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CHAIR MANUAL

CHAIR MANUAL

COMPLEX PROJECTS ACADEMIC PROGR AMME OF COMPLE X P R OJ E C T S FA L L S E M E S T E R 2 016 - 2 017

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INTRODUCTION Complex Projects............................................................... Value in Architecture......................................................... CP Ambition....................................................................... CP Interest.......................................................................... CP Literature.......................................................................

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COMMUNICATION CP Products & Media.......................................................

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EDUCATION MSc Fall 2016 overview.................................................... MSc 1 Landmark Studio.................................................... MSc 2 IN Chicago Studio................................................. MSc 3/4 Caribbean Studio...............................................

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TEACHING STAFF.........................................................

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RESEARCH Mapping the Territory....................................................... Urban Makeover Amsterdam 2025.................................

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D E PA R T M E N T O F A R C H I T E C T U R E


COMPLEX PROJECTS CHAIR MANUAL FALL 2016


DELFT UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY Chair Kees Kaan Department of Architecture The Netherlands


Kees Kaan, Fruits of Study Lecture, at TU Delft Faculty of Architecture, 2015


INTRODUCTION


CHAIR OF ARCHITECURAL DESIGN DEPARTMENT OF ARCHITECTURE

COMPLEX PROJECTS -­APPROACH FROM THE CITY, ECONOMY, CULTURE, POLITICS -­THE BUILDING IN THE CITY -­THE NARRATIVE ON THE CITY IS THE FOCUS -­DEVELOPMENT OF TYPES FROM ANALYSIS OF URBAN DYNAMICS -­BUILDINGS ARE GENERIC, THE PROGRAM IS RESULT


‘I like big ideas and I would describe myself a comprehensive anticipatory design scientist... an emerging synthesis of artist, inventor, mechanic, objectiv economist and evolutionary scientist’ Buckminster Fuller, 1962


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COMPLEX PROJECTS

The Chair Complex Projects (CP) is a culture saturated with intensity, energized by an environment that demands a suspicion that is manifested through debate, rigor, humor, curiosity, and youthful optimism. Our expectations are not obtainable, however, the return is high for those who attempt the Odyssey like journey. Architecture is largely a practice of organizing information, of identifying and deploying patterns in our built environment. CP prepares its graduates to transcend and perhaps even ignore the scales, of these spatial and organizational patterns through the systematic development of critical thinking as well as strong vocational understanding of our profession. A nonlinear trajectory of integrated design studios and seminars will expose the multiple layers that define complex projects. Employing forensics, analysis, and documentation, one will develop a methodology to separate and examine the elements which define the layers. Complex Projects is structured to produce graduates able to think, negotiate, and collaborate through all scales and mediums of intervention. Informed by a contemporary and historical understanding of its discipline and location, Complex Projects ventures to liberate and demand a fundamental critique in the very concepts we take to be true‌we demand suspicion and critical thinking, which is born from a hermeneutic tradition. The training of an architect is legally split between the university and the office. Our view of this bilateral cooperation is that University must instill values, discipline, critical thinking, problem solving and most importantly intellectual rigor and taste, while the office provides the necessity to practice. The forced relationship between school and office in developing architects is most productive when each understands the expertise of the other, and the necessity of a critical distance between the two.

Through a close attention to its discipline, the Chair is best able to prepare students for the multiple formats of practice that inevitably emerge in a the contemporary practice. A school does not serve its students well by simulating practice, but can be extremely effective at demonstrating ways of thinking and working that give students the confidence to confront the unknown and contribute to the development of any project regardless of scale, location, cost and function. Complex Projects has eliminated the antiquated and linear roles, which define the building process: Planning, Urban Design, and Architecture. Due to redefined complexities and parameters the designer must function simultaneously as a planner, community organizer, strategist, but most importantly‌ architect. In essence, the Chair will attempt to find a theory for practice, one that address the true complexity in our post-modern environment, a new system, which the Chair of Complex Projects together with its students, teachers, and staff, hope to define. Before we can change our environment, we must change ourselves.


‘ While both activities seek to formulate ways to bring about preferable futures, they are cognitively different. Planning applies established procedures to solve a largely understood problem within an accepted framework. Design inquires into the nature of a problem to conceive a framework for solving that problem. In general, planning is problem solving, while design is problem setting. Where planning focuses on generating a plan – a series of executable actions – design focuses on learning about the nature of an unfamiliar problem. ’ The Relationship between Design and Planning D.H Petraeus, 2016


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VALUE IN ARCHITECTURE

The creation of value encompasses two elements: economic value and cultural value. That’s the starting point. Economic and cultural value are linked. Economics and cultural life are interwoven, especially when you consider culture not as analogous to art, that being an expression of artistic endeavours, but as a shared experience of achievements and activities within diverse areas. Culture is something we share collectively. Cultural value can lead to sustainability or longevity, but that need not always reflect economic value. The inverse can also be true: a building or neighbourhood that is built without any expressly cultural ambition, may still do well in terms of economic value. So it’s about a certain cultural value, one that is practical and doesn’t interfere with the use, or in more general terms: easy to use, serves everyday culture, and lends daily life a certain meaningfulness and worthiness. That’s what really makes buildings valuable. This is what we want to do – make serviceable buildings that are meaningfully outspoken and distinctive. The process of designing and executing through which we can fulfil this ambition is complex and typically erratic. After the contract is signed it’s up to the architect to instigate the design process. That’s a temporary situation in which value remains a transient matter. During the run of the design process all the interested parties are still very involved. After planning permission has been granted many of those parties lose active interest. Sometimes at completion or some publicity moment, interest returns. For me, it’s those moments when partners are less involved that are the most interesting, because that’s when you embed value in the building’s design. Real value is not found in the rendering but in how you translate an attractive rendering into good construction drawings, since these ultimately determine how the building will look. The closer you move toward execution, the more defining your choices become. The interchangeability of appealing scenarios tossed about at the beginning cannot be compared to the definitive character of a construction drawing. Cultural durability as a factor in value creation is the slow emergence of flavour, or in other words

the realisation of meaning in daily use that lies entrenched within the building. If a building still functions well ten years after its completion and still exudes a flavour, then it has value. In our careless culture, we tire quickly of products as well as buildings; we want to be continually surprised. This doesn’t just apply to architecture, but to many other things in our society. Before we can even experience the true value, we’ve zapped through to the next thing. As a result, lots of building designs are geared not towards intrinsic value but rather ambience. This is in fact strongly at odds with the concept of sustainability – so our behaviour is very unsustainable. The design process can be explained through the film Groundhog Day, where the main character lands in a loop, going through the exact same day every day and experiencing the same things everyday anew. The initiation phase and the preliminary design phase of a project are characterised by an abundance of meetings and presentations, since it’s in the interests of the commissioning party to line up the many stakeholders as early as possible in the process. Support and commitment must be generated. As an architect I am the one who adds colour and animation to the meetings. The architect presents his plans to a procession of passing participants. Just like the main character in Groundhog Day, I keep giving the same presentation on the design again and again. It’s easier to generate support for what we call iconic architecture, an exceptional architectural gesture, since it takes less time and energy to convince parties involved of the specialness of the plan and to achieve consensus. Increasingly the emphasis is being placed on contrived originality and iconographic effects: it’s the marketing of architecture as a product whereby image and look are replacing intrinsic value. Really good buildings are rarely valued.

(interview to Kees Kaan published in De Ontwerpmanager n.4, 2009)


Architects are divided amongst themselves as to the role and tasks of the architect. The interpretations of the profession vary from those who see themselves as the innovators of concepts concentrating on taking the initiative and on the preliminary design – consciously choosing not to play a role in the building process other than guarding the concept -, to those who take on the part of the master builder, play the confidant of the client, and manage the entire project from start to finish but without paying particular attention to the opportunities provided by the initial/ initiative phase. ‘The Choice’ Inaugural lecture at TU Delft Kees Kaan, 2008


Ludwig Mies Van Der Rohe


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ARRATIVE’

CP AMBITION

‘NARRATIVE’ ‘NARRATIVE’

NARRATIVE The architect operates within many different scales and cultural context and consequently sees the world through many lenses: as an artist, organizer, politician, economist, philosopher, strategist, humanitarian, planner and sometimes visionary. The complexity of these parameters converges into a new definition of design which in turn enables students to unpack virtually any set of design constraints, cultivating a strong critical and analytical approach to the design process. In Complex Projects, the research-by-design zooms in from the large scale of the city itself, to the medium scale the site, to the small scale of the building. This serves as basis for a design ‘narrative’ that on its turn is a lead for the individual proposals.


Le Corbusier; Unite d’habitation, Marseille, Sem Presser 1951

Not being familiar with the role and tasks of the architect is perhaps due to the differences in interpretation of the profession among architects themselves, but maybe even more due to the image of the creative genius who has appropriated the profession where copyright plays an important role. Ever since the Renaissance authorship has been recovered in Western culture. After the period of anonymity of the master builders of the Middle Ages the person and individual vision of the architect has gained in importance. Over time, the image of the architect developed from being the master carpenter, to being an intellectual, artist, and engineer. The architect is the designer of the totality of the building. This status reached its apex during the modernist period when the architect appropriated complete control over the building. ‘The Choice’ Inaugural lecture at TU Delft Kees Kaan, 2008


Space Matters, Phillipe Halsman 1948


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CP INTEREST

ONE ‘MOULD’ CP interests focus on the notion of ‘common’ in different urban contexts. In the Netherlands, for example, the permanent relation with the water throughout the history has settled in the DNA of our culture. Building Dutch cities implied making or reinforcing the land, keeping it in place and making foundations in the water. There is little stable and dry land available so not only buildings are constructed but also the streets and the canals. The canal, street and house section is inherently related and intertwined: one “mould” (synonymous of build, form, shape, structure, nature, character, quality). The houses are built out of the same bricks as the docks, streets and bridges and have similar foundations. Public, collective and private interests are constantly negotiated in these complex constructions. In the Netherlands, the production of land or vice versa the flooding of land was and is used as a military, political and economical tool. The expression ’poldermodel’ literally refers to the habit of dealing with societal issues by compromising and finding consensus among stakeholders, this implies collaboration. It produces a strong sense of shared values and interest in the ‘common’. If architecture is supposed to reflect shared values the question is raised what extend contemporary buildings can actually represent fundamental principles of the organizations they facilitate.


“There is no logic that can be superimposed on the city; people make it, and it is to them, not buildings, that we must fit our plans.� The Death and Life of Great American Cities Jane Jacobs, , 1961


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CP LITERATURE

A SELECTION De Keuze Intreerede prof.ir. C.H.C.F. Kaan hoogleraar Architectonisch Ontwerpen - The Choice Inaugural speech prof.ir. C.H.C.F. Kaan Professor Architectonic Design, Delft University of Technology, March 14 2008 Extrastatecraft: The Power of Infrastructure Space (2014) by Keller Easterling Public Places, Urban Spaces, The dimensions of Urban Design. (2010) by Carmona M. et al. Managing brief for a better Design, New York (2010) by Worthington J., Blyth A. Cities and the creative class (2005) by Florida, R. Tower and Office (2003) by Abalos Iñaki Steps to an Ecology of Mind, Chicago (2000) by Gregory Bateson The Rise of the Network Society. The Information Age: Economy, Society and Culture (1996) by Castells, M. Form Follows Function (1995) by Carol Willis S,M,L,XL (1994) by Koolhaas. R., Werlemann H. and Bruce Mau Wicked Problems in Design Thinking (1992) by Buchanan R. The Reflective Practitioner: How professionals think in A ction (1991) by Schon The Three Ecologies (1989) by Felix Guattari Inquiry by design, Cambridge Univeristy Press, Cambridge (1984) by Zeisel, J. The Architecture of the City (1982) by Aldo Rossi Collage City (1978) by Colin Rowe and Fred Koetter A Pattern Language (1977) by Christopher Alexander, et al. The Production of Space (1974) by Henri Lefebvre Social Justice and the City (1973) by David Harvey Architecture without Architects (1964) by Bernard Rudosfky The Structural Transformation of the Public Sphere by Jürgen Habermas (1962) The Death and Life of Great American Cities (1961) by Jane Jacobs Megalopolis. (1961) Gottmann, J.


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COMMUNICATION


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CP PRODUCTS & MEDIA

THE MAKING OF In Complex Projects, the research products of the different studios vary from the kickoff material, that has to be prepared and edited by the teachers, and the models, collages, books, video, wallpapers and presentations prepared by the students. Students will analyse the existing material, develop innovative visualization tools and design methods. Through the various final products it should be visible how the research led to the narrative and how this in its turn is translated in the design. During the academin year, the research products will be uploaded in CP webpage of the Department of Architecture, Facebook and issuu. The students will have also the possibility to discuss their works in PIN UP sessions, accompanied by film screening and feedback by visiting critics. A selection of the research books and models of the students will be part of a final annual exhibition curated by the Chair.


TU DELFT WEBSITE http://www.tudelft.nl/en/study/master-of-science/master-programmes/architecture-urbanism-and-building-sciences/ architecture/programme/specialisations/complex-projects/


FACEBOOK PAGE https://m.facebook.com/profile.php?id=422914291241447

CP BOOKLETS ON ISSUU https://issuu.com/complex_projects_havana_2016/ docs/160406-cp_havana_studio_book_with_c

DEPT. ARCHITECTURE WEBSITE http://www.tudelft-architecture.nl/chairs/complex-projects

COMPLEX CAPSULE https://complexcapsule.wordpress.com


Cinema Night at POST OFFICE, Rotterdam, MSc3/4 Havana studio, Fall 2016

CP EXHIBITION | CINEMA NIGHT


CP EXHIBITION | CINEMA NIGHT


CP EXHIBITION | CINEMA NIGHT


CP EXHIBITION | SUMMER EVENT


CP EXHIBITION | SUMMER EVENT


CP GRADUATION STUDIO


CP GRADUATION STUDIO

“In the process of enlightenment there can only be participants.” Jürgen Habermas


Students’ group, Model making, MSc4 El Paso/Juarez, Fall 2015


Students’ group, Wallpaper, MSc3 Havana, Fall 2016


CP BOOKLETS


CP BOOKLETS

Zaira Pourier, Yiannis Tsoskounoglou, Aruba Kick-off booklet, spring semester 2016


CP BOOKLETS


CP BOOKLETS


CP BOOKLETS


CP BOOKLETS


CP BOOKLETS


CP BOOKLETS


CP BOOKLETS

“Arriving at each new city, the traveler finds again a past of his that he did not know he had: the foreignness of what you no longer are or no longer possess lies in wait for you in foreign, unpossessed places.� Invisible Cities Italo Calvino, 1972


CP BOOKLETS

“I think you recognize cities better on the atlas then when you visit them in person,” the emperor says to Marco, snapping the volume shut. And Polo answers, “Traveling, you realize that differences are lost: each city takes to resembling all cities, places exchange their form, order, distances, a shapeless dust cloud invades the continents. Your atlas preserves the differences intact: that assortment of qualities which are like the letters in a name.” Invisible Cities Italo Calvino, 1972


CP GRADUATION STUDIO


CP GRADUATION STUDIO


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EDUCATION


“Arriving at each new city, the traveler finds again a past of his that he did not know he had: the foreignness of what you no longer are or no longer possess lies in wait for you in foreign, unpossessed places.� Invisible Cities Italo Calvino, 1972

MSC3 Havana studiio, students group in Havana, May 2016


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MASTER PROGRAM FALL SEMESTER


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YEAR 1

MSc1

LANDMARKS

AR1A060 AR1A065 AR1A075 AR1CP010 AR1CP040

Delft Lectures on Architectural Design Delft Lectures on Architectural History Delft Seminars on Building Technology Landmark Studio Belgrade Anatomy Seminar

MSc2

IN CITIES

AR2CP010

In Chicago

3 ects 3 ects 6 ects 12 ects 6 ects

15 ects

YEAR 2 MSc3/4

GRADUATION STUDIO

AR3A160 AR3AT060 AR3CP010 AR3CP040 AR4CP010

Lectures Series Research Methods New Urban Questions on Minor Infrastructure Havana, Cuba Studio Water Seminar Havana Studio

6 ects 3 ects 15 ects 6 ects 30 ects


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MSc 1

Landmarks The studio, via the dissection of an existing Landmark, will expose the basic elements that will define a building or an ensemble. The resulting data will be organised into a comprehensive research tool, which will be used to develop a position to the Landmark. In Fall the City will be Belgrade.


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MSc 2

In Cities The aim of studio In is to search for the idea and condition of the very current ‘city’ itself and this can be done only by living and working in a city during the studio. The goal is to take a critical stance to the consumption of culture, clichés, tourism traps, false perceptions and instead experience the city in its most crude way while being in one. The MSc2 studio allows the broadest platform after the MSc1 and before Graduation year for students to explore academic working methods and personal expressions and fascinations. In Fall the City will be Chicago.


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MSc 3/4

Caribbean Region Havana is without a doubt the cultural and political center of the country, but due to the economic and political sanctions since 1959 the country finds its self with a very unique situation of preservation through lack of means. The city did not experience any post WW2 reconstruction and development, nor did it experience the vast commercial development that dominates the cost lines of in the 70’s and 80’s as happened in many other Caribbean cities. How to keep the rich layers of history and modernize at the same time. How to do you learn from the mistakes of other soulless commercial developments in the Caribbean?


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MSc1 LANDMARKS


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Niek van der Zwaag, Labour Housing, Berlin

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AMBITION MSc1 LANDMARKS

On a physical level, a city consists of an urban fabric and architectural features. The fabric contains various layers such as infrastructure, buildings, green zones, water bodies and public spaces. The features are singular buildings that stand out from the fabric and work as anchor points. In his book ‘The Image of the City’, Kevin Lynch explains that people perceive the city by means of five predictable elements: paths, edges, districts, nodes (these make up the fabric) and Landmarks (features). Landmarks are defined as ‘readily identifiable objects which serve as external reference points’. Kevin Lynch’s study shows that Landmarks are essential for creating an awareness of ‘place’ and that they play a vital role in man’s navigation in cities. What determines a Landmark, is that it exists by virtue of the environment it’s located in and its unique representation, otherwise it would be merely a building. So to understand the true meaning of a specific Landmark, it is important to first identify the contexts to which that Landmark relates. Since Landmarks often are buildings of certain importance or impact, their ‘raison d’etre’ should always be comprehended before analyzing the building itself. Only then the meaning of the building’s intrinsic elements can be understood to the fullest; just as the engine of a car can be understood when taken into account that the car is a means of transportation. All the engine’s components, their movements, dimensions, materials and relations, have that one function. In the design studio we will dissect existing Landmarks via anatomy, exposing the basic elements that define a building or an ensemble. Through their specific location, function and distinct architecture, Landmarks have become meaningful and recognizable. The city around has changed, but the building has remained and solidified its meaning.

This fall semester we will investigate Belgrade, a city materialized through a continuity of ruptures, following a non-linear course of history, where every social and political system caused drastic changes in the city’s tissue. The morphological evolution of Belgrade highlights five historical stages; each developed in antagonism towards the previous one: Ottoman, early modern (between independence from the Ottoman Empire until the World War II), communist (1945 -1989), transitional (the 1990s, during which Yugoslavia disintegrated and Serbia suffered a deep social crisis) and contemporary (following the political stabilization of Serbia after the elections in 2000). Each period left a distinctive spatial imprint on the city, marking abrupt and traumatic political changes in its structure and identity. At present we are witnessing a new denial of the inherited city, in Belgrade’s efforts to position itself on the map of global cities through the Sava riverfront transformation project called Belgrade Waterfront. It’s public-private endeavour of pharaonic proportions likely to generate new spatio-social discontinuities. This fall the studio will examine historical buildings around the area designated for the Belgrade Waterfront megaproject. We part from the hypothesis that the palimpsestic identity of Belgrade is consolidated through the succession of ideologies and developments, each with their own Landmarks. This hypothesis, defending morphological and semiotic complexity as means of enhancing the relationship between the city and its waterfront, will be tested on five landmarks. Each one resembles a different ideology, time, function and site. All together they frame the Riverfront development and their position has the potential to improve the embedding of the Riverfront in the city.

“A building does not have to be an important work of architecture to become a first-rate landmark. Landmarks are not created by architects. They are fashioned by those who encounter them after they are built. The essential feature of a landmark is not its design, but the place it holds in a city’s memory. Compared to the place it occupies in social history, a landmark’s artistic qualities are incidental.” Herbert Muschamp

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MSc1 STUDIO

Landmark Studio: Belgrade Waterfront AR1CP010 - Complex Projects Design Studio SPRING 2016 STUDIO LEADERS Aldo Trim Albert Takashi Richters Steven Steenbruggen Stefanos Filippas Alexander Pols TEACHING ASSISTANT Kasia Piekarczyk Alessandro Arcangeli

Contact Hours / Week x/x/x/x Education Period

Start education Exam period Course language Expected prior knowledge

4 hours per week 80 hours per semester 1 2 3 4 1 3 None English Bachelor degree Architecture


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FIVE LANDMARKS

Five Landmarks frame the Belgrade Riverfront development

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STUDIO STRUCTURE & METHODOLOGY

LOCAL PARTNER

PART 1 - Trip and research - Weeks 1 - 6 Various parallel studies are done; collecting data of Belgrade, studying the development of the riverfront and analysing the individual Landmarks. Within each group a selection of students works on the site and others do research on the general topics. In this period it’s important to keep each other updated of all relevant information. At the end fo week 6 the students should be able to draw conclusions from the research.

Our local partner, who will help us in evaluation of our hypotheses and facilitate understanding of the current processes, positions and aims is Belgrade. SCAPES:LAB, part of SCAPES:LAB - an independent platform for knowledge transfer that addresses the pressing urge of reshuffling architecture&urbanism education modes.

PART 2 - Concept - Week 7 - 10 Based on the group conclusion, each student develops a personal argument and concept, stated by further research. The redesign of the Landmark can be done in teams of two students. Teachers will monitor the teams and advice in communication and collaborations. In week ten the concept, or multiple concepts, should be worked out in such a way that it’s a good basis for the BT course. PART 3 - Design - Weeks 15 - 20 The knowledge gained in the BT course is further developed. Important deadline in the studio is the trial presentation taking place in week 19. The design and work needs to be finished by then and on such level that the production gives confidense for the last two weeks. The trial presentation is used for reflection on the project, give advice on further material to be produced and sharpening the presentation. WEEKLY SCHEDULE Tutoring every Friday from 9am - 13pm. Pin up every three weeks. STUDIO EVALUATION Evaluations will be based on the overall performance within the studio. The student’s performance will be determined by the quality of his/her work, commitment, effort and improvement over the entire course of the semester. Deliverables As each proposal might play on different scales, the final products are project depending and their exact efficiency for the design be discussed with the teacher. But through the various final products it should be visible how the research led to the argument and how this in its turn is translated in the design.

SCAPES:LAB explores alternatives to hierarchical models and produces knowledge through innovative – critical and progressive – readings of cities & policies, direct collaboration with professionals, colleagues and institutions, variety of collectives (large and small), activists and other relevant initiatives - aimed at establishing a transnational, networked structure that focuses on urban-scapes without hesitation. By encouraging a critical mindset among its participants, SCAPES:LAB expands the field of studies on the behalf of post-socialist cities in Serbia, Macedonia, Montenegro and Bosnia & Herzegovina. Actions are conducted through temporary autonomous labs aspiring to define, create and engage permanent new structures. So far, they have conducted specific programes throughout EU, Russia and the Balkans.


MSc1

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LANDMARK STUDIO

METHODOLOGY STUDIO METHODOLOGY

LANDMARK STUDIO

Methodology

gr. 1 context building gr. 5

gr. 2

USCE

context building

va

Sa

SPLAVS gr. 4

context building

r

ve

Ri

COOP

Belgrade Waterfront Project

gr. 3

context building

context building

MOSTAR

BIGZ

individual groups

everybody

Existing city

The zone now projected to become the Belgrade Waterfront forms a void in the center of the city. Essentially, it’s not only a physical cut but also the border between history and the future. The objective is to tackle this relationship by means of a time-line covering the following topics: -Politics, Economy -Morphology, Infrastructure -Environment, Typology -Demography, culture

1/2 group nearby context through photo, audio, people documentation defining interesting sections through areas 1/2 group analysis of building purely through handdrawings base on themes: - structure - detailing - movements - patterns, rythms

CP

TRIM, RICHTERS

TRIM, RICHTERS

4

CP

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MSc1

BELGRADE COOPERATIVE BUILDING / GEOZAVOD [1905-1907] Architects: Andra Stevanović, Nikola Nestorović Belgrade Cooperative for mutual help and savings, was the full name of the joint stock company founded in 1882. It was designed for small and medium traders, artisans and clerks. There’s Department of Banking and Insurance Department, which represented the first domestic insurance company, formed in 1897. The construction of Belgrade Cooperative coincided with the change of political regime in Serbia. After the assassination of the king Aleksandar Obrenovic, the Karadjordjevic dynasty came to power, which led to a change in the system of governance. Autocratic regime was replaced by liberal bourgeois regime of Petar the I, the civil liberties were increased and the economic situation was improved. With the Principality’s full independence in 1878, and its transformation into the Kingdom of Serbia in 1882, Belgrade once again became a key city in the Balkans, and developed rapidly. 1 The president of the Cooperative was Luka Ćelović, one of the richest men in the early 20 century in Serbia. He was a merchant, landlord, financier and a leading Serbian benefactor, and he made the “Belgrade Cooperative” one of the most successful Serbian companies. Luka was the cooperative president until his death in the 1929 and his entire property was bequeathed to the University of Belgrade. When it comes to the building, angled three-winged palace was built of reinforced concrete, which is the most advanced technique at that time. It is adorned with artistically worked stone sculptures and ornaments designed by the known artist Franjo Valdman. This is the first building in Belgrade with representative hall with a monumental staircase, the German sculptures, ceremonial hall, all of which were the works of Andrea Domenica and Bora Kovačević. The building is a joint work by the authors (architects Andre Stevanović and Nikola Nestorović) and an excellent example of a modern anthology of Serbian architecture. After the World War II it was the seat of several institutions but finally became the main building of the Geological Geophysical Institute - Geozavod. This lead in 1958/59 to its most renovation when Institute made a decision to extend the building by adding the third floor above both wings in Travnička and Hercegovačka streets, and then three floors above the central wing in the yard around the former Counter hall. The architectural style represents home of a double symbols. In the early 20th century, when foundations of this building were built, Serbia was a young country demanding style in architecture. A new spirit of innovations was present at the time,

COMPLEX PROJECTS

using new technologies and materials as reinforced concrete, wide glass areas, sections in wrought iron. Serbian architectural culture tended to create its own Serbian architectural style. Demetrius Leko was a harbinger of the flow, also Stevanović’s and Nestorović’s signatures are present on the construction paper. The interior is characterized by representative three monumental staircase. The luxurious counter hall on the mezzanine level is reachable by a central arc and from here two side arcs reach the first floor and the reception and conference hall. Stylistically – the eclectic building belongs to Baroque and Art Nouveau. In short, the building of Belgrade Cooperative is aesthetically well resolved and it dominates not just the small crossroads of several streets but the whole environment.2 The Belgrade Cooperative Building, famous as one of the city’s most beautiful edifice was once the central figure of the historically and culturally important Savamala neighborhood, which shared the destiny of the area as it had been neglected for decades and thickly covered by urban greyness. The Eagle Hills Company [The United Arab Emirates financial partner backer of the Waterfront masterplan] made an agreement with the city representatives, to invest in its reconstruction, as an “act of generosity” and as “a start of good cooperation”. In return for the investment, the company got free use of over 6000 sq.m. of the aforementioned building for the next 3 years. Although its appearance has been improved and its architectural beauty can finally find a way to surface, the reconstruction was more of a cosmetics nature, while the basement remains soaked in water and not all interventions respected the heritage protection propositions. The beginning of the Belgrade Waterfront Project was thus officially announced. At the end of June 2014, a public presentation of the project was held in this reconstructed building. In a room filled with high officials from both countries (Serbia and the UAE), the grandiose model of the master plan was revealed. The Belgrade Cooperative building’s function thus has been reduced to a promotional exhibition space.3 Sources: 1. Belgrade Cooperative (latest update 2016, May 26). Retrieved from https://en.wikipedia. org/wiki/Belgrade_Cooperative 2. Christine C. (2013, January 15).The History of Geozavod Building. Retrieved from http:// stillinbelgrade.com/the-history-of-geozavod/ 3. Ljubica Slavković (2015, May 15), Belgrade Waterfront, An Investors vision of National Significance. Retrieved from http://www. failedarchitecture.com/belgrade-waterfront


MSc1

FALL 2016

LANDMARK STUDIO

be ->

Danu

1

Sav a ->

LANDMARK STUDIO

TRIM, RICHTERS

6

CP

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82

MSc1

BIGZ BUILDING [1934-1941] Architect: Dragiša Brašovan The BIGZ building is one of the most famous architectural landmarks and works of Yugoslavian modern architecture, and in recent times, it presents a significant cultural, artistic and social spot. It was designed by Dragiša Brašovan, and it was constructed between 1934 and 1941 as the headquarters of the National Printing Institution of Yugoslavia.1 This interwar period was characterized by fast growth and significant modernisation. Belgrade’s population grew to 239,000 by 1931 (incorporating the town of Zemun, formerly in Austria-Hungary), and 320,000 by 1940. The population growth rate between 1921 and 1948 averaged 4.08% a year. In 1927, Belgrade’s first airport opened, and in 1929, its first radio station began broadcasting. The Pančevo Bridge, which crosses the Danube, was opened in 1935, while “King Alexander Bridge” over the Sava was opened in 1934.2 After the second world war, with founding of BIGZ (Publishing and Graphics Institution of Belgrade), the building switched to state ownership under the reign of Socialist leader, Josip Broz Tito, who remained president of Yugoslavia till his death in 1980.3 During the late 40s to 80s the building employed more than 3000 workers. After a social and economic crisis of the early 90’s, lack of funding left the building mostly unused and neglected. After a decade, by the turn of the millennium, it has slowly began to get occupied by few small businesses.1 Nowadays its brutal industrial design, big rooms and hallways, isolation and relative distance from residential buildings have greatly attracted many young artists, designers, architects, musicians and DJs. BIGZ remains the building’s majority owner, renting out its 25,000 square meters of usable space. Its units currently house printing offices, warehouses, music and art studios, night clubs, a capoeira school, radio-stations, a cultural center, a circus, etc. Among its more famous tenants is Čekaonica BIGZ, a jazz club. Since it contains such cultural, social and artistic diversity and richness, it somewhat unofficially became a centre of Belgrade’s art life. The BIGZ building is a very significant place for New Serbian Scene. Many bands practice in the building such as: The Schtrebers, DžDž, Metak Za Zlikovca, Stuttgart Online, Autopark, Petrol, Repetitor, Sinestezija, Tobija, The Branka, Damjan od Resnika, Bolesna Štenad, Brigand, Figlio Di

COMPLEX PROJECTS

Puttana, Vox Populi, Dažd, S.A.R.S., Very Heavy Sars, Pozdravi Kevu, White City Massive, and many others. Musicians of the BIGZ building have founded an organization called “Manekeni bigza” (fashion models of BIGZ), and they organize several festivals like “Festivalito” and “Bigz na Povetarcu” (BIGZ on a breeze). Most recently the BIGZ building is in the process of inclusion to Docomomo International project’s list for protection and preservation as a cultural monument of modernist architecture. 1 The BIGZ building is located in on the Northern corner of Belgrade’s neighborhood of Senjak, bordering the Mostar interchange. Senjak is known as one of the more affluent neighborhoods of downtown Belgrade.4 Sources: 1. BIGZ Building (latest update 2016, June 15). Retrieved from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ BIGZ_building 2. Belgrade (2016, August 30).Retrieved from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Belgrade 3. Josip Broz Tito (2016, September 3). Retrieved from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Josip_Broz_Tito 4. Senjak (latest update 2016, March 17). Retrieved from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Senjak


MSc1

FALL 2016 LANDMARK STUDIO

be ->

Danu

LANDMARK STUDIO

Sav a ->

2

TRIM, RICHTERS

8

CP

83


84

MSc1

MOSTAR INTERCHANGE (1974) Mostar interchange or colloquially Mostar is one of major interchange and a surrounding urban neighborhood of Belgrade, the capital of Serbia. It is located in Belgrade’s municipality of Savski Venac. The Mostar looped interchange was construction began in 1967 and completed in 1974, as one of two major ones (the other one being Autokomanda) on the highway Belgrade–Niš. The highway runs right through the urban centre of Belgrade, which is still an issue of debate even though the road was originally intended as a fast, intercity Bežanija-Autokomanda freeway. The interchange itself was built on the location of the old neighbourhood of Jatagan Mala. A bitter dispute between the mayor of Belgrade, Nenad Bogdanović and a group of architects from the previous city’s establishment (including the construction of Mostar and Auto Komanda) resulted in mayor’s description of the interchanges from October 2006: ‘Those are the two worst interchanges and the only ones in the world with traffic lights... people who made those are today criticizing us.’1 It’s location near to downtown Belgrade makes it an important landmark on the border of different areas. From north to south it stands between the more downtown center of old Belgrade to the North and the historically more afluent Senjak nieghborhood to the south. From east to west it marks the border between the residential neighborhoods and the non-residential fairgrounds and Waterfront zone along the Sava river. The surrounding neighbourhood is entirely non-residential. The northern side is occupied by the buildings of the Ministry of the Interior (destroyed in the 1999 NATO bombing of Serbia) and the Clinical Centre, which is the largest clinical complex in Belgrade. The southern side comprises the ‘BIP’ brewery, Prokop train station, a series of half-ruined storages and former factories and the facilities of the Belgrade Fair. To the west it continues into the Belgrade-Niš highway and to the east to the Novi Beograd and further to Belgrade-Zagreb highway (over the Gazela bridge). Though it takes up a fairly large area near the Belgrade Center there are signs of informal commercial activity taking place under the overpass usually linked to the fact many commuters wait there near the bus, tram stations and carparks.

COMPLEX PROJECTS

Facts and figures: It covers an area of 20,000 square metres Elevation: 22 metres It’s crossed by double tram tracks, has 6 underground pedestrian passages and 4 passarellas, leading to 4 bus and 2 tram stops.1 Source: 1. Mostar Interchange (latest update 2015, December 14). Retrieved from https://en.wikipedia.org/ wiki/Mostar_interchange


MSc1

FALL 2016 LANDMARK STUDIO

be ->

Danu

3

Sav a ->

LANDMARK STUDIO

TRIM, RICHTERS

10

CP

85


86

MSc1

UŠĆE TOWER [1964 - RESTORATION IN 2005] Architects: Mihailo Janković (restoration by architecture firm IN-VI) “REBIRTH OF A LANDMARK AS THE HEART OF NEW BELGRADE” - IN-VI architecture firm1 Ušće Tower (Serbian Cyrillic: meaning “confluence”) is a 25-story mixed use skyscraper located at 6 Mihajlo Pupin Boulevard in the New Belgrade municipality of Belgrade. It is currently the tallest building in Serbia, and the second-tallest freestanding structure, after the Avala Tower. Built in 1964, the glass building overlooks the confluence Danube and Sava rivers from the New Belgrade side. It was originally 105 meters tall and used as the headquarters of the Central Committee of the League of Communists of Yugoslavia in the former Yugoslavia, which broke apart in 1990.2 The competition projects for this building stirred up much discussion over the issues of symbolism. Until then, buildings for parties and goverment were built in the style of sociorealism, but this tower designed by Mihailo Janković was a simple aluminium and glass clad International style administrative type building of anonymous character void of any symbolism and represented the latest architectural modernity.3 Ušće Tower was built in 1964 as the headquarters of the Central Committee of the League of Communists of Yugoslavia. The original building was 105 meters tall. Even today many people still call it “CK”, which is the acronym for Centralni Komitet (Central Committee). During the “golden years” of Yugoslavia the lights were left partially turned on during the night to spell out “TITO”, after president Josip Broz Tito. In 1979, the Tower became a target of Nikola Kavaja, who hijacked American Airlines Flight 293 with the intention of crashing the plane into the building. During the collapse of Yugoslavia in the 1990s, the Socialist Party of Serbia under leadership of Slobodan Milosevic4 occupied the first ten floors of the building. The party leased out many of the floors to domestic companies. They kept however 9 levels as offices for their party. The cabinet of Josip Broz Tito (which he rarely used) was cleared out. Later in the 1990s, three Serbian television stations occupied some of the levels in the building: RTV BK Telecom, RTV Pink and TV Košava. On April 21, 1999 NATO air strikes hit the building, setting the upper floors on fire, and few days later NATO repeated the attack. Several Tomahawk cruise missiles were fired at the building. Despite the heavy damage, the building did not collapse and remained structurally intact. There were no reported deaths or injuries in the attack as the building was unoccupied at the time.

COMPLEX PROJECTS

Reconstruction work on the building started in early 2003 and was arried out by European Construction. The façade was redesigned and is now made entirely out of glass. The reconstruction was completed in 2005 and the official opening took place in July that year. Two additional floors were added—conference halls are located on 24th and a restaurant on the 25th The multimillion-dollar project has 25 stories (above ground), totaling around 25,000 m2 of office space. An observation deck, fitness area and cafe are located on the top floor of the building. The observation deck is currently closed to the public, although there are plans to open it in the future. Addiko Bank is now renting out the first five floors of the building and has become the anchor tenant. This bank also has a light-ad on the building roof. Additionally the Usce Mall was opened on April 2009. The mall has an area of 130,000 square metres (1,400,000 sq ft) on 6 levels, of which 50,000 square metres (540,000 sq ft) is retail space, with 150 stores, restaurants and cafés. The shopping mall also has a multiplex cinema with 11 screens, a bowling alley and a casino. Subterranean levels house a 4,000 m2 hypermarket and two levels of parking.2 Sources: 1. IN-VI Architecture, Planning and Development. Retrieved from http://in-vi.com/projects/ commercial/182-usce-tower 2. Ušće Tower (latest update 2016, August 30). Retrieved from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ Ušće_Tower 3. Francesca Mitrovic (2008, July 30). NATO TARGET - Usce Tower (CK building). Retrieved from http://sajkaca.blogspot. nl/2008/07/nato-targetusce-tower-ck-building_30.html 4. Socialist Party of Serbia (latest update 2016, September 2). Retrieved from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Socialist_Party_of_ Serbia


MSc1

FALL 2016

LANDMARK STUDIO

be ->

Danu

4

Sav a ->

LANDMARK STUDIO

TRIM, RICHTERS

12

CP

87


88

MSc1

SPLAVOVI (RAFTS) / FLOATING RIVER CLUBS (1990’S) Before the nineties, to have a “splav” (raft) meant to have your own getaway where you can go with your friends to relax and enjoy the tranquility on a river or a lake. Those were the places of friendly gatherings and private parties. After the nineties, these barges turned into something much bigger, while turbo-folk, a completely new kind of music at the time, reached its highest popularity. In years to come, “splavs” became the venues where the new Serbian “elite” was going out.1 It is said that the crisis after the break-up of Yugoslavia and civil war, UN sanctions, hyperinflation, and high unemployment made sure that the only entertainment Belgraders had back in those days was the one they created themselves.2 It was a means to excape from the daily threats and hardships and lead to an alternative and informal scene. For instance, techno and house took off in Belgrade in the 1990s as a rebellious alternative to Milosevic’s regime, feeding off the city’s prodigious nervous energies.3 Splavovi have become a symbol of Belgrade in the recent years, mainly because of their exclusive nightlife. They are usually night clubs, cafes & bars, restaurants and even hostels. The rafts offer a unique way of having fun, relax by the rivers and refuge from the urban chaos of the downtown. There are several splav zones in Belgrade: The most popular splav clubs are located in front of Staro Sajmište, on the Sava river between the Gazela and Tram bridge; there is a mixed clubs/bars zone in front of Hotel Jugoslavija on the Zemun quay, and a predominantly cafe/restaurant zone at the Ada Ciganlija river front. The Ušće park waterfront is also full of splavs. There’s a less known zone at New Belgrade Savski quay and a small one at the Dorćol Danube quay.1 Located mainly opposite of the Begrade Waterfront on the Sava River. The informality and small scale of theses highly popular Splavs are in stark contrast to the very large-scale and formalized development that is projected on the opposite banks. Moreover the location of the Splavs near the Sajmište park form a contrast with a more gloomy history. Before World War II this area used to be the location of the old Belgrade fairgrounds but during the German occupation between 1941-1945 it was used as a concentration camp. According to the Helsinki Committee for Human Rights in Serbia, the overall death toll was about 50,000, with 20,000 killed.

COMPLEX PROJECTS

Nowadays, little is visible of this history since the area has turned into a park and memorial grounds. A ruin of a TV-broadcasting tower by Philips still stands in the park as a remainder of the former fairgrounds4. Sources: 1. Nightlife (2016). Retrieved from http:// www.serbia.com/visit-serbia/enjoy-serbia/nightlife/ the-splavs-floating-river-clubs/ 2. Belgrade Nightlife (2016). Retrieved from http://belgradeatnight.com/belgrade/ 3. Garth Cartwright (2009. July 25). Dancing on the Danube. Retrieved from https://www. theguardian.com/travel/2009/jul/25/belgrade-music-serbia-gypsy-techno 4. Sajmište concentration camp (latest update 2016, September 5). Retrieved from https:// en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sajmište_ concentration_ camp


MSc1

FALL 2016

LANDMARK STUDIO

be ->

Danu

5

Sav a ->

LANDMARK STUDIO

TRIM, RICHTERS

14

CP

89


90

MSc1

STUDIO SCHEDULE Week 1.1 / 9th September: Chair and studio introduction Week 1.2 / 14th - 18th September: Belgrade trip Week 1.3 / 23rd September: Trip summary, documentation, fascination Week 1.4 / 30th September: Pin-up General research and proposal for personal focus Week 1.5 / 7th October: Research Week 1.6 / 14th October: Research Week 1.7 / 21st October: Pin-up Research and narrative Week 1.8 / 28th October: Concept Week 1.9 / 4th November: Concept Week 1.10 / 11th November: Pin-up Concept, scenario’s, variations, study models Week 2.1 / 18th November: No studio, Delft Seminars on BT Week 2.2 / 25th November: No studio, Delft Seminars on BT Week 2.3 / 2nd December: No studio, Delft Seminars on BT Week 2.4 / 9th December: No studio, Delft Seminars on BT Week 2.5 / 16th December: No studio, Delft Seminars on BT Week 2.6 / 23th December: Pin-up Outcome BT and plan for design development Week 2.7 / 13rd January: Design development Week 2.8 / 20th January: Trial presentation Week 2.9 / 27th January: Presentation development Week 2.10 / 3rd February: Final presentation

COMPLEX PROJECTS


FALL 2016

MSc1

91


92

MSc1

COMPLEX PROJECTS


FALL 2016

MSc1

93


94

MSc1

COMPLEX PROJECTS


MSc1

FALL 2016

“Well, the lights fire like neurons in a great brain. The lifts seem like the chambers of a heart. I move along its corridors like a cell in a network of arteries.� High-Rise movie J.G. Ballard, 1975

95


96

MSc1

COMPLEX PROJECTS

MSc1 SEMINAR

Anatomy Seminar AR1CP040 - Complex Projects Seminar FALL 2016 SEMINAR LEADER Aldo Trim

SEMINAR BRIEF In history, the scientific revolution marks a break with the old assumptions used to explain natural phenomena. This break is radical and resulted in the transition from spiritual interpretation of our existence to reason, observation and analysis. During this transition, drawings became objective illustrations instead of subjective representations. Key figures of the scientific revolution were Copernicus, Vesalius and Palladio who all used anatomy as a tool to do research in their specific field. Copernicus drew the first realistic solar system showing the earth revolved around the sun, Vesalius drew the human body in its bare functional beauty and Palladio drew the Roman temples to understand the classical architecture for re-using its elements in new designs. The main principle of gross anatomy is that it studies the structure and organisation of organisms or things. A more physiological study is needed to determine the functionality of the elements. Essential is to understand that in anatomy the

drawing alone has a certain value, but it is especially the act of drawing that gives insight. It is the direct relationship the researcher has with the object of study through drawing. The cumulative process of seeing, drawing and understanding leads to a stimulation of what you might call ‘serendipity’; coincidental discoveries. During the seminar running parallel with the Landmark studio, we’ll do a typological study of high-rise buildings. By studying their evolution and by anatomically drawing key examples we try to gain knowledge of structural, spatial, functional and aesthetical changes. The contains lectures, discussions and readings of various books that cover different aspects of the type. Final product is a collection of drawn explorations enhancing the research work done in the Landmark studio.


FALL 2016

MSc1

97


98

COMPLEX PROJECTS

MSc1

VERTICAL WUNDERKAMMER Kasia Piekarczyk, Asmund Skeie Madrid, Spain MSc 1 | Complex Projects, Anatomy of a Landmark | Aldo Trim


FALL 2016

MSc1

99


100

COMPLEX PROJECTS

MSc1

AGORA Alessandro Arcangeli, Filippo Fiorani Madrid, Spain MSc 1 | Complex Projects, Anatomy of a Landmark | Aldo Trim


FALL 2016

MSc1

101


MSc2 In Cities


104

MSc2

COMPLEX PROJECTS

MSc2 STUDIO

IN CHICAGO 2016-2017 AR2CP010 - Complex Projects Design Studio FALL 2016 STUDIO LEADERS: Andrew Balster Roland Reemaa

Contact Hours / Week x/x/x/x Education Period Start education Exam period Course language

8 hours per week 80 hours per semester 3 4 3 None English


FALL 2016

MSc2

Being in Chicago, image by Roman de Weijer, 2015

105


106

COMPLEX PROJECTS

MSc2

STUDIO CONTEXT Chicago has been the image of productivity, directness and maybe even greed since it founding from 1833. Together with its center and hinterland the Illionois region introduced numerous modern day technical and intellectual devices to handle its vast expansion: the grid, the railway, the masterplan, mailorder catalogues, meat packing etc. That very eager and adamance has created a historically, financally and architecturally unique city of which its citizens could proudly relate to. This unshakeable growth has nevertheless taken place in hand with segregation, nepotistm and corruption - Windy City as they call it, that which also has become the image and culture of a place. Within the context of economical decline of the Midwest region, Chicago is facing crucial issues and also chances in order find its new goals to follow in the globally driven present. STUDIO AIM In order to understand the complexity of Chicago, it must be understood from viewpoints of various agents with its past and current resources. The aim of the studio is to capture the spirit - the geist of a city, region and country that has inherently been ordering its social, economical, spatial decisions and continues to do so. Regardless of the historical and contemporary periods of turmoil we seek for the underlying of a place. As part of the chair Complex Projects objective, it is precisely this search for definition of city, which guides the In Chicago studio in its most direct way. The goal of the studio is to reveal what truly lies underneath a globally determined city and this, we believe, can be only done when being in one. The goal of the studio is to examine the very condition of Chicago itself - a center of culture, diversity, education, civic institutions, and freedom of thought. In fall 2016, MSc2 students from TU Delft, will move to Chicago for their Architecture & Urbanism studio, led by professor Kees Kaan, tutored by Andrew Balster and Roland Reemaa. The studio is a collaboration between TU Delft and Archeworks Chicago based design school, research lab and think tank. STUDIO THEME For this fall 2016 studio the In Chicago will question the notion of a midcity, a state of a city between a core and its arable, industrial or suburban hinterland. It is a place between living space and the non-places of movement, between small local economic cycles and the dependency on the world market. It is the ring of unexpected cultures, in uncertainty and creativity, a flux around the stagnant centralized core which give rise to new forms of order, living quality and technology.

Within this theme we seek to find the agents that influence the way a city is being developed, used and lived in. Similarly to a mail-ordering catalogue that changed the habits of consumption during the previous century, we now need to disregard this linearity and think free of possible futures. What is the role of space here, if at all? Through research, documentation, experience, experimentation and proposals we seek to find the midcity and its scenarios. PUBLIC LECTURE SERIES In Chicago is organizing lecture series “The Speakeasy� inviting local active Chicagoans of various backgrounds to discuss and present their work and activity in the city of Chicago. With Kees Kaan giving an opening lecture on water - an element that according to him guides the development of the Netherlands, the following lectures will aim to follow similar thoughts in order to unfold the geist of Chicago. WEEKLY SCHEDULE Tutoring every Tuesday 10am - 7pm Weekly pin-ups, friday updates Tours and sight visits STUDIO OBJECTIVE The studio promotes broad speculation, independent thinking, collective work with the aim of positioning architecture into a broader social, cultural, political, and economic context. Through the various themes, students are exposed to the versatile layers of the city of Chicago, while simultaneously expected to engage their observations with daily studio work. Workshops, lectures, trips are to be attended. Besides studio program students are expected to fully engage with events and people that Chicago has to offer. STUDIO EVALUATION Evaluations will be based on the individual performance of the student. The performance will be determined by the quality of the work, its commitment, effort and improvement over the entire course of the semester.


MSc2

FALL 2016

IN NAPERVILLE, image by FLORIS VAN DER BURGHT, 2015

107


108

MSc2

PRODUCTIVITY - Diary Each students is responsible for a well structured and documented weekly diary package; printed, bound and handed in digitally in the end of the studio. - Creativity Each students is encouraged to explore mediums throughout the semester that best suit to its research and methodology. Basic skill skills in reading and creating drawings is essential. During the introduction weeks in NL, working with CAD, ILL, INDD, PSD are presented. - Presentation Each students in expected to carry out various presentation types throughout the semester: elevator pitch, 5 slide limits, 10 minutes presentation, online updates etc - to be determined according to ongoing workflows. - Research Each students is expected to carry out thorough research according to the theme of the studio and personal field of interest. Different methods, including factual and empirical, to study a field of interest are encouraged and asked to carry out with precision and accuracy. - Statement Each students is expected during the studio to present a statement based on the research and project proposal. - Final Project Each students is expected to deliver a project, that is nevertheless of a discussion, what a project actually means. In any case it is to be based on one’s research, statement, personal goals and interests. It is a presentable whole of ones opinion and speculations on the city of Chicago. - Final item For the final review, each students is expected to deliver one physical (besides the diary) item that conceptually and on correct purposes represents the project. RECOMMENDED READING - Daniel Burnham, Edward H. Bennet - Plan of Chicago (1909) - Frank Lloyd Wright - Broadacre City (1932) - Clarence Stein - Toward New Towns for America (1951) - Jane Jacobs - The Death and Life of Great American Cities (1961) - Kevin Lynch - View From The Road (1965) - M. Christine Boyer - Dreaming the Rational City, The Myth of American City Planning (1983) - Carol Willis - Form Follows Function (1995) - Mark Pimlott - Within and Without, Essays on Territory and the Interior (2007)

COMPLEX PROJECTS


FALL 2016

MSc2

109


110

MSc2

COMPLEX PROJECTS


FALL 2016

MSc2

111


112

COMPLEX PROJECTS

MSc2

LOOP, AN ARTIFACT Maria Rohof Chicago, Illinois MSc 2 | Complex Projects, In Chicago | Roland Reemaa


FALL 2016

MSc2

113


114

COMPLEX PROJECTS

MSc2

ENTER THE VOIDS Jorik Bais Chicago, Illinois MSc 2 | Complex Projects, In Chicago | Roland Reemaa


FALL 2016

MSc2

115


MSc3 CARIBBEAN REGION


118

MSc3/4

COMPLEX PROJECTS

Cuba is roughly the size of Belgium, The Netherlands and Luxumburg combined


FALL 2016

MSc3/4

AMBITION

MSc3 CARIBBEAN REGION

Cuba was once described by Christopher Columbus in1492 as: “This is the loveliest land ever beheld by human eyes.” Since then it has been a place of desire, inspiration and political ideologies. Originally established in 1514 on Cuba’s southern coast, San Cristóbal de la Habana had been moved by 1519 to its present-day location on the island’s north coast, at the mouth of a deep and spacious harbour with a narrow, protected harbour channel. Before long, Havana had become the most important port in the Spanish colonial empire, a natural final gathering place for the resupply and embarkation of the Spanish fleet before returning to the Old Country laden with bounty. By 1607, Havana had been declared the capital of colonial Cuba, and by the early 1700s, it was the third-largest city in the Spanish empire, behind Mexico City and Lima. Subsequent centuries saw Havana grow steadily in wealth, size, and prominence. Havana was luckily spared the bulk of the violence and fighting that occurred in Cuba’s Wars of Independence, and later revolutionary war. Following the sinking of the USS Maine in Havana harbour in 1898, a long period of direct U.S. control and indirect U.S. influence followed. This period saw the first indications of suburban sprawl and the growing importance of the western neighbourhoods of Vedado and Miramar. This era was also marked by a strong presence of mob activity, with the likes of Al Capone, Meyer Lansky, and Lucky Luciano setting up shop in Havana.

Havana has been largely frozen in time in the wake of the 1959 Revolution. Decades of economic crisis and shortages have left much of Havana in severe decay and decomposition. The great exception to this rule is La Habana Vieja, where parts have been meticulously restored to much of its colonial glory, using a percentage of tourism receipts from the Old City hotels. Although the situation in Havana is beginning to change, with the recent boom in tourism and tourism-related growth, what new construction has occurred over the past 40 years has largely borne the drab architectural stamp of the former Soviet Union and its central state planning. Luckily, most of this has taken place outside the boundaries of the city centre. Today, Havana, with some 2.5 million inhabitants, is the largest city in the Caribbean and Cuba’s undisputed political, business, and cultural centre.

119


120

MSc3/4

COMPLEX PROJECTS

MSc3 STUDIO

HAVANA 2016-2017 AR3CP010 - Complex Projects Design Studio FALL 2016 STUDIO LEADERS Hrvoje Smidihen - Studio Leader (La Habana Vieja) Paul Cournet - Studio Leader (La Habana Vedado) Sebastian Janusz- Studio Leader (Havana Profunda) Olindo Caso - Studio Leader (Havana Alamar) Michelle Provoost - Architectural Historian / Critic Tanner Merkeley - Studio Coordinator / Curator Manuela Triggianese - CP Chair Coordinator TEACHING ASSISTANT Zaira Pourier

Contact Hours / Week x/x/x/x Education Period

Start education Exam period Course language Expected prior knowledge Required for

4 hours per week 80 hours per semester 1 2 3 4 1 3 None English Completed MSc1 and MSc2 MSc4 Complex Projects Graduation Studio


122

MSc3/4

CP IN HAVANA FALL 2016 fieldtrip planning: Saturday, October 22th - Sunday October 30th, 2016

COMPLEX PROJECTS


FALL 2016

MSc3/4

Complex Projects Havana Site Visit 2016

123


124

MSc3/4

STUDIO BRIEF Havana is without a doubt the cultural and political center of the country, but due to the economic and political sanctions since 1959 the country finds its self with a very unique situation of preservation through lack of means. The city did not experience any post WW2 reconstruction and development, nor did it experience the vast commercial development that dominates the cost lines of in the 70’s and 80’s as happened in many other Caribbean cities. Simply put Havana has not had much development in general, only a selective restoration of the historic center to promote it’s modest tourism industry. Just outside this compact zone in the historic city center the urban fabric is literally crumbling; it’s infrastructure, it’s buildings and government. The people in Cuba have a love hate relationship with their country. They are fiercely proud, but on the other hand they know they are living in comparative poverty and the situation is not getting better. There is also a huge lack of basic necessities like access to water due to the a leaky infrastructure from the 1920’s. About 50% of the drinking water is lost before it makes it to people households. The natural beauty is also being threatened, the Harbour was once a pristine fishing bay is heavily polluted by industry and raw sewage is often dumped directly into the bay. This city needs to be upgraded, but the question is how? How to keep the rich layers of history and modernize at the same time. How do you to create planning policies that innovate and enrich the city and its inhabitants? How to do you learn from the mistakes of other soulless commercial developments in the Caribbean?

COMPLEX PROJECTS


FALL 2016

MSc3/4

“The revolution is not an apple that falls when it is ripe. You have to make it fall.� Che Guevara 1968

125


126

COMPLEX PROJECTS

MSc3/4

STUDIO STRUCTURE & METHODOLOGY FALL TERM (MSC 3) Phase 1 (P0.5) Kick-Off: weeks 1 – 5 Personal introductions, fascinations, each student present their favourite personal project and motivation for the studio. Each group will organize into three sub-groups focused on coordinating three main group deliverables over the year: Site Models, Wallpaper & Books. The first weeks we will focus on making clean CAD drawings, high resolution satellite map, base 3D model and 2m x2m group site model and collecting material for the group book. The model group with the help of all the students will build the model. Drawing group with the help of all the students will prepare a clean set of site drawings, 3D, and base diagrams. Book group will begin collecting and organizing the urban layers such as: roads,buildings, public space, landmarks, etc. and preliminary research initial suspicions the group discovers along the way. Phase 2 (P1) Research: weeks 6 – 10 Students will use the work knowledge developed from phase one to continue and develop their research and understanding of the site. This will include: History, Time-line, Highlights of the group site. The group will also begin to investigate the four research themes: Urban, Economic, Political & Social through the lens of their site. This will be the basis for the final studio book and preparation for the Studio trip. Each group is responsible for preparing an excursion guide and taking the other groups on tour of their site during the trip to Havana (See trip preparation section for more details). The trip will focus on observation, sketching, photo & video recording, and interviewing local residents. By the end of this phase students will formulate clear conclusions from the tip, develop a premise for their thesis, and define a clear spatial issue they will work out through their design project. Note: The trip to Havana is scheduled for the week of October 23-29 Phase 3 (P1.5) Concept: weeks 11 – 16 Each group will develop and analyse relevant Cuban typologies, vernacular building forms, building orientations, proportions, material use and a reference library. Develop a preliminary program proposal, site location and spatial concept. Adapt the concept to the site context using knowledge from the typological research. Develop your concept and refine the building program. Prepare all work up to this point into a clear presentation (test run for your P2) and prepare the

site model and site plan, maps, site drawing and book for a formal review, exhibition and drink before the holiday break. Note: Expo, and presentation location to be determined Phase 4 (P2) Finalizing: weeks 17 – 21 Students should focus on developing their building concept within their master-plan connecting back the research and analysis in the first phases (we suggest a building between 5,000-20,000m2) is a good size to develop for a thesis project. Students should begin to develop this fragment by defining urban parameters, opportunities potential massing, program mix, density, phasing, transport, sustainability, street profiles, shading studies, etc. You should identify future buildings you would like to develop your final project. Show at least three conceptual proposals of how to solve the spatial problems you have defined in the previous phases dealing with program, logistics and design intentions. This will be a formal presentation which concludes your analysis, urban master-plan, urban fragment and conceptual building strategy. SPRING TERM (MSC 4) Phase 5 (P2.5) Concept Development: weeks 22 – 25 The building concepts developed in Phase 4 will be explored further and one will be selected to be developed further. The building concept should be clear, program placement explored, sustainable principles integrated early into design and circulation development (Depending on typology, like elevator, fire, lighting capacities, span depths should be studied here. By the end of this phase the function and form of the building should be clearly articulated and poised for further development. You should have a structural concept for your building to discuss with your structural advisor. Phase 6 (P3) Design Development: weeks 26 – 30 The spatial organization will be explored in more detailed plans and sections of your building; you should already be thinking about a material concept and express your intentions through collages and quality references. This is also the phase where must articulate your façade concept. What are the main principles, how does it work conceptually through diagrams, how does it connect to your sustainability concept. How does it impact the building from a distance, from inside, etc.. You should also have a pre-visualization of the most important / interesting spaces in your building. This will be the bases for your renders and collages in the final phases.


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HAVANA SITE LOCATIONS 2.1m

2.1m

La Habana Alamar

Post Revolution Utopian Havana Group Site Model 1:1000

2.1m 2.1m

2.1m 2.1m

La Habana Vieja

La Habana Vedado

UNESCO Protected / Touristic Havana Group Site Model 1:1000

Westernized Affluent Havana Group Site Model 1:1000

2.1m

2.1m

La Habana Profunda

Deep Working Class Havana Group Site Model 1:1000

La Habana Vedado

Westernized Affluent Havana Group Site Model 1:1000

La Habana Vieja

UNESCO Protected / Touristic Havana Group Site Model 1:1000

La Habana Profunda

Deep Working Class Havana Group Site Model 1:1000

La Habana Alamar

Post Revolution Utopian Havana Group Site Model 1:1000

URBAN ANALYSIS

(Preliminary list of themes to compare between selected sites)

TOURISM

Preservation & Heritage Expansion & Neglect Neglect as Heritage Unesco vs Developers Tourism Boom Mega City vs Thinning Culture & History Lack of Advertising Public Space & WiFi

ECONOMY

Innovation through necessity Retail & Sharing Economy Inform pop-up economy Official Trade & Export Unofficial Trade & Export Entrepreneurs & Regulation Food Production & Rations Recycling, Reuse, Waste Urban Farming

POLICY

SOCIETY

Ideology Goverment & Policy

Health Care & Prevention Education & Freedom Music & Musicians

Public Opionion Private Opinion Religion & Belief Corruption Colonialism Capitalism Communism Liberated Professions

Artistist & Writers Urban Squatting Public Safety Crime & Punishment Cuban Military Service Climate Change


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P5 weeks 0.5

P1

Msc 3 CP SHOW

5 weeks

P5 weeks 1.5

Msc 4

P2

P4 weeks 2.5

5 weeks

P3

P3.5 4 weeks

4 weeks

Phase 1

Phase 2

Phase 3

Phase 4

Phase 5

Phase 6

Phase 7

KICK OFF

RESEARCH

CONCEPT

FINALISING

CONCEPT DEVELOPMENT

DESIGN DEVELOPMENT

MATERIALISATION

Initial Suspicion

Thesis Topic

Basic Concept

Thesis Intervnetion

Design Concept

Preliminary Design

Materialisatio


MSc3/4

FALL 2016

Phase 7 (P3.5) Materialization: weeks 31 – 34 Now that your building is well underway we want you to zoom back and re-examine how your building is working within your master-plan, this will help you to seamlessly integrate your building into the overall vision of the region and make sure that your architectural design decisions are reinforcing your urban strategy into a clear narrative. Here we would like you to do a detailed 3D Axonometric drawing of your ground floor and it’s relation to the other urban spaces in the vicinity (See graphic template for more details) You should continue developing you façade and clarifying how your building works as a whole through rendered spatial diagrams. We would also like you to visualize how the building looks from different scales and perspectives in the city and in key spaces in the building (Preliminary draft of panels should be complete at this phase scaled to fit on A3). Phase 8 (P4) Finalizing: weeks 35 – 38 This is where you will refine and develop your project based advice from your tutors and building off of all previous phases. All plans, collages, drawings, diagrams will go through a refinement and clarification. Your building detail will be explored in much more precision and detail. All elements of your building and design will be seamlessly integrated into a clear compelling project that touches on all issues from analysis, problem definition, urban design, building in context, building concept, materialization, to critical detail and told in a clear story.

Revolution Square 1965

GRADUATION CP EXPO

.5 eks

P 4 3 weeks

se 7

Phase 8

Phase 9

Phase 10

ALISAON

FINALISING

MODELS

EXHIBITION

Final Project

Final Presentation

Final Show

isation

P5

6 weeks

P1 week 5.5

Phase 9 (P5) Models: weeks 40 – 43 Based you your comments and mark-ups from your P4 you will have an additional month to make further refinements, build a models and final touches to your presentation for the public jury and formal graduation. This phase will be all about the details, books finished, panels refined, narrative polished, models photographed, entire year’s work structured into a concentrated story about Havana and your design proposal. Phase 10 (P5.5) Exhibition: weeks 44 – 45 This is the year end show where all CP students are invited to celebrate, and showcase their projects to friends, family and the public in a final exhibition and awards ceremony. Research books, wallpaper and student models will be on display to highlight the complexity and richness of the students work as a coherent body of spatial research.

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La Habana Vieja

UNESCO Protected / Touristic Havana

No other area in Havana gives such a vivid and immediate impression of the city’s history as Habana Vieja (Old Havana). Cobbled plazas, shadowy streets, colonial mansions, leafy courtyards, sixteenth-century fortresses and architecture famously ravaged by time and climate are all remarkably unmarred by modern change or growth. Ironically, however, the very lack of urban development between the 1960s and 1990s, which allowed the historical core to be so untouched, was the same force that allowed for the area’s subsequent decay. The huge restoration project of this UNESCO World Heritage Site that began some 25 years ago is visibly still underway today, and though there are now one or two whole streets almost completely lined by beautifully renovated buildings, much work remains. But though its central streets are heaving with visitors, Habana Vieja is no sanitized tourist trap, and the area buzzes with a frenetic sense of life and

a raw sense of the past – for every recently restored colonial building, there are ten crumbling apartment blocks packed with residents. And in the side-streets, neighbours chat through wrought-iron window grills and schoolchildren attend classes in former merchants’ houses.


FALL 2016

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La Habana Vedado

Westernized Affluent Havana

The cultural heart of the city, graceful Vedado draws the crowds with its palatial hotels, contemporary art galleries, exciting (and sometimes incomprehensible) theatre productions and live music concerts, not to mention its glut of restaurants, bars and nightspots. Loosely defined as the area running west of Calzada de Infanta up to the Río Almendares, Vedado is less ramshackle than other parts of the city. Tall 1950s buildings and battered hot rods parked outside glass-fronted stores lend the downtown area a strongly North American air, contrasted with the classical ambience of nineteenth-century mansions; the general impression is of an incompletely sealed time capsule, where the decades and centuries all run together. Vedado is fairly easy to negotiate, laid out on a grid system divided by four main thoroughfares: the broad and handsome boulevards Avenida de los Presidentes (also called Calle G) and Paseo, running

north to south, and the more prosaic Linea and Calle 23 running east to west. The most prominent sector is modern La Rampa – the name given to a busy section of Calle 23 immediately west from the Malecón, as well as the streets just to the north and south. Presenting a rather bland uniformity that’s absent from the rest of Vedado, it’s a relatively small space, trailing along the eastern part of the Malecón and spanning just a couple of streets inland. A little to the south of La Rampa proper is the elegant Universidad de La Habana, attended by orderly students who personif the virtues of post-Revolution education.

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COMPLEX PROJECTS

La Habana Alamar

Post Revolution Utopian Havana

Alamar is a New Town to the east of Havana, originally destined to become a luxurious American-style suburb. In 1959, Fidel Castro halted these developments and put an end to any investment in the capital city. Castro’s policy was to replace the projected building of villa’s with that of prefab apartment blocks for the workers, built by microbrigades. By now, Alamar has 90.000 inhabitants. In the eighties the area was quite popular, but this changed in the Special Period because of the distance to the city centre and the lack of public transport. Recently, the low quality of housing and services have turned Alamar into a city in decline. However, the New Town has by now acquired its own identity and role in the urban region. Alamar has become internationally famous as the birthplace of Cuban Hip Hop, producing a number of local artists that meanwhile have found their way

abroad. Regularly, hip-hop events and festivals are organized in Alamar. Part of its identity is also the production of food: Alamar has a reputation as forerunner in the urban agriculture movement. Large plantations have been made in what was planned as the urban centre of Alamar. Born out of necessity, the question is what the future of this practice will be in a period of economic growth.


FALL 2016

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La Habana Profunda

Deep Working Class Havana

Habana Profunda (Deep Havana) is the living space of a large part of the population, and it is the visible expression of the diversity of this metropolis. Deep Havana represents an important share of the city’s cultural and urban heritage with a great richness of urban typologies and identities. It can in some ways be regarded as the heartland of Havana. Deep Havana has a key role especially in view of Havana’s future development: On the one hand, it is situated at the geographic center of the city, and features a differentiated urban structure with great qualities. It should be regarded as an important asset and resource, as a reservoir of Havana’s authenticity, and as a platform for future development. On the other hand, it is a neglected area that has until now not received the necessary public attention and is not recognized as an essential part of Havana. As a result, there is a great risk that the current process of

deterioration of its buildings will continue, possibly producing severe social problems. This highlights the importance of looking at Havana not only from the point of view of the shiny, touristy parts of the city, but also from the perspective of this hilly and balconied hinterland.

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MODELS - coordination of the making models - making working 3D / foam model - making final group model

M W B Group A

Group B

Group C

Group D

HRVOJE SMIDIHEN

Bi-Monthly Updates Group Coordination

STUDIO MODELS EXHIBITION

WALLPAPER - coordination of the site material - making clean site drawing / satellite -Timeline / Infrographics / Impressions

M W B Group A

Group B

Group C

Group D

TANNER MERKELEY

Bi-Monthly Updates Group Coordination

STUDIO WALLPAPER EXHIBITION

BOOK - coordination of the making book - collecting & editing material for book - making and oganising book

M W B Group A

Group B

Group C

Group D

MICHELLE PROVOOST TANNER MERKELEY

Bi-Monthly Updates Group Coordination

FINAL STUDIO PUBLICATION

Site Models are an essential part of collaborative design discussions in the studio. The information needed to create a site model will also form the framework for clean CAD file and the basis for a 3D model which will also be an important tool utilized throughout the year. Each studio group will develop a 2km x 2km 1:1000 site model of their respective site. We will display these site models next to each other to learn about the diverse urban morphology of Havana’s urban fabric. Group Site models will be first made in foam and will be set up in a designated spot in the studio so students can test design ideas and cultivate a collaborative dialogue through out the year. The site models will part of a large exhibition at the end of the year and will help to locate and contextualize individual student projects.

The wallpaper exhibition plays an important role in filtering and sharing important information about Havana. The wallpaper will also help contextualize the four sites and student work over the course of the year. We will focus primarily on three main areas: satellite and CAD mapping of the region, statistics and data relating to Havana, & impressions / photos / video of the atmosphere of the city. We will work with selecting and refining the most essential research and work and presenting this content in a visually clear and appealing form. Teams of 3 students/ group will be responsible for collecting, organizing and synchronizing the work done in each group and across the entire studio. We will work together to create / curate the final exhibition data wall for the P1.5 & P5.5 CP end show.

The intention of the group studio book is to compare the four distinctly different urban areas in Havana through central themes that emerge through the urban research. Chapters such as: history, politics, working, living, food, transport, typology, society, interviews, culture and tourism will be investigated in detail. For instance: one chapter will be dedicated to a detailed typology study investigating the typical vernacular forms and construction techniques. The book will encompass a summary of the entire body of work developed over the entire year and should function as a stand alone compilation of research analysis and student design proposals developed as final thesis projects. Teams of 3 students/ group will be responsible for collecting, organizing and synchronizing the work done in each group and across the entire studio. The book deadline will be two weeks before the P5.5 exhibition.

Site Model Construction Techniques

Wallpaper Infographic Instalation

Final Edited Studio Book


FALL 2016

TRIP PLANNING: There is a site trip planned for Havana. We encourage all student who have the opportunity to join if possible. Students that would like to join the trip are each responsible for booking their own flights. Sky-scanner is a good resource for finding the most economical options. Return flights are approximately 650-850Euro. Accommodation can be booked through Airbnb or Havana Casa Particular we suggest staying in La Habana Vieja or Habana Vedado. To help students budget for their trip realistic costs from last years trip was approximately 60euro/day to cover all your expenses (accommodation 20euro, food 20euro, travel & extras 20euros) One and a half weeks (10 days) is a comfortable amount of time to see Havana and surrounding. We suggest travelling between October 20-October 30. This would be the optimal time to travel with the least conflicts in the TU Delft course calendar. Complex projects will use our contacts in Havana and with the CUAJE University to arrange special tours and site visits. Several CP tutors will also join the trip to help with the organization and planning. In principle groups will each prepare a research booklet before the trip and in Cuba will guide the other groups around their select areas in Havana explaining the highlights of their research in Havana. This will be useful for individual trip preparation and will help share the research and insights with the rest of the group and will help the students get a better understanding of the complexity and richness of the city. GROUP WORK & STUDIO WORKSHOPS There will be three main group assignments over the year. 1) A collective research and project book, 2) Site Models, and 3) a large 2D wallpaper or map of Havana displaying the student site interventions. The studio book will highlight important insights, student work, trip photos, interviews, typological research and themes that emerge over the entire year. The group work with be guest edited by Dr. Michelle Provoost and will be supported and guided by the CP staff. Each month we will try to have short workshops or lectures to help share practical skills and knowledge to help students expand their skills and tools for representing their project. PRESENTATIONS & EXHIBITIONS There will be ten official presentations and pin-ups over the year ranging in formality and size to help students develop a clear narrative and learn to articulate their projects in a professional and clear manner. We will invite guest critics periodically throughout the year and will have two opportunities to have a public event to share the student work outside of the TU Delft in a more public and

MSc3/4

informal way. Our goal as tutors is to continually refine the methods of representing, presenting and communicating the urban and architectural work. We encourage student to explore methods of presentation, storytelling and design documentation. COURSE WORK The Water seminar (AR3CP040) is paralleled by and connected with Cuba graduation studio and other seminars: the lecture series Research Methods (AR3A160) coordinated by prof. Tom Avermate and New Urban Questions or Minor Infractions (AR3AT060) led by Heidi Sohn, only in Q4. One word of advise is to focus all your course work towards the design studio so that you work as efficiently as possible and everything you do supplements the overall design process in the studio. For instance in the Urban Question Essay, why not write it about an Urban questions relating to Havana or a related topic to your project. From past experience we urge students to finish all your course work in MSc.3 if you defer and carry course work forward to MSc4 it will be very difficult to almost impossible to graduate in July (on time) due to the heavy work load in MSc.4. WEEKLY SCHEDULE: To be set with individual studio leaders (tentatively we plan to have the studio on Fridays TBA) If students would like additional support or feed back feel free to e-mail a weekly progress / concerns A4 portrait (recommended) best to send the questions in the middle of the week so you can react at the next scheduled meeting in the studio. Meetings in Rotterdam or Amsterdam are available by appointment Weekly updates to your process book or blog should be ongoing, and will be part of your overall grade assessment. DESIGN STUDIO PROCESS BOOKLET We would like each student to keep an ongoing archive of your sketchs, thoughts, articles, ideas and fascinations. Each student will produce an on-going book / blog (complex capsule) including weekly research assignments, weekly updates, and all supplemental research material. This book will be continuously updated throughout the year and will show the creative and analytic process of the student. It is an on-going process book that traces the student’s intellectual development and interests through the studio work and design process.

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COMPLEX PROJECTS

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PROPOSED END SHOW EXHIBITION PLAN

2D Installation (Timeline / Wallpaper / Photo / Video)

2.1m

2.1m

La Habana Vedado

Westernized Affluent Havana Group Site Model 1:1000

Books

La Habana Vieja

UNESCO Protected / Touristic Havana Group Site Model 1:1000

La Habana Profunda

La Habana Alamar

Books

Books

Deep Working Class Havana Group Site Model 1:1000

Books

12m

Models

70cm

70cm

14cm

Post Revolution Utopian Havana Group Site Model 1:1000


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137

Student Models at Various Scales (one 70cm x 70cm podium per student)

Area for panels

120cm

120cm 70cm 70cm

120cm 70cm 70cm

70cm 70cm


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Workers surveyed a building before it was demolished in September 2016 in Havana PROGRESS & GRADING How you get to a result is just as important as the final result. Your working process, consistency & quality of your weekly progress will influence your final grade. So take your working process very seriously over the year. This is how you will likely work in an office later so it will help you tremendously to learn how to work consistently and productively over the year. Ultimately each phase over the year is a an aggregation of work building to your final graduation. BOOKS & ESSAYS Havana Beyond the Ruins: Cultural Mappings After 1989 by Esther Katheryn Whitfield, Anke Birkenmaier, 2011 Poetics of Relation by Edouard Glissant, University of Michigan Press, 1997 Postscript on the Societies of Control. Gilles Deleuze. October, Vol. 59. 1992

The Old Man and the Sea by Ernest Hemingway, 1952 Cecilia Valdes (Angel Hill) by Cirilo Villaverde, 1839 FILMS & DOCUMENTARYS Unfinishedspaces, Cuba’s National Art School, 2011 Life Inside Cuba, BBC World News Documentary, 2011 CUBA: Defending Socialism, Resisting Imperialism, 2010 Suite Habana, Fernando PÊrez, 2003


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FALL 2016

MSC3 PLANNING

PHASE 1

PHASE 2

PHASE 3

PHASE 4

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MSc3/4 WATER SEMINAR


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MSc3 SEMINAR WATER SEMINAR AR3CP040 seminar within AR3CP010 Cuba studio (CP) in collaboration with AR3D02 Delta Interventions Studio (DI) FALL 2016 SEMINAR LEADERS Manuela Triggianese (CP Coordinator, Dept. Architecture) Taneha Kuzniecow Bacchin (DI Coordinator, Dept. Urbanism)

SEMINAR CONTEXT This course is part of the graduation studio of Complex Projects (CP) CUBA, Dept. Architecture, and of Delta Interventions Studio (DI) San Francisco Bay Area, Dept. of Urbanism. For the Architecture students, the Water seminar | CAPITA SELECTA is paralleled by the lecture series Research Methods (AR3A160) and New Urban Questions on Minor Infrastructure (AR3AT060), only in Q4. SEMINAR BRIEF In 2025, more than one billion people will be living in about one hundred megacities. The concentration of populations, services, goods and water bodies amplifies the consequences of water related risks: large-scale flooding, insufficient resources, environmental pollution and multiplication of dangers as a result of climate change. Furthermore, higher seas mean greater financial exposure for coastal cities, where the value of buildings and infrastructure is increasing. More frequent flooding would likely disrupt insurance underwriting and with it the financing that drives city developments.

In 2050 about 60% of the world population will be living in coastal areas, sometimes dangerous deltas all over the world making land-reclamation techniques and proper water-management techniques extremely important. Deltas, rivers and coastal cities become hubs of industry and trade. They provide ample food for their inhabitants because of the extremely fertile soil. However also the conceptual impact and the political and cultural consequences will become tangible. In sustainable territorial developments the relation to water goes far beyond the technical aspects of land reclamation. For Dutch this situation is as normal as breathing. The Netherlands is made out of water, with almost 4000 polders. Any city in the Netherlands is somehow related to the water or partially developed on reclaimed land. The creation of the regional water authorities started in 1122, organizing water safety on a regional functional level. In the country the production of land or vice versa the flooding of land was and is used as a military, political and economical tool. Throughout the history of Dutch urban planning, flooding devastated many cities


FALL 2016

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Complex Projects Water Seminar spring 2016 and the society was shaped around the system of polders with 22000km of dikes, creating connectivity and spatial transformations. An institutional world was established with the water at the core. Aspects as transport, sewage, drainage, storage are constantly measured in balance with reclamation and safety from flooding. It implies the entire control or balance of the water versus land situation and therefore also includes water as a part of the infrastructure of the country, the construction of land and infrastructure and the complex publicprivate relations as a result. Public, collective and private interests are constantly negotiated in these complex constructions. In the Netherlands, the production of land or vice versa the flooding of land was and is used as a military, political and economical tool. The expression ’poldermodel’ literally refers to the habit of dealing with societal issues by compromising and finding consensus among stakeholders, this implies collaboration. It produces a strong sense of shared values and interest in the ‘common’.

SEMINAR OBJECTIVE The seminar aims at knowledge development of the impact of (water) infrastructure in urban transformation processes, as well as the cultural conceptions and meaning of water in society. The water aspects that influence architecture and urban configurations of cities will be investigated with a multidisciplinary approach: flood risks management, geography, climate change, economy, politics, resiliency, ecology, design thinking, heritage (among others). The seminar challenges students to develop critical and comparative investigations on the power of tangible and intangible infrastructure that influence complex urban developments. They will develop research questions and positions in relation to the site of their graduation studio and in response to particular social, environmental, political and economical references and fascinations. They can look at the most relevant urbanized deltas or coastal cities in the world (Mekong Delta in Vietnam, Rhine-Meuse-Scheldt in North Europe, Nile Delta in Egypt, Bangladesh, Mississipi Delta in U.S. or the Yellow River in China, etc...).

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The seminar aims at knowledge development of the impact of water in urban transformation processes, the traditions of planning and architecture around water usage, as well as the cultural conceptions and meaning of water in society in different countries. The water aspects that influence architecture and urban configurations of cities will be investigated through the following sub-topics: water infrastrucCAPITA SELECTA ture, water management, water scarcity, geograArticulated in 3 sections - ON PROCESSES phy, climate and change, flood risks, economy, politics, (formation transformation of urbanized resiliency,ON adaptation strategies, history of extreme deltas), INSTRUMENTS OF DESIGN events (among (mapping andothers). drawing as a language, Questionswaterscapes) that might be addressed in this seminar reading and ON DESIGN (safe, are the cultural, climate and political differences, smart,resilience, design with uncentainties), that are important as a background to the site and the combined lectures of both researchers projects studied. and professionals will be multidisciplinary. The seminar challenges students to develop critical They will vary from the field of architecture and comparative investigations on the impact of and planning, heritage and policy, to ecology water on city developments, policies and building, and biology, to hydraulic engineering and focusing on the site of their graduation studio in process management. response to particular social, environmental, political and economical references. Other contexts will be analysed, such as the most relevant urbanized deltas or coastal cities in the world (Mekong Delta in Vietnam, Rhine-Meuse-Scheldt in North Europe, Nile Delta in Egypt, Ganges in India and Bangladesh)

CAPITA SELECTA spring 2016


MSc3/4

FALL 2016

TROPICA ISLANDS | CORAL REEFS Ecosystems & Human Disturbances

MILO DE BAAT Researcher at UVA, IBED Research Group of Aquatic Environmental Ecology

Coral reefs in Tropical Islands Ecosystem © diveplanit.com

APRIL 12TH 2016 Lecture ROOM U - 10:00

WATER SEMINAR | session #7

TOPICS: Coral reefs / Water quality/ Ecosystem Relationships / tropical mainland habitats. The lecturer will give a background on tropical islands, and especially coral reef, ecosystems. From there the focus will be on the impacts of human activities that cause disturbances on such ecosystems, giving some examples of sustainable solutions to avoid such disturbances. Here some seferences: Coral reef ecosystems in the Tropical Americas: https://www.ncdc.noaa.gov/paleo/outreach/coral/sor/sor_americas.html Maps that contain information about coral reefs in each one of the countries of the Wider Caribbean: http://wwf.panda.org/what_we_do/endangered_species/marine_turtles/lac_marine_turtle_programme/projects/hawksbill_caribbean_english/maps/coral_reefs/

Complex Projects

CAPITA SELECTA spring 2016

WWW.TUDELFT-ARCHITECTURE.NL/CHAIRS/COMPLEX PROJECTS

CHAIR Kees Kaan SEMINAR LEADER Manuela Triggianese

Complex Projects Faculty of Architecture and the Built Environment Delft University of Technology Julianalaan 134, 2628 BL, Delft Netherlands

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COMPLEX PROJECTS

WATER MAGAZINE This seminar investigates both the aspects of water-related design and the cultural dimention of ‘living with water’. The research questions will be addressed not only in relation to climate change adaptation strategies, flood risk management or ecology, but also to the politics of infrastructure and urbanization processes. (Water)infrastructure sets the invisible rules that govern the spaces of everyday life, making the city the key site of power and resistance in the twenty-first century. Students will develop ‘journalistic-style’ papers based on their research positions and fascinations, that will be collected in a one magazine.

Complex Projects Water Magazine spring 2016


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FALL 2016

CAPITA SELECTA 20th Sept - 13th Dec.

[CAPITA SELECTA]     th

session 01  

Tuesday, 20  September  

   

Waterscapes urbanism  and  architecture  dimensions      

DW-­‐IZ 3  (160  1verd)   Han  Meyer   Frits  Palmboom   Kees  Kaan  

09:45-­‐10:30 10:45-­‐11:15   11:30-­‐12:15  

Tineke Ruijgh    

DW-­‐IZ 3  (160  1verd)   09:45-­‐10:45  

Jeroen van  den  Bos     Leon  Hermans  

11:00-­‐12:00 12:30-­‐13:30  

Steffen Nijhuis     Milo  de  Baat   to  be  defined    by  CEG  

DW-­‐IZ 3  (160  1verd)   09:45-­‐10:45   11:00-­‐12:00   12:30-­‐13:30  

Carola Hein   Reinout  Rutte  

BK-­‐CZ B   13:30-­‐14:30   14:45-­‐15:45  

Han Meyer  

BK-­‐CZ B   09:45-­‐10:45  

INTRODUCTION     th

session 02    

Tuesday, 27  September   Planning,  decision  making  and  negotiations                    

 

Hydraulic structures  and  flood  risk     Stakeholder  processes  in  planning,  decision-­‐making   and  implementation     Ecology   Ecosystems  and  Human  disturbances   Coastal  morphology  and  morphodynamics  of   estuaries   th Thursday,  06    October   Urbanization  and  economic  exploitation    

session 03         session  04      

ON  PROCESSES     session  05    

th

session 06  

Tuesday, 11    October   Reading/  designing  for  different  dynamics  of   urbanized  deltas                                                                                         th Thursday,  13    October  

Space and  place  narratives  –  exploring  by  drawing  

BK-­‐CZ Q   Frits  Palmboom  

09:45-­‐11:00

ON  INSTRUMENTS  OF  DESIGN     session  07       session  08     session  09       session  10       session  11     session  12       session  13        

st

Tuesday, 01  November   Designing  with  scales  Water  sensitive  design   Designing  with  scales  Nature  as  performative   infrastructure   th Tuesday,  8  November   Building  with  nature   th Tuesday,  15  November   Site-­‐specific  design  Cultural  agency     Site-­‐specific  design  Design  principles   nd Tuesday,  22    November   Designing  with  time  flexibility  of  the  urban   structure   Designing  with  time  designing  for  adaptation   th Tuesday,  29    November   Resilience  by  Design  Transformation  challenge   st Tuesday,  06  December   Designing  with  uncertainties  hydraulic  engineering   designs   Designing  with  uncertainties  Sunsurface/surface   spatial  design  synchronicity   th Tuesday,  13  December   Design  thinking  for  integrated  infrastructure   engineering     Complex  projects    

Nanco Dolman  (RDHV)   Taneha  Bacchin  

Session being  confirmed   Joost  Koningen     Frans  Klijn   Birgit  Hausleitner   Peter  van  Veelen  

  BK-­‐CZ  B   09:45-­‐10:45   11:00-­‐12:00   BK-­‐CZ  B   09:45-­‐10:45  

Kristina Reinders    

11:00-­‐12:00 BK-­‐CZ  B   09:45-­‐10:45   BK-­‐CZ  B   09:00-­‐10:00  

Fransje Hooimeijer  

11:00-­‐12:00

Joannes Visser  

IO-­‐Bernd Schierbeek   09:45-­‐10:45  

Bert van  Eekelen   Manuela  Triggianese  

11:00-­‐12:00 12:30-­‐13:30  

Chris Zevenbergen  

ON DESIGN      

26-­‐Zaal 2   09:45-­‐10:45   11:00-­‐12:00  

CAPITA SELECTA fall 2016

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WEEKLY SCHEDULE Every Tuesday from 9:45 to 12:45 (exceptions may apply for the lecture series, check with the tutor). Monthly submission of progressive articles and final magazine. Meeting with the seminar leaders for reviewing the papers (upon appointment) DELIVERABLES Article (journalistic-style): 2500-3000 words (20000 characters - included space) The final deliverable of the seminar will be: WATER Magazine, issue #2, edited by the seminar leaders and presented in February 2017. Additional information For the journalistic-style: please read ‘Creative nonfiction Writing ‘ (https://davehood59.wordpress. com/2010/03/29/how-to-write-a-literary-journalistic-essay/). For English editing: On matters of spelling and punctuation we follow Oxford English (thus, colour/ behaviour and familiarise/standardise). For the references: Chicago Manual of Style (http:// www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/tools_citationguide. html) For the Visuals: the argumentation of your papers need to be supported by relevant graphic illustrations with captions. Please avoid images found on google and use your sketches, key plans, diagrams.... The final article will be supported by pictures and extracts of interviews you will potentially make during your fieldtrip and site research. Structure of the article (paper): Title, sub-title and short abstract (150 words) followed by 5 paragraphs (1. Introduction/Event; 2. Background/History; 3. Argumentation; 4. Conclusion/Lesson Learned; 5. References). The full article has to include a short text (or digression) of around 500 words, related to similar or extremely different issues investigated in the paper in a different geographical context (country). IMAGES: TIFF or JPEG (300DPI) with captions (students might use pictures taken during the fieldtrip) The layout of the magazine will be sent to you from the second submission of the Draft paper. DEADLINES Thursday 22nd September: FASCINATION - one-page (300 words) describing your chosen topic - one page setting out a plan of action: what you will read, how you will develop the article, initial ideas - one page with properly captioned images (describing what we are looking at and the source).

Tuesday 11th October: Draft ARTICLE - introduction of 300 words - 1,000-word finely edited paper - illustrations and captions - appendix consisting of properly sourced original data Thursday 10th November: Draft ARTICLE - as above, edited and improved according to comments - introduction of 500 words - 2,500-word finely edited paper Tuesday 20th December: Final ARTICLE - as above, edited and improved according to comments - follow the layout of the magazine (n. of paragraph and words) February: PRESENTATION OF THE MAGAZINE READINGS Boeijenga, J. & Mensink, J. (2008) VINEX Atlas, Rotterdam: 010 Publishers Colenbrander, B.; van Gessel, M. and Steenbergen, C. (2007). Atlas Nieuwe Hollandse Waterlinie. Rotterdam: 010 Uitgeverij. Hooimeijer, F. and Kamphuis, M. (2001) The Water Project. A nineteenth-century walk through Rotterdam. Rotterdam: 010 Publishers Hooimeijer,F.; Meyer, H. and Nienhuis, A. (2005) Atlas van de Nederlandse waterstad. Amsterdam: SUN Reh, W.; Steenbergen, C. and Aten, D. (2005). Zee van Land; De droogmakerij als atlas van de Hollandse landschapsarchitectuur. Amsterdam: Toth Meyer, H., Bobbink, I. and Nijhuis, S. (2010) Delta Urbanism: The Netherlands. Chicago/Washington: APA Planners Press. Anne Loes Nillesen (2014), Improving the allocation of flood-risk interventions from a spatial quality perspective, Journal of Landscape Architecture, 9:1, 20-31 Han Meyer, Steffen Nijhuis (2014) Urbanizing deltas in Transition, Amsterdam: Techne Press Fransje Hooimeijer (2014) The Tradition of Making: Poldercities, Amsterdam: Techne Press Waggonner & Ball Architects (2013) Greater New Orleans Urban Water Plan Peter Newman (2009) Resilient Cities Responding to Peak Oil and Climate Change, Washington: Island Press Jean-Jacques Terrin (2015) Villes inondables : Prévention, résilience, adaptation, Paris: Editions Parenthèses Keller Easterling (2014) Extrastatecraft: The Power of Infrastructure Space, London: Verso Gregory Bateson (2000) Steps to an Ecology of Mind, Chicago: University of Chicago Press


MSc3/4

FALL 2016

“Due to its fundamental role in society’s life, water has a strong cultural dimension. Without understanding and considering the cultural aspects of our water problems, no sustainable solution can be found.” Session Water and Cultural Diversity, Statement to the Ministerial Conference, 3rd World Water Forum, 22 March 2003

Vendicari Nature Reserve, Sicily – Sanility

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MSc 4 GRADUATION PROJECTS


CP GRADUATION | FINAL PRESENTATION


CP GRADUATION | FINAL PRESENTATION


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CP GRADUATION PROJECTS

MSC4 During the MSc4, the architectural proposal (presented at P2) will be developped into a clear and comprehensive architectural design till scale 1:1. The architectural design proposal clearly results form the research and Master plan made during the MSc3. The spatial organization will be explored in more detailed plans and sections of the building. What are the main principles, how does it work conceptually through diagrams, how does it connect to your sustainability concept. How does it impact the building from a distance, from inside, etc. All elements of the building and design will be seamlessly integrated into a clear compelling project that touches on all issues from analysis, problem definition, urban design, building in context, building concept, materialization, to critical detail and told in a clear story (narrative).

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NAFTA EXCHANGE Joeseph Bailey Juarez, Mexico MSc 4 | Complex Projects, El Paso/Juarez | Hrvoje Smidihen


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INFRASTRUCTURAL HUB Maicol Cardelli Juarez, Mexico MSc 4 | Complex Projects, El Paso/Juarez | Hrvoje Smidihen


FALL 2016

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WATER TOWER Egle Briliauskaite Juarez, Mexico MSc 4 | Complex Projects, El Paso/Juarez | Hrvoje Smidihen


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TEACHING STAFF


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CP TEACHING STAFF

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1

Kees Kaan

Chair Professor

In 2014 Kees Kaan founded KAAN Architecten together with partners Vincent Panhuysen and Dikkie Scipio, after collaborating with Felix Claus for 25 years as Claus en Kaan Architecten. He has built up a national and international range of projects, urban planning, architecture and interior design, among which in the last five years the won competitions for the master plan El Prat de Llobregat in Barcelona, the Chambre des Métiers et de l’Artisanat in Lille, the Royal Museum of Fine Arts in Antwerp and the Pharmacy building on the campus of the University of Granada. Realized projects include the Supreme Court of The Netherlands, Provinciehuis Noord-Brabant and the multiple awards winning the Crematorium Heimolen in Sint-Niklaas, Belgium, the Netherlands Forensic Institute in The Hague, awarded with the Lensvelt De Architect Interior Prize, and the Royal Netherlands

Embassy in Maputo, Mozambique. Various books and exhibitions have been dedicated to his body of work. Kees Kaan has been a practice professor of Architectural Design (Chair of Materialization) at the Delft University of Technology since 2006. In 2012 he founded a new Chair ‘Complex Projects’. The ambition of this program is to develop analytical and critical thinking skills on any scale projects in the city, merging knowledge from the different fields of architecture and urbanism. As well as taking on a range of peripheral activities, he is an international lecturer and member of various juries and boards both in the Netherlands and abroad, in cities like Barcelona, Berlin, Dublin, Madrid, Mexico City, Paris, Split, São Paulo, Brasilia, Novosibirsk and Tokyo.


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Henri van Bennekom

Olindo Caso

Henri van Bennekom (1964) graduated cum laude from TU Delft faculty of Architecture, and graduated from the Amsterdamse Technische Hogeschool. He has worked primarily as a designer/project leader on large public buildings, such as the headquarters of ‘De Nederlandsche Bank’ in Amsterdam, The European Patent Office in The Hague (at A+D+P Architecten), the Netherlands Forensic Institute in the Hague (with Claus en Kaan Architecten), and the Courts of Justice in Zwolle (for the Governmental Building Agency). Henri van Bennekom is founding partner of the architectural firm ‘VBVP Architecten’, mainly designing private residences in The Netherlands and The United States. Together with Kees Kaan he is responsible for the Chair of complex projects.

Olindo Caso graduated at the Faculty of Architecture of the University of Naples ‘Federico II’ (1988, with honourable mention). In 1990 he began collaborating with the TU Delft where in 1999 he achieved his Ph.D. defending a dissertation about the relevance of ICT for the design of spatial settings. Olindo Caso also runs his own architectural practice since 1989 and has experience in the design and consultancy about ‘the space of mobility’. Specialist in multidisciplinary research and the relationships between different scales of design he is the author of a variety of (international) publications and research reports. Last title appeared: Architettura contemporanea: Olanda. Motta, 2009.

Teacher and Coordinator of MSc program of the Dept. of Architecture

Assistant Professor and Researcher


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Roberto Cavallo

Esther Gramsbergen

Roberto Cavallo is an architect, principal at STUDIO-AI based in Amsterdame. He is member of the steering team of the research programme ‘The Architectural Project and its Foundations’ and a key actor in two research programmes of the Department of Architecture: Architecture and the City, Public Building /Public Realm, Composition & Tectonics, and Mapping Randstad Holland. He has been organising and coordinating several international workshops, symposia and conferences (the last one the EAAEISUF International Conference ‘New Urban Configuration’ in 2012, with the proceedings book published under his supervision). His scientific publications range from the urban to the architectural project. In 2013 he worked as senior researcher at the Shanghai Academy of Social Sciences (SASS), Centre for Urban and Regional Studies (CURS), and at the Faculty of Architecture of Hong Kong University (HKU).

She has a degree in architecture from TU Delft and worked as an architect in various offices, among which Karelse van der Meer Architecten (Groningen, Rotterdam) and the Architecten Cie. (Amsterdam). She has been teaching and researching at the TU Delft since 1999 and is co-author of Zakboek voor de woonomgeving (2001). She has further publications on urban morphology of Amsterdam and Dordrecht. In 2009 she became editor of OverHolland, a series of books dedicated to the study of the Dutch Town, published on behalf of Delft University of Technology, Faculty of Architecture. In 2011 she was awarded the title of dottore di ricerca at the IUAV University of Venice for her study Inner fringe belts and the formation of the knowledge infrastructure in Amsterdam, 1578-1880.

Associate Professor and Director of Education at TU Delft Bouwkunde

Assistant Professor and Researcher


COMPLEX PROJECTS

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Tanner Merkeley

Manuela Triggianese

Tanner Merkeley is a project architect at OMA & AMO since 2005. Throughout his time at OMA, Tanner has worked on a wide range of projects focusing on: culture, politics, business, energy infrastructure, urbanism, post-occupancy, product design and teaching and how these forces influence our own contemporary architectural production. Tanner has taught at the TU Delft since 2011 and has been an invited guest critic at the Berlage Institute in 2012 and 2013. Tanner holds degrees in architecture from Canada & the Netherlands.

Graduated cum laude in Architecture at the Second University of Naples (Italy), she studied both in Italy and in Belgium (Bruxelles). She is researcher and coordinator of the Chair of Complex Projects at TU Delft Faculty of Architecture. In April 2015 she moved to Beijing (China) as UKNA research fellow conducting research activities and teaching activities at Beijing University of Technology. She has been participating for 3 years (2011/2014) to the international research program ‘Villard d’ Honnecourt’ coordinated by IUAV, the Italian Faculty of Architecture in Venice, in collaboration with ETSAM in Madrid (Escuela tecnica superior de arquitectura) and Ecole Nationale Superieure d’Architecture de Paris Belleville. She currently collaborates as architectural researcher at KAAN Architecten. She has published articles in journals and presented papers in international and national conferences.

Guest Teacher Architect at OMA*AMO

Researcher and Coordinator of the Chair of Complex Projects


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9

Sebastian Janusz

Stefan de Koning

Sebastian Janusz is a project architect with 15 years of professional experience with well regarded architectural practices including Rem Koolhaas/ Office for Metropolitan Architecture, UNStudio, NL Architects and Herman Hertzberger. After being classically trained as a pianist and composer in Poland and Russia from the age of five, he studied architecture in Poland and Germany and completed his masters degree at the Amsterdam Academy of Architecture, The Netherlands. He is visiting lecturer at The Royal Academy of Art in The Hague and at the Minerva Art Academy in Groningen and visiting critic at the Amsterdam Academy of Architecture and at the TU Delft.

Stefan de Koning graduated as an interior architect and designer from the Gerrit Rietveld Academie Amsterdam in 2001, after obtaining a degree in industrial and architectural design from the Design Academy Eindhoven in 1998. Since 2002 he joined MVRDV and became a registered architect. As senior project leader he is active on both the front and back side of the office. Within the projects he monitors the design process and is also responsible for the planning and communication. Since 2014 he is a tutor Masters in Architecture at the TU Delft.

Guest Teacher Architect at UN STUDIO

Guest Teacher Architect at MVRDV


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Paul Cournet

Aldo Trim

Paul Cournet is an architect at OMA*AMO. After studying at Bordeaux Architecture School and Paris La Villette Architecture School, Paul joined OMA in 2010. While OMA remains dedicated to the realization of buildings and masterplans, AMO operates in areas beyond the traditional boundaries of architecture, including media, politics, sociology, renewable energy, technology, fashion, curating, publishing, and graphic design.

Aldo Trim graduated with honours at the Faculty of Architecture of Delft University of Technology in 2003 and thereafter collaborated with Claus en Kaan Architecten in Rotterdam. In 2006 he joined Abalos y Herreros Arquitectos in Madrid as project architect for international competitions. Back in the Netherlands in 2009, Aldo Trim founded Plane Sight, a design office for architecture, but with a range of other activities such as education, writing and photography. Aldo Trim is correspondent for various media, studio leader at the faculty of Architecture of the Delft University of Technology and teaches at the Rotterdam Academy of Architecture. Since 2013 he is a member of the Commission for Spatial Quality in the city of Amersfoort.

Guest Teacher Architect at OMA*AMO

Guest Teacher Architect at KAAN Architecten


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Stefanos Filippas

Hrvoje Smidihen

Stefanos Filippas received his Master degree in Architecture with honours from the University of Thessaly in Greece in 2012. Since 2011 he has been working for Austria and Netherlands based office TD architects. His work besides architecture, focuses on visual journalism and multi-layered information essays. These essays have been published in Mark and GEO magazines. He has participated in architecture, design and art exhibitions like Milan Furniture Fair (Milan, 2012), Venice Architecture Biennale (Venice, 2012), Dutch Design week (Eindhoven, 2013), Future Fictions Z33 (Hasselt, 2014) and Bi-City Biennale of Urbanism\ Architecture (Shenzhen, 2015).

Hrvoje Smidihen, after graduating the Master of Architecture and Urban Planning at the Technical University Delft in 2014 (with honourable mention), he joined Rotterdam based DOMAIN office. He is currently Architect at KAAN Architecten. His final graduation project was nominated for Archi Prix. Prior to his studies in Delft, he did undergraduate program at the Faculty of Architecture in Zagreb and worked in Croatian office STUDIO UP. He teaches architecture graduation studio at TU Delft.

Guest Teacher Architect at TD Architects

Guest Teacher Architect at KAAN Architecten


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Albert Takashi Richters

Alexander Pols

Albert Takashi Richters is a freelance architect operating predominantly from Rotterdam. Richters attained his Master degree in Architecture with honourable mention in 2010. Next to his own design work, Richters has collaborated with small studios such as Inter.National.Design, Studio Oblique (Samir Bantal), and MAKS (Marieke Kums). Since 2012 Richters is co-founder of POST--OFFICE - an observatory and platform for the state of contemporary architecture in Rotterdam. Richters sees P--O as an alternative space for academic achievement in the design field. For P--O, which has a predominantly international character, he works closely with the municipality to embed the platform within the context of Rotterdam. He currently tutors the MSc1 Anatomy of a Landmark studio.

Alexander Pols (Rotterdam, 1973) studied Architecture at the TU Delft and South Bank University in London. After graduating, he worked for several German offices in Berlin. Since 1998 he has worked at the Berlin architectural office of Prof. Hans Kollhoff and in 2000 started the Dutch branch of the agency. He teaches at the Technical University of Delft and the Rotterdam Academy of Architecture. Alexander is based in The Hague on various projects for Hans Kollhoff and Pols & Baranowski Architecten.

Guest Teacher Co-founder of POST-OFFICE

Guest Teacher Architect at KOLLHOFF Arkitecten


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Afaina de Jong

Andrew Balster

Prior to starting her research and design studio AFARAI in 2005, she worked for the Hakuhodo Institute of Live and Living in Tokyo and at AMO-OMA. Afaina’s aim is to cross the boundaries of the traditional architecture practice by dealing with the existing city with a multidisciplinary approach, integrating research and design with a strong focus on social design. With AFARAI she has worked on a divers portfolio of projects from architectural design for the Architectural League in New York to monumental re-use projects like the MC theater and the redevelopment the Hofplein station into a shopping-mall for creative entrepreneurs. In 2012 Afaina published her first book for the People, By the People; a visual story on the DIY city and opened the Creative Space Ultra de la Rue in Amsterdam’s infamous Red Light District. Afaina joined Complex Projects in 2014 and is currently working on her PHD research at the TU Delft.

Andrew Balster is a Chicago-based leader operating in the fields of architecture, urbanism, public policy, sociology, and academia. Working closely with influential leaders in the public and private sector, ranging from architects and planners to government officials and social activists, he creates research platforms with universities to explore many forms of cultural production. In practice, Balster has worked on projects that are broad in typology and scale - ranging from small civic centers to super-tall towers to entire urban districts. Balster was a Senior Designer at Skidmore, Owings & Merrill in Chicago on several award-winning projects located all over the globe. He received an MScAAD and a MArch w/ distinction from the University of Edinburgh in the UK. He currently serves as the Executive Director of Archeworks in Chicago.

Visiting Critic Founder of AFARAI

Visiting Critic Executive Director of ARCHEWORKS


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Roland Reemaa

Steven Steenbruggen

Roland Reemaa studied in Estonian Academy of Arts and completed his Master of Science degree in Architecture in TU Delft, Netherlands. He has worked in AB Salto (EST), collaborated with 3+1 Architects (EST) and is currently an architect in KAAN Architecten, Rotterdam (NLD). Roland was one of the editors of 39 Town Halls (Tallinn 2013), published for the 2013 Tallinn Architecture Biennale Curator’s Exhibition. He has taken part in summer schools led by Anne Holtrop, Kersten Geers, Juhani Pallasmaa and tutored a workshop in EASA Slovenia together with Laura Linsi.

Steven Steenbruggen (1971) graduated at the TU Delft in Architecture and is a practicing architect since 1998. After working in several offices he starts his own architectual office in 2002, Studio Steenbruggen. As an architect he realised various projects, from several private houses to a new hotel concept like the Volkshotel. He is also teaching at the TU Delft, started as guest teacher in 2000. He became member of staff in the former chair of Leen van Duin (started in 2006) and is now (since 2013) joining the team of Complex projects. He is teaching in bachelor and master and assist in the development of the last bachelor reform in which he is coördinating now the first architectural design assignment ‘Huis & verankering’. He is also co-editor of Raadhuizen (2007).

Guest Teacher Architect at KAAN Architecten

Teacher at TU Delft Founder of Studio Steenbruggen


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Michelle Provoost

Visiting Critic Executive Director of INTI

Dr. Michelle Provoost is an architectural historian specialised in urban planning history, postwar architecture and contemporary urban development. She co-founded the office of Crimson Architectural Historians in 1994, which has subsequently been engaged in a large number of research and design projects in the fields of urban planning, architecture and art. Since 2008 Dr. Provoost has served as Director of the International New Town Institute (INTI) in Almere, the Netherlands. Under her direction, INTI has grown into an internationally known center for education and research relating to New Towns. Dr. Provoost is the head editor of the INTI publications.

She teaches at various universities in the Netherlands and abroad and continues to be in great demand as a public speaker. She lectures regularly throughout Europe, Asia, Africa and the United States, and has been involved in many municipal, national and private committees and juries..


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RESEARCH


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OverHolland publications, a selection


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Mapping the Territory

CP & History Chairs, Research Programme “Mapping the territory and the cities of the Randstad” presents a comparative analysis of the architecture of the nine most important historical cities of the Randstad Holland based on the historical dynamics of the system of Dutch cities and its impact on the interaction of urban form and building typology. It is an interdisciplinary research group with special focus on architecture. It aims to bring about an intensive exchange of scientific knowledge. In collaboration with other parties, the aim of the group is to publish an Atlas of the Randstad Holland. The Atlas is intended as a comprehensive design tool for future architectural interventions. In the meantime the research group publishes in collaboration with Vantilt publishers once or twice a year an issue of OverHolland. The book series is dedicated to architectural studies for the Dutch cities. The subjects that are addressed by an international group of authors vary from architectural interventions, typomorphological research and theoretical reflections on mapping and architectural design. This research group is focussing on the following themes: ‘Randstad Holland’, planning concept and material context. • the impact of transportation systems on the formation & form of Dutch cities •the impact of public institutions on the formation and the form of Dutch cities •changing architectural typologies, their impact on urban land use & density Coordinator: Esther Gramsbergen


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Various optimisation opportunities for cities Air quality

Health, businesses, services Buildings

Public transportation

Energy network

Environmental noise

© La Fabrique de la Cité

Water supply

© La Fabrique de la Cité

Multiple data sources

Internet of Things

Internet and social networks

Mobile apps

Towards Data-Driven Cities and new technologies

Sensors


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187

Urban Makeover: Amsterdam 2025

CP & AMS, Strategic Research Project Available (big) data are often both over-abundant and incomplete. The main focus of the researcg is on city design based on data collection from the region to neighbour-hoods and the building level by means of tangible locations in Amsterdam (fringe-belts). How do we do research in design? We are interested in different visualization tools (graphic design, parametric design, modelling, publications) approachable and scalable. We are willing to map, comprehend and redefine the spatial problems of selected locations, understanding the spatial consequences of new technologies and big scale decisions, with the participation of experts, local parties and potential users. The aim of the research is to increase the awareness of current urban conditions and (shared) value and responsibility for the development of Amsterdam. The pivotal question is ‘How to deal with the growth of inhabitants and tourists, the extra demand for new housing, infrastructure, data and energy networks, climate change management, etc. on a time horizon up to 2025?’ ‘How to achieve substantial reductions in district energy use, water use, and transportation emissions?’ ‘Which City do we want?’ In the context of AMS themes (Vital City, Circular City, Connected City), CP is interested in building the bridge between Research and Education through visualization and research-by-design methods. To this end, a scenario analysis will be conducted, involving substantial researchers–experts-stakeholder interactions , starting from urban areas (clusters) mentioned in the map “Space for the City 2025” and selected in consultation with the City of Amsterdam. Coordinator: Manuela Triggianese


Picture copyright Paul Cournet Vedado area, Havana (Cuba)

Credits Editor Manuela Triggianese Chair coordinator

DELFT UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY Chair of Complex Projects Department of Architecture The Netherlands


DELFT UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY Chair Kees Kaan Department of Architecture The Netherlands

Complex Projects Chair Manual - Fall 2016  

TU Delft Faculty of Architecture, Netherlands Department of Architecture Chair Professor Kees Kaan

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