue of their zip code, even when those schools may not be meeting their needs! A poll of Nevada voters showed that 61% of them support the ESA. The same poll also showed that voters have an “overwhelmingly positive view” of ESAs and school choice in the state. Despite the strong support that the community has shown for the program, some groups continue to protect the status quo, denying children who need something different a chance to get the education they deserve. The State Teachers Union, a multimillion dollar union backed by DC special interests, is spending large amounts of money to scare and to mislead Nevadans. In addition, elected Democratic leaders have expressed their reservations about supporting the ESA although they haven’t even heard the bill yet! As we approach the end of this legislative session, we are anxiously hoping to see the ESA becoming a funded program, because we believe that parents should have the power to decide what to do and where to send their children so they could get a quality education. Please visit the Nevada Legislature website and learn who your legislators are and contact them, you can use this link here to learn who your legislators are: http://mapserve1.leg. state.nv.us/whoRU/ Editors note: Before we went to print with this edition, the 2017 Elections have taken place. We are sorry to report, the 2017 Legislation missed a great opportunity to support over 10,000 families who had already sent their applications for their children to get a better education in Nevada. Governor Sandoval, promised a good fight to win the funding needed. Something over 10,000 families expected and failed to see. NEVADA HISPANIC MAGAZINE 2017

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INDEPENDENCE

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In 1964, Roberto Robledo began operating San Diego’s first taco shop. Roberto’s, now an institution in fresh authentic, Mexican food, has kept a promise to the family that their commitment to quality, service and family recipes would never be compromised. With over 100 recipes to choose from,

Roberto’s continues to be a pioneer of classic Mexican food for over 50 years, and it is what keeps the famous taco shop thriving today. Roberto’s began as a family operated business in 1964 and continues to be family run, with 52 Roberto’s Taco Shops in Southern Nevada.

“Real Mexican Food You Like!”

52 Convenient location to seve you!

www.robertostacoshop.com

Profile for El Concilio Hispano

Nevada Hispanic Magazine 2017  

A Concilio Hispano Media Publication

Nevada Hispanic Magazine 2017  

A Concilio Hispano Media Publication

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