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HOW TO DO COMICS THE

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by Con Chrisoulis

traditional and digital tips

WAY

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My studio setup 1. Overall view of desk space incl. recreational instruments 2. I, drawing 3. My traditional tools (incl. Pentel Brush, crow quill dip pens, mechanical pencil and a range of felt tip markers) 4. Some hard copy inspiration 5. Reference material for my non-fiction biographical graphic novel, Tales of The Smiths 6. My digital setup (including a basic scanner/printer device and the essential Wacom drawing tablet and pen) 3

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CHARACTERS and landscape

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1. The characters’ features must be consistent throughout the books. The ability to draw characteristics in a repetitive manner is crucial in allowing the reader to immerse himself into the plot. Facial expressions, specific marks on their faces, wrinkles, moles, moustaches, spectacles, earrings etc help to discern one character from the other. 3. 5. The blurb writes “Watch (though he can’t read it)”. It’s in these small side-notes on the character sheets that the author gets to know his character and fleshes out his personality before creating the plot of the story. It is necessary to note down as many details as possible, even if most won’t be used in the final script. It is these details that make up a human psyche and not the real obvious 2D ones. This will lead to far more realistic results. 2. As with the characters, so with landscape that they shall be placed in, repetitive features are necessary in order to establish the place, country, era etc without having the need to be too wordy about it. It’s in the small details that a place achieves its own character within the book and in those details that the protagonists shall blend. 4. 6. By creating floor plans and detailed interiors of houses (or aerial plans of roads, towns etc) you will again assist the reader in emerging into the illusion of the fictional landscape and most importantly you will avoid bloopers, like changing the side of a door handle or the objects on a table.

traditional

The first step in creating and producing a comic book or a graphic novel is establishing the characters and the time and space in which they shall be enacting scenes.


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FROM PLOTTING to scripting

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traditional

The first step in creating and producing a comic book or a graphic novel is establishing the characters and the time and space in which they shall be enacting scenes. 1. Panel by panel breakdown of 3. 5. The blurb writes “Watch (though he can’t read it)”. It’s in these small side-notes on the character sheets that the author gets to know his character and fleshes out his personality before creating the plot of the story. It is necessary to note down as many details as possible, even if most won’t be used in the final script. It is these details that make up a human psyche and not the real obvious 2D ones. This will lead to far more realistic results. 2. As with the characters, so with landscape that they shall be placed in, repetitive features are necessary in order to establish the place, country, era etc without having the need to be too wordy about it. It’s in the small details that a place achieves its own character within the book and in those details that the protagonists shall blend. 4. 6. By creating floor plans and detailed interiors of houses (or aerial plans of roads, towns etc) you will again assist the reader in emerging into the illusion of the fictional landscape and most importantly you will avoid bloopers, like changing the side of a door handle or the objects on a table.


BREAKDOWNS and storyboards

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1. The characters’ features must be consistent throughout the books. The ability to draw characteristics in a repetitive manner is crucial in allowing the reader to immerse himself into the plot. Facial expressions, specific marks on their faces, wrinkles, moles, moustaches, spectacles, earrings etc help to discern one character from the other. 3. 5. The blurb writes “Watch (though he can’t read it)”. It’s in these small side-notes on the character sheets that the author gets to know his character and fleshes out his personality before creating the plot of the story. It is necessary to note down as many details as possible, even if most won’t be used in the final script. It is these details that make up a human psyche and not the real obvious 2D ones. This will lead to far more realistic results. 2. As with the characters, so with landscape that they shall be placed in, repetitive features are necessary in order to establish the place, country, era etc without having the need to be too wordy about it. It’s in the small details that a place achieves its own character within the book and in those details that the protagonists shall blend. 4. 6. By creating floor plans and detailed interiors of houses (or aerial plans of roads, towns etc) you will again assist the reader in emerging into the illusion of the fictional landscape and most importantly you will avoid bloopers, like changing the side of a door handle or the objects on a table.

traditional

The first step in creating and producing a comic book or a graphic novel is establishing the characters and the time and space in which they shall be enacting scenes.


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PENCILS, layouts and panels

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traditional

The first step in creating and producing a comic book or a graphic novel is establishing the characters and the time and space in which they shall be enacting scenes. 1. The characters’ features must be consistent throughout the books. The ability to draw characteristics in a repetitive manner is crucial in allowing the reader to immerse himself into the plot. Facial expressions, specific marks on their faces, wrinkles, moles, mustaches, spectacles, earrings etc help to discern one character from the other. 3. 5. The blurb writes “Watch (though he can’t read it)”. It’s in these small side-notes on the character sheets that the author gets to know his character and fleshes out his personality before creating the plot of the story. It is necessary to note down as many details as possible, even if most won’t be used in the final script. It is these details that make up a human psyche and not the real obvious 2D ones. This will lead to far more realistic results. 2. As with the characters, so with landscape that they shall be placed in, repetitive features are necessary in order to establish the place, country, era etc without having the need to be too wordy about it. It’s in the small details that a place achieves its own character within the book and in those details that the protagonists shall blend. 4. 6. By creating floor plans and detailed interiors of houses (or aerial plans of roads, towns etc) you will again assist the reader in emerging into the illusion of the fictional landscape and most importantly you will avoid bloopers, like changing the side of a door handle or the objects on a table.


INKING and emphasising

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1. The characters’ features must be consistent throughout the books. The ability to draw characteristics in a repetitive manner is crucial in allowing the reader to immerse himself into the plot. Facial expressions, specific marks on their faces, wrinkles, moles, moustaches, spectacles, earrings etc help to discern one character from the other. 3. 5. The blurb writes “Watch (though he can’t read it)”. It’s in these small side-notes on the character sheets that the author gets to know his character and fleshes out his personality before creating the plot of the story. It is necessary to note down as many details as possible, even if most won’t be used in the final script. It is these details that make up a human psyche and not the real obvious 2D ones. This will lead to far more realistic results. 2. As with the characters, so with landscape that they shall be placed in, repetitive features are necessary in order to establish the place, country, era etc without having the need to be too wordy about it. It’s in the small details that a place achieves its own character within the book and in those details that the protagonists shall blend. 4. 6. By creating floor plans and detailed interiors of houses (or aerial plans of roads, towns etc) you will again assist the reader in emerging into the illusion of the fictional landscape and most importantly you will avoid bloopers, like changing the side of a door handle or the objects on a table.

traditional

The first step in creating and producing a comic book or a graphic novel is establishing the characters and the time and space in which they shall be enacting scenes.


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SCANNING and adjusting

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digital

The first step in creating and producing a comic book or a graphic novel is establishing the characters and the time and space in which they shall be enacting scenes. 1. The characters’ features must be consistent throughout the books. The ability to draw characteristics in a repetitive manner is crucial in allowing the reader to immerse himself into the plot. Facial expressions, specific marks on their faces, wrinkles, moles, mustaches, spectacles, earrings etc help to discern one character from the other. 3. 5. The blurb writes “Watch (though he can’t read it)”. It’s in these small side-notes on the character sheets that the author gets to know his character and fleshes out his personality before creating the plot of the story. It is necessary to note down as many details as possible, even if most won’t be used in the final script. It is these details that make up a human psyche and not the real obvious 2D ones. This will lead to far more realistic results. 2. As with the characters, so with landscape that they shall be placed in, repetitive features are necessary in order to establish the place, country, era etc without having the need to be too wordy about it. It’s in the small details that a place achieves its own character within the book and in those details that the protagonists shall blend. 4. 6. By creating floor plans and detailed interiors of houses (or aerial plans of roads, towns etc) you will again assist the reader in emerging into the illusion of the fictional landscape and most importantly you will avoid bloopers, like changing the side of a door handle or the objects on a table.


PHOTOSHOP and digital setup

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1. The characters’ features must be consistent throughout the books. The ability to draw characteristics in a repetitive manner is crucial in allowing the reader to immerse himself into the plot. Facial expressions, specific marks on their faces, wrinkles, moles, moustaches, spectacles, earrings etc help to discern one character from the other. 3. 5. The blurb writes “Watch (though he can’t read it)”. It’s in these small side-notes on the character sheets that the author gets to know his character and fleshes out his personality before creating the plot of the story. It is necessary to note down as many details as possible, even if most won’t be used in the final script. It is these details that make up a human psyche and not the real obvious 2D ones. This will lead to far more realistic results. 2. As with the characters, so with landscape that they shall be placed in, repetitive features are necessary in order to establish the place, country, era etc without having the need to be too wordy about it. It’s in the small details that a place achieves its own character within the book and in those details that the protagonists shall blend. 4. 6. By creating floor plans and detailed interiors of houses (or aerial plans of roads, towns etc) you will again assist the reader in emerging into the illusion of the fictional landscape and most importantly you will avoid bloopers, like changing the side of a door handle or the objects on a table.

digital

The first step in creating and producing a comic book or a graphic novel is establishing the characters and the time and space in which they shall be enacting scenes.


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COLOURING the panels

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digital

The first step in creating and producing a comic book or a graphic novel is establishing the characters and the time and space in which they shall be enacting scenes. 1. The characters’ features must be consistent throughout the books. The ability to draw characteristics in a repetitive manner is crucial in allowing the reader to immerse himself into the plot. Facial expressions, specific marks on their faces, wrinkles, moles, mustaches, spectacles, earrings etc help to discern one character from the other. 3. 5. The blurb writes “Watch (though he can’t read it)”. It’s in these small side-notes on the character sheets that the author gets to know his character and fleshes out his personality before creating the plot of the story. It is necessary to note down as many details as possible, even if most won’t be used in the final script. It is these details that make up a human psyche and not the real obvious 2D ones. This will lead to far more realistic results. 2. As with the characters, so with landscape that they shall be placed in, repetitive features are necessary in order to establish the place, country, era etc without having the need to be too wordy about it. It’s in the small details that a place achieves its own character within the book and in those details that the protagonists shall blend. 4. 6. By creating floor plans and detailed interiors of houses (or aerial plans of roads, towns etc) you will again assist the reader in emerging into the illusion of the fictional landscape and most importantly you will avoid bloopers, like changing the side of a door handle or the objects on a table.


COLOURING the line art

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1. The characters’ features must be consistent throughout the books. The ability to draw characteristics in a repetitive manner is crucial in allowing the reader to immerse himself into the plot. Facial expressions, specific marks on their faces, wrinkles, moles, moustaches, spectacles, earrings etc help to discern one character from the other. 3. 5. The blurb writes “Watch (though he can’t read it)”. It’s in these small side-notes on the character sheets that the author gets to know his character and fleshes out his personality before creating the plot of the story. It is necessary to note down as many details as possible, even if most won’t be used in the final script. It is these details that make up a human psyche and not the real obvious 2D ones. This will lead to far more realistic results. 2. As with the characters, so with landscape that they shall be placed in, repetitive features are necessary in order to establish the place, country, era etc without having the need to be too wordy about it. It’s in the small details that a place achieves its own character within the book and in those details that the protagonists shall blend. 4. 6. By creating floor plans and detailed interiors of houses (or aerial plans of roads, towns etc) you will again assist the reader in emerging into the illusion of the fictional landscape and most importantly you will avoid bloopers, like changing the side of a door handle or the objects on a table.

digital

The first step in creating and producing a comic book or a graphic novel is establishing the characters and the time and space in which they shall be enacting scenes.


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INSERTING halftones and patterns

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The first step in creating and producing a comic book or a graphic novel is establishing the characters and the time and space in which they shall be enacting scenes. 1. The characters’ features must be consistent throughout the books. The ability to draw characteristics in a repetitive manner is crucial in allowing the reader to immerse himself into the plot. Facial expressions, specific marks on their faces, wrinkles, moles, mustaches, spectacles, earrings etc help to discern one character from the other. 3. 5. The blurb writes “Watch (though he can’t read it)”. It’s in these small side-notes on the character sheets that the author gets to know his character and fleshes out his personality before creating the plot of the story. It is necessary to note down as many details as possible, even if most won’t be used in the final script. It is these details that make up a human psyche and not the real obvious 2D ones. This will lead to far more realistic results. 2. As with the characters, so with landscape that they shall be placed in, repetitive features are necessary in order to establish the place, country, era etc without having the need to be too wordy about it. It’s in the small details that a place achieves its own character within the book and in those details that the protagonists shall blend. 4. 6. By creating floor plans and detailed interiors of houses (or aerial plans of roads, towns etc) you will again assist the reader in emerging into the illusion of the fictional landscape and most importantly you will avoid bloopers, like changing the side of a door handle or the objects on a table.


LETTERING by hand

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1. The characters’ features must be consistent throughout the books. The ability to draw characteristics in a repetitive manner is crucial in allowing the reader to immerse himself into the plot. Facial expressions, specific marks on their faces, wrinkles, moles, moustaches, spectacles, earrings etc help to discern one character from the other. 3. 5. The blurb writes “Watch (though he can’t read it)”. It’s in these small side-notes on the character sheets that the author gets to know his character and fleshes out his personality before creating the plot of the story. It is necessary to note down as many details as possible, even if most won’t be used in the final script. It is these details that make up a human psyche and not the real obvious 2D ones. This will lead to far more realistic results. 2. As with the characters, so with landscape that they shall be placed in, repetitive features are necessary in order to establish the place, country, era etc without having the need to be too wordy about it. It’s in the small details that a place achieves its own character within the book and in those details that the protagonists shall blend. 4. 6. By creating floor plans and detailed interiors of houses (or aerial plans of roads, towns etc) you will again assist the reader in emerging into the illusion of the fictional landscape and most importantly you will avoid bloopers, like changing the side of a door handle or the objects on a table.

traditional and digital

The first step in creating and producing a comic book or a graphic novel is establishing the characters and the time and space in which they shall be enacting scenes.


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LETTERING digitally

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digital

The first step in creating and producing a comic book or a graphic novel is establishing the characters and the time and space in which they shall be enacting scenes. 1. The characters’ features must be consistent throughout the books. The ability to draw characteristics in a repetitive manner is crucial in allowing the reader to immerse himself into the plot. Facial expressions, specific marks on their faces, wrinkles, moles, mustaches, spectacles, earrings etc help to discern one character from the other. 3. 5. The blurb writes “Watch (though he can’t read it)”. It’s in these small side-notes on the character sheets that the author gets to know his character and fleshes out his personality before creating the plot of the story. It is necessary to note down as many details as possible, even if most won’t be used in the final script. It is these details that make up a human psyche and not the real obvious 2D ones. This will lead to far more realistic results. 2. As with the characters, so with landscape that they shall be placed in, repetitive features are necessary in order to establish the place, country, era etc without having the need to be too wordy about it. It’s in the small details that a place achieves its own character within the book and in those details that the protagonists shall blend. 4. 6. By creating floor plans and detailed interiors of houses (or aerial plans of roads, towns etc) you will again assist the reader in emerging into the illusion of the fictional landscape and most importantly you will avoid bloopers, like changing the side of a door handle or the objects on a table.


SETTING UP for print

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1. The characters’ features must be consistent throughout the books. The ability to draw characteristics in a repetitive manner is crucial in allowing the reader to immerse himself into the plot. Facial expressions, specific marks on their faces, wrinkles, moles, moustaches, spectacles, earrings etc help to discern one character from the other. 3. 5. The blurb writes “Watch (though he can’t read it)”. It’s in these small side-notes on the character sheets that the author gets to know his character and fleshes out his personality before creating the plot of the story. It is necessary to note down as many details as possible, even if most won’t be used in the final script. It is these details that make up a human psyche and not the real obvious 2D ones. This will lead to far more realistic results. 2. As with the characters, so with landscape that they shall be placed in, repetitive features are necessary in order to establish the place, country, era etc without having the need to be too wordy about it. It’s in the small details that a place achieves its own character within the book and in those details that the protagonists shall blend. 4. 6. By creating floor plans and detailed interiors of houses (or aerial plans of roads, towns etc) you will again assist the reader in emerging into the illusion of the fictional landscape and most importantly you will avoid bloopers, like changing the side of a door handle or the objects on a table.

traditional and digital

The first step in creating and producing a comic book or a graphic novel is establishing the characters and the time and space in which they shall be enacting scenes.


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PRINTING and uploading

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traditional and digital

The first step in creating and producing a comic book or a graphic novel is establishing the characters and the time and space in which they shall be enacting scenes. 1. The characters’ features must be consistent throughout the books. The ability to draw characteristics in a repetitive manner is crucial in allowing the reader to immerse himself into the plot. Facial expressions, specific marks on their faces, wrinkles, moles, mustaches, spectacles, earrings etc help to discern one character from the other. 3. 5. The blurb writes “Watch (though he can’t read it)”. It’s in these small side-notes on the character sheets that the author gets to know his character and fleshes out his personality before creating the plot of the story. It is necessary to note down as many details as possible, even if most won’t be used in the final script. It is these details that make up a human psyche and not the real obvious 2D ones. This will lead to far more realistic results. 2. As with the characters, so with landscape that they shall be placed in, repetitive features are necessary in order to establish the place, country, era etc without having the need to be too wordy about it. It’s in the small details that a place achieves its own character within the book and in those details that the protagonists shall blend. 4. 6. By creating floor plans and detailed interiors of houses (or aerial plans of roads, towns etc) you will again assist the reader in emerging into the illusion of the fictional landscape and most importantly you will avoid bloopers, like changing the side of a door handle or the objects on a table.


PUBLISHING and publicising

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1. The characters’ features must be consistent throughout the books. The ability to draw characteristics in a repetitive manner is crucial in allowing the reader to immerse himself into the plot. Facial expressions, specific marks on their faces, wrinkles, moles, mustaches, spectacles, earrings etc help to discern one character from the other. 3. 5. The blurb writes “Watch (though he can’t read it)”. It’s in these small side-notes on the character sheets that the author gets to know his character and fleshes out his personality before creating the plot of the story. It is necessary to note down as many details as possible, even if most won’t be used in the final script. It is these details that make up a human psyche and not the real obvious 2D ones. This will lead to far more realistic results. 2. As with the characters, so with landscape that they shall be placed in, repetitive features are necessary in order to establish the place, country, era etc without having the need to be too wordy about it. It’s in the small details that a place achieves its own character within the book and in those details that the protagonists shall blend. 4. 6. By creating floor plans and detailed interiors of houses (or aerial plans of roads, towns etc) you will again assist the reader in emerging into the illusion of the fictional landscape and most importantly you will avoid bloopers, like changing the side of a door handle or the objects on a table.

traditional and digital

The first step in creating and producing a comic book or a graphic novel is establishing the characters and the time and space in which they shall be enacting scenes.


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CONVENTIONS and book fairs

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traditional

The first step in creating and producing a comic book or a graphic novel is establishing the characters and the time and space in which they shall be enacting scenes. 1. The characters’ features must be consistent throughout the books. The ability to draw characteristics in a repetitive manner is crucial in allowing the reader to immerse himself into the plot. Facial expressions, specific marks on their faces, wrinkles, moles, mustaches, spectacles, earrings etc help to discern one character from the other. 3. 5. The blurb writes “Watch (though he can’t read it)”. It’s in these small side-notes on the character sheets that the author gets to know his character and fleshes out his personality before creating the plot of the story. It is necessary to note down as many details as possible, even if most won’t be used in the final script. It is these details that make up a human psyche and not the real obvious 2D ones. This will lead to far more realistic results. 2. As with the characters, so with landscape that they shall be placed in, repetitive features are necessary in order to establish the place, country, era etc without having the need to be too wordy about it. It’s in the small details that a place achieves its own character within the book and in those details that the protagonists shall blend.


Influences / Bibliography 1. Overall view of desk space incl. recreational instruments 2. I, drawing 3. My traditional tools (incl. Pentel Brush, crow quill dip pens, mechanical pencil and a range of felt tip markers) 4. Some hard copy inspiration 5. Reference material for my non-fiction biographical graphic novel, Tales of The Smiths 6. My digital setup (including a basic scanner/printer device and the essential Wacom drawing tablet and pen) 3

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3

4

5

6

The first step in creating and producing a comic book or a graphic novel is establishing the characters and the time and space in which they shall be enacting scenes. The characters’ features must be consistent throughout the books. The ability to draw characteristics in a repetitive manner is crucial in allowing the reader to immerse himself into the plot. Facial expressions, specific marks on their faces, wrinkles, moles, mustaches, spectacles, earrings etc help to discern one character from the other. The blurb writes “Watch (though he can’t read it)”. It’s in these small side-notes on the character sheets that the author gets to know his character and fleshes out his personality before creating the plot of the story. It is necessary to note down as many details as possible, even if most won’t be used in the final script. It is these details that make up a human psyche and not the real obvious 2D ones. This will lead to far more realistic results.

traditional and digital tips


How To Do Comics The Con Way