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STOP MULTITASKING | FARMERS STRUGGLE TO DIAL UP | ROBOTS IN MEDICINE

BUSINESS INSIGHT FOR THE CAPITAL REGION

SEPTEMBER ‘17 VOL. 29 | NO. 9

city sprouts Can agrihoods strengthen the Capital Region’s urban farming movement — or will they overshadow it? by Sena Christian CHANOWK YISRAEL Yisrael Family Urban Farm


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Volume 29 Number 9 PRESIDENT & PUBLISHER Winnie Comstock-Carlson, Ext. 101 winnie@comstocksmag.com EDITOR IN CHIEF Allison Joy, Ext. 106 MANAGING EDITOR Sena Christian, Ext. 110 ASSOCIATE EDITOR Robin Epley, Ext. 104 ART DIRECTOR Kelly Barr, Ext. 115

CREW Sacramento

Sierra Foothills Wine Tour Friday, September 22, 2017 for sponsorship information contact: Haven Fry, hfry@jmenv.com Brenda Moore, brenda.moore@aus.com Register Online at: www.crewsacto.org

SENIOR DESIGNER Sara Bogovich, Ext. 108 AD DESIGNER Jason Balangue, Ext. 105 VICE PRESIDENT & DIRECTOR OF BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT Clayton Blakley, Ext. 109 claytonb@comstocksmag.com REGIONAL BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT Susan Cruz, Ext. 102 susan@comstocksmag.com For more information about advertising, send an email to ads@comstocksmag.com

BUSINESS MANAGER Sharon Brewer, Ext. 103 MARKETING MANAGER Kiara Reed, Ext. 112 MARKETING ASSISTANT Thomas Hanns, Ext. 111 CIRCULATION DEPARTMENT Tamara Duarte, Ext. 107 CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Bree Cahill, Rich Ehisen, Suzanne Lucas, Russell Nichols, Karen Wilkinson, Jeff Wilser CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS Terence Duffy, Tia Gemmell, Ken James, Noel Neuburger, Rachel Valley CONTRIBUTING ILLUSTRATOR Andrew J. Nilsen PRINTING Commerce Printing Sacramento, Calif. commerceprinting.com Published by Comstock Publishing Inc. 2335 American River Dr., Suite 301 Sacramento, CA 95825 (916) 364-1000 Fax (916) 364-0350 comstocksmag.com

Comstock’s magazine covers commerce and community in the counties of Amador, El Dorado, Nevada, Placer, Sacramento, San Joaquin, Solano, Sutter, Yolo and Yuba, known as California’s Capital Region. Comstock’s is published monthly by Comstock Publishing Inc, 2335 American River Dr., Ste. 301, Sacramento, CA. 95825. Comstock’s Volume 29, No. 9. A one year subscription to Comstock’s is $25 per year; a single copy is $4.95 plus postage, plus tax (if applicable). All rates are payable in U.S. funds. Publisher is not responsible for unsolicited manuscripts and artwork. ©2017 by Comstock Publishing Inc. No part of this publication may be reproduced without the written permission of the publisher.

Comstock’s is a member of the Western Publishing Association.

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comstocksmag.com | September 2017


September 2017

CO-CHAIR CHRISTI BLACK-DAVIS Executive Vice President, Edelman MIKE AMMANN President and CEO, San Joaquin Partnership JAMES BECKWITH CEO, Five Star Bank STEPHEN BENDER CEO, Warren G. Bender Co. CAROL BURGER President, Burger Rehabilitation TIM CARMICHAEL Manager, Southern California Gas Co.

NOW IS YOUR CHANCE TO CARE FOR OUR COMMUNITY!

CO-CHAIR MEG ARNOLD Managing Director, Valley Vision Inc.

MAC CLEMMENS CEO, Digital Deployment JOHN FINEGAN Founder, Beck Ag

FIND OUT MORE AT YourLocalUnitedWay.org/DayofCaring

STEVE FLEMING President and CEO, River City Bank ANDREW GRANT President and CEO, World Trade Center Northern California

PRESENTED BY

JIM HARTLEY Vice President, CH2M OLEG KAGANOVICH Founder and CEO, Wyndow TOM KANDRIS CEO/Managing Director, PK1 Inc.

SEPTEMBER 23, 2017

DENTON KELLEY Managing Principal, LDK Capital LLC

5:00 - 9:00 PM

BRIAN KING Chancellor, Los Rios Community College District JEFF KOEWLER Partner, Delfino Madden O’Malley Coyle & Koewler LLP LEO M C FARLAND President and CEO, Greater Sacramento and Northern Nevada Volunteers of America BILL MUELLER CEO, Valley Vision Inc. TIM MURPHY CEO, Sacramento Regional Builders Exchange

Newly Built Rio Americano Performing Arts Center 4540 American River Drive

Wine Tasting • Food • Live Music & Entertainment • Silent Auction, Raffle, and Live Auction of unique “experiences” by David Sobon Auctions STARS Hall of Fame Program • Emcee: Rob Stewart Program includes induction of new STARS Hall of Fame honorees with Q&A.

2017 STARS HALL OF FAME HONORS THE ENTERTAINMENT INDUSTRY

MARIA OGRYDZIAK Owner, Maria Ogrydziak Architecture SANDY PERSON President, Solano EDC CURT ROCCA Managing Partner, DCA Partners VERNA SULPIZIO Principal, VASE Consulting & Talent Management DARRELL TEAT Principal, Darrell Teat Consulting SANJAY VARSHNEY VP/Wealth Advisor, Wells Fargo The Private Bank JOSHUA WOOD CEO, Region Business Opinions expressed in this publication do not necessarily reflect the individual opinions of the members of the editorial board.

Merrin Dungey

(Rio Americano High School) Actress Known for her work in Big Little Lies, Alias, and King of Queens

Channing Dungey

(Rio Americano High School) President of ABC Entertainment Oversees ABC Primetime and Late Night development, programming, marketing, and scheduling

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Proceeds support innovative learning opportunities in science, technology, arts, and reading for students in San Juan Unified schools. Presenting Sponsor For tickets & information, visit www.sjefeveningwiththestars.com September 2017 | comstocksmag.com

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Ranked among the nation’s BEST hospitals UC Davis Medical Center is nationally ranked by U.S. News & World Report in cancer; cardiology and heart surgery; diabetes and endocrinology; ear, nose and throat; geriatrics; gynecology; nephrology; neurology and neurosurgery; orthopedics; pulmonology; and urology.

UC Davis Children’s Hospital is nationally ranked in neonatology, diabetes and endocrinology, nephrology, orthopedics* and urology.*

*Together with Shriners Hospital for Children – Northern California

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comstocksmag.com | September 2017


CONTENTS n

September 2017

FEATURES

52 58

PRODUCTIVITY

34 Get Focused

Stop what you’re doing — which is probably a lot, all at once. As it turns out, experts say multitasking drains your brain power and dilutes the quality of your work. Luckily, there’s a solution: Start mono-focusing.

ON THE COVER: PHOTO: TERENCE DUFFY STOP MULTITASKING | FARMERS STRUGGLE TO DIAL UP | ROBOTS IN MEDICINE

BUSINESS INSIGHT FOR THE CAPITAL REGION

SEPTEMBER ‘17 VOL. 29 | NO. 9

by Jeff Wilser

HEALTH CARE

52 Dr. Robot

Automation in the health care sector has the potential to save lives without killing jobs (to the extent seen in other industries). Regional hospitals are finding the upfront costs of going robotic pay off in money saved and improved patient outcomes.

city sprouts Can agrihoods strengthen the Capital Region’s urban farming movement — or will they overshadow it? by Sena Christian CHANOWK YISRAEL Yisrael Family Urban Farm

40

by Russell Nichols

TECHNOLOGY

58 The Long Reach

They say farmers are connected to the land, but in rural areas of California, that’s about all they’re connected to: Wireless internet and cell phone service is all but nonexistent, isolating food producers and inhibiting their ability to use technology to improve operations. by Karen Wilkinson

URBAN FARMING

Grow Your Own Way

Urban farming is about more than growing food — advocates say it hinges on educating residents and policymakers alike on the importance of nutrition and access to healthy food. But is there room for agrihoods? by Sena Christian

September 2017 | comstocksmag.com

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n CONTENTS

September 2017

DEPARTMENTS

30

24

22

120

THE USUAL

EVIL HR LADY A potential employee is asking about your company on social media — here’s why that’s a good thing

11

by Suzanne Lucas

24

Now that recreational cannabis is legal in California, how will growing it impact local real estate?

12

DISCOURSE Panorea Avdis, director of GO-Biz, discusses California’s GDP, tax credits and zero-emission vehicles

TASTE Chris Barnum-Dann, owner and executive chef of Localis, wants to change your mind about fine dining in Sacramento

SPECIAL PROMOTIONAL SECTION

2017 AIACV Experience Architecture The American Institute of Architects Central Valley Chapter invites you to be a part of their sixth annual AIA Experience Architecture event.

113

8

CAPITAL REGION CARES The tenth installment of our 22 annual salute to nonprofits

comstocksmag.com | September 2017

Nonprofits need more unrestricted funding

14

rsvp

20

worth noting

by Karen Wilkinson

65

opinion by Bree Cahill

interview by Rich Ehisen

30

The wine industry is more important to Sacramento than people realize by Winnie Comstock-Carlson

ON THE MARKET

by Ryan Lundquist

26

letter from the publisher

nd

American River Parkway Foundation Summer Solstice Dinner and Auction/ Center for Land-Based Learning Dinner on the Farm/ My Sister’s House Art with a Heart/ Comstock’s Client Appreciation

Buzzword of the Month: Scalable/ Readers weigh in on Sacramento’s music festival scene/ ICYMI: An urban wood movement is growing across the nation and in the Capital Region

120

snap

122

the breakdown

Roseville-based Gutterglove assembles ready-to-use gutter guards

How does California’s health care compare?


EXECUTIVE EDUCATION

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sent 17 other staff from engineering, sales

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September 2017 | comstocksmag.com

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May 2017 | comstocksmag.com

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LETTER FROM THE PUBLISHER n

THE CAPITAL REGION’S SMALL WINERIES OFFER SOMETHING NAPA CANNOT PHOTO: ELEAKIS & ELDER PHOTOGRAPHY

I

can’t help but notice that the days are getting a little bit shorter and the sun is setting lower in the sky. These waning days of summer mean that harvest season is just around the corner. Of course, the Capital Region has other traditional signs of the upcoming fall season. In the valley, tomato trucks barrel down freeways, delivering their red-ripe cargo for processing. In the foothills, grape vines hang heavy with fruit as growers carefully monitor sugar levels to find the magic day to start the crush. Our region is renowned for its agricultural bounty ­— we grow more rice than any other place in the state. Those fields also preserve open space for fish and wildlife and are a critical stop for migrating birds along the Pacific Flyway. Fruit and almond orchards are also plentiful. As I drive up and down the valley or in the foothills, I see the value of agriculture along every highway and country road. It is a significant engine of the economy in Sacramento and the surrounding counties. Almonds alone, one of the state’s biggest cash crops, add nearly $6 billion to our economy. “Farm to Fork” is not just an advertising slogan: It reflects a big part of the region’s identity, and that reputation is growing. Wine has become one of California’s most recognizable crops and production has grown tremendously over the last two decades. California is home to 4,700 wineries and produces more wine than any other U.S. state. The industry-wide payroll is an estimated $17 billion and wine sales add $7 billion of tax money to the state’s coffers each year. That growth has reached the Capital Region, too. It’s not surprising, considering the many micro-climates in our foothills that allow growers to create a wide variety of wines. There are 39,000 acres in wine grapes planted in the six-county metro region; more acreage than in all but two states. In August, I attended the Metro Chamber’s annual State of Agriculture luncheon. During a discussion on the region’s wine industry, one local grower noted that 20 years ago, he used to describe Sacramento to out-of-towners as “90 minutes from the Napa Valley.” Now, he said, those same people bypass Napa Valley to sample wines from the Sacramento region and the surrounding foothills. The serenity I feel from looking out over the acres of a leafy vineyard belies just how much work goes into producing and

selling a bottle of wine. The increasing number of wineries adds competition, which puts smaller wineries at a disadvantage. Mechanization cuts labor costs for some wineries. In fact, 80 percent of California’s wine grapes are now harvested by machine. That’s not a solution for everyone. One foothill vintner noted that machine harvesting “brutalizes the grapes.” Unsurprisingly, labor was a hot topic of discussion at this year’s luncheon. While ag companies large and small are grappling with issues like rising minimum wage, farmers in the foothills already often find themselves needing to increase wages to entice workers into more remote areas. But harvesting machines work best on flat land, not suitable for the steep slopes where most of our region’s grapes are grown. To be sure, it’s the quality, not the quantity, of our local wines that attracts the out-of-town sippers and makes our local wine industry an economic foundation for foothill tourism. As one local vintner noted, “You can’t make premium product without hand labor.” Most of that labor force is made up of immigrants, who work seasonally. Increasingly stringent restrictions on immigration are making it harder to find that labor force and more expensive to hire. But it is key to the quality that keeps tourists flowing to our local wineries. As large distributors focus on high-volume wineries, smaller local wineries depend on that flow of tourists for as much as 35 percent of their annual sales. It’s a good thing to savor the next time you open a bottle of locally produced wine. The labor — most of it immigrants' — is just as important as the grapes.

Winnie Comstock-Carlson President & Publisher

September 2017 | comstocksmag.com

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n OPINION

DONATING FOR IMPACT? DON’T RESTRICT YOUR DOLLARS by Bree Cahill

L

eaders working in the nonprofit sector are some of the most passionate and dedicated folks you will ever meet. Many, especially those who founded their own nonprofits, felt called to make a difference in what they see as a solvable problem within our society. Whatever the problem, they had a spark of inspiration about the solutions, an innovative plan to feed that spark, and the drive and motivation to pull together the volunteers, resources and funders necessary to make their dream for our communities a reality. So why is it that many funders — particularly funders offering mid- to large-sized grants — indicate a lack of trust for the skills and budgeting ability of these incredible entrepreneurs by restricting funds to particular buckets within their organizational budget? Funders may tell you that restricted funding increases nonprofit transparency, but what exactly are funders so afraid nonprofit leaders will do if given the flexibility and implied trust that comes with unrestricted funding? Let’s back up. What exactly am I talking about? When you donate to a nonprofit, you are either offering restricted or unrestricted funds. Restricted dollars are tied to a specific purpose, meaning a donor funding a nonprofit reading program could restrict all of their dollars to purchasing books. But what if the nonprofit had hundreds of books donated the quarter you made your restricted donation and instead wanted to use the money to pay a new tutor to serve an additional 10 children? Well, too bad. Granted, not all restricted funding situations are so black and white. Some funders are open to redistributing a restricted donation through an open dialogue with the nonprofit. And sometimes restricting dollars makes sense for a particular donor. (Say, when a donor believes in a particular program a nonprofit runs, but their theory of change does not match the mission of the nonprofit’s sum total work). But restricted dollars can also significantly limit nonprofit flexibility in

making decisions about how the biggest overall impact can be made. Unrestricted dollars — far more rare in the nonprofit world — are not tied to a specific purpose. This means the organization may use the dollars as they see fit. So, in the same example used above, the nonprofit could decide to use the funding to hire that new tutor because that is the need they have determined to be most pressing. One common form of restricting funding is when funders indicate that only a certain percentage (typically below 20) be spent on overhead. Encouragingly, over the past few years, more influential voices in the philanthropic space have been speaking about the impact-limiting systems of both restricted funding and the emphasis on low overhead cost. Certainly, when you invest in (or donate to) an organization, you want to make sure it spends its money wisely. But what is more important: percentage of dollars used on overhead or overall impact? By restricting overhead costs to a small percentage of dollars donated, a donor may be unintentionally limiting the power of their donation. Items like strategy development, staff salaries and training are often considered overhead costs. Do funders really want to limit funding of these important line items? Ironically, grantmakers who fund through restricted dollars often do so because they believe restricted funding leads to more transparency. On the surface, that makes sense: Restricted dollars go toward specific items, are trackable and often come with reporting requirements on their ultimate use. But restricted dollars signal a huge roadblock in the way of a transparent relationship — lack of trust. Many funders — particularly those of scale — have skills and knowledge that could serve as the basis for a valuable partnership with nonprofits. But, without a foundation of trust, a transparent partnership focused on outcomes is all but impossible to form and maintain. When funders restrict dollars, they

As a donor, if you believe in the mission of the organizations you support and in the leadership team that nonprofit has assembled to make lasting change, fully invest in the cause by trusting them to make the right decisions with your dollars.

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this month's

CONTRIBUTORS RICH EHISEN Rich has contributed to Com"Getting to Launch" stock’s magazine for over 16 years. pg. 26

do the opposite of what they are trying to do, highlighting the inequality in the funder/fundee relationship and eliminating the possibility of true transparency around a nonprofit’s needs. Trust begins with a change in the typical funding model. Certainly, vet the nonprofits you plan to fund. But once you believe in the team and have seen the data to support their work, underscore your belief and trust by releasing the restrictions on your dollars. Over the last few years, there has been a trend toward discussing the often destructive, inefficient nature of restricted funding. But many funders still hang their hat on the need for “transparency,” missing the point that restricted funding decreases trust and efficiency by its very nature. When nonprofit leaders are forced to spend their time determining where every single one of your donated dollars went and making sure they haven’t spent too much on those completely unnecessary (eye roll) overhead costs, they’re taken away from what they do best, which is making an impact. As a donor, if you believe in the mission of the organizations you support and in the leadership team that nonprofit has assembled to make lasting change, fully invest in the cause by trusting them to make the right decisions with your dollars. Trust that they will use those dollars to build capacity and, ultimately, make progress toward solving the social problem they are addressing.

His work has also appeared in a number of regional and national publications, including Government Technology, Sunset, San Francisco Magazine, Sacramento Magazine and Capitol Weekly. He is the managing editor of the State Net Capitol Journal, a LexisNexis publication that covers state public policy issues nationwide. “I love doing Discourse because we can move beyond sound bites and get to the heart of key issues with the very people who make the decisions that impact all of us,” Ehisen says. For more, visit www.richehisen.com.

JEFF WILSER Jeff has been a regular contribu"Get Focused" tor to Comstock’s since 2012. He is pg. 34

a lifelong “multitasker” who realized that this just seemed to cause more and more stress, so he explored the upside of “mono-focus” for this month’s feature. Alas, multitasking is a tough habit to shake, as he is also the author of The Book of Joe: The Life, Wit, and (Sometimes Accidental) Wisdom of Joe Biden, on-sale Oct. 24, and just began traveling the world, indefinitely, beginning in Lisbon, Portugal. Visit www.jeffwilser.com or on Twitter @jeffwilser.

TERENCE Terence discovered photography DUFFY as a medium with endless creative "Grow Your possibilities, and studied this craft Own Way" at the Academy of Art University pg. 40

Bree Cahill is the executive director of SVP Sacramento. In this role, she connects business leaders with nonprofits, securing unrestricted funding and in-kind support for educationally-focused organizations in the region. In 2015, under Cahill’s leadership, SVP launched the first nonprofit pitch event "SVP Fast Pitch," which has now led to over $650,000 in funding donated to local nonprofits. She is a former Teach for America Corp member, and a graduate of the Nehemiah Emerging Leaders Program.

in San Francisco. He now shoots magazine work and ads, and photographed this month’s cover story on urban farming in Sacramento. “I wouldn't choose any other man’s life over the one I live or any other career — each experience is part of the process,” he says. Some of his other favorite things include fishing, old cars and motorcycles, conversing with strangers and surfing. For more, visit www.terenceduffy.com.

September 2017 | comstocksmag.com

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n RSVP

AMERICAN RIVER PARKWAY FOUNDATION SUMMER SOLSTICE DINNER AND AUCTION On June 24, more than 300 guests and volunteers gathered for the third annual Summer Solstice Dinner & Auction, to benefit the American River Parkway Foundation. Proceeds supported the foundation’s programs and efforts to maintain and improve the American River Parkway, including a portion dedicated to youth STEM education through the Campfire Outdoor Education Site. Photography: Tia Gemmell

2

1 Keith McLane, owner/lead auctioneer, KLM Auctions; Kelli DeMarco, anchor, KCRA 3; and Rob Stewart, executive producer/ host of “Rob on the Road,” KVIE Public Television. 2 Ricardo Goñi, principal, Desmond Marcello & Amster; and JoAnn Moffett, operations manager, Cunningham Engineering. 3 Rhonda Staley-Brooks, executive director, Nehemiah Community Foundation; and Bruce Brooks, electrician, Rex Moore. 4 Shirley Smith, owner, SKS Communications; Justin Santana, student, Sacramento City College; Tracey Schaal, executive director, Power Inn Alliance; and Mike Flaningam, doctor of internal medicine, Sutter Health. 5 Raymond James Irwin, CEO/ President, Fizz Champagne & Bubbles Bar; Rita Gallardo-Good, assistant director, California State Teachers Retirement System; Ross Good, senior manager of state government relations, FCA; Vanessa Caigoy, coordinator of compliance, Fortune School of Education; and Justin Ward, attorney, The Ward Firm.

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more images at comstocksmag.com

CENTER FOR LAND-BASED LEARNING DINNER ON THE FARM On July 15, the Center for Land-Based Learning, in partnership with Nugget Markets, presented their annual Dinner on the Farm in Winters. The annual event is one of two fundraiser dinners that benefit the CLBL in their mission to inspire, educate and cultivate future generations of farmers, agricultural leaders and natural resource stewards. Photography: Tia Gemmell

1 Dan Rogers, senior software engineer, Webflow; and Nicole Rogers, director of marketing/communications, Nugget Markets. 2 Eric Stille, CEO/president, Nugget Markets; Kate Stille, vice president of marketing/ communications, Nugget Markets; and Craig McNamara, founder, Center for Land-Based Learning. 3 Patty Nguyen, teacher, Yolo High School; and Shayne Zurilgen, farmer, Fiery Ginger Farm. 4 Beth DelReal, Caring for Our Watersheds program coordinator, Center for Land-Based Learning; Shannon Ross, co-founder, Meridian Pacific; and Poonie Holst, guest. 5 Marianne and Gio Ferrendelli, owners, Route 3 Wines.

September 2017 | comstocksmag.com

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n RSVP

MY SISTER’S HOUSE ART WITH A HEART On July 12, My Sister’s House celebrated its annual Art with a Heart fundraiser at the Sierra 2 Center in Sacramento. Proceeds from the evening will help My Sister’s House provide services to Asian and Pacific Islander and other underserved women and children impacted by domestic violence, sexual assault and human trafficking by providing a culturally-appropriate and responsive safe haven, job training and community services. Photography: Tia Gemmell

1 Genevieve Shiroma, Ward 4 director, SMUD. 2 Erin Maurie, communications media officer, First 5 Sacramento; Darrell Woo, trustee, Sacramento City Unified School District; and Nilda Valmores, executive director, My Sister’s House. 3 Heidi Pyle, public relations, KP Public Affairs; and Carolie Lawson, events coordinator, Golden 1 Credit Union. 4 Stephanie Tom, director of North American sales, Oracle; Maeley Tom, CEO, Tom & Associates; and Ron Tom, board member, My Sister’s House. 5 Yen Marshall, area director, AT&T External Affairs; Toni Hoang, enterprise risk coordinator, SMUD; Rosie Dauz, communications specialist, Golden 1 Credit Union; and Lauren Carpio, internal auditor, DMV.

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September 2017 | comstocksmag.com

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n RSVP

COMSTOCK’S MAGAZINE CLIENT APPRECIATION On August 9, Comstock’s magazine held its quarterly client appreciation night at Mulvaney’s B&L. Clients were treated to a dinner and reception. The evening ended with complimentary tickets for all attendees to see the Music Circus’ Broadway production of “Damn Yankees.” Photography: Tia Gemmell

2

1 Leeann Johnson, marketing communications specialist, Gilbert Associates; Monera Popal, with her partner, Sam Yarmagyan, COO Sacramento Ultrasound Institute. 2 Scott Kime, director of business development, Morton & Pitalo; Lorretta Laslo, director of business development, Lawson Mechanical. 3 Liz Liles-Brown, marketing and sales manager, B Street Theatre; and Leslie Hoffeditz, marketing director/sales coordinator, Miles Treaster & Associates. 4 Debbie McDermott, and her husband; Frankie McDermott, Chief Energy Delivery Officer, SMUD; Kathleen Murphy Fund Development Assistant, Sutter Health Office of Philanthropy; Tim Murphy, CEO, Sacramento Regional Builders Exchange. 5 Chris Cormier, project engineer, Tricorp Construction; Jillian Bender-Cormier, brand manager/partner, Warren G. Bender Co.; Tony Moayed, CEO, Tricorp Construction.

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TEAM WORKS.

Working together, our doctors don’t just see you. They see the big picture of your overall health. By collaborating and seamlessly sharing your records, your care team stays on the same page, so your health always takes center stage. Visit kp.org today because together we thrive. September 2017 | comstocksmag.com

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n WORTH NOTING

buzzwords

scal a ble /skāləbəl/, adj.

READERS RESPOND IN THE COMMENTS PHOTO: RICHARD BECKERMEYER

An ability to invest time and energy in systems that allow small businesses to grow while still handling increased demands.

BY Robin Epley ILLUSTRATION:

Jason Balangue

S

ay you’re a new business owner, trying to get the word out about your amazing product or service. You do whatever you can to get clients, even if it means taping up flyers or sending individual personalized emails. But, as you’re reminded time and time again by mentors and colleagues, that’s simply not “scalable.” Scalability is the idea that how a young business functions now — such as investing significant personal time with every would-be client — can’t continue as the company grows. It’s not sustainable. But just because a strategy won’t translate to a larger workflow, does that mean the foundation of the business isn’t solid?

THE BUZZ Obviously, your goal is to put in place systems and processes that won’t break down and that you can build upon. Your mode of operation needs to grow just as fast as your customer base does. Most entrepreneurs worry (understandably) that you can’t eventually increase revenue if you’re bogged down in a bunch of minute tasks. When Sacramento-based Grin was first trying to find clients for their software, which connects companies to relevant social media influencers, “We were taking on any client just to get people in the door,” says Brian Mechem, COO and co-founder. Mechem and co-founder Brandon Brown found themselves covering any role their new clients required — such as acting as a full-service marketing firm and running influencer marketing campaigns for clients — to prove that they were capable of handling client needs. “That wasn’t scalable for us over time,” Mechem admits.

THE WORD But the activities of Grin in those early days got clients in the door, and Mechem says he doesn’t regret spending company time on un-scalable actions. These days, Grin has stopped offering fully-managed campaigns, and instead, clients come to the company to buy the software and learn to do it themselves. Mechem says a lot of entrepreneurs mistakenly believe that because an action isn’t scalable, they shouldn’t bother doing it at all: “I think the most common thing people don’t understand is there are certain things that are necessary, even if they’re not scalable.” Importantly, Grin informed those early clients upfront that the company wouldn’t always provide those marketing services. “We said we’re willing to do this, keeping in mind that it’s not an extended engagement,” Mechem says. It was a test to see if the marketing software would work for clients’ needs, to show them the ropes and to demonstrate the value. The company then trained clients to use the product for themselves after a trial period. In this way, Grin was able to eventually make scalable both its product and its clientele. Grin didn’t let a fear of scalability stop them from doing what needed to be done at the outset. “It might not be scalable, but that often doesn’t matter,” Mechem says. “Over time, you will build the efficient processes that can scale.” Watch the video online! 20

comstocksmag.com | September 2017

The Little Music Festival That Was: What happened to TBD Fest — and what happens next?

Robert Berry: No mention of First Fest? Bil Morrissey: "Bit off more than they could chew" Does seem to be a valid statement as an explanation, but for what? Nothing seems to indicate that the festival wasn't on target to becoming a profitable annual festival. The losses were in line with what should be expected. Possibly "Loose lips sink ships" would better exclaim the fate of this venue ... It appears that a poor assumption about the credibility of an investor triggered a reaction that that was substantial enough to negatively affect the confidence of the individuals whose support may not have been pulled had the information about the "elusive" $300,000 payment been kept confidential, simply by playing it cool instead of "frantically" reacting to something that apparently remedied itself. I'm sure there is more to it. But we have all made the mistake of doubting an outcome that wasn't an actual threat and suffering some kind of loss as a result. The sad thing is when this type of error causes a total defeat of something that was on track for success. It just appears as though this type of error could have been overcome by simply not acknowledging it to be anything other than a normal course of events along the road to a great success rather than "the straw that broke the camel’s back." Carly: WE HAVE FIRST FESTIVAL. It's going on its fourth year and it's all locally based and supported. It is succeeding without undercutting anyone, and it's about time people embrace it. Kari Jo: I agree with Bill Morrissey … Totally on track for GREATNESS and profit. As soon as Sac Bee published their biased article of some disgruntled food vendor, they were toast. This area had a great thing and now we are all really missing it. Way to go Hargis … Passion and vision pulses thru this guy’s veins. He does put a mean show on 2nd Saturdays … Have something to say? Email us. editorial@comstocksmag.com.


ON THE WEB ONLY get social

Read the full stories at comstocksmag.com

Here’s what’s coming down the pipeline for September, stay tuned. #Behindthescenes

Wood from the Hood THE URBAN WOOD MOVEMENT IS GROWING ACROSS THE U.S. — WITH EFFORTS BOOMING IN THE CAPITAL REGION

@innovatesac: More Arts Are Good For Our Soul — And Our Economy via @comstocksmag @Chris_Weare

by Jennifer Berry

Far West Forest Products specializes in urban, salvaged and reclaimed wood. The company mills and dries the wood they receive, to sell in their retail store. Clients include homeowners, architects, contractors, furniture makers and small businesses. Arts Are Good For Our Soul – And Our Economy

@lightedstar "We need to change the debate away from a competition for dollars.." Patrons of the Arts in the private sector can and should help. @JasonTLaw Creative art attracts talent and tourists to live and visit

Next Stop: Nixtaco LEAVING A CAREER IN INTERNATIONAL FINANCE, ROSEVILLE MAN OPENS TAQUERIA INSPIRED BY HIS MEXICAN ROOTS by Zack Quaintance

Patricio Wise started his career as an economic analyst. Now he is Nixtaco’s owner and chef. On the surface, his two careers don’t seem to have much in common, but Wise says he is applying the same pragmatic approach from banking to running a restaurant.

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@comstocksmag Opening day! @truittbarkpark #yappyhour September 2017 | comstocksmag.com

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n EVIL HR LADY

DILEMMA OF THE MONTH

Retracting a Job Offer by Suzanne Lucas ILLUSTRATION: JOHN CHASE

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recently made an offer to a new director of communications for my company. They asked for a few days to consider our offer, which seemed fair. However, I then found out this individual had posted to Facebook asking friends for feedback on two job offers — one for my company and another for a local competitor. I was horrified that a prospective employee would elicit advice and critique in such a public forum. I want to remove my offer. Any advice on how to tactfully prevent this from happening in the future?

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YES, GO BACK TO 1983 WHEN PEOPLE JUST ASKED THEIR FRIENDS AT DINNER PARTIES RATHER THAN ON FACEBOOK. If that’s not a possibility, then consider exactly why you are so horrified by the action of this individual. Social media is how people communicate today. Unless they said something horrific about your company or your competitor’s company, this is something you actually want to happen. Here’s why:

LANDING A JOB IS NOT LIKE WINNING A BEAUTY PAGEANT If you win a beauty pageant, you’ll most likely never see the people judging you again. But a job? It’s a lot more like getting married to one of those judges. Employees spend more time with coworkers, direct reports and bosses than they do with their spouse. It’s important that everyone is happy with the situation. Would you marry someone with-


ILLUSTRATION: SHUTTERSTOCK

out introducing him to your friends? Of course not. So why would you take a job without asking others what they think? YOU ARE SUBJECT TO BACKGROUND CHECKS THE SAME WAY YOUR CANDIDATES ARE If you hired properly, then you probably contacted former bosses and asked questions about the candidate. If someone had said, “They’re great at getting ideas out there, but rude to their staff,” you’d have sent this person a polite “No thank you.” You, undoubtedly, were on your best behavior during the job interview, and the candidate knows that. They just want to know what it’s really like to work at your company. So, this is their background check on you. It’s easier to ask friends what they know than to ask strangers on LinkedIn. YOUR COMPANY IS (PROBABLY) NOT THE BEST OPTION OUT THERE Most jobs offer good things and bad things, and people are better fits for some jobs and worse fits for others. But, when it comes down to it, people take the best job they can get at the moment. Your company is like your child. You love it and would do anything for it. Your employees may like their jobs — in fact, they may love their jobs — but it’s not their child like it is for you. When the job gets annoying, or something better comes along, they’re going to leave. That’s not a condemnation of your business, it’s just a reality of worklife. YOU SHOULD BE HAPPY YOUR CANDIDATE HAS OPTIONS First, this means someone other than you evaluated this candidate and came to the same conclusion — it’s great to have some outside confirmation. Second, if this person accepts your offer, you know it’s because they want to be working for you — not that they didn’t have any other options. That means there’s a better chance for success.

TAKE THIS AS AN OPPORTUNITY This depends on exactly how you discovered the Facebook post. If it was posted privately and someone took a screenshot and sent it to you ... that’s creepy. Don’t bring it up directly, but do send an email offering to answer any questions they have as they make their decision, and then include some additional reasons why you think they’d be a great fit for your company. If it was a public post, you can email the candidate and say, “I saw your Facebook post that said you were choosing between us and [competitor]. They are a great company, so you can’t go wrong, but we would really love to have you on our team. If you have any questions whatsoever, please reach out to me.” Notice there’s nothing negative about your competitor there, just positive things about you. EMPLOYERS HAVE THE UPPER HAND, BUT … Seeing the Facebook post was probably pretty jarring because you’re used

to being the one who makes the decision, instead of being the one decided upon. Employers still have more power in the hiring process, but the information asymmetry is not as great in today’s connected world. With websites like LinkedIn, Glassdoor and even Yelp, candidates can learn a lot more about your business than they could in years past. You’ve got to up your game and be a better place to work if you want top-notch people to accept your offers. n Suzanne Lucas spent 10 years in corporate human resources, where she hired, fired, managed the numbers and doublechecked with the lawyers. On Twitter @RealEvilHRLady.

Have a burning HR question? Email it to: evilhrlady@comstocksmag.com.

September 2017 | comstocksmag.com

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n ON THE MARKET

THE GREAT GREEN UNKNOWN How will legalized cannabis impact Sacramento real estate? BY Ryan Lundquist

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ILLUSTRATION: ELEMENTS FROM SHUTTERSTOCK

IS MARIJUANA GOING TO BE A GAMECHANGER FOR SACRAMENTO REAL ESTATE? Let’s talk about that, and let’s try not to argue. Despite California’s reputation for progressiveness, marijuana is still a polarizing topic. After all, Proposition 64, which made recreational marijuana legal for adults throughout the state, only passed by 56 percent. This means nearly 1 out of every 2 voters did not approve. Or in other words, half of everyone you meet might have a different opinion than you. No matter your opinion, let’s take a look at how the cannabis industry is beginning to take root in Sacramento’s regional market. The goal here is to pay attention to the real estate trends happening around us. You might think we’re going to become Potville USA since recreational marijuana is now legal in California, but local cities and counties have the right to create their own rules. To date, most throughout the greater Sacramento region have said yes to residents having the right to grow recreational marijuana inside their homes, but have largely said no to commercial cannabis cultivation. The City of Sacramento does allow for the cultivation of commercial cannabis in certain areas, deemed “green zones,” making it the wild child sibling of the county. So, the legal marijuana industry isn’t going to look the same everywhere. In some places, it won’t even exist. Did you know that law enforcement officials have said that more than


The City of Sacramento does allow for the cultivation of commercial cannabis in certain areas, deemed ‘green zones,’ making it the wild child sibling of the county. 1,000 illegal residential grow houses may exist within Sacramento city limits alone? They are illegal because the city government does not allow commercial production on residential properties. But this is a reminder that this industry is already happening all around us. While University of the Pacific projects the cannabis industry can create 20,000 jobs in the greater Sacramento region, we have to remember it’s a stealthy business. There’s potential to see explosive growth in this industry, but most legal grows will be in industrial locations off the beaten path of neighborhoods. Sacramento city officials hope many of the illegal residential grow houses will go legit and move to the commercial sector. We’ll see. One of the most obvious post-election impacts we’re seeing in Sacramento has been increasing values and rents for industrial properties within designated green zones within city limits. Brian Jacks, a commercial broker, tells me standard industrial rents in the Sacramento area range from $0.50-$0.70 per square foot per month, though in some cases properly-zoned marijuana cultivation facilities, located within city limits, can command up to $2 per square foot per month or more. On the purchase side, Realtor Tina Wilks says buyers need to have cash or at least 50 percent down to obtain a hard money loan. Understandably, we are currently seeing a price markup for

commercial properties located in areas where commercial cultivation is legal. Last year, before Prop 64 even passed, there was a “green rush” in Yolo County. Investors from all over the U.S. flooded the Capay Valley gobbling up 10-plus acre parcels suitable for outdoor cannabis cultivation. Buyers paid top dollar for these vacant lots until October 2016, when cannabis farmers could no longer obtain a permit from the Central Valley Regional Water Quality Control Board, which was a prerequisite for obtaining a cannabis cultivation permit. I recently spoke with a homeowner in Fair Oaks who was hoping to sell his one-fourth acre lot to a marijuana grower. He was excited about his property now being worth more because of the new state law, but there were two big problems. First, Sacramento County does not currently allow commercial cannabis cultivation. So, owning a parcel of land or industrial building in the county doesn’t mean much since zoning prohibits marijuana growers. Second, the big growers aren’t buying tiny postage stamp lots — especially in residential neighborhoods. Just because recreational marijuana is legal in California does not mean everyone can cash in and get rich. It all comes down to having the right zoning and location for legal cannabis cultivation. Most surrounding cities and counties have been adamant about not al-

lowing dispensaries or commercial grows, but for how long? If the City of Sacramento does eventually generate $18 million-$20 million in annual revenue, as Councilman Jay Schenirer has publicly said is possible, don’t you think that’s going to put pressure on the rules to change in other places? Right or wrong, money has a way of altering people’s minds. Moreover, if the cannabis industry has explosive growth in the city of Sacramento, can you imagine an eventual moratorium placed on dispensaries and commercial operations within city limits? Couldn’t this also put more pressure on other areas to allow green zones? Some say Sacramento is primed to be an epicenter for marijuana cultivation, like Denver, Col., which has over 4.2 million square feet of industrial space set aside for growing cannabis. Nobody has a crystal ball though, so it’s impossible to say how exactly this trend will unfold. Is all of this good or bad? Well, that depends on who you ask. n Ryan Lundquist is a certified real estate appraiser at Lundquist Appraisal Company. Read more at sacramentoappraisalblog.com. On Twitter @SacAppraiser.

Join Ryan every other month as he tackles the big real estate issues of our region.

September 2017 | comstocksmag.com

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n DISCOURSE

Getting to Launch GO-Biz Director Panorea Avdis on tax incentives, public/private partnerships and ZEVs INTERVIEW BY Rich Ehisen PHOTO: Noel Neuburger

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alifornia Gov. Jerry Brown created the Governor’s Office of Business and Economic Development, or GO-Biz, in 2012 to serve as a single point of contact for assisting entrepreneurs and others looking to start, grow or move a business that creates jobs in the Golden State. We recently sat down with Director Panorea Avdis to learn more about what the agency is doing to help California businesses.

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How would you assess California’s business climate today? It’s important to look at the numbers. We’re the sixth-largest economy, we’ve been leading the nation in GDP growth, we’ve been leading the nation in our job growth efforts and our overall unemployment rate has dropped down to 4.9 percent, which is an all-time low for the state of California. I don’t think we’ve seen numbers like this since December of 2000. Even so, we do still have some parts of the state that are suffering from double-digit [unemployment] numbers, so we’ve increased our outreach efforts in terms of services we have available at the state level, in partnership with local and regional economic development organizations.

Your office seems to have a program for just about every kind of business. What is your strongest area of focus? Well, for sure this governor has definitely modernized the way our economic development tools are shaped. A few years ago, Gov. Brown created within the Governor’s Economic Development Initiative a great program called the California Competes Tax Credit program, in which we are able to administer $200 million a year in tax credits to businesses looking to create new jobs and invest in the state. That is very effective for us. We have great programs that target small businesses, such as our Jump Start program [for] entrepreneurs that really need very small loans, anywhere from $500-$10,000, just to get them started in their own business.

A lot of small businesses are family-run. They often fail to take advantage of programs designed to help them. What kinds of offerings do you have geared to the small family-owned company, and how do you reach out to them? That’s a great question. I came from a small-business family where we had our own cattle and sheep ranch, and my hus-

We have great programs that target small businesses, such as our Jump Start program [for] entrepreneurs that really need very small loans, anywhere from $500-$10,000, just to get them started in their own business.”

band has his own business as well, so I’m constantly asking these questions of my own family. Why didn’t we take advantage of these opportunities? It really came down to just not understanding what was available to us. It’s really important that we identify the right partners throughout the state: Who are the folks we are trying to target in these communities, and who are our best partners to do that? For instance, our business investment services team can work with our local partners to help an aspiring entrepreneur with site selection or with identifying available incentives.

What is the biggest challenge you face in connecting with new businesses, or those that might want to relocate here? It depends on the company and how sophisticated they are in terms of understanding where they want to be or what specific sector they are focused on. So if the companies that come in know where they want to be, we’re able to move a lot quicker. For those that don’t really know what skill sets are available throughout the state, or the difference in affordability across different regions, it sometimes ends up putting them in a little bit of a difficult situation because they didn’t expect there to be so many places that could potentially meet their needs. For instance, we have our iHub program, which is a collection of 14 public/ private partnerships comprising the state,

academia, research institutions, local government and the private sector, all around different emerging technologies. These hubs are creating this ecosystem for new emerging technologies to come to market. So sometimes the challenge is helping companies narrow down just where the skill set is that they’re looking for: Where is the technology and an incubator they could potentially utilize to get their products to market? Is part of that helping academic institutions fully assess what they need to be teaching, to make sure they have that workforce? Absolutely, it’s an opportunity where we can bring the private sector together with academia to speak to what that company’s needs are now, and most importantly what their needs will be in the future, so they can create a curriculum that can produce that skillset.

Many state and local governments turn first to tax incentives when they’re trying to attract a company. Is that also the predominant interest among most companies? It’s just one of several issues they’re looking at. It [also] comes down to workforce. What does the skilled labor force look like? What opportunities are there to partner with existing research facilities? What does the supply chain look like? The available incentives to help that company grow is absolutely part of the conversation, but not the only factor.

September 2017 | comstocksmag.com

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CHAMBER VIEW

The Path to Lead At the end of week one in my first “real job,” the President of the company invited me for a cup of coffee. Our interaction wasn’t longer than 10 minutes, but the fact that he took interest in learning who I was stuck with me throughout my career. After that quick cup of coffee, I felt a new sense of pride and confidence in my position; this was someone I did not want to let down. Acclaimed organizational psychologist, Adam Grant, refers to interactions such as this as five-minute favors; leaders who intentionally focus short bursts of positive and constructive energy upon others leave a lasting impact. At the Metro Chamber Foundation, I have the honor of facilitating and observing leadership in action. In its 32nd year, Leadership Sacramento continues to provide opportunities for business leaders to develop their knowledge of the Capital Region’s greatest strengths and challenges by becoming more community-minded and civically engaged and expanding their network of colleagues and friends. Over the past 32 years, the program has provided opportunities for over 1,000 business leaders from across economic sectors at various stages in their career to better understand their organization’s and their own personal ability to impact their community. Understanding where one can have the greatest mark is a critical question for leaders and motivates many to lean in. Program participants gain exposure to the opportunities and challenges facing our region which often inspires community action. A critical component of the program is a class project assisting a local nonprofit. In 12 months, the class must identify the project they wish to tackle, develop a game plan for raising funds, and execute. Through the years, Leadership Sacramento classes have helped build the kitchen of an Oak Park women’s shelter serving over 200 daily, to developing an outdoor classroom promoting local agriculture inspiring our future farmers. This month, applications open for the next Leadership Sacramento class. If you’re looking for a chance to lead, the opportunity to connect and to give back to your community, we want you to apply. Join us as we continue to help build and inspire tomorrow’s business leaders on their path to lead.

n DISCOURSE California has defied many critics in that it has grown its economy while still aggressively moving to combat climate change. Now we’re doing something similar with our efforts to address our transportation infrastructure needs. Does this help or hinder your efforts to lure companies to California? Overall, it’s a positive thing. Look at how much we’ve grown our ‘green sector.’ No other state in the Union has been able to grow that sector that much and it’s because these policies have brought about new technologies around energy storage and renewable energy and so on. I think the zero emission vehicle is the perfect example of that marketplace. We are definitely leading the nation in the automotive industries these days given specific opportunity around ZEVs.

What does the possible incorporation of Sacramento into the Bay Area mega-region mean? [Companies that move from the Bay Area to Sacramento have] the potential to grow not only a startup, but also the supply chain it uses … If you get a solar manufacturer to locate here, their supply chain ends up locating here too, and it in turn starts creating an ecosystem that benefits more people. So how can we create the ecosystem for it to continue to grow, to bring its supply chain here and create a resiliency for that supply chain?

As the U.S. pulls away from international agreements, California continues to strengthen its partnerships with other nations. What are some of the biggest opportunities in this regard? We continue to have many opportunities to collaborate with other nations, particularly around specific technologies. For example, we’re not the only ones that have challenges with water. So there are opportunities for our innovation hubs, research institutions and universities around sharing best practices and sharing the technologies some of them are putting forward [and] opportunities for companies here to take their products abroad … We continue to partner with any country and every country that is really interested in doing business with this state. n Rich Ehisen is the managing editor of State Net Capitol Journal. His work has appeared in Sunset, San Francisco Magazine, California Journal, Sacramento Magazine and the Lexis Legal Network. On Twitter @WordsmithRich.

Talia Kaufman

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR Sacramento Metro Chamber Foundation

What do you consider the biggest advantage to doing business in California? TWEET US @COMSTOCKSMAG.

Get Involved metrochamberfoundation.org 28

comstocksmag.com | September 2017


2016 AIACV

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September 2017 | comstocksmag.com

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n TASTE

CHEF’S CHOICE Having left behind his metal music roots, Localis’ Chris Barnum-Dann still marches to the beat of his own drum BY Karen Wilkinson PHOTOS: Rachel Valley

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Chris Barnum-Dann opened Localis in Midtown Sacramento in 2016.

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hris Barnum-Dann is meticulous, driven and creative. A little OCD with a rocker persona, those close to him say, but in a way that’s an asset for the man focused on shaking the Sacramento culinary scene. He’s unapologetic about his restaurant’s changing menu or pricey offerings. Barnum-Dann is making his mark, not pleasing the masses. “Why fight for the majority when the minority wants somewhere to eat?” says the 35-year-old executive chef and owner of Localis, a high-end New American, farm-to-fork restaurant in Midtown that celebrated its two-year anniversary in July. Jeb Burton, one of several Localis investors, says he fell in love with BarnumDann’s cooking immediately. He credits the chef with understanding wine pairing on a level that’s rare in the industry and admired by wine makers. “No one has his flair, presentation style and ability to mix ingredients the way he does,” Burton says. “His palate and understanding of food is way beyond 99 percent of the chefs out there.” Barnum-Dann has already achieved local celebrity chef status — he’s one of six lead chefs selected to create the annual Tower Bridge Dinner on Sept. 24. But culinary conquest on a broader scale is what drives the self-described “small-town kid with big-city aspirations” who was raised in Foresthill. He wants to attain Michelin Star status within the next five years and to win a James Beard Foundation Award, considered the Oscars of food, which honor the finest chefs, restaurants and other food professionals nationally. While at it, he


wants to see Sacramento flourish as an arts, agricultural and food hub, with his destination restaurant playing a pivotal part in that transformation. “My goal is get Sacramento higher up in the food chain,” he says, adding he wants to retain a fun, lively kitchen and work environment. He has experienced tedium — no talking, joking or laughing, just silence — in restaurants he’s worked at briefly for free (known as staging, a French word pronounced staahjing) abroad that offered superb techniques and ingredients, but scared him away with their structure and sterility. As a former death metal drummer, guitarist and vocalist, Barnum-Dann says he has to hear music to work. And have space to innovate. “I’m going to stick to my guns and create without boundaries,” Barnum-Dann says. He is adamant that his restaurant won’t capitulate to the masses and serve predictable dishes. “I’m OK with not being safe. If I were to lose my restaurant tomorrow, it’d be OK because I’d get another job.”

STICKING TO IT From age 17 to 25, Barnum-Dann toured North America with his band Dismal Lapse as a guitarist, drummer and vocalist. He also spent several years as an electrician. Before Localis, he was executive chef at Winchester Country Club outside of Auburn, Cibo 7 in Roseville, Wise Villa Winery in Lincoln and he worked at Ten22 in Old Sacramento. Now married with three children and living in Auburn, he’s manifesting a vision for Localis that took root six years ago, down to the details of the sturdy menu paper patrons could easily grasp. “I wanted somewhere that served fine-dining food, with great service and a wine list, but without the snootiness and pretentiousness of a lot of fine-dining restaurants,” he says. “A restaurant that would showcase how I like to dine when I go out.” The Localis menu is atypical — on any day there could be lamb, rabbit, octopus or swordfish — and its tasting menu switches daily. “One thing Localis

will never be is stagnant,” Barnum-Dann says. “We tell people, ‘Fall in love with us, not in love with the dish, because it could change tomorrow.’” Prices are considerable: $79 for the tasting menu, $12-$25 for “Lite Fare” items on the dinner menu, and increasingly pricier main dishes. “Chris is the embodiment of the spirit of local farm-to-fork in Sacramento,” says Kari Miskit, public relations director at Visit Sacramento, which hosts the fan-

Thai beef tongue, as served at Localis.

“I’m going to stick to my guns and create without boundaries. I’m OK with not being safe.” ~ Chris Barnum-Dann, owner and executive chef, Localis cy, $200-per-head Tower Bridge Dinner fundraiser for the free Farm-to-Fork Festival. “He’s created this magical little niche in the neighborhood — he’s so passionate about the local food scene that he took over the restaurant.” The restaurant opened in 2015 on the corner of S and 21st streets under the ownership of Broderick Roadhouse’s Chris Jarosz, who wanted to feature Italian food but gave Barnum-Dann the autonomy to

LOCALIS LOCATION: 2031 S St., Sacramento HOURS: Tues-Thurs: 4–9 p.m.; Fri: 4–10

p.m.; Sat: 5–10 p.m.; Sun: 10 a.m.–2 p.m. INFO: 916-737-7699, www.localissacramento.com

September 2017 | comstocksmag.com

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n TASTE

Chris Barnum-Dann (right) only hires employees who specifically want to work at Localis.

execute his dream as executive chef. In a changing of minds, Barnum-Dann says that freedom was quashed when he was told to scale down his higher-end cuisine concept. The morning of Sept. 9, 2016, with the help of investors, Barnum-Dann bought out the original owners — to the tune of roughly $100,000 — and opened the same day for lunch. He realizes the risk to his family and friends (his wife, Jessica, recently came on part-time to do accounting) of such an investment and going it alone. “I try to stay very humble and grounded,” he says. “I know it can go away in the blink of an eye.” Despite a slow week here and there, Localis is operating in the black. BarnumDann tries to be smart about business expenses, fully cognizant that excessive spending often destroys restaurants. He knows what every item on a plate costs, but is aware of the bigger picture. “If it gets to the point where a dollar makes a difference, we’re doing something wrong,” he says.

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STAYING FRESH Barnum-Dann wears black cargo shorts and black closed-toe Birkenstocks with black socks. His T-shirt features a death metal band out of England called Carcass. He’s got short, dark hair with wisps of gray coming through, and a short beard that frames his face. Other than his personality, the most colorful part of him is his arms, which display intricate tattoos — an octopus playing a pile of vegetables as if they were a drumset on his left forearm, and on his right what he calls a “west walking rose” (also the name of his limited liability company that owns Localis) in tribute to his children Weston, Walker and Emma-Lee Rose. As a point of clarification, BarnumDann explains that the Localis investors are in a limited partnership agreement with the LLC. So he maintains ownership and control. Barnum-Dann is constantly eating at other Sacramento restaurants, and when he has time to explore other cities, such as

a recent trip to Portland, he wastes no belly space while observing what works well and what doesn’t. He’ll soon be staging again, hopefully at Alinea in Chicago, and supports his employees who do the same, such as one who recently returned from The French Laundry in the Napa Valley. As far as hiring, he says he only selects people who specifically want to work at Localis, not those who just need a job. He’s present at his restaurant; his face is often the first you’ll see in the open kitchen. He emphasizes Localis isn’t an in-and-out, order your regular meal and never try anything new, kind of establishment. It’s about the experience, a journey of the senses. “When people leave and are blown away, it’s worth everything,” he says. “It’s about feeding people. I love to feed people.” n Karen Wilkinson is a writer, communications consultant and journalist who gained newspaper experience along California’s North Coast.


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ommunication is a vital key to any business’ success, whether it’s customer related, internal or prospective, and typically that communication is via telephone. Although technology has changed the way we communicate, it’s still over the phone, often a smartphone — voice, text, email, face time, etc. It’s no secret that the smartphone has taken over our world of communication, but businesses still need traditional business phone systems for daily communication. Smile has seen recent trends that customers are requesting such as onsite installation through the company’s infrastructure, and keeping it simple. On premise systems allow Smile to locally install, manage and maintain all aspects of the phone system, and keeping it simple with such features as: voicemail, transferring phone calls, voicemail sent to email, conference calls and integration with smartphones. Our most common installation includes VoIP which usually is the most cost effective as the customer can tap into the same internet connection that they are currently using for day to day use. The Samsung systems also have the flexibility to incorporate both VoIP and analog lines if needed. The most common features that are asked for are: • Easy to use receptionist dashboard • Transferred calls within the office/ branch or to voicemail

• Calls that transfer to voicemail can also be routed to email • Conference calls • VoIP ( Voice over Internet Protocol) • The big one: transfer to the smartphone The communication connection is continuous and seamless! Imagine you are driving back to the office and receive a call that is transferred from your office to your smartphone. You continue the conversation and once you arrive back to your office, you want to transfer to your desk phone and put it on speaker without losing the call. Simple…these are all standard features we set up for our clients. Another popular feature that Smile offers is programming your phone to ring in up to five different locations at one time. No need to worry about missing those important calls as we have you covered. It’s important to Smile that we insure our customers have the correct systems to meet the needs of their organization. Following are two examples of systems that Smile set up for specific applications: MEDICAL TRANSPORTATION You can imagine the pressure ambulance services are under. It’s imperative that calls are received without downtime and responded to immediately. Whether the call is transferred from the police, fire department, hospitals or direct from an individual, all calls must be routed quickly and flawlessly.

Smile designed a phone system to integrate all three offices including a mobile command center. All calls received are routed directly to the call center, then to a tiered system depending on the type of call. Smile worked diligently to insure the programming was to spec. The mobile command center is used in case of a natural disaster and equipped with a customized phone system to receive calls from police, fire departments, etc., and integrates with the branch offices as needed. HOSPITALITY – HOTEL Of course with any hotel, hospitality is an essential aspect of its business and receiving calls for various needs is constant. Smile integrated a phone system for the entire hotel - rooms, operations, reservations, front desk and main dashboard. Smile worked with a third party property management software to integrate guest names within the voicemail for each room. The scope of the project was very detailed, and our engineers’ hard work designing and executing this complex system paid off. Smile is ready to help you assess your current system and determine the best strategy for expanding your existing system or opting for a new system. Give us a call today for a Free Assessment.

916.481.7695 | www.SmileBPI.com

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get

FOCUSED The science behind why multitasking is ruining your ability to get things done BY Jeff Wilser PHOTO: Terence Duff y

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our job demands multitasking. Your boss’s job demands multitasking. Every job seems to demand multitasking. In Sacramento alone, job posts on Monster.com using the keyword “multitask” include senior auditor, designer and “bottling room supervisor.” We demand multitasking from our receptionists to our CEOs. Yet, what if we’re doing it all wrong? What if instead of trying to do 37 things at once, we just try and do one thing at a time — what some productivity experts call either “monotasking,” “mono-focus” or “uni-tasking”— and do the job well? “A lot of people say that multitasking keeps them alert and helps them avoid boredom. They’re confusing ‘multitasking’ with ‘having many projects,’” says Lisa Montanaro, a Sacramento-based productivity expert who also runs workshops at UC Davis and Sacramento State. “It makes a lot of sense to work on several projects. But working on several tasks at once doesn’t make sense. It’s like juggling a bunch of balls in the air, while also having a conversation on the phone and drafting an email. Your brain can’t do all of those tasks at once and do them well.” This is more than just common sense. A growing body of research shows that when our brain is forced to scurry from task to task, switching from A to B to C to D then back to A, ad

infinitum, it’s less effective than if the brain just stays locked on A. “‘Switching costs’ are real,” says Dr. John Olichney, a professor of neurology at UC Davis, referring to the extra energy it takes for the brain to toggle from one task to the next. “We have a limited neural capacity. When we start doing three things at once or overloading our immediate attention, we get into trouble.” He says that the brain is not a “magical organ,” but a physiological one. It accounts for just 2 percent of our body weight, but consumes 20 percent of the body’s calories. It works hard. And like the rest of our body, it can get tuckered out. Olichney’s team at UC Davis can measure the brain’s processing speed with an assessment called the Cognitive Event Related Potential, or CERP. Imagine being given a series of auditory cues, like beep, beep, beep — and then an oddball like boop — then more beeps. Every time you hear a boop, your job is to press a button. That’s one single task. If you are simultaneously given a dual task, like looking at pictures and pressing a button when you see the color red, your CERP will suffer. This can cause you to make sloppy mistakes. Stanford professor Clifford Nass, a pioneer in multitasking research, saw this phenomenon play out when he studied multitaskers back in 2010. Nass concluded that “multitaskers are terrible at every aspect of multitasking,” including ignoring irrelevant infor-

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mation, organizing information in their minds and switching between tasks. Oof. When we leave the academic world of beeps and boops, study after study suggests a real-world tax of multitasking. “It’s impossible to do two tasks at the same time without compromising each,” Montanaro says. “It takes your brain four times longer to process than if you had focused on each task separately.” A 2014 study in the Journal of Experimental Psychology found that even a seemingly innocuous two-second distraction could double your amount of mistakes. A previous study from 2001 found that when we multitask, it takes our brains longer to solve math problems. A 2007 study examining the email habits of Microsoft employees found that when office workers responded to an email alert, they would stay in their email for 10 minutes, and then it took another 10-15 minutes (!!) for them to refocus. So, those tiny distractions can mushroom, even if you’re not aware of the extent to which they derail your focus. “Users spend more time than they realize responding to alerts,” conclude the authors of the Microsoft study, adding that when we have multiple windows visible on our screen, recovery time is even longer. (Key takeaway: If we have visual temptation, we’ll indulge in that temptation. Consider full-screen mode.) The authors also found that “27 percent of task suspensions resulted in more than two hours of time until resumption.” So one time out of four, responding to a single email is enough to kneecap your entire afternoon. Not only is multitasking a drag on productivity, it stresses us out — literally. A 2014 study from the UC Irvine hooked up college students to heart-rate monitors, and found the more they switched between windows on their computers, the higher the levels of stress. “Multitasking contributes to that overwhelmed, stressed-out feeling because they’re doing so many things at once, so they feel scattered,” Montanaro says. These higher levels of stress can cause other downstream problems. “When the mind jumps from one thing to another, people can have problems sleeping,” says Dr. Daniel Rockers, a Sacramento-based psychologist. “If your mind is scattered at work for eight hours, do you think you’re going to just shut that off at home? Good luck.” Rockers says that the damage from our 9-to-5 multitasking is then exacerbated — or given rocketfuel, really — by the multitasking on our smartphones. “The apps take advantage of this scatteredness. The apps know how to guide our attention. So our attention can be led around, mindlessly.” This leads to one of the biggest complaints he hears from his patients: “People are so damned stressed, they feel that they can’t shut their heads off.”

HOW TO MONO-FOCUS

As with any other addiction, the first step is recognizing the problem. The next time you’re at work, Rockers recommends

mono-tize your life 1. Get It Together: Things like poor diet, lack of sleep and minimal exercise all impede our ability to focus. If you can’t get to the gym, try a quick morning stroll before you sit down to work. Stop skipping breakfast, and cut back on fast food. Turn all devices off an hour before bed to ensure a more peaceful slumber. Also, clean your desk — that cluttered mess of old memos and unopened mail is simply another distraction. 2. Take Inventory: Know your big tasks for the week. Write them down. Then, make a separate list with the smaller tasks that need to be done daily: checking email, scheduling appointments, responding to voicemail. The big tasks are where you need to mono-focus the most. 3. Make a Plan: Our most creative hours of the day are typically early morning or late evening. So make a point to address those big-picture tasks identified above when your brain is at its best and when you have the largest chunks of time to dedicate to staying focused. Then, allot yourself smaller increments of time, no more than a half hour, to deal with the minutia. 4. Reflect on Procrastination: Is there a project you’re avoiding, even when you do have time to sit down and focus? Consider why. Procrastination is often rooted in fear or uncertainty: We’re not quite sure how to do something or feel nervous about a presentation so we avoid planning our talking points, etc. Being honest with yourself will make it more difficult to avoid these (oftentimes very important) tasks when something else comes up. 5. Filter Out the Distractions: Shut your door. If necessary, email your team to let them know you need to focus and, unless there is a fire or someone is quitting, to send you an email or wait until further notice. Turn off your phone. At your computer, close all 400 of your open tabs and maximize your screen. Do not check Twitter under any circumstances. 6. Start Small: Ideally, you’d start with no less than an hour of focused work, but that won’t work for everyone. Try no less than a half hour, and work your way up from there. Aim for two hours of mono-focusing, increasing your time spent on a single task incrementally over days and weeks. 7. Keep Multitasking: In small doses! Accomplishing many things in a short window gives us a natural high. Remember those smaller tasks from Step 3? Those are where you can truly embrace your inner whirring multitasker. Catch up on social media, respond to text messages, etc. But aim to limit your time spent multitasking to 30 minutes.

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taking 30 minutes to count how many times you switch between tasks. Count every glance at your phone, check of your inbox and chat with coworkers. “Awareness is the foundational step towards change,” he says. Montanaro gives the same advice and says clients are floored to find themselves switching tasks as often as every three minutes. “They might be checking email and then all of a sudden realize that they forgot to call someone, and then lean over and pick up the phone. During the phone call, they start opening the mail and reading it, which makes them realize that they’re not really listening to the conversation on the phone.” Once you tally up your distractions, the next step is to create an environment — or process — that helps control your zig-zagging focus. “Set aside a few hours that are blocked from distractions,” says Olichney, the neurologist at UC Davis. “Work for four hours that are undistracted, and then do all the multitasking and email in the other half of the day. That’s better than juggling it all day, which leads to fatigue.” The antidote to mindless switching, after all, is mindful focus. You don’t need to meditate or slip into a monk-like trance to reap the benefits. “Just focus on your breathing,” Rockers says. “It’s pretty easy to mock this, but it actually does work.” By monitoring muscle tension, breathing and

heart rate variability (proxy for overall stress levels), Rockers sees, in real time, as his patients take deeper breaths and focus on a single thing, their stress levels are quantifiably lower. You don’t need to be in a therapist’s office to feel this in action: At your laptop you can inhale, take a few deep breaths and focus on just one thing. Or if that feels too new-agey, Montanaro has a more nuts-and-bolts solution. She recommends the Pomodoro Technique, which is, essentially, the office version of high intensity interval training at the gym. Here’s how it works: Do one highly-focused thing for 25 minutes. During that time, do not email, call, text or peek at Twitter. Then you get a five-minute break. Then 25 minutes of sustained focus, followed by a five-minute break. Rinse and repeat. Soon you’ll be done. “Many people may be thinking, ‘25 minutes? How easy!’ And then they try it and realize that this 25 minutes of highly-focused work means that you can’t multitask or task switch,” Montanaro says. “Now they realize how difficult it is, and it brings so much awareness to the fact that they probably weren’t conducting highly-focused work sessions in the past.” It helps to remove the temptations. When I’m in writingmode, I use a program called Freedom to sever my laptop

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from the internet, then I take my iPhone and banish it from the room, even stowing it in a locker. In psychiatry this is known as a “Ulysses pact,” inspired by how Ulysses strapped himself to the mast so he wouldn’t be tempted by the sirens. Tools and apps can help you mono-focus. I switched to a to-do list manager called Things, which offers a view that only shows you the item at the top of your list (and not the 37 additional tasks jockeying for your attention). Plenty of other task managers provide the same interface. The point is that you want a list that’s sequential, allowing you to focus on the item that’s at the very top, right now, and nothing else. Leadership coach Peter Bregman tried mono-focusing for a week, and found he actually worked faster to avoid boredom. Distractions like email and Twitter are shiny baubles of interest. When we remove these, we lose patience for doing the same thing and this can be exploited. “Use your loss of patience to your advantage. Create unrealistically short deadlines. Cut all meetings in half. Give yourself a third of the time you think you need to accomplish something,” he writes in Harvard Business Review. “There’s nothing like a deadline to keep things moving.” Obviously, all of this has enormous potential benefits to a company. Productive employees make for a productive

firm. “It certainly can help a company’s bottom line because everyone is more productive,” Montanaro says, “but looking at this a bit more creatively, employees will be a lot more focused, so you’re getting a better use of their brain power. And they’ll be a lot happier. So if a company is really concerned with increasing ROI, then mono-focusing makes a lot of sense.” There’s one last question worth considering: How many times did you do something else while you read this article? (Be honest.) Distractions can sneak up on you. Every time you switched focus, your brain got a little woozier — even if you can’t feel it. Now extrapolate that over an entire workday, then a week, then a month, then a year. This is why Olichney calls multitasking “the plague of our era.” Thankfully, the solution is simple: Do more by doing less. n Jeff Wilser is the author of The Book of Joe: The Life, Wit, and (Sometimes Accidental) Wisdom of Joe Biden. His work has appeared in print or online in GQ, New York Magazine, Esquire and Mental Floss. On Twitter @Jeff Wilser

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The Compass is a trademark of Ameriprise Financial, Inc. Ameriprise Financial Services, Inc. Member FINRA and SIPC. © 2015 Ameriprise Financial Services, Inc. All rights reserved. The Confident Retirement approach is not a guarantee of future financial results. Investment advisory products and services are made available through Ameriprise Financial Services, Inc., a registered investment adviser. September 2017 | comstocksmag.com

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Grow your own way

Does the evolution of urban agriculture reveal a schism in the community or a movement picking up steam?

by Sena Christian PHOTOS: Terence Duffy

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Judith and Chanowk Yisrael, of Yisrael Family Urban Farm, started growing food in 2007 to feed their own family — now they focus on the larger community. September 2017 | comstocksmag.com

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Chanowk Yisrael always seems to move at full-speed. Whether he’s pulling kale out of the ground, sticking a thermometer into a compost pile, shouting out instructions to volunteers or grabbing an interested visitor for an impromptu tour of Yisrael Family Urban Farm. His property includes two adjacent residential parcels in unincorporated Sacramento County’s South Oak Park, a poor neighborhood with modest houses and chain-link fences. On a sweltering May afternoon, Yisrael catches two teenage boys struggling to hand-pick fruit hanging high above their reach. “You guys grabbing yourself some cherries, huh?” Yisrael calls out, as he rushes past them. “Grab yourself something to snatch those cherries down!” There must be a fruit picker laying around. But before Yisrael can find them one, he’s onto the next task of preparing his farm stand to open later that afternoon. Volunteers like these teenagers often help at the farm in exchange for free produce to take home.

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Yisrael Family Urban Farm in South Oak Park started out in 2007 at 3,500 square feet with five fruit trees; it is now 11,200 square feet with 40 fruit trees.

To the purists, Yisrael represents what an urban farmer should be: a city-dweller as tied to the land as any rural farmer, committed to providing access to healthy foods at an affordable price, to people in his own marginalized neighborhood. Roughly 10 years into the movement, urban farming in the Sacramento region has garnered widespread support in large part for its promises to promote healthier eating habits, alleviate food deserts and reconnect urbanites to their food sources. These farms can help remove blight, make neighborhoods safer and empower a new generation of growers via schoolyard gardens. But in that time, hard-fought wins with local governments that lifted regulatory obstacles aren’t necessarily translating into more farms within cities. Meanwhile, activists have found a new friend — or perhaps frenemy — in the form of private residential developers who have embraced farms in their planned communities and ushered urban farming into the mainstream market.

IN THE EARLY DAYS

If asked, Yisrael might tell you he’s “as old as the sun, moon and stars,” jokes his wife, Judith. But in mortal years, he is 42. He has long dreadlocks and a lean, muscled frame. He is philosophical and thoughtful, yet impressively energetic — a brief encounter wouldn’t suggest that he toils outside all day and is father to a blended family of nine children. In 2007, the couple’s farm was still just a homestead: 3,500 square feet and five fruit trees, where Yisrael grew food solely for his family. A cancer scare with both his parents had convinced him and Judith that they needed to focus on healthy eating to ward off disease. A decade ago, throughout much of the region, people weren’t allowed to keep backyard chickens or beehives, or sell food gleaned from their own gardens at residential farm stands. But a lot has changed since then. That same year, the nonprofit Soil Born Farms upgraded from the 1.5-acre plot in the Arden-Arcade area it had founded in 2000 to an additional 55-acre location along the

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American River in Rancho Cordova — truly launching the with vegetable rows, compost piles, mushroom patches and region’s urban farming movement, which also built upon chickens. He grows from seed, practices either no- or lowwhat many Hmong and Mien residents had been doing for till, and doesn’t apply synthetic pesticides or herbicides. He years, by growing strawberries on small urban plots and and Judith also manage a 9,500-square-foot garden across selling them at informal farm stands and along sidewalks the street at Fruit Ridge Community Collaborative (a shutthroughout the area. tered elementary school now a hub of nonprofit offices). Now, Soil Born grows certified-organic fruits and vegetaThe couple’s business model is built on a few main revbles on 15 acres, which they sell to local restaurants, grocery enue sources: selling produce and handmade bath products stores, farmers markets, at like soaps, managing the a farm stand and through Fruit Ridge plot, and teacha community-supported ing others how to garden for agriculture program. They themselves. While they ocalso have hogs, sheep and casionally pay for short-term chickens, who have jobs in contract work, they have no weed control, soil fertilemployees and often rely on ity or as a teaching tool for the assistance of volunteers. visitors. The public visits One of those volunteers the farm for volunteering, might eventually be neighbor yoga classes, educational Nina Berry, who happens to workshops and special stop by the Yisrael Family Urevents, like the annual ban Farm right before its first Day on the Farm festival farm stand opens to the pubthat attracts nearly 2,000 lic on a May evening. “You people and the Autumn come here before the farm Equinox Celebration funstand is set up and we put you draiser for 1,000 attendees. to work,” Yisrael jokes to the — Judith Yisrael, Yisrael Family Urban Farm The organization’s 17 woman. staff members are assisted “I always say I will come by about 800 volunteers out here to work, but I never who help out both on the have a chance,” she responds. farm and off it, primarily "We’ll put you to work,” through the Harvest Sacramento program, in which people Judith chimes in, smiling. “Give her a shovel.” Instead, Yisharvest surplus fruits and vegetables around their neigh- rael whisks Berry away to give her a tour of the property. borhoods to donate to food banks. Soil Born also oversees a Berry, who learned of the Yisraels’ farm on Facebook, is number of school gardens in local food deserts. The original interested in learning how to grow her own produce. “I’m 1.5-acre plot now serves as the training ground for second- a container gardener and I follow how they’re doing their year farmer apprentices. things, and I’m like, I got to get out here,” she says. In 2012, Yisrael also doubled down on the movement, Yisrael shows her his front yard, which used to be lawn, growing his 3,500 square feet and five fruit trees to 11,200 but now has herbs, vegetable plants and fruit trees. “That’s square feet (about one-fourth of an acre) and 40 fruit trees, pretty cool. You can use every spot,” Berry says, before

“You can’t walk by this place and not take note. I think it’s a completely different landscape than most of the people in this community see.”

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High school students in the Growing Green Internship Program, of the Center for Land-Based Learning, harvest crops at the Cannery Urban Farm in Davis. photo: kelly barr

turning to examine the cherries, eggs and leafy greens on the farm stand table, along with handmade soaps and herbal bath salts, and declares she “came for the kale.” "We got kale — three different types of kale,” Yisrael says, selling her a bunch for $2. Berry grabs a schedule of upcoming workshops and departs. Yisrael attracts potential students, customers and volunteers like Berry through the visible uniqueness of his homestead: Neighbors passing by often pause to look at the front yard, drawn in by the fruit orchards, vegetable plants and the man tending his land. Two years ago, Yisrael got his permaculture design certificate to learn how to create a natural landscape that doesn’t require as much maintenance and human intervention. The effect: an eyecatching agrarian jungle. “You can’t walk by this place and not take note,” Judith says. “I think it’s a completely different landscape than most of the people in this community see.”

REMOVING BARRIERS

As Sacramento’s pioneers, Yisrael Family Urban Farm and Soil Born set the stage for a vision of urban farming that focuses on getting healthy food to those who need it most. They have also been integral in shaping policy to accommodate this vision; both are members of the Sacramento Urban Agriculture Coalition. Founded in 2013, the coalition’s first big win occurred in March 2015 with the Sacramento City Council voting 6-1 to pass the city’s urban agriculture ordinance, which allows urban growers to sell directly to consumers at residential farm stands. The policy had overwhelming support during public comment, but since the ordinance does not require permits, the number of people taking advantage of the new rule is unknown. But it meant Yisrael was able to sell at a farm stand within city limits on another parcel near Broadway owned by his family. Then, this past February, Sacramento County’s new urban agriculture ordinance — passed unanimously by the

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“There are a handful of people who have made it work. Beyond those handful of folks, the barriers to entry are still too great, so we have to find ways to remove those barriers.” — Paul Towers, secretary, Sacramento Food Policy Council

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Board of Supervisors — went into effect, allowing urban farmers to grow and sell food from their properties. The ordinance also allows people to raise egg-laying birds and honey bees. Two applications for a permit to operate a farm stand have since been received and approved; Yisrael holds one of them. That means he’s finally able to legally sell produce in South Oak Park’s food desert, and this summer he launched his inaugural farm stand at his home, which ran regularly May through July. For many small farmers, selling off-site presents a challenge; they must pack up their produce and equipment and drive to farmers markets — sometimes in other cities and towns — when the potential for customers could be neighbors right down the road. While the Yisraels used to participate in a farmers market in south Sacramento, the goal was always to serve their immediate neighbors. Before having the farm stand outside their home, “mostly, we’ve committed acts of civil disobedience to do what was necessary to get our food into the hands of our community,” Judith says. SUAC also worked toward the passage of the City of Sacramento's Urban Agriculture Incentive Zone, which offers tax incentives for landowners to allow their properties to become farms (no more than 3-acres in size). The land must be blighted, unimproved or vacant, and kept in active agricultural use for five years in exchange for a property tax benefit. The incentive program began accepting applications in August 2016 and currently has only two participants — undoubtedly much lower than expected. More recently, in August 2017, SUAC successfully helped extend the incentive zone to cover unincorporated Sacramento county properties, not just city limits. But these policies didn’t “think as big” as advocates would have liked, says Paul Towers, secretary of the Sacramento Food Policy Council, who has been involved with the urban farm movement since the early days. “It’s hard enough to grow food versus figuring out how to sell at a farm stand.” So additionally, advocates want the City’s ordinance to remove restrictions around when people can sell produce


at their residences — currently only Tuesdays and Saturdays from 8 a.m. to 7 p.m. They want farmers allowed to sell whenever is convenient for them and when doing so makes the most business sense. SUAC also recently began co-hosting workshops in marginalized communities on how to operate an urban farm, says Jackie Cole, who joined the group earlier this year. “We want to encourage entrepreneurship,” she says. “We want to encourage people to use their backyards in some of these underserved neighborhoods … This is something they can do from their home.” The first workshop in July, held at Yisrael's farm, had 14 participants. More workshops are scheduled through September. Because the unavoidable fact remains that farming — anywhere — is hard. “There are a handful of people who have made it work,” Towers says, meaning that only a few urban farmers, including Yisrael, have actually been able to run a successful business. “Beyond those handful of folks, the barriers to entry are still too great, so we have to find ways to remove those barriers.” Barriers since the beginning — lack of access to land, water and market —  remain for those aspiring to become growers in Sacramento. While incentives make it more attractive for private landowners to allow their vacant lots to become farms, they often don’t want the expense of adding water hookups, which cost thousands of dollars. Or a landowner doesn’t want to commit their land to something as long-term as a fruit orchard, which takes years to produce its first crop. Much of the current hype around urban farming is happening west of the Sacramento River. The City of West Sacramento is “hugely invested,” doing things like buying topsoil and stepping in when water connections proved too costly, says Sri Sethuratnam, director of the California Farm Academy, operated by the Center for Land-Based Learning in Winters. “In the initial development stages [of an urban farm], that support is really critical.” West Sacramento also amended its zoning code to allow for commercial crop production in residential, commercial, industrial and other areas.

ENTER AGRIHOODS

An estimated 200 agrihoods — residential communities built with a working farm as a focus — exist across the U.S., according to the Urban Land Institute. A 2016 report on the intersection of food and real estate by ULI notes that the real estate industry is more often incorporating food halls, grocery stores, working farms, community gardens and restaurants into their development projects, as these amenities add value at little cost. Whereas once a golf course and clubhouse might be the centerpiece of a subdivision, over the past decade, there’s been a big push for farms and community gardens, according to a recent report by the nonprofit National Center for Appropriate Technology. The Cannery is a new 547-home, 100-acre development in Davis that includes an adjacent 3-acre farm. Produce grown here is sold to the public at a weekly onsite farm stand and through a veggie box subscription. The Mill at Broadway in Sacramento is a planned 825-home development with a 2.5-acre farm where residents can grow fruits and vegetables to consume themselves, and with a production farm with produce to be harvested for sale at the Mill Market. The Creamery at Alkali Flat, a 122-home development in Sacramento, will offer homeowners about a half-acre of urban gardens and planter boxes — more of a community garden than a farm, but a food-centered development that no doubt benefits from an increased attention toward land connectedness. These developments are capitalizing on consumer demand among the foodie generation. A 2015 ULI study found that 73 percent of U.S. residents consider access to fresh, healthy foods a priority. The 2016 report finds that 35 percent of all households grow produce at home or in community gardens. But some local advocates worry that agrihoods represent the co-opting of a movement borne out of socioeconomic justice. Cannery homes are priced between the high-$400,000s up to $1 million, and the units (with names like “Heirloom” and “Persimmon”) have been selling quick-

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ly. The development sits about a half-mile from a Nugget “It really is critical to have all these stakeholders at the Market — these residents aren’t exactly lacking access to table,” Stott says. These may be city officials with the power healthy produce. to change ordinances, and corporate leaders with the mon“We have to be careful to not make a farm too pretty and ey to donate to nonprofit food-related organizations. hobby-like,” Towers says of The Cannery. “Agriculture is not The movement benefits from everyone being involved, just a hobby and people need to make a living from it. But because improving the food system, Stott says, “is a centuit is a good model ... for people making connections to their ry-long movement, and we’re just at the beginning of it.” food.” Cole says these development projects miss the mark. TEACH SOMEONE TO FARM For example, they are “clearly for an audience who can As Stott will attest, education is one key piece to changing hit up a Whole Foods to pay for pre-packaged, pre-peeled the food system and has long been central to the urban farmoranges, should the mood ing movement. The Yisraels strike them,” she says. regularly hold workshops “They have the luxury of enon topics such as compostjoying fresh produce pretty ing 101, backyard chickens much at-will. They don’t and building soil over time. actually need urban farms, Soil Born has an education but it’s cool if you have one. program that incorporates And that’s great for them. classes for adults, sumI mean it. That’s actually mer camps for children, pretty great. However, the a school garden program current paradigm we live in that includes 10 campuses ignores the communities in located throughout south the region that have never Sacramento and Rancho had access to truly fresh Cordova (see sidebar on pg. produce.” 51) and a symposium for Amber Stott, executive teachers and others who director of the nonprofit want to someday see a garFood Literacy Center (and den in every school. reg ular Comstock’s colIn 2016, Soil Born partumnist), which teaches nered with the California — Chanowk Yisrael, Yisrael Family Urban Farm low-income children about Farm Academy to launch a cooking and nutrition, says comprehensive apprenticethis mainstream acceptance ship program for aspiring shows that urban farming is continuing to gain traction, farm and ranch managers, or those looking to start their consumers want these spaces and the market is respond- own business. Soil Born already had an apprenticeship proing. This gets more people in positions of authority — who gram, but this one dovetails off the substantial work of CFA may not have cared before — to pay attention. That may be to educate and train beginning farmers; apprentices must what’s needed if this region is to truly tackle food insecu- first graduate from the 7-month academy before they can be rity. placed at Soil Born’s farms for ongoing, hands-on experience.

“After 10 years of the work I’ve been doing, what I’ve realized is we have to impact people in their natural environment. We have to impact people at their home."

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The academy incorporates all types of farmers — those who plan to grow on 3,000 acres in the countryside and those who only want one acre in a city. Another partnership between the Center for Land-Based Learning and the City of West Sacramento for an urban farm program has provided academy graduates the opportunity to work on smaller plots, close to markets and on a part-time basis to supplement a day job or on their way to becoming a fulltime farmer. CLBL leases the land — vacant, underutilized lots — and then provides it at an affordable rate to the farmers. The existence of urban farms — small and more financially-manageable plots that don’t require access to large tracts of rural land —  and now agrihoods may allow for educational programs to translate into businesses and entrepreneurship. Take for instance, the partnership between the academy and The Cannery, where two graduates operate the Cannery Urban Farm. The New Home Company deeded the farmland (the former site of a tomato cannery) to the City of Davis, which then leases it to CLBL. The Cannery agrihood might be the first model in the U.S. that incorporates beginning farmers, says Mary Kimball, executive director of the Center for Land-Based Learning. “It’s definitely very unique,” she says, noting how the arrangement ref lects a partnership among a private developer, city government, a nonprofit organization and entrepreneural farmers.

THE DAWN OF A NEW DECADE

In 2015, the Sacramento Region Community Foundation enlisted Valley Vision to create the "Sacramento Region Food System Action Plan," which reported that our region’s agricultural abundance doesn’t translate to low levels of hunger and food insecurity. About 240,000 Sacramento County residents (or 16 percent) were food insecure, according to data from Feeding America. The plan involved representatives from various municipalities, industries and nonprofit organizations, and established four goals: improve the ag economy at all scales through better financing and more affordable land; increase

the amount of locally-grown food distributed within the region instead of exported out; develop access to healthy food in underserved neighborhoods; and spread nutrition education. Urban farming can, and has, played a role in each of these goals. In fact, Shawn Harrison — cofounder of Soil Born — serves on the Valley Vision board and participated in the creation of the action plan. The plan is meant to “offer all players in the regional food system a roadmap as to how to focus their energies,” and the foundation will periodically update the community on related initiatives, says Chief Giving Officer Priscilla Enriquez. Meanwhile, the nexus of Soil Born’s work remains their 55-acre farm. Over one week in July, 17 children participate in a summer day camp — popular camps that typically book up months in advance, says Youth Education Coordinator Alyssa Kassner. During one morning, the kids dig out potatoes. “We got to harvest them, but so many other hands and bodies and kids were involved in the growing and tending of these plants and potatoes,” Kassner tells the children. “We’re so lucky we got to pull them out of the soil.” Not far from here, about a dozen Soil Born volunteers spend their weekday morning tending to tasks, like maintaining the herb and f lower gardens, and helping with cooking demonstrations and food preservation. The parking lot is nearly full, and the farm is abuzz with activity. Soil Born has no doubt been the main player responsible for the excitement around urban farming over the past decade throughout the Sacramento region —  along with Yisrael Family Urban Farm, once they joined the movement a few years later. Yisrael says this summer’s inaugural farm stand at his homestead went all right, but they had to scale back the frequency to devote more attention to their youth mentorship program, Project GOOD, which stands for Growing Our Own Destiny. “I’m at the point where I want to focus on education because that’s such a big void,” Yisrael says. During the course of 50 hours from June to August, the Yisraels taught 12 youth participants about gardening,

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The Sacramento Region Food System Action Plan reported that our region’s agricultural abundance doesn’t translate to low levels of hunger and food insecurity. About 240,000 Sacramento County residents (or 16 percent) are food insecure.

healthy eating and how to develop community. The kids ate only a plant-based diet for their lunches. “For the most part, everyone liked it,” Yisrael says. “Some were, ‘Nah, I won’t eat that.’” Most of the work was done at their farm and across the street at Fruit Ridge Community Collaborative — although a small group also traveled to Denver in July for Slow Food Nations, a festival-conference on local food, where Yisrael served on a panel. Youth were accepted into Project GOOD through an application and interview process, and had to attend an orientation. “We want them to take what we do very seriously,” Judith says. The Sacramento Building Healthy Communities initiative  — of the California Endowment — grant-funded the program, but the Yisraels raised more money through crowdfunding to cover the costs of all children who fulfilled the application process, Judith says. “We didn’t turn anyone away.” For Yisrael, he’s now questioning how much energy he should continue to devote to farming and selling his produce versus education. “After 10 years of the work I’ve been doing, what I’ve realized is we have to impact people in their natural environment. We have to impact people at their home,” he says. “There’s so much education that needs to be done.” As the Sacramento region’s urban farming movement enters its second decade, the true successes of its efforts to improve the local food system will be tested. There’s also plenty of self-ref lection occurring, as community members examine how to make room for a profit-driven push for urban agriculture while not squeezing out those residents who can most benefit from these places. “We’ve got lots of kinds of models that are expanding and growing," Kimball says, "and we need all of them." n Sena Christian is the managing editor for Comstock’s. On Twitter @SenaCChristian or www.senachristian.com.

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Soil Born Builds a Pipeline I

n 2004, four years after launching their first farm, the founders of Soil Born Farms Urban Agriculture and Education Project incorporated their group as a nonprofit to help others see the value of growing food within cities, spreading the philosophy of “healthy food for all.” Over the years, Soil Born has evolved, says cofounder Shawn Harrison, with one recent shift involving the organization’s approach to youth education — and making sure they close the gaps between the first time a child is exposed to growing healthy food in gardens, the second and third time, and so on. The group used to take a shotgun approach when accepting campuses in the target area of south Sacramento into its school garden program. But if the garden's lessons in, say, ecology, nutrition or agriculture are to be truly effective, students need to avoid the gaps in education that can cause them to lose interest or forget what they learned. Now, Soil Born more carefully selects the campuses they accept into the program to ensure stronger educational pathways. For instance, they oversee the garden at Pacific Elementary School in a food desert in south Sacramento; those students feed into Fern Bacon Middle School, which Soil Born has in its garden program. According to Soil Born School Gardens Manager Shannon Hardwicke, Pacific alumni at Fern Bacon immediately asked their teacher to start a garden club. “It was student-led: ‘Hey, we want to keep doing this.’” These students then typically attend Burbank High School, which has its own urban garden program. This closes the gaps. On a school day in June, Pacific students harvest potatoes to cook and eat at lunchtime, and lettuce and onions to toss into a big salad. When the garden’s apricots recently ripened, students devoured them, Hardwicke says. Children are always asking to eat whatever is allowed, and digging in the dirt seems to make them eager to taste unfamiliar produce, Hardwicke says. On this particular day, four second-grade girls come in during recess to help harvest lettuce and do a scavenger hunt to uncover

Shannon Hardwicke with children at Pacific Elementary School. photo: sena christian

potatoes hidden in the soil. Hardwicke asks them why they like the garden. They shout out responses: It’s beautiful. Healthy. They get to play with the plants. And, of course, the rollie pollies. Soil Born manages six school gardens within the Sacramento City Unified School District, which are mainly funded through the California Endowment’s Building Healthy Communities initiative. The 10-year, $1 billion initiative identified 14 high-risk communities throughout the state where groups could collaborate to improve health outcomes, and ends in 2020. The organization also oversees four gardens in the Folsom Cordova Unified School District. Hardwicke’s job entails training teachers and developing garden-related science curriculum aligned with California content standards. She says SCUSD is beginning to see gardens as learning spaces with academic value: “I think we’re just always trying to show them how powerful this is for students, and all the gains and bring that to life.” — Sena Christian

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Xhaiden is a germ-zapping robot, pictured here at Sutter Medical Center in Sacramento.

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dr.

Robot On the cusp of the new automation age, health care providers have more high-tech tools than ever before, which may forever change medicine — one robot at a time BY Russell Nichols PHOTO: Ken James

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F

rom a robot’s perspective, humans probably look like quietly creeping into the health care sector, one of the Capital deeply flawed creatures: imprecise, accident-prone, Region’s biggest employers. injury-ridden, hazardous — walking glitches waiting These innovative tools can improve patient safety and to happen. accuracy, reduce costs and enable compliance, according to This view isn’t exactly wrong. automation advocates. But with such technology being so new Think about the fungal meningitis outbreak in 2012 and relatively untested on a large scale, unknown variables do that started when the New England Compounding Center exist. Interested hospitals face questions of affordability. And shipped mislabeled and unsanitary or contaminated drugs of course, will artificial intelligent machines ultimately take all over the country. As a result of these tainted drugs, 64 over human jobs? (Omnicell declined to disclose the cost of people died and 732 became very sick. It was one of the worst its IV robot.) pharmaceutical scandals in U.S. history. (In June, the owner How exactly the medical workforce will be altered by of the now-defunct Massachusetts pharmacy was sentenced artificial intelligence remains to be seen. But what is certo nine years in prison.) tain is that Rideout expects automation to help its bottom Would this national nightmare have happened if robots line. By insourcing IV compounding with a robot instead of were handling the compounding (mixing and packaging) of spending money to outsource at compounding pharmacies, personalized medications for patients? Rideout expects to save about $150,000 in the first year with Rideout Health is siding with the machines on this one. a goal of saving $250,000 every year by 2020, Gonzales says. Last year, the Marysville hospital ordered a specialized robot Additionally, the new robot allows the hospital to better meet to handle IV compounding infederal guidelines (per the house rather than outsourcing Drug Quality and Security to compounding pharmacies. Act) for consistent quality of Developed by Mountain Viewproduct, in sterility and conbased Omnicell Technologies, centration. this robot is set to make its de“Because we’re using aubut at Rideout this month. tomation,” he says, “I know Unlike a pharmacist who we’re using the exact same can suffer repetitive stress injuprocess as another pharmacy ries from the repeated motions with a robot in another state, of IV compounding, this robot is across the country.” designed to operate with careful and consistent movements. TECH TAKEOVER The pharmacy technician sim— Jerry Gonzales, director of pharmacy, Rideout Health On the cusp of a new autoply selects from a menu what mation age, it’s no longer solution to make, loads the cona question of if robots will tainer with the solutions to be mixed and the bags or syringes greatly impact global economy, but when. A 2017 McKinsey to be filled, then presses a button. The machine takes over Global Institute report predicts that 50 percent of the work from there: mixing, filling, labeling and finally weighing the done today could be automated by 2055, but the authors note contents for accuracy. that could happen sooner or later depending on various fac“With all those steps done manually, you can imagine that tors and economic conditions. Regardless, the rise of the a human will make a mistake in selecting the drug or wrong robots is inevitable. label, or be inaccurate with consistency,” says Jerry Gonzales, With advances in robotics, artificial intelligence and maRideout’s director of pharmacy. “By having all the ingredients chine learning, this shouldn’t be much of a surprise. Robots pre-loaded before you push the start button, there’s a higher and computers can handle various tasks better, faster and level of confidence that the end product will be better.” cheaper than humans can. Technology has also boosted their Last year, the White House issued a report, “Preparing for cognitive abilities so they can now make judgments, sense the Future of Artificial Intelligence,” that predicts a “new age emotion and drive better than ever. In the grand scheme, auin the global economy” where machines will “reach and ex- tomation won’t displace workers as much as reassign them ceed human performance on more and more tasks.” Robotics to different positions alongside machines to produce growth have already impacted major industries such as manufactur- — or workers will find other employment. By boosting proing and agriculture, but in recent years automation has been ductivity and enabling businesses to improve performance,

“Because we’re using automation, I know we’re using the exact same process as another pharmacy with a robot in another state, across the country.”

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Rideout Hospital in Marysville will start using an IV compounding machine, like the one pictured here, in September. The facility expects to save $150,000 in the first year of the device's use.

COURTESY PHOTO: OMNICELL

the authors believe this age will be as transformative as the Industrial Revolution. Almost every occupation can be automated in some way, according to the report: Accommodation and food services (73 percent), manufacturing (60 percent) and agriculture (58 percent) show the highest levels of automation potential. Health care services show up at the lower end of the spectrum at 36 percent. But the industry can still benefit from automation by using machines to handle data analysis, predictable physical tasks and help cut down on the hours patients spend waiting in hospital emergency departments. “Automation has the potential to reduce those waits and increase productivity, as doctors and nurses focus more effectively on better outcomes, and machines take on routine activities such as registration, checkout and dispensing of prescriptions,” the report says. “Predictive health care using sensing wearables to check vital medical signs and remote diagnostics could cut patient waiting times. For hospitals, automation could streamline billing and other administrative activities.” But will health care providers buy in? Adopting such technology costs money, requires training and calls for shifts in the workforce. Education will help hospitals navigate the transition. Omnicell, for example, works with customers to train, document and walk users through its solutions. When

hospitals purchase its new robotic IV solution, Omnicell will also provide technicians to run the equipment. “Disrupting technology that completely flips the model on its head is not something that happens overnight,” says Dennis Wright, Omnicell’s director of marketing for IV solutions. “When you can assure a pharmacy that they will have a partner in adoption, it usually creates some peace of mind.” One of the most popular technologies is automated dispensing cabinets. These computerized storage units allow for easy transfer of medications from the hospital pharmacy to a nursing ward. According to Omnicell, nearly 90 percent of U.S. acute care hospitals use their cabinets for controlling, tracking and distributing drugs. But this tool has been around for decades, proving its worth over time. With newer technology, the “perceived pain of change” makes hospitals reluctant to move forward, says Len Hom, Omnicell’s senior product manager. “We design our solutions with the user in mind to minimize these concerns,” Hom says. “We understand that it’s human nature to oppose change.” One regional health systems is lighting the way.

LIGHT SAVERS

At the Sutter Medical Center in Sacramento, Xhaiden has been on a search-and-destroy mission since February. About

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10 times a day, the wheeled robot rolls inside germ-ridden rooms and emits pulses of ultraviolet light that kills bacteria hiding in walls, floors and other crevices that human cleaners might miss. This is Sutter’s first germ-zapping robot. Its name means “cleansing beam of light.” Before Xhaiden came along, workers cleaned rooms manually in a seven-step process, focused on high-touch surfaces and exposed areas, to prevent hospital-acquired infections. HAIs affect 5-10 percent of hospitalized U.S. patients per year, resulting in 99,000 deaths, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Manual cleaning still happens, but Xhaiden provides backup as the mean, green (no toxic mercury, as has been used for decades in lamps as the go-to-tool for disinfecting surfaces and liquids) germ-fighting machine by Xenex. “The robot isn’t taking the place of anything,” says Debbie Sandberg, director of environmental services for Sutter Medical Center. “This is an added level of cleaning.” The robot cost $103,000, including training. Sandberg reassigned one of her staff to handle Xhaiden. According to Texas-based Xenex, its R2-D2-looking robot is now used in about 40 California hospitals and health facilities, but Sutter is the first in Sacramento. Some regional hospitals have already seen benefits. For example, Napa’s Queen of the Valley Medical Center

GETTING

DEALS

reported decreased rates of the pathogen Clostridium difficile by 47 percent from July 2016 to December 2016, compared to the same period in 2015. Sandberg expects to see strong cost benefits when Sutter runs its analysis later this year and suspects that Xhaiden will have robot friends in the future. “We’re all challenged with looking at germs and pathogens and bugs that come our way,” she says. “For us to stay on top of that, I think we’ll see more than this robot.”

PATTERN RECOGNITION

The UC Davis Medical Center hasn’t invested in a germzapping robot, but uses automation in its data processing to organize and improve the quality of care. Typically, a care management nurse is responsible for reaching out to the patient, making sure they get a flu vaccine, mammogram or other health maintenance intervention. “Now you can look at large populations and be able to identify hundreds or thousands that missed a test. With one action, using computer software, you can close those care gaps,” says Dr. Jeff Wajda, chief medical information officer for UC Davis Medical Center. The software automatically scans each admission and analyzes medical records to assess if a patient is likely to become ill again, which would take much more time and energy to do

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manually. These at-risk patients require more care and receive calls from care management nurses and home visits to monitor their treatments. Within health care, Wajda sees only benefits to the patient. Beyond health care, he admits there could be scenarios where such data is misused. He notes the medical center follows best industry practices regarding the protection of health information to prevent cyberattacks. In May, two UC Davis doctors and two former U.S. Air Force surgeons cofounded a startup focused on automated critical care and trauma management. Based in Sacramento, Certus Critical Care is developing biomedical devices to optimize ventilation, hemorrhage control, and the delivery of fluid and medication to critically injured patients. The first minutes to hours after critical injury are vital, and automation can help physicians avoid complications, says Jason Adams, Certus co-founder and medical director of UC Davis Data Management Services. The devices, which have been tested on animals that are in shock, use algorithms to constantly monitor ill patients and sensors that communicate with each other to deliver fluid and medications as needed. They also provide “clinician decision support to optimize ventilation and hemorrhage control,” says co-founder Austin Johnson, an emergency medicine physician at the UC Davis Medical Center. The Certus team expects to submit its application to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration by 2018 for two prototypes. Even with all the advanced tools and robotics, technology has limitations. That’s one of the hardest things to get health care staff to understand, says Meghan Frear, the Medication-Use Systems and Technology Safety pharmacist at the UC Davis Medical Center. For example, when dispensing a drug in the hospital, the medical cen-

ter staff uses barcode technology. But without human verification, errors can happen that scanners won’t catch. A label might be applied to the wrong drug, or a patient allergy might not be properly documented. In such cases, a computer cannot alert you to the danger, Frear says. “Technology relies on systems being set up correctly, which is why humans

are still integral,” she says. “Technology can’t function without us.” n Russell Nichols is a freelance writer who focuses on technology, culture and mental health. His work has appeared in The Wall Street Journal, The Boston Globe, and Governing Magazine and Government Technology. On Twitter @ russellnichols.

Transforming the Aging Experience

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the long

Reach As smart technology grows more essential to modern ag, farmers languish in digital dead zones BY Karen Wilkinson ILLUSTR ATION: Andrew J. Nilsen

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D

avid Ogilvie is a fourth-generation farmer growing wine grapes on his family’s 1,500-acre farm in Clarksburg, a 20-minute drive from downtown Sacramento. But make no mistake, this small Delta community is country by all accounts. Pickup trucks outnumber sedans along roads sandwiched between crop fields and the Sacramento River. It’s 10 degrees cooler than downtown Sacramento on a scorching summer day. You’ll lose your sense of time — and your cell phone service. Clarksburg displays the best and worst of rural living in California. It’s teeming with agriculture — wine grapes, tomatoes, pears — and is anchored by a market, two churches and three adjacent schools. The Old Sugar Mill, a grand brick building built in 1934 as a beet sugar refinery, hosts over a dozen wineries and serves as a wedding venue. Some 400 residents consider this Yolo County community their home. Ogilvie, his twin brother Phil, and their childhood friend Tom Merwin grew up playing in these fields. Today they run an award-winning wine company, Muddy Boot Wines, and produce grapes on Ogilvie’s family farm, Wilson Vineyards. They’ve recently introduced smart farming technologies intended to conserve energy and improve efficiency. But much to Ogilvie’s chagrin, capitalizing on agtech is proving to be a formidable feat. The culprit? Unreliable broadband. “The digital divide isn’t going away; it’s getting worse,” Ogilvie says. “Our society relies more on getting information digitally, and speaking as a farmer, all the new technology that comes out that helps me farm more efficiently requires internet connection of some kind. It’s worse than it was 10 years ago — 10 years ago we weren’t farming with smart phones.” California remains the largest agricultural economy in the U.S. According to data from the Sacramento Area Council of Governments, the Sacramento region’s ag industry generates $1.9 billion in crop production for an overall economic impact of $7.2 billion through processing, packaging, distribution and additional support industries. Thirty percent of the region’s annual export activity is through crop production and food manufacturing, and the industry supports 37,000 jobs. Yet those living and working locally in agriculture have limited access to modern technologies. Only 43 percent of California’s rural population has the same internet speed as urban areas, according to the California Public Utilities Commission. As the baby boom generation retires — like Ogilvie’s parents — smart farming tools will help the next generation stay competitive and in business, he says. Yet the utter lack or inadequate nature of high-speed internet has become a roadblock to efficiency and sustainability. Ogilvie and local leaders are working to bring better broad-

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band and wireless capabilities to the area. Some small internet service providers are working in tandem, but it’s a struggle for them as well. Ogilvie isn’t just griping about being unable to stream Netflix — he’s talking about total dead zones on ranches. Being tied to the office to load data related to his crops’ growth, moisture levels or overall weather fluctuations. Having all the savvy farm apps at his disposal, but being unable to use them.

GETTING CONNECTED

Broadband, or high-speed internet, can include several modes of delivery — DSL, cable modem, fiber, wireless, fixed wireless, satellite and BPL (broadband over powerlines) — and is currently defined by the Federal Communications Commission as 25 megabits/second download, and 3 Mbps upload. That said, the California Public Utilities Commission has lower standards of 6 Mbps download, and 1.5 Mbps upload. “There’s a lot we can do with better internet,” says Trish Kelly, managing director of Valley Vision. “Our telecoms are not required to put the same level of speed in, which is crazy because we’re California, the leading tech state.” Even with the lower speed standards, five of the six counties in the Sacramento region detailed in Valley Vision’s “Broadband Report Card” received “barely passing” grades. Kelly and Ogilvie were two of four co-chairs on the 2017 Cap-to-Cap Food and Agriculture Committee pilgrimage to Washington, D.C. (organized by the Sacramento Metro Chamber). This spring they pushed for more federal grant funding for broadband infrastructure projects — it can cost tens of thousands of dollars to build a trench fiber connection for one remote home — in rural areas where it’s not economically viable for the private sector to invest, among other issues. There’s no simple answer to how much it would cost to get a town the size of Clarksburg more reliable broadband, says Tara Thornson, Yolo County Supervisor Don Saylor’s deputy. “I don’t think there’s a one-size-fits-all solution to everything. You need a willing provider and player. If they’re not willing to partner, we’re stuck. We’re not in the broadband business.” There are pervasive barriers to publicly funding infrastructure where the private market does not invest, Kelly says, which are worsened by federal funding programs’ direct tie to the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s definition of rural. “We realized the problem for some of our communities, like Woodland or Marysville, is they’re grouped into larger urban population areas,” Kelly says. “The biggest problem is that the USDA is a major funder for rural broadband infrastructure projects; our region cannot compete for those resources,” she says. Such language limits local rural regions’ access to critical funding, and doesn’t accurately reflect the nature of rural


California communities in proximity to urban areas, she says. There is no clear-cut definition of rural, however, as different population thresholds exist for different federal programs, but “those definitions are made for the rural Midwest,” Kelly says. Who is responsible — the private sector or the government — remains a major issue. Infrastructure improvements are costly, and with too few customers spread over too great a distance, are usually not worth the return on investment for business. But some ISPs are finding ways.

THE STRUGGLE OF SMALL ISPS

About 60 miles northeast of Sacramento in Nevada City, tiny pockets of town receive cable internet, which is the best available, says Spiral Internet CEO John Paul. Paul describes rural broadband speeds as oftentimes “intolerable,” with the big companies doing as little as possible to get by. Spiral Internet — which provides DSL to about 1,200 customers — tries to fill this gap by paying a wholesale price to use AT&T’s network, and in turn selling that network to customers through Spiral. If that sounds convoluted, it’s because it is. To even use Spiral’s services, customers need to have a landline through AT&T. And if those customers lose phone service due to billing

disputes, their internet gets shut off too — even if they’ve paid their bill to Spiral. People are miffed, to say the least. “It’s a nightmare — it’s getting worse and worse, and no one seems to know this,” Paul says. “We’re dealing with so many angry people right now.” He’s trying to get out of the DSL business and into something more reliable, without the hassle of corporate telecoms. Spiral was awarded a $16.2 million California Advanced Services Fund grant in 2015, which will allow the building of broadband in areas either without any access, or that use dial-up. He believes that installing a fiber optic network in the ground is a better long-term plan than fixed wireless technology, which requires a “line in sight” and no obstructions such as trees or hills. “Once you put it in the ground, it’ll last for 50 to 100 years,” Paul says. “It’s worthwhile as far as the state money going into it. Whereas fixed wireless technology you’ll have to swap out in five to 10 years due to technology changes.” Nevada City also won a contest sponsored by Google in 2010 to build a gigabit fiber network. A gigabit translates to 1,000 Mbps download and upload. Paul says the project should break ground in September. In Clarksburg, broadband options are scarce — the primary provider is Frontier Communications, which has placed a moratorium on new accounts.

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While Frontier has investigated upgrades to the area through the Connect America fund, or other state-sponsored programs, Clarksburg isn’t eligible, says Frontier Spokesman Javier Mendoza. (Frontier did not respond to inquiries as to the reasons behind the moratorium or Clarksburg’s ineligibility.) Broadband infrastructure grades in certain areas of Yolo County are ranked “F” in an analysis of data provided by the California Public Utilities Commission, which considers existing levels of broadband service, competition and speed. A failing grade of “F,” which Clarksburg received, means there’s at least one service provider, but none provide service that meets the CPUC’s minimum speed standards. In the town of Winters, also in Yolo County, Winters Broadband CEO Brian Horn competes with satellite broadband providers to cover about 500 square miles, he says. Most customers are farmers or living on small farms between Winters and Davis. And that’s his forte. Winters Broadband provides fixed wireless, point-to-multipoint broadband at speeds of up to 25 Mbps download, and 6.25 Mbps upload. An antenna is mounted to a customer’s home, which receives a wireless signal from one of the company’s 65 access points (or cell phone towers). This method is more reliable in areas without major obstructions such as trees or hills, Horn says. Like Paul with Spiral in Nevada City, Horn’s business model includes buying cost-effective broadband from ISPs that don’t provide service in rural areas, such as AT&T and Wave Broadband, which he then resells to customers in tiered packages. The surge in streaming services such as Netflix, Hulu and Amazon Prime has increased customers’ bandwidth demands, which his company meets by continually negotiating for lower prices with larger service providers. Another ongoing challenge is obtaining sites to install towers. Winters Broadband either owns or leases the space for its towers, which on the high end can support between 30 and 40 customers, Horn says. “We have a small user base, not thousands,” he says. “So to try and pass that cost on [to customers] is not easy.” With an engineering background and experience in the Silicon Valley startup world, Horn understands both technology and finances. He’s learned what to not do. “We haven’t grown as fast as other [providers] have, but we don’t have millions in debt in loans that they’ve used to grow,” Horn says. For him, creating a direct customer service line, what he calls “managed service,” allows his company to remain competitive and attractive. Technicians can diagnose connection issues remotely, Horn says, which saves money on site visits and time.

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Most issues customers encounter involve Wifi-enabled devices that suck up bandwidth and decrease overall speed and service, which they’re usually unaware of, Horn says.

LOSING OUT ON AGTECH

Agricultural technology is slowly taking root on farms looking to increase production while decreasing costs. Ogilvie is among those farmers willing to experiment with gizmos and gadgets. Five years ago, Ogilvie installed drip irrigation systems on all but one of his vineyards. In summer 2016, he hopped on the smart farming train, and using Farm Data Systems to assess the farm’s needs, had soil moisture probes installed on two of the five ranches. This technology interfaces with a smartphone or tablet, but without consistent, reliable service across the farm, cannot be uniformly installed. “I’m losing efficiency on three ranches,” he says. Earlier this summer, he had a smart weather system installed that tracks wind, rainfall, temperature, humidity and solar activity, which translates into the amount of water needed for the vineyards. Another smart feature on Ogilvie’s farm is an aerial mapping tool that transmits images that show areas of vigorous vs. weak growth. To use it, Ogilvie must load the app at the office, then drive out to the fields. But if he wants to pull up the map while in the fields, he’s in a dead zone. Ogilvie’s story echoes many others throughout the region who lack the access required to capitalize on the digital economy. While designed to improve efficiency, increase productivity and give farmers more control over their plots, agtech is often out of reach for those they’re aimed at serving. “You can’t deploy these innovative technologies in the field unless you have broadband,” Kelly says. “At a real level, it affects our economy. We’re a $7 billion economic driver for food and agriculture, yet if we don’t have farmers who can use ag technology, they will lag behind in being as efficient and productive as possible.”

DOING THE DIGGING

While it’d be nice to say that overall service in rural areas is improving, Kelly says that’s not necessarily the case. “The more we document the speed tests, the more areas of need we have,” she says. And she would know. As part of an agtech pilot project in Yolo County, Valley Vision conducted research, surveyed farmers and studied actual internet speeds to gather qualitative and quantitative evidence of broadband capacity and gaps. Even if speed is taken out of the equation, with only one or two providers and dismal or no competition, costs increase for users and unreliability becomes the norm.


Kelly says ISPs don’t always understand the economic impact of investing in high-speed internet. “But if it doesn’t make sense for providers, that’s OK, but let us work with other providers,” she says. “If they’re not going to invest, get out of the way. We’re trying to document better what the gaps are, and make the case for why it’s important to invest in California.” Without the pressure to compete, ISPs can move into an area and become complacent, as happened when Verizon in 2015 sold a portion of its wireless phone, internet and TV networks to Frontier Communications, which included Clarksburg. “And they [Frontier] don’t want to expand service,” Kelly says. “We just really want to help our communities get fair access to services, and we want to help our providers too,” she says. That’s where the Internet For All Now Act comes into play. This would extend the California Advanced Services Fund, which was established by the Legislature in 2008 and comes from a few cents mostly surcharge on phone bills. For Ogilvie, quicker and faster service can’t happen soon enough. At his office, he receives 27 Mbps download and 8.5 Mbps upload. But after loading his smart farming apps, as he drives his pickup truck into a vineyard, he loses reception entirely. “It’s frustrating because you’re trying to get work done,” he says. “Five percent of the population feeds the other 95 percent — don’t you think it’s important to give that 5 percent what they need to do their job?” . n Karen Wilkinson is a writer, communications consultant and journalist who gained newspaper experience along California’s North Coast.

October 7, 2017

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Experience an enchanting evening in Sutter Park and Jensen Botanical Gardens featuring celebrated chefs Mike and Molly of Hawks Restaurant & Hawks Provisions + Public House Musical performance by renowned artist Joe Gilman and his trio Appetizers by Carmichael’s finest restaurants Saturday, September 30, 2017 5:00 Reception followed by Dinner in the Garden at 6:30 Sponsor tables and individual tickets available For ticket and shuttle transportation information call (916) 485-5322 Or visit CarmichaelParksFoundation.org Tickets must be purchased in advance, no day of ticket sales. No parking will be available in the park areas. Shuttle service will be provided to and from Carmichael Elementary.

CARMICHAEL PARKS FOUNDATION, 501(c)(3), FEDERAL ID# 26-4274059 September 2017 | comstocksmag.com

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Valley Communications, Inc. CONNECTING BUSINESS WITH TECHNOLOGY

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IT Services

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Congratulations to Golden 1 Center and ArchNexus for leading Sacramento’s design and construction into the future We are proud to have provided our design-build services to the Sacramento Kings at the most technologically advanced indoor sports and entertainment venue in the world and would like to congratulate them on achieving the Regional Recognition Award for Golden 1 Center. We are also proud to have provided our services to ArchNexus and would like to congratulate them on earning a Design Award for the visionary design of their Sacramento headquarters; one of the first Living Buildings in California. We look forward to providing our advanced integrated technology services to the next award winning buildings in Sacramento. 6921 Roseville Road, Sacramento, CA 95842 | 916.349.7300 info@valley-com.com | www.valley-com.com | LIC# 806644

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DOWNTOWN PLAZA PROJECT

Iron Mechanical is committed to building successful projects and long-term relationships. We have engineered and detailed a variety of buildings including commercial, high-rise, multifamily, medical, educational facilities, and many more. Whether your project delivery method is design-build, design-assist, or plans & specs, our “build it before we get there” approach to pre-construction will have us fully prepared well before your building breaks ground.

We are proud to have partnered with Swinerton Builders to create this incredible addition to the Sacramento skyline. Their professionalism and expertise was an excellent complement to our “Build it Before You Get There” approach to construction. Iron Mechanical is honored to be a part of the team!

To make your next project a success, please contact Iron Mechanical at (916) 341-3530. CA License # 934181| www.IronMechanical.com | With offices serving Northern and Southern California

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CONSTRUCTION DONE THE RIGHT WAY — Congratulations Divine Enterprises on your new Headquarters!

“Norm and his team at Headwaters Construction were all very professional and proved themselves very capable throughout the building process. They completed the job the right way and I’ve never regretted selecting them to build our new headquarters location in Rocklin.” — Nick Yarmolyuk, CEO Divine Enterprises

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Photo by: Douglas Taylor

“Alex and Tommy” – E. Claire Raley Studios for the Performing Arts

Choreographing Sacramento’s

AWARD WINNING PROJECTS for more than 30 years

GC LICENSE #198069

REDW O O7 D comstocksmag.com | September 201

California Preservation Foundation – 2017 Design Award E. Claire Raley Studios for the Performing Arts AIA Central Valley 2017 Design Awards – Merit Award Sacramento Valley Station ENR California – Renovation/Restoration Best Project Award Sacramento Valley Station California Preservation Foundation – 2017 Trustees Award Sacramento Valley Station Sacramento Business Journal – Best Community Impact Intermodal Transit Facility Nonprofit Healthcare Coalition – Leapfrog Top Hospitals UC Davis Medical Center, Cancer Center Expansion Nonprofit Healthcare Coalition – Leapfrog Top Hospitals Kaiser Permanente, Roseville Medical Center Hospital California Construction – Award for Merit for Office Construction Bank of the West Office

RSCONSTRUCTION.COM 72

AIA Central Valley 2017 Design Awards – Honor Award E. Claire Raley Studios for the Performing Arts

CITY | SAN FRANCISCO | ROSEVILLE | LOS ANGELES | IRVINE | SAN DIEGO


CONTENTS 75 78 80 92

CALENDAR OF EVENTS PRESIDENT’S LETTER & SPONSORS E V E N T I N F O R M AT I O N D E S I G N AWA R D S

92 94

H O N O R / L PA I N C .

West Valley College, Cilker School of Art & Design H O N O R + D E V I N E D E TA I L / DREYFUSS + BLACKFORD ARCHITECTURE

E. Claire Raley Studios for the Performing Arts

COVER DESIGN: SARA BOGOVICH PHOTO CREDITS: GLOBE MILLS: COURTESY OF MICHAEL MALINOWSKI (OLD), COURTESY OF APPLIED ARCHITECTURE (NEW); ELLIOTT BUILDING: COURTESY OF VRILIKAS; 2600 CAPITOL BUILDING: CHIP ALLEN ARCHITECTURAL IMAGES; SMUD BUILDING: COURTESY OF DREYFUSS + BLACKFORD ARCHITECTURE (OLD), COURTESY OF WILLIAMS + PADDON ARCHITECTS + PLANNERS, INC. (NEW); ELKS TOWER: CENTER FOR SACRAMENTO HISTORY (OLD), COURTESY OF PHIL KAMPEL (NEW)

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M E R I T / PA G E + T U R N B U L L

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C I TAT I O N / H G A , I N C .

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Sacramento Valley Station

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S U S TA I N A B L E R E C O G N I T I O N / ARCHITECTURAL NEXUS, INC.

Arch|Nexus SAC

101

REGIONAL RECOGNITION / AECOM

102

W I N N PA R K G R A N D W I N N E R /

Golden 1 Center

A L B E R T W I N N PA R K : A C Y C L I S T ’ S D E S T I N AT I O N

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W I N N PA R K H O N O R A B L E M E N T I O N S /

Winn Park Regeneration: An Extroverted Introvert Art Parks: Winn Park

HGA Offices

ARCHITECTURE AND URBAN DESIGN

The Barn

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ARCHITECTURA OBSCURA PHOTOGRAPHY CONTEST

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Better. By design. If your business is planning a new construction project or major retrofit, talk to us about Savings By Design. Partner with SMUD’s Savings By Design team on your next project and receive design assistance, financial incentives and more when you integrate energy-saving features. It’s not only better for the environment, it’s better for your bottom line.

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Powering forward. Together.


Location: Capitol Mall Traffic Circle (between 9th and 10th streets) For more information visit: asla-sierra.org/ events/parking-day-2017

SEPT. 17

PRESERVATION SACRAMENTO HISTORIC HOME TOUR: THE HISTORIC ALKALI FLAT NEIGHBORHOOD 10 A.M. TO 4 P.M. /// $30 ADVANCE, $35 DOOR

EXHIBITIONS

Location: Alkali Flat Neighborhood Purchase Tickets: www.preservationsacramento.org/ hometour

ART X ARCHITECTS OPENS SECOND SATURDAY, AUG. 12. TUES-FRI, 11 A.M. TO 5 PM.; SAT-SUN, 11 A.M. TO 4 P.M. (RUNS THROUGH SEPT. 29) /// FREE

Location: Sparrow Gallery, 1021 R St., Sacramento

EXHIBIT OPENING: ARCHITECTURA OBSCURA, AN EVENING OF ARCHITECTURAL PHOTOGRAPHY

ARCHITECTURA OBSCURA: AN EVENING OF ARCHITECTURAL PHOTOGRAPHY, RECEPTION & AWARDS PRESENTATION, PG. 82 6 P.M. TO 9 P.M. /// $10

Location: Uptown Studios, 2415 23rd St., Sacramento

21

DESIGN|ACCESS: 75 YEARS OF CENTRAL VALLEY ARCHITECTURE, PG. 84

EMERGING PROFESSIONALS WINN PARK DESIGN COMPETITION EXHIBIT

Location: Bike Dog Taproom, 915 Broadway, Sacramento

OPENS TUESDAY, SEPT. 5, RUNS MON–THURS, THROUGH END OF MONTH, 9 A.M. TO 4 P.M. /// FREE

22

CHILDREN’S ART FUN(DAMENTALS) EXHIBIT SEPT. 18-22, MON-FRI 10 A.M. TO 6 P.M./// FREE

Location: E. Claire Raley Studios for the Performing Arts, 2420 N. St., Sacramento

KID’S DRAW ARCHITECTURE: IN PARTNERSHIP WITH AIA CALIFORNIA COUNCIL, PG. 89 10 A.M. TO 12 P.M. /// FREE

75TH ANNIVERSARY GALA + DESIGN AWARDS PRESENTATION, PG. 90

2 P.M. TO 4 P.M. /// $15

Location: Arch|Nexus SAC, 930 R St. Sacramento

Location: Starts at Arch|Nexus SAC, 930 R St., Sacramento

Location: Multiple locations

Location: Uptown Studios, 2415 23rd St., Sacramento

OPENS SECOND SATURDAY, SEPT. 9, RUNS MON-FRI 8 A.M. TO 5 P.M. /// FREE

10 A.M. TO 12 P.M. /// $10

Location: Sutter’s Fort, 2701 L St., Sacramento

PINT OF DESIGN - BIKE DOG BREWERY, PG. 86

AIA COMMITTEE ON THE ENVIRONMENT (COTE) 2017 EXHIBIT

75 YEARS OF ARCHITECTURE WALKING TOUR, PG. 88

(RUNS THROUGH SEPT. 22), 10 A.M. TO 4 P.M. /// FREE, REGISTRATION REQUIRED

OPENS SECOND SATURDAY, SEPT. 9 (RUNS THROUGH SEPT. 24) /// FREE

Location: AIACV Gallery, 1400 S St. Ste 100, Sacramento

23

SAT

20

DESIGN|ACCESS: 75 YEARS OF CENTRAL VALLEY ARCHITECTURE (see details above)

PECHAKUCHA: REGIONALISM, PG. 87

6 P.M. TO 10 P.M. /// $75 GENERAL ADMISSION

Location: Lincoln Plaza West Atrium, 400 Q St., Sacramento

24

SUN

9 A.M. TO 7 P.M. /// FREE

WED

SACRAMENTO UNITED PARK(ING) DAY

Events

THU

SEPT. 16

FRI

Pre-Events

september 20-24

2017

CALENDAR

TOUR D’ ARCHITECTURE BIKE TOUR, PG. 91 10 A.M. TO 2 P.M. /// $20

Location: Tour starts at the AIA Central Valley Chapter office, 1400 S St., Sacramento

6 P.M. TO 9 P.M. /// $15 ($5 DONATED TO PECHAKUCHA)

Location: Uptown Studios, 2415 23rd St., Sacramento

Go to aiacv.org to register

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WELCOME

CELEBRATING 75 YEARS OF AIA IN THE CENTRAL VALLEY This year, AIA Central Valley is celebrating a big milestone — our 75th anniversary — and we’re celebrating the history, members and projects that have defined the profession in our region. Our chapter was formed in 1942 during a bleak time. There were few projects in the private sector and a lack of workforce due to the war effort. Despite this, a small group of AIA architects from Northern California gathered to form a new chapter. They included: Charles Francis Dean, F.J. DeLongchamps, Alfred Eichler, Herbert E. Goodpaster, Frank V. Mayo, Peter Louis Sala, Leonard F. Starks and Hammond Witsitt. In 1942, AIACV covered an enormous geographical region, including most of Northern and Central California and the entire state of Nevada. In 1968, the chapter was reduced to a more manageable 17 counties: Alpine, Amador, Butte, Colusa, El Dorado, Glenn, Lassen, Nevada, Placer, Plumas, Tehama, Sacramento, Shasta, Sierra, Sutter, Yolo and Yuba. These are the counties we still represent today.

Over the last 75 years, the chapter has grown to a membership of more than 600 architect, associate, emeritus and allied members. We are proud that several of our chapter’s early firms, including Dreyfuss + Blackford Architecture, Lionakis, Nacht & Lewis and Stafford King Wiese are still thriving today. While much has changed, AIACV’s commitment to the profession and our community has remained steadfast. Our members run first-rate firms; serve AIA at the national, state and local levels; represent the profession in our cities and fill key roles on community boards and organizations. We thank our founders for starting our chapter, and raise a toast to them, and our current and future members, as our chapter continues its mission to demonstrate and promote the value and contribution of AIA architects in our region and beyond. Cheers! Our thanks to Whitson Cox, FAIA for his past research on AIACV’s history included in this article. ~ KIMBERLY ANDERSON, HON. AIACC EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR

8210 Demetre Ave. Sacramento, CA 95828 916.381.4523 401 13 th St. Ste. 200 San Francisco, CA 94130 415.982.4726 Lic. 311454 | www.AircoMech.com

Airco Mechanical is proud to have been part of the project team for the innovative new Riverview Hall at California State University, Sacramento. Thank you and congratulations to Sacramento State and Otto Construction on this exciting project serving students and improving educational outcomes for years to come. Image courtesy of Solomon Cordwell Buenz (SCB).

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Go to aiacv.org to register

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WELCOME

EXPERIENCE ARCHITECTURE SPONSORS MEDIA SPONSOR

HEADLINERS

BRIAN WHITMORE, AIA

PATRONS

CHAPTER PRESIDENT, BCA ARCHITECTS 2017 Experience Architecture Chair Sacramento has changed a lot in the last 75 years. Since 1942, the American Institute of Architects Central Valley Chapter has worked to promote good design and camaraderie, helping to shape our skyline, promote smart city growth and create a valuable urban environment that we enjoy today. We are thrilled to celebrate our 75th anniversary during this year’s AIACV Experience Architecture event, Sept. 20-24. This is your opportunity to engage with community and area architects, and be inspired by Sacramento design. Here are a few of this year’s offerings: • Pint of Design: Come have a pint and get a tour of Bike Dog Brewing Company’s newest location on Broadway in Midtown Sacramento. • Gain access to several of the region’s award-winning historic and repurposed civic buildings during this free, two-day event. • Tour D’ Architecture Bike & Walking Tours: Our always-popular bike tour is back! Our walking tour is also back for those who like to explore Sacramento’s architecture on foot. Join us as we acknowledge the past, present and future of Sacramento architecture design. Explore new developments and historical buildings and the talents of our emerging architectural professionals. Immerse yourself and gain a new appreciation for our region’s architecture at this year’s Experience Architecture. Given our history, the next generation of architects and the leadership that is currently involved in the chapter, I have no doubt that AIA Central Valley is poised for another great 75 years. And to that I say, “Here’s looking at you, kid.”

SUSTAINING PARTNERS PREMIERE

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Cunningham Engineering Dealey Renton & Associates DesignTECH Interior Design Services Miyamoto International

SIGNATURE EVENT SPONSORS Boulder Associates Architects Corporate Design Group, Inc. DLR Group HGA Architects + Engineers Nacht & Lewis Turley & Associates Mechanical Engineering Group, Inc. Williams + Paddon Architects + Planners STANDARD EVENT SPONSORS 3-Form Ascent Builders BCA Architects Buehler & Buehler Structural Engineers, Inc. Dealy Renton & Associates DPR Construction Dreyfuss + Blackford Architecture Heller Pacific, Inc. HGA Architects + Engineers The HLA Group Landscape Architects + Planners, Inc. KBM | Hogue, Inc. LPA Inc. Maria Ogrydziak Architecture Preservation Sacramento PZSE Structural Engineers Rainforth Grau Architects Western Chapter of the Association for Preservation Technology (WCAPT) SUPPORTERS Mojica Architecture Studio Paul Schmidt Architect SPECIAL THANKS Faithmari Lopez / @VisitSacramento


P H OTO CO U R T E S Y B C A

Known as the collaborative builder, Landmark Construction works closely with architects and clients to effectively turn architectural vision into beautiful public environments. Expect outstanding quality, innovative solutions and on-time delivery. “We are honored to be selected to partner with outstanding architects to build the Bayshore Elementary School, Natomas Charter STAR Academy, Martial Cottle Park, Benvenuti Performing Arts Center, Caltrans Commercial Vehicle Enforcement Facility, and hundreds of other public works projects since 1998.� Joe Bittaker, President Landmark Construction

916-663-1953 www.landmarkconst.net

Lic. 807981 P H OTO CO U 79 RTESY Go to aiacv.org to register

HMC


EVENTS

2017events How To Participate Experience Architecture events run from Wednesday, Sept. 20 through Sunday, Sept. 24. There are two special pre-events this year: On Saturday Sept. 16, the Sacramento United Park(ing) Day event will be at the Capitol Mall traffic circle between 9th and 10th streets in downtown Sacramento, and the following day, on Sunday, Sept. 17, the Preservation Sacramento Historic Home Tour will look at historic homes and buildings in the Alkali Flat neighborhood. Look further in the guide for more details. To participate in an event, please visit aiacv.org/exparch to purchase tickets. Registration is required for most events and space may be limited, so please register early. Events and times are subject to change. For reasonable accommodations or alternate formats, please contact AIA Central Valley at least 72 hours prior to the event at 916-444-3658 or email info@aiacv.org.

PREEVENTS SACRAMENTO UNITED PARK(ING) DAY SATURDAY, SEPT. 16, 9 A.M. TO 7 P.M. /// FREE Location: Capitol Mall traffic circle (between 9th and 10th streets in downtown Sacramento)

PRESERVATION SACRAMENTO HISTORIC HOME TOUR: THE HISTORIC ALKALI FLAT NEIGHBORHOOD SUNDAY, SEPT. 17, 10 A.M. TO 4 P.M. /// $30 ADVANCE, $35 DOOR Location: Alkali Flat Neighborhood Buy tickets at www.preservationsacramento.org/hometour

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Join architects, landscape architects, artists, contractors and businesses to transform metered parking spaces into temporary public spaces. PARK(ing) Day is an annual, worldwide event where artists, designers and citizens transform parking spots into temporary “parklets” for all to enjoy.

Tour Sacramento’s Alkali Flat neighborhood, Sacramento’s first residential district to be listed on the National Register of Historic Places, in 1984. The neighborhood is bordered by the Southern Pacific railroad tracks, 7th, I and 12th streets. This tour will explore Alkali Flat’s collection of 19th century residential buildings and recently-completed infill projects surrounding the district.


EXHIBITIONS ART X ARCHITECTS AUG. 12 THROUGH SEPT. 29, TUES-FRI, 11 A.M. TO 5 PM.; SAT-SUN, 11 A.M. TO 4 P.M.; SECOND SATURDAYS 6 P.M. TO 9 P.M. /// FREE Location: Sparrow Gallery, 1021 R St., Sacramento

AIA Central Valley is excited to team up again with the Sparrow Gallery of Sacramento on a special commissioned exhibition of our members’ work. This year’s participating artists include: Jeffery Grau, AIA; Chris Holt, AIA; Jennifer Harris, Assoc. AIA; Peter McBride, AIA; Maria Ogrydziak, AIA; Emily Potts, AIA; Saxon Sigerson, AIA; and Yevgenia Watts, Assoc. AIA. The exhibit will be open to the public through September 29 at Sparrow Gallery.

Go to aiacv.org to register

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EVENTS

EXHIBIT OPENING, ARCHITECTURA OBSCURA: AN EVENING OF ARCHITECTURAL PHOTOGRAPHY Exhibit: SATURDAY, SEPT. 9 THROUGH SEPT. 24 /// FREE

Location: Uptown Studios, 2415 23rd St., Sacramento Be inspired at this exhibition, reception and awards presentation honoring the winning photographs of the Architectura Obscura Photography + Instagram Competition, showcasing exciting new buildings and development, and historic and landmark buildings in Sacramento and beyond. Open to both professional and novice photographers, the competition showcases photographs of the built environment in our region and around the world. Enjoy refreshments and architecture, and mingle with talented photographers. See the award-winning photos on page 106. Competition and event founded by Kristopher Barkley, AIA. SPONSORS: Comstock’s magazine, Flint Builders, Fulcrum Property, California Surveying & Drafting Supply, Lionakis, Milgard, SMUD and Dreyfuss + Blackford Architecture

Cordova High School Performing Arts Center

34 years of making a difference...

impacting education through design

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PHOTO: PHIL KAMPEL PHOTOGRAPHY

Reception & Awards Presentation: WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 20, 6 P.M. TO 9 P.M. /// $10


EMERGING PROFESSIONALS WINN PARK DESIGN COMPETITION EXHIBIT OPENS TUESDAY, SEPT. 5, RUNS MON-THURS, THROUGH END OF MONTH, 9 A.M. TO 4 P.M. /// FREE

View all the submissions to this competition, created to inspire and activate a new vision for Sacramento’s Albert Winn Park and the abandoned fire alarm building in its center. This competition is a partnership between AIACV, the City of Sacramento and the Midtown Association.

Location: AIACV Gallery, 1400 S St. Ste 100, Sacramento

AIA COMMITTEE ON THE ENVIRONMENT (COTE) 2017 EXHIBIT OPENS SECOND SATURDAY, SEPT. 9, 5 P.M. TO 8 P.M.; RUNS MON–FRI THROUGH SEPT. 24, 8 A.M. TO 5 P.M. /// FREE Location: Arch|Nexus SAC, 930 R St., Sacramento

CHILDREN’S ART FUN(DAMENTALS) EXHIBIT SEPT. 18 THROUGH SEPT. 22, MON-FRI 10 A.M. TO 6 P.M. /// FREE

This exhibition features the recipients of the COTE “Top Ten Awards,” the industry’s premier program celebrating great design and great performance. Now in its 21st year, the Top Ten Awards highlight sustainable projects that protect and enhance the environment. Exhibit opens during Sacramento’s Second Saturday in September. Exhibit is hosted by the 2017 Sustainable Design Award Winner. (See page 100.)

Enjoy architecture from a child’s perspective. This exhibit features artwork in a variety of mediums from an architect-led course held at the Crocker Art Museum this summer, where children draw a one-point perspective using a Sacramento landmark and then insert themselves in the landmark.

Location: E. Claire Raley Studios for the Performing Arts, 2420 N St., Sacramento

SACRAMENTO’S LARGEST & MOST ADVANCED REPROGRAPHER

With 3 locations in greater Sacramento and the fastest, most advanced full color wide-format printers, Century Graphics provides AEC clients with unsurpassed service and quality at the guaranteed lowest prices.

Fleet Graphics l Window Graphics l Vehicle Wraps l Banners l Spec Books and More! El Dorado Hills 916.941.1895 | Roseville 916.788.8400 | Sacramento 916.344.0232 Go to aiacv.org to register

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EVENTS

EVENTS DESIGN|ACCESS: 75 YEARS OF CENTRAL VALLEY ARCHITECTURE

Various Locations. A map will be provided with registration Experience examples of nearly eight decades of architecture first-hand, on a self-guided tour at your own pace, during AIACV’s inaugural two-day Design|Access event. Discover historic buildings, repurposed spaces and civic buildings on this one-of-a-kind Sacramento building tour. Event founded by Sugra Panvelwala, Associate AIA; Mark Huck, AIA; and Felicia Reyes, Associate AIA. SPONSORS: Comstock’s magazine, DLR Group, Flint Builders, Fulcrum Property, California Surveying & Drafting Supply, Lionakis, Milgard, SMUD, Ascent Builders and PZSE Structural Engineers

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HGA Architects and Engineers | 916.787.5100 | hga.com 1200 R Street, Suite 100 | Sacramento | California | 95811

PHOTO: CHIP ALLEN PHOTOGRAPHY

THURSDAY, SEPT. 21 THROUGH FRIDAY, SEPT. 22, 10 A.M. TO 4 P.M. /// FREE, REGISTRATION REQUIRED


“Coming together is a beginning; keeping together is progress; working together is success.” – Henry Ford Today’s SMACNA contractors, in partnership with Sheet Metal Workers’ Local 104, are innovators in heating and air conditioning technologies that save energy, reduce utility bills and maintain indoor air quality. Our contractors work with the pre-construction team to help develop green building practices from the inception of the project through completion. You can count on us for high value and high performance on every job.

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Engineering,

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Electrical Engineers | Lighting Designers

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Zero Net Energy Project - Indigo / Hammond & Playle Architects, LLP in Davis Go to aiacv.org to register

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EVENTS

PHOTO: COURTESY OF BIKE DOG BREWING CO.

architecture p l a n n i n g i n t e r i o r s

PINT OF DESIGN BIKE DOG BREWERY THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 21, 2 P.M. TO 4 P.M. /// $15 Location: Bike Dog Taproom, 915 Broadway, Sacramento Enjoy a presentation, taproom tour and beer tasting with the architect and owner at the newest location of Bike Dog Brewing Co. on Broadway, one of Sacramento’s top breweries! Join architect Dustin Littrell, AIA, Popp Littrell; co-owner Sage Smith, and brewmaster Pete Atwood to hear more about the brewery’s non-traditional design. After the presentation, pop over to the new Selland’s Cafe and Market for a bite to eat. Get your tickets now as space is limited. Event founded by Kevin Young, Associate AIA. Sponsors: Comstock’s magazine, Flint Builders, Fulcrum Property, California Surveying & Drafting Supply, Lionakis, Milgard, SMUD, Heller Pacific and KBM|Hogue.

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PHOTO: PHIL KAMPEL PHOTOGRAPHY

PHOTOS BY: TIM GRIFFITH

PECHAKUCHA: REGIONALISM FRIDAY, SEPT. 22, 6 P.M. TO 9 P.M. /// $15 ($5 DONATED TO PECHAKUCHA) Location: Uptown Studios, 2415 23rd St, Sacramento Fun, rapid-fire presentations by multiple speakers about the concept of regionalism and identity through architecture, followed by an interactive panel discussion. Dinner included, drinks available for purchase. Event led by Maria Ogrydziak, AIA. Sponsors: Comstock’s Magazine, Flint Builders, Fulcrum, California Surveying & Drafting Supply, Lionakis, Milgard , SMUD, LPA Inc, Maria Ogrydziak Architecture and Uptown Studios.

imagining change in historic environments through design, research, and technology

P

age & Turnbull is a fullservice architecture, design, planning and preservation firm that transforms the built environment. Founded in 1973, the firm has offices in San Francisco, Los Angeles and Sacramento, bringing together architects, planners, architectural historians and conservators to build new structures or imbue new life into existing structures by adapting them to meet contemporary needs. The firm’s Sacramento office, launched in 2006, was a key participant of the rehabilitation team at the Sacramento Valley Station, honored with a 2017 AIACV Award of Merit. “We invested eight years into this

project and are delighted to see this landmark again serving travelers and downtown visitors with quality spaces,” says Melisa Gaudreau, Director of the Sacramento office. The station’s rehabilitation incorporates modern rail travel standards in a beautifully-restored grand civic space. The $36 million, 66,000 square-foot project vastly improves the traveler experience and efficient Amtrak operations. Interior and exterior improvements revive original character while integrating better circulation, high-performance building systems, accessibility improvements, sustainable practices and new commercial lease space.

San Francisco | Sacramento | Los Angeles | www.Page-Turnbull.com Go to aiacv.org to register

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PHOTO: PHIL KAMPEL PHOTOGRAPHY

75 YEARS OF ARCHITECTURE WALKING TOUR SATURDAY, SEPT. 23, 10 A.M. TO 12 P.M. /// $10

FOR

BE A PART OF THE FUTURE BUILT ON THE LEGACY www.lionakis.com 88

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Location: Walk starts at AIACV firm: Arch|Nexus SAC, 930 R St, Sacramento Grab your comfortable shoes and join us for an informative walking tour of downtown Sacramento’s buildings, many designed or restored by AIACV Chapter members. Explore Sacramento with an emphasis on our region’s rich historic architecture, land use and urban form, potential future new construction and adaptive reuse. Tour includes a stop at Ambrosia Cafe for refreshments. Register now to receive your guide map and more information. Led by local historian William Burg. Sponsors: Comstock’s Magazine, Flint Builders, Fulcrum Property, California Surveying & Drafting Supply, Lionakis, Milgard, SMUD, Preservation Sacramento and WCAPT.


Innovative interior design solutions since 1991

PHOTO: RUDY CALPO

We measure buildings for architects.

CDG is the exclusive area provider of Lasertech Floorplans KID’S DRAW ARCHITECTURE: IN PARTNERSHIP WITH AIA CALIFORNIA COUNCIL

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SATURDAY, SEPT. 23, 10 A.M. TO 12 P.M. /// FREE Location: Sutter’s Fort, 2701 L St., Sacramento This family-friendly event provides children with a hands-on learning experience in appreciating and drawing buildings and landscapes. AIA architects will be on-hand to assist the children and demonstrate drawing techniques. Drawing materials, a light snack and water will be provided. Drawings may be featured in a local or state-wide AIA Kid’s Draw Calendar. All ages welcome. (Children under 18 must have an accompanying parent or guardian participate with them.) Led by Ida Clair, AIA. Sponsors: Comstock’s magazine, Flint Builders, Fulcrum Property, California Surveying & Drafting Supply, Lionakis, Milgard, SMUD and Rainforth Grau, with grant support from Hanley Wood.

VALLEY INSPIRED SPACE FOR YOUR LIFE 530.400.5030 MARIA@OARCH.COM OARCH.COM Go to aiacv.org to register

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75 TH ANNIVERSARY GALA + DESIGN AWARDS PRESENTATION SATURDAY, SEPT. 23, 6 P.M. TO 10 P.M. /// $75 GENERAL ADMISSION Location: Lincoln Plaza West Atrium, 400 Q St., Sacramento The Chapter celebrates 75 years as the voice of the architectural profession in our region with a formal attire fête. The event will feature a locally-sourced, family-style dinner, guest speakers, including a keynote address by Richard Rich, City of Sacramento Railyards and Riverfront project manager. Awards will be bestowed for the 2017 Design Awards and the Winn Park Competition. A photo-booth, music and exhibitions will round out the festivities!

Wendy Nelson, Business Development Manager wnelson@m1b.com | 916-928-7474

Sponsors: Comstock’s magazine, Flint Builders, Fulcrum Property, California Surveying & Drafting Supply, Lionakis, Milgard, SMUD, Corporate Design Group Inc., BCA Architects, Boulder Associate Architects, Dealey Renton & Associates, DLR Group and Turley + Associates Mechanical Engineering Group Inc., Williams + Paddon Architects + Planners and 3Form. Special thanks to HGA for providing commemorative wine glasses for all the guests.

Supporting Sacramento’s architectural vision for over 70 years

COLLABORATION | CREATIVITY | COMMITMENT

 Sacramento

 Los Angeles

 San Francisco

 Phoenix

 Silicon Valley 90

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PHOTO: PHIL KAMPEL PHOTOGRAPHY

BEFORE

BEFORE

TOUR D’ ARCHITECTURE BIKE TOUR SUNDAY, SEPT. 24, 10 A.M. TO 2 P.M. /// $20 Location: Tour starts at the AIA Central Valley Chapter office, 1400 S St., Sacramento

AFTER

AFTER

HAPPY 75TH BIRTHDAY AIA

Join our popular bicycle ride to see the latest in architectural design and development in Sacramento. Take a leisurely ride with us on flat and shady public streets during this eight-mile tour. Get special sneak peeks at new developments, designer commentary and enjoy a stop at the end for refreshments. Return directions will be provided. Due to this tour’s popularity, it is advised to register early. Sponsors: Comstock’s magazine, Flint Builders, Fulcrum Property, California Surveying & Drafting Supply, HLA Group Landscape + Planners Inc., Lionakis, Milgard, SMUD, Buehler + Buehler Structural Engineers, DPR Construction and Nacht & Lewis.

Go to aiacv.org to register

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AWARDS

HONOR FIRM: LPA INC. /// PROJECT: WEST VALLEY COLLEGE, CILKER SCHOOL OF ART & DESIGN /// LOCATION: SARATOGA /// 92

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Originally built in 1967, the Applied Arts & Science Building at West Valley College was dark, inflexible and no longer met the needs of the art, design and vocational programs housed within. A new focus on collaborative learning meant architects at LPA Inc. had to completely gut the building down to the concrete structure to bring in daylight. The anticipated LEED Gold design incorporated a sustainable approach to every aspect of the remodel — including building reuse, material reuse, a high-performance envelope and HVAC, daylighting tactics, a low-impact material palette, and site and landscape strategies. What were once dark, narrow interior corridors with a dearth of openings are now bright showcases. Views through labs, lecture room and studios connect and allow light-spill in all directions. To highlight the studies going on within, special display walls allow students to place their work made in the art and design classes on display. Special care was given to insure total and equal accessibility and promote ease of movement throughout. The college was committed to preserving and reusing the existing concrete structure. A measured approach was undertaken on the exterior, which consisted of a concrete frame with clay shingle infill. The robust facade was restored to its original condition, but with the addition of fullheight exterior glazing. The “good bones” of the concrete structure allow for a balance of warm, woodlined ceilings with exposed concrete. The landscaping, which was overgrown and had overtaken the facade, was stripped back and replaced with drought-tolerant native landscaping. Opening up the common areas within the building, AIACV Design Award judges say, improved the building’s circulation, while unifying spaces. The design team demonstrated “that great works can come from modest means.” n

PHOTO: COSTEA PHOTOGRAPHY, INC.

SIZE: 59,500 SQUARE FEET /// TYPE: RENOVATION /// USE: EDUCATION Go to aiacv.org to register

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HONOR + divine detail FIRM: DREYFUSS + BLACKFORD ARCHITECTURE /// PROJECT: E. CLAIRE RALEY STUDIOS FOR THE PERFORMING ARTS /// LOCATION: SACRAMENTO /// SIZE: 49,592 SQUARE FEET /// TYPE: REHABILITATION /// USE: ART STUDIOS 94

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Divine Detail: A tensile cable support system allowed for the removal of columns. This created the necessary room for ballet practice. These cables were purposefully left exposed with red sheathing — to add a dramatic effect.

When the Fremont School closed, the historic building morphed from a landmark to a neighborhood nuisance. Although it could have fallen victim to demolition, the Sacramento Ballet, residents and a talented team of architects came to the rescue. Innovative solutions transformed the abandoned building into Midtown Sacramento’s premier home for the arts. Marginally maintained since its closure in 2012, the Fremont School had been superficially damaged and became a hub for transients and neighborhood concern. Although the Sacramento Ballet wanted to call Fremont School home, the structural layout proved challenging due to the 50foot clear spans and adequate head clearance required for the dancers. On a tight restoration budget, and facing these limitations, the architecture, engineering and construction teams embraced a collaborative process to design an innovative structural solution which reenergized the space and revitalized this neighborhood. A truly creative solution was applied — one that fit within the client’s budget — to open up the classrooms and hallways for ballet studios. After the hallway walls were removed, a hole was cut in the roof and six, 62-foot steel beams were slipped in to support the roof structure when the concrete columns were removed on the second floor. The community impact of this project was an instant benefit to the immediate neighborhood, the professional ballet community, and local arts groups and their patrons in the region. The aspect of this project that put it over the top for the AIACV Design Award judges was the project’s ability to create a transformation of both the building and the surrounding neighborhood. Furthermore, the contemporary approach to opening the span of the building through the use of exposed post-tensioned cables, judges noted, was what earned this submission the “Divine Detail” award. n

PHOTOS: CHIP ALLEN PHOTOGRAPHY

Go to aiacv.org to register

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AWARDS

MERIT FIRM: PAGE + TURNBULL /// PROJECT: SACRAMENTO VALLEY STATION /// LOCATION: SACRAMENTO /// SIZE: 66,000 SQUARE FEET /// TYPE: HISTORIC PRESERVATION /// USE: TRANSPORTATION 96

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The rehabilitation of this historic train station served to rescue a once state-of-theart depot from years of disrepair and return it to the beauty of the heyday of rail travel. The $36 million project sought to improve the traveler experience and support Amtrak operations in a beautifully-restored space. Both interior and exterior improvements revived the original character of the train station while improving air circulation, accessibility upgrades and new commercial lease space inside. When acquired by the City of Sacramento in 2006, the station was in poor condition and lacked the necessary infrastructure to serve the increase in riders, various transportation systems and surrounding retail shops. The design optimizes passenger flow, restoring the open passageways to the concourse and ticketing areas (which were infilled sometime around the 1950s with poor-quality construction), separation of Amtrak service routes and public routes, and new signage. The south plaza has been enlarged, the shade canopies restored and the exterior lighting enhanced for pedestrian traffic. The result is a superior “curbto-platform experience” for passengers and employees. Judges noted that by “peeling back the layers of clumsy construction hiding the proportions of the original, the project demonstrates a restrained approach to revitalization.” The project, they added, is simply a well-done restoration that “breathes new life into a 1920s beauty.” In addition to other improvements, existing building systems (such as structural pile foundations and framing) were upgraded to meet current seismic standards, while new systems — such as fire suppression and alarms, elevators, mechanical, electrical, security, wifi and plumbing — were introduced. The restored station offers travelers and visitors an enduring link to the city’s cultural heritage, a grand civic gathering space and a newly-restored gateway to ever-expanding transportation networks. n PHOTO: TIM GRIFFITH

Go to aiacv.org to register

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AWARDS

citation FIRM: HGA, INC. /// PROJECT: HGA OFFICES /// LOCATION: SACRAMENTO /// SIZE: 13,659 SQUARE FEET /// TYPE: INTERIORS /// USE: PROFESSIONAL In the heart of R Street’s burgeoning creative corridor was an old warehouse that became the catalyst and inspiration for this new office space. Architecture firm HGA, both the owners and the designers of the building, wanted it to provide a showcase of their expertise in designing sustainable, flexible and efficient office environments. The original building boasted an impressive brick shell and high ceilings. By reusing the existing masonry and the exposed wood trusses, the architects provided a contrast to the crisp, bold forms in their additions to the space. The owners say they were drawn to the creative energy and activity on R Street, and felt the office should connect to that energy as much as possible, by opening many of the spaces up to the street. The office is focused on two principal spaces: a large open studio and a gathering space, stretching from the entrance to more than 120 feet into the office. Open workstations and collaborative areas, a mezzanine overlook and a kitchen at the center of the plan were designed purposefully, to create a place where employees could best cultivate ideas and share knowledge. AIACV Design Award judges noted that it’s always a challenge to find designs that recognize and preserve a building’s unique character while still giving it a new, functional identity. They lauded the design team’s success in preserving the bones of the old warehouse’s industrial roof, while transforming it into an illuminated canopy that brightens the working areas below. “It’s definitely architecture for an architect’s office,” says judge Steve Dvorak. n 98 98

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PHOTO: CHAD DAVIES


citation FIRM: !MELK LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE AND URBAN DESIGN /// PROJECT: THE BARN /// LOCATION: WEST SACRAMENTO /// SIZE: 9,100 SQUARE FEET /// TYPE: NEW CONSTRUCTION /// USE: EVENTS PAVILION, WITH RESTAURANT FACILITIES AND PUBLIC SPACE

The Barn is the inaugural project for West Sacramento’s Bridge District, and a promise of things to come. Positioned along the Sacramento River, The Barn is a multi-use structure that blurs the boundaries of architecture, landscaping and structural engineering, by engaging all three. The Barn reflects Northern California’s agricultural heritage in a way that is both approachable and memorable say the architects, !melk Landscape Architecture and Urban Design. Of all the submissions, says AIACV Design Award judge Steve Dvorak, this project received a number of points for “Brave Use of Form.” The overall sculptural form of The Barn is a result of the design team’s intensive sun angle studies, says the design team in their report. The shape of The Barn’s canopy maximizes the amount of shade created — ideal for hosting community social events underneath. Primarily constructed from wood, the concept for the building was drawn from a contemporary interpretation of traditional barn-building techniques. More than 200 feet in length, The Barn is designed to seemingly defy gravity. As a double cantilever, the structure juts upward from two separate foundations, forming a canopy which holds more than 16 tons of material on its roof, including more than 7,000 shingles. Since its opening last year, The Barn has become a noted landmark structure for West Sacramento. n PHOTO: DAVIES IMAGING GROUP, LLC.

Go to aiacv.org to register

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AWARDS

sustainable recognition FIRM: ARCHITECTURAL NEXUS, INC. /// PROJECT: ARCH | NEXUS SAC /// LOCATION: SACRAMENTO /// SIZE: 8,252 SQUARE FEET /// TYPE: ADAPTIVE REUSE /// USE: OFFICE This office space, on the R Street Corridor in Midtown Sacramento, was built based around the design ideas of connecting of people and community through nature and history. Patterns and rhythms of the nearby rivers and the city’s railroad history inspired subtle designs and forms used throughout the building. For example, the nearby American and Sacramento rivers influenced the curvature of the reception area’s living wall, where green plants grow using the building’s recycled grey-water system. Like the circulation of those nearby rivers, the designers say, people can flow in from the street, eddy in the lobby and swirl back into the flow of the work area. AIACV Design Award judges were particularly impressed by this project’s approach to net-positive environmental effects. While not the only submission with LEED certification, this building was the most experimental and the most well-documented, the judges noted. This project was conceived partly in response to the California drought: It has already received LEED V4 Platinum Certification, and after successful completion of a trial performance period, Arch|Nexus SAC hopes to be the first fully-certified Living Building Challenge project in California. The people who work in the Arch|Nexus SAC building are the key organism to the building’s ecosystem, from monitoring their own personal energy usage to operating the natural ventilation system and learning how to interact with the systems. Engagement is necessary to the building functioning well — such as having employees commute by bicycle, or take showers at work, which in turn, activates the grey water system that feeds the living wall. The building itself encourages and requires a healthy lifestyles from its workers. n

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PHOTO: ARCHITECTURAL NEXUS: JOSH ALLRED / TARANEH KALATI

regional recognition FIRM: AECOM /// PROJECT: GOLDEN 1 CENTER /// LOCATION: SACRAMENTO /// USE: ARENA The Golden 1 Center celebrates Sacramento’s climate and lifestyle with a unique indoor-outdoor design that reverses the typical design of an introverted arena. It’s the world’s first LEED Platinum indoor sports arena, and received the highest LEED score of any sports venue. The arena is also the first 100 percent solar-powered professional sports venue and ranks in the top three percent of all LEED-certified buildings. Its design elements include five-story-tall, folding canopy doors that open to the city and the cooling delta breeze; a first-of-its-kind ventilation system that saves energy and delivers conditioned air directly beneath the seats, allowing visitors to influence the temperature through an app on their phones. An open concourse allows fans to cruise the arena with 360-degree views to both the court and the city. The AIACV Regional Recognition Award acknowledges completed projects that represent a regional character, iconic presence and timeless expression of architectural quality. Projects may be from any past or present time period, and can be original construction, reconstruction or restoration. They are not required to be designed by AIACV members or firms, but must be located within the Chapter membership area. n

PHOTO: PAUL CROSBY

Go Goto toaiacv.org aiacv.orgto toregister register

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AWARDS

WITH EXISTING BICYCLE LANES ON THREE SIDES OF THE PARK, THE NEW INTEGRATED PATHWAYS MAKE TRAVELING ACROSS THE PARK FASTER, WHILE MORE CONVENIENT WHEN NEEDING TO TAKE A BREAK.

A

B

INSPIRATION: PLAYGROUND EQUIPMENT

B

C

D

I

CAFE

H THE SLOPED SIDEWALKS MAKE TRAVELING EASY FOR EVERYONE.

THE PLAYGROUND AREA AND AMPHITHEATER ARE ON OPPOSITE SIDES OF THE PARK TO ALLOW A MORE ENCLOSED SPACE FOR THE CHILDREN TO PLAY.

E

INSPIRATION: INTEGRATED BICYCLE PARKING

G

F

BY HAVING A SLOPE IN THE GRASS, MORE PEOPLE NEW PAVING CREATES VISUAL INTEREST AND ACARE ABLE TO ENJOY THE PERFORMANCE IN THE CESSIBLE PATHWAYS TO ANY PART OF THE PARK AMPHITHEATER . AND CAFE.

A PLAYGROUND AREA

C BICYCLE PARKING/ SEATING

E STAGE

G SLOPED AMPHITHEATER

B PLANTERS

D PLATFORM ENTRANCE

F SHADE STRUCTURE

H SEATING/ BICYCLE PARKING

INSPIRATION: INTEGRATED BICYCLE PARKING

PLATFORM ENTRANCE

I OUTDOOR CAFE SEATING

SECOND FLOOR PLAN 2 MEZZANINE/

3

1 RENTABLE SPACE 2 CHAIR LIFT

1 3 ENTRANCE

OPEN TO BELOW

FIRST FLOOR PLAN 4 DINING AREA

11 6

5 BAR

SECTION A

AMPHITHEATER AND STAGE AREA

4 12

5

6 RESTROOM 7 REFRIGERATOR STORAGE

6

7

BAR

8 DISH WASHING ROOM

10 8 9

9 KITCHEN 10 OUTDOOR DINING AREA 11 JANITOR’S CLOSET 12 CHAIR LIFT

SECTION B

winn park grand winner “Albert Winn Park: A Cyclist’s Destination” TEAM: BCA ARCHITECTS — AMANDA MENSCHEL, ASSOC. AIA; ARTURO RUIZ-MARTELL; SPENCER BINKERD; LISA MAY “Children using the play equipment would be turned into electricity used to power the lights throughout the park. An information board displayed nearby would inform users of how much energy has been produced and teach about sustainable living. A bicyclist café could transform the city by propelling the bike movement in Sacramento and improving the air quality and health of the people,” says team lead Amanda Menschel. “Winn Park will become a retreat where people can escape from their busy lives, relax in solitude or meet up with friends, and spend time at the café or under the trees.”

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The American Institute of Architects Central Valley Chapter, in partnership with Midtown Association and the City of Sacramento, issued a design competition for Emerging Professionals focusing on innovative ideas to activate the historic vacant building at the center of Winn Park. Twelve inspired designs were submitted with one grand prize and two honorable mentions selected for recognition.

honorable mention “Art Parks: Winn Park” TEAM: DAN PENICK, ASSOC. AIA; JIAJIA FENG, ASSOC. AIA; MEGAN SCOTT; KEVIN YOUNG, ASSOC. AIA “Art Parks: Winn Park transforms the Winn Park building into City Obscura, framing city life as art. Using mirrors inside the top of a new Art Deco inspired tower, the dark City Obscura room will feature a live rotating view of the city outside, projected onto a large disk in the center of the room. This unique space becomes a catalyst for further activity around the building and through the park.”

honorable mention “Winn Park Regeneration: An Extroverted Introvert” TEAM: PETER MCBRIDE, AIA; SUGRA PANVELWALA, ASSOC. AIA “The concept … is based on the ideas of business incubators and art galleries, but is centered around the community connector of food. With a small commercial kitchen on the ground level and dining space on the upper level … the re-imagined facility is designed to support a rotating chef or restaurant on a periodic basis. Either option would create a flowing and dynamic public attraction to the park.”

Go to aiacv.org to register

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EXPERTISE ON THE CONSTRUCTION JOBSITE

SACRAMENTO

ROSEVILLE

801 Broadway, Sacramento, CA 95817

106 N. Sunrise Ave., Suite C-4, Roseville, CA 95661

916-443-1322 | sac.cs@e-arc.com

916-782-8000 | rsv.branch@e-arc.com


AWARDS

2017 Design Awards + Architectura Obscura + Instagram contests

KRISTOPHER BARKLEY, AIA DREYFUSS + BLACKFORD ARCHITECTURE

Have you ever snapped a quick photo only to look at it later and find something interesting that took you completely by surprise? Have you ever driven by a particular building or structure and realized it had some unique feature you never saw? Don’t worry, you’re completely normal because we often look without truly seeing, particularly in this age of digital distraction. So how do we get people to see things? Through photography. Now nearly everyone has the means to capture the world around them and share. A few years ago, I helped launch the Architectura Obscura architectural photography competition through the American Institute of Architects, Central Valley Chapter. The goals of the competition are simple: increase awareness of architecture and design; provide a stronger connection of non-architects to the profession of architecture and provide yet another creative outlet that can be experienced by all who choose to participate. Our traditional gallery quality print submissions continue as an important part of Architectura Obscura but we have expanded the competition to include digital submissions through Instagram by partnering with Comstock’s and Visit Sacramento. This serves to provide opportunities to connect to an entirely new generation of photographers. In addition, our Design Awards program provides us with a unique opportunity to truly “see” architecture and gain a better understanding about why we feel the way we do when experiencing well-designed spaces. Enjoy viewing this year’s award-winning projects, and join us on Saturday, Sept. 23 for our 75th Anniversary Gala and Design Awards Presentation to learn more. Enjoy!

2017 Design Awards & Architectura Obscura + Instagram Chair

EMERGING

PROFESSIONALS

Cultivating Sacramento’s future generations of design professionals since 1922.

nachtlewis.com | 916.329.4000

Go to aiacv.org to register

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GALLERY SUBMISSION

AWARD WINNERS Richard Halliburton

Rudy Calpo

Cyrus Javid

Go to aiacv.org to register

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AWARDS

HONORABLE

Shannon Bourque Cyrus Javid

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Richard Halliburton


MENTIONS

Cyrus Javid

Rudy Calpo

Cyrus Javid

Go to aiacv.org to register

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AWARDS

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FINALIST

#ARCHOBS2017 1ST PLACE:

@ben.orloff 2ND PLACE:

@suha.musallam 3RD PLACE:

@onelastshottt FINALISTS: FROM TOP

@mattfraser9 @maynorchrome @coruscatingimages

FINALIST

FINALIST

HONORABLE MENTIONS

@mperryphoto

@aerialsacramento

@howardtravs

@leovisions Go to aiacv.org to register

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2017 PART 10

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Capital Region cares

omstock’s magazine is proud to present the tenth installment of our 22nd annual Capital Region Cares salute to nonprofits. At Comstock’s, we seek to drive community engagement and the support of the business community by introducing our readers to the many charitable organizations making an impact in communities across Northern California. These charities — from food banks and animal shelters to museums and hospitals — are changing lives 365 days a year. You’ll read about some of them in this issue of Comstock’s and online at comstocksmag.com as we build content for what will become our flagship Capital Region Cares annual publication. In September, business leaders, philanthropists, volunteers and nonprofit organizers across the region will receive the final product, Capital Region Cares 2017, filled with moving stories, informative resources and contact information for over 500 local nonprofits that need your help.

September March 2017 | comstocksmag.com

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• success story

d o o g game SACRAMENTO ROTARY FOUNDATION’S ANNUAL GOLF 4 KIDS EVENT

COURTESY PHOTO: ROTARY CLUB OF SACRAMENTO

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BY Robin Epley PHOTO: Ken James

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his story starts back in 1922. That’s the year when a small group of Sacramento-based doctors combined their professional connections and their Rotary Club memberships to form a program that is now the longest-running Rotary fundraiser in the country. Those Sacramento Rotarian doctors started a fundraising event to provide medical services and braces for orthopedically-challenged children. Then, beginning in 1986, the fundraiser became an annual golf tournament. In 2005, it was renamed “Golf 4 Kids.” Today, Golf 4 Kids is a successful fundraiser supporting the differently-abled children’s programs at four local schools: Ralph Richardson Center,

Luther Burbank High School, Fern Bacon Middle School and Bowling Green Charter School. The Rotary Foundation, which organizes the event, is the charity arm of the Sacramento Rotary Club. In 1922, when the fundraiser was just a club-sponsored event, members raised just over $1,900 (the equivalent of nearly $3 million today), and has distributed more than $4 million since it began. When the foundation was incorporated in 1971, the annual event became a foundation fundraiser. Last year, members raised $39,317. “I think it reflects a clearly defined need in the community,” says Jim Leet, president of the foundation. “It’s a discreet need, but an important one.”


Left: Golfers and students gather together for a picture after the 2016 Golf 4 Kids event. Right: Students help out by selling raffle tickets to golfers during the 2017 Golf 4 Kids, held at Valley Hi Country Club on Aug. 7.

Funds from the event support the children’s programs in a variety of ways, but most often by providing specialized computers, keyboards and communication devices. There is also a need for wheelchairs — such as those operated merely by head movements. Other money goes toward equipment and activities that the four schools cannot cover on their own. Bob Miller, chairman for the event, says nearly 100 golfers participate every year. This year’s Golf 4 Kids was held on Aug. 7 at Valley Hi Country Club in Elk Grove. As usual, Miller began the day by reading out the story of how the event started to all of the golfers and children present, to help them understand the “essence” of the tournament.

“Parents bring their children out and they assist with selling raffle tickets and really just being present to meet our golfers,” Miller says. “Everyone participating can meet these kids and their families and see what kind of an impact their donations have.” Many of the tools that are necessary in these special classes are technical and expensive, Miller says. This year, some of the funds raised from the tournament will go toward a special, adaptive physical education program at the Ralph Richardson Center and Luther Burbank High School that will pay for special bikes, mats and other equipment to improve mobility and independence. “People really have become attached to the tournament and enjoy

knowing the funds go directly to these kids,” foundation vice president Jeannie Reese says. n Robin Epley is the associate editor for Comstock’s. She is also the founder of Millennials in Media, a Sacramento-based program for young journalists. On Twitter @robin_epley.

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Gateway Community charters QUALITY SCHOOL CHOICE, A GATEWAY TO THE FUTURE

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ith a mission of creating and managing highquality charter schools which provide access to innovative, quality, standards-based educational opportunity for all students, Gateway Community Charters breaks the standard mold of charter schools. Founded by Dr. Cindy Petersen and launched in 2003, Gateway celebrates its 15th anniversary this school year. As a 501c(3) non-profit public benefit corporation, Gateway’s vision is to create quality schools of choice for K-12 students in the greater Sacramento region with an emphasis on serving vulnerable, underserved, unserved, and at-risk populations. “We strive to provide all students, regardless of

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circumstances, a safe, caring school choice with high academic and behavior expectations where they can reach their fullest academic and social potential,” shares Dr. Cindy Petersen, Superintendent/CEO for Gateway Community Charters. “It’s our goal to take underserved or at-risk students and give them our best so they can be their best,” explains Jason Sample, Chief Communications and Strategy Officer. “We take students who have traditionally been unserved or underserved and create quality school options that meet their needs.” Gateway was established at the former McClellan Air Force Base with about 300 students in 2003, primarily from immigrant families and at-risk

youth. Today, Gateway Community Charters has about 4,500 students, seven charter schools, and 18 locations ranging from Del Paso Heights to West Sacramento to South Sacramento and Elk Grove. Rancho Del Paso, a new state-of-the-art campus currently under construction, will accommodate Futures High School and Gateway’s Higher Learning Academy by the 201819 school year. Dr. Cindy Petersen, founder, Superintendent, and CEO says, “Gateway Community Charters is honored to have served the needs of vulnerable populations across the Sacramento region in partnership with local districts and community providers for the last 15 years.”


Functioning as independent public schools, charter schools are allowed to be more innovative and adaptable to the needs of students. Through these strong partnerships with parents, teachers, students, and the community, charter schools can create environments specially tailored for students. Parents are encouraged to be involved, teachers have the freedom to innovate, and students have the chance to learn.

Gateway Community Charters is a Capturing Kids’ Hearts (CKH) organization. This year, three GCC schools were recognized as National CKH Showcase Schools. “When you have a child’s heart you can then educate their mind.” Shares Dr. Cindy Petersen, "Capturing hearts and creating relational capacity is powerful for all of our stakeholders." This initiative focuses attention on students from the superintendent, principals, teachers, secretaries, and custodians to show that

administrators, educators, and staff actively care about each student. Each of Gateway’s charter schools has a unique mission and vision, with a track record of helping students succeed academically. Three of Gateway’s campuses are International Baccalaureate schools (IB). IB is an internationally recognized program that institutes learner profiles and character traits that all global learners should have. When these students leave Gateway’s doors, they will be competitive in a global society. Some GCC schools have a vocational focus including Sacramento Academic and Vocational Academy (SAVA), which has ten pathways and sixteen courses articulated with local community colleges. This allows students to earn college credits while in high

shadowing, and career exploration,” notes Sample. “We invite business leaders to come in, inspire our students and provide internship and job shadowing opportunities.” Learn more about how your business can become involved with Gateway Community Charters at Jason.Sample@gcccharters.org.

school and graduate career ready. “We’re always seeking ways for our students to connect to the business world through internships, job

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Sacramento area

Animal coalition SERVING ANIMALS, FAMILIES, AND OUR COMMUNITY SINCE 1999

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acramento Area Animal Coalition (SAAC) may be small, but its results are mighty. Founded in 1999, this allvolunteer non-profit provides critical spay and neuter services benefiting animals and caretakers. “Our mission is to reduce the number of animals entering Sacramento area animal shelters by providing affordable spay and neuter surgeries with an overarching goal of ending animal homelessness in Sacramento and Yolo counties,” says past president Alexis Raymond. With no headquarters and no paid staff, SAAC is able to put 95 percent of donations into its programs. All SAAC board members are volunteers with full-time jobs who dedicate their time to marketing, fundraising, and running programs. “We always welcome more volunteers to help with those duties,” 118

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adds president Jillian Hacker. SAAC also provides education and information online, providing links to other resources for low-income services. SAAC depends on partnerships with area veterinary clinics that perform the surgeries at discounted rates as a community service. One program issues vouchers and a list of participating clinics to low-income pet guardians who then may choose a convenient clinic and schedule an appointment. Clients pay a small copayment to the clinic, and SAAC pays the balance. Another program tackles feral cat colonies, a community-wide problem. Many hard-working animal lovers manage these large colonies, feeding cats, trapping them, and bringing them in for spaying and neutering. Caregivers pay only $10 per cat, and SAAC pays the rewt. SACANIMAL.ORG

Held every February, Spay Day is SAAC’s best-known program, offering spaying and neutering on a specific day to low-income families. Vaccinations and permanent identification through microchips are also offered that day. “We’re grateful for all funding sources – individual donors, business sponsors, and local municipalities’ grant money – and encourage businesses to help sponsor our Spay Days,” says Hacker. “Please help us provide the services that benefit animals, families, and entire communities.”


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THE LEUKEMIA & LYMPHOMA SOCIETY’S

2017 MAN, WOMAN & STUDENTS of the YEAR

WOMAN of the YEAR KARLEE CEMO-McINTOSH SACRAMENTO365 STUDENTS of the YEAR ALEXIS AREIAS ST. FRANCIS HIGH SCHOOL RYAN FITZGERALD JESUIT HIGH SCHOOL

PRESENTING SPONSOR

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Many thanks to OMAR, FRITZ and EMMA 2017 Honored HERO, BOY & GIRL of the YEAR For information on the MAN, WOMAN & STUDENTS of the YEAR campaign: call 916.929.4720 or visit www.lls.org/sac OUR MISSION: Cure leukemia, lymphoma, Hodgkin’s disease and myeloma, and improve the quality of life of patients and their families Photo by Charles V. McDonald September 2017 | comstocksmag.com

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n SNAP

PHOTOS: KEN JAMES, CAPTION: SENA CHRISTIAN

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more images at comstocksmag.com

FULL PROTECTION Production Supervisor Brendon Wammes uses a hammer to fasten mesh to the aluminum rails of a gutter guard as the first of the three-step manufacturing process at Gutterglove. Wammes has worked here two years and says he enjoys getting to use his hands, plus “I work with a lot of nice people and they’re from all over.” The Ohio native has colleagues originally from Kansas, New York, Nevada, Colo-

rado, Alaska, Sacramento, Mexico and Africa. Zac Epling and Boubacar Sy Savane (pictured bottom left) next place the pre-assembled gutter guards into a press before they are boxed as a DIY kit sold to retailers, including Home Depot and Costco. Founded in 1996, Gutterglove recently doubled its space by moving from Rocklin to a 43,000-square-foot facility in Roseville where the company manufac-

tures 60,000 feet of gutters in one day — all done by the hands of people. CEO Robert Lenney says he takes pride in being a job creator. He currently has about 50 employees. Production workers meet “doable” quotas and get paid more when exceeding them, so they can drive their own wages, says Operations Manager Jennifer Pentkowski: “It’s that American thing: If I work hard, I can earn more.” n September 2017 | comstocksmag.com

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n THE BREAKDOWN

HOW DOES CALIFORNIA

HEALTH CARE COVERAGE MEASURE UP?

MEDI-CAL GREATLY EXPANDED ENROLLMENT BETWEEN 2013 AND 2015, ENROLLING 153,000. BUT SOME MEDI-CAL HEALTH PLANS SCORED WELL BELOW THE STATE AVERAGE FOR QUALITY AND SATISFACTION:

KAISER: 18%

ANTHEM BLUE CROSS: 40 HEALTH NET: 45

MOLINA: 14%

ANTHEM BLUE CROSS: 39%

HEALTH NET: 30%

KAISER: 98

MOLINA: 41

PERCENTAGE OF MARKET SHARE*

STATE AVERAGE: 58

4 MAJOR PRIVATE HEALTH PLANS COMPETE FOR CALIFORNIA’S MEDI-CAL PATIENTS, WHICH COVERS NEARLY 420,000 PEOPLE:

CALIFORNIA HAS THE MOST RESIDENTS ON A MARKETPLACE* INSURANCE PLAN IN THE WESTERN U.S.** AS OF MARCH 2015, NEARLY 1.4 MILLION PEOPLE WERE ENROLLED IN A COVERED CALIFORNIA HEALTH PLAN.

* From most recent data available (2015)

HOW MANY ELIGIBLE RESIDENTS USE MARKETPLACE INSURANCE PLANS? IMMEDIATELY FOLLOWING THE IMPLEMENTATION OF THE AFFORDABLE CARE ACT IN 2014, CALIFORNIA ENROLLEES WITH INDIVIDUAL PLANS AND MEDICAL ENROLLMENTS INCREASED WHILE THE UNINSURED RATE IN THE STATE DROPPED BY NEARLY HALF.

Montana: 41% Idaho: 39% Utah: 34%

WHERE RESIDENTS GET THEIR COVERAGE:* Employer-Based

California: 42%

Public Programs

Individual

Uninsured

CALIFORNIA 2013

Oregon: 32% Washington: 32% New Mexico: 28%

56%

Wyoming: 28%

25%

Arizona: 26%

10%

Nevada: 25%

16% CALIFORNIA 2015

56%

Colorado: 22% Alaska: 21%

32%

Hawaii: 15%

17% 9% NATIONAL 2015

61% 27% 14% 11% *Coverage may not total 100% because individuals may receive coverage from more than one source. 122

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*Marketplace: A service that helps people shop for and enroll in affordable health insurance. The federal government operates HealthCare.gov on behalf of most states, while some states run their own, including Covered California. **Based on share of potential marketplace population, from most recent data available (2015) SOURCES: BUDGET EXPENDITURES BY FUNDING SOURCE, CALIFORNIA COMPARED TO NATIONAL, FY 2013, FROM THE KAISER FAMILY FOUNDATION, CALIFORNIA REGIONAL MARKETS: SACRAMENTO, CALIFORNIA HEALTH CARE ALMANAC QUICK REFERENCE GUIDE, FROM THE CALIFORNIA HEALTHCARE FOUNDATION: 2013, 2016, CALIFORNIA’S UNINSURED: AS COVERAGE GROWS, MILLIONS GO WITHOUT, MEDI-CAL MANAGED CARE PERFORMANCE DASHBOARD, CALIFORNIA HEALTH CARE ALMANAC: 2009, 2016


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