Issuu on Google+

%RRN<RXU7HDDQG7RXU &DOO IT'S HERE!

WHAT’S INSIDE Weather Calendar What’s On Letters Classifieds Sports

A2 N.Islander B4 A10 B6 B5

Inside

Walmart

3199 Cliffe Av enue, Courtenay

Superstore

757 Ryan Roa d, Courtenay

Check out pages B2 & B3 for details

w w w.sussexin

surance.com

www.comoxvalleyecho.com Price: 57 cents plus GST

Tuesday June 17, 2014

Volume 20, No. 48

Harbour Air Scenic Glacier Tours this weekend only The final weekend of the BC Shellfish and Seafood Festival boasts an amazing new addition to its line up; 30 minute scenic Glacier Tours aboard a Harbour Air float plane, and like the other Festival events, seats are selling fast. Depart from Comox Harbour this Saturday and Sunday, 10 am, 11 am, 1 pm, 2 pm and 3 pm.

Regular price $129 per flight pp, however, businesses and families can book the entire 12 seats on the plane, and get a bulk rate of $69 pp, or $99 pp for groups of 4 or more. Call the Vancouver Island Visitor Centre, 250-400-2882 or bcshellfishfestival.com

City Hall discloses details of top earners Confirmation contracts of two senior staff were severed By Philip Round Echo Staff

Fire fighters and emergency responders work carefully to extract a woman from a Chevy HHR. (Drew A. Penner photo)

Woman sent to hospital in pain following two-car collision By Drew A. Penner Echo Staff A Volvo with a canoe strapped to its roof collided with a Chevrolet multi-purpose crossover vehicle with a KAYAK sticker Thursday before 9 p.m., spraying debris along the Old Island Highway just north of Dingwall Road and sending a woman to hospital. Courtenay Fire Department members raced to the scene and worked to free a woman trapped in the Chevy HHR, stabi-

lizing the car and using a triangular among other tools. The male occupant had already gotten out by the time firefighters and paramedics helped the woman, who was conscious but in pain, out of the burnt orange multi-purpose vehicle. One of the first responders held her head steady to prevent any dangerous and unwanted movements. She was loaded into an ambulance and rushed to hospital. Traffic along the route was down to one lane, as RCMP officers allowed drivers

heading north and south to continue using the Old Island Highway, taking turns. Bits of plastic and other rubble stretched nearly the full distance between the cars, which had come to rest the distance of approximately two telephone poles apart. Dusk had begun to settle as police questioned the male driver of the Volvo extensively, although they declined to say whether they planned to press charges. By 9:30 p.m. both cars had been removed from the scene by tow-truck.

Twenty-eight people employed by the City of Courtenay received remuneration of more than $75,000 each last year, according to figures revealed by the authority last night. The information has been released in line with BC local government transparency laws, and at the same time details of more than $200,000 in payments and expenses to the City’s seven elected officials were also posted. Usually the top earner in any municipality is the chief administrative officer, but as that post changed hands during 2013, the remuneration in Courtenay’s case is split between outgoing CAO Sandy Gray ($89,261) and incoming CAO David Allen ($111,655). So 2013’s top earner at City Hall is listed as deputy CAO and director of financial services Tillie Manthey ($139,978), followed by the now-retired director of operational services, Kevin Lagan ($124,576), and the current director of planning services, Peter Crawford ($122,235). Others shown as having remuneration of more than $100,000 are fire chief Don Bardonnex ($103,220), manager of operations Keir Gervais ($104,293), senior manager of engineering Lesley Hatch ($101,351), director of community services Randy Wiwchar ($114,324) and director of legislative services John Ward ($100,004). A further 18 people are named online with remuneration of between $75,000 and $100,000 - mainly departmental managers or foremen. (Continued on page 2)

Better Beach Bus service to Goose Spit this summer By Philip Round Echo Staff Beach bums of all ages will be able to take the Beach Bus direct from Courtenay to Goose Spit this summer. For 11 weeks, a special summer bus service will run seven days a week from Saturday, June 21 to Sunday, September 7 so people can avoid the often-congested parking at the hugely popular seaside regional park.

And thanks to the cooperation of HMCS Quadra in allowing access to a turning area for larger vehicles, it will now be possible to extend some of the existing express bus services from Courtenay to Comox right out to the beach. The new direct Beach Bus from Courtenay downtown (Fourth and Cliffe) will see four return trips Monday to Friday, with extra runs on weekends. It will follow the Cliffe Avenue,

6 Vehicles Under 6 Grand Sale

17th Street Bridge, Comox Road and Comox Avenue route, picking up and setting down at stops along the way to maximize the number of riders. The same bus will continue on to Goose Spit before returning to Courtenay via Comox, avoiding the need for transfers. In addition, and only on Sundays, there will be an extra direct bus service to Goose Spit from the Aquatic Centre car park off Lerwick Road and picking up beside Thrifty Foods’

Crown Isle Shopping Centre on Lerwick and other stops along Lerwick, Guthrie and Torrence before arriving at Goose Spit and returning via the same route. That route will use a smaller bus than the one from Courtenay, but big enough to carry the anticipated number of passengers. Comox Valley MLA Don McRae is welcoming the improved summer services. (Continued on page 2)

2006 CHEVY OPTRA WAGON

4 cyl., 5 spd., 106,000 kms Stk#3077


A2 Comox Valley Echo Tuesday, June 17, 2014

News

Comox Valley Weather

CA$H REWARD$

ď&#x20AC;Ąď&#x20AC;˘

ď &#x2020;ď &#x2021;

ď &#x2020;ď &#x2021;

ď &#x20AC;ď

ď&#x20AC;Ąď&#x20AC;˘

Tuesday, 17 June Sunny. High 21°C.

Wednesday, 18 June Cloudy with 30% chance of showers. Low 13°C. High 17°C.

Thursday, 19 June Cloudy with 30% chance of showers. Low 13°C. High 17°C.

Friday, 20 June Cloudy. Low 13°C. High 19°C.

Saturday, 21 June Sunny. Low 12°C. High 22°C.

For the latest Comox Valley Weather visit: www.comoxvalleyecho.com

1-800-222-TIPS www.comoxvalleycrimestoppers.bc.ca

Suspected gang member charged with firearms violations Better beach bus service By Drew A. Penner Echo Staff A 32-year-old Courtenay man says heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s confident heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll beat the 13 charges leveled against him by the Crown, the results of a month-long investigation by the provinceâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s anti-gang force. On June 16 the Combined Forces Special Enforcement Unit British Columbia announced charges against Bryce McDonald including careless storage of a firearm, possession of a restricted firearm and possession of a prohibited weapon. He was also charged with eight counts of possession of a firearm in an unauthorized place and one count of possession of a controlled substance. McDonald says while heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;outragedâ&#x20AC;? by the charges heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s confident his story will hold up in court. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s going to be an open and shut case, I can tell you right now,â&#x20AC;? he said, calling the charges against him bogus. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s all paperwork on their end theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve screwed up.â&#x20AC;? Police say they seized restricted and prohibited weapons, six grams of crack cocaine, a machete, and equipment believed to be used for the sale of drugs as well as

Bryce McDonald thousands of rounds of ammunition, several firearms parts, a Taser, a metal baton, and brass knuckles in a series of three raids Dec. 19. CFSEU-BC spokesman Sgt. Lindsey Houghton says while McDonald is innocent until proven guilty, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s important for the RCMP to target gun crimes in their gangland battles because of how deadly the results can be. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The bullets fly and you sometimes have

hundreds of people around,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The bullets coming out of the muzzle donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t discriminate.â&#x20AC;? In this case action was delayed until after the day the initial court date had passed. Police believe McDonald has links to at least one Vancouver Island organized crime group and that he was actively selling drugs. The Crown is not pursuing trafficking charges. McDonald says he was actually expecting to get his stuff back on Friday, June 13, as he was under the impression that was the last day the authorities could legally hold onto his property. Only then did he find out the Crown was moving forward with formal charges. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m not too worried about the charges at all,â&#x20AC;? McDonald said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a waste of government tax dollars and a waste of court time.â&#x20AC;? The Echo has verified the authenticity of McDonaldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Possession and Acquisition Licence (PAL), and he says he has documentation to prove he is innocent. Houghton notes because of the indictable nature of the offences in question there is no statute of limitations involved, but confirmed the 13 charges were sworn June 13.

City Hall discloses details of top earners (Continued from page 1) The disclosure report also confirms long-standing rumours there were severance agreements ending the employment of two senior non-unionized staff during 2013. The individuals are not identified, but the disclosure statement notes â&#x20AC;&#x153;these agreements represent from ten to 12 monthsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; in salary and benefits.â&#x20AC;? In all, the 28 top earners had total remuneration of fractionally under $2.6 million and claimed just over $100,000 in out-ofpocket expenses in connection with their work. The Cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s total paybill amounted to $9,451,000 in 2013. As far as elected officials are concerned, Mayor Larry Jangula is listed as being paid $49,291 with $9,394 in out of pocket expenses for the year.

Five of the six councillors received $21,190 each in remuneration, plus expenses. They were Jon Ambler (plus $6,245 in expenses), Bill Anglin (plus $6,732), Doug Hillian (plus $2,897), Manno Theos (plus $3,591) and Starr Winchester (plus $4,481). Councillor Ronna-Rae Leonard had a marginally higher remuneration of $21,815 to recognize additional duties, plus $7,201 in expenses. At the same meeting last night, the Cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s draft annual report was presented, featuring highlights of the Cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s activities throughout the year, as well as audited financial statements. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The annual report is an opportunity for our residents to learn about some of the many projects that occurred throughout our municipal operations,â&#x20AC;? explained Mayor Jangula. â&#x20AC;&#x153;2013 was another busy

$R3TERLING$ESMOND !#505.#452%

IB

.!452!,#().%3%-%$)#).% YEARSOFEXPERIENCESUCCESSFULLYTREATING DhiZd"6gi]g^i^X?d^cih!H]djaYZgh!7VX`!=^e@cZZh! 9^\Zhi^kZ!GZhe^gVidgn!8^gXjaVi^dc!;Vi^\jZ>bbjcZ! ;VX^VaGZ_jkZcVi^dc!Higd`Z!EVgVanh^h!He^cVaHiZcdh^h! Edhi@cZZ$=^eGZeaVXZbZci>cĂ&#x201C;VbbVi^dc$EV^c &-)'78dbdm6kZ#'*%#.)&#-,,,Â&#x2122;lll#:kdakZL^i]9ZhZgV#Xdb

â&#x20AC;&#x153;My practice is about more than just tax. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s about building your business, understanding the difficulties that youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re facing and finding real solutions. Solutions that lead to growth. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve been part of the management team of a growing business for the last decade, and Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve seen the challenges that business owners run into every day. If you own a business and find yourself thinking that there has to be a better way, we should talk. And of course, I do taxes too.â&#x20AC;?

year at the City, with several new initiatives and lots of ongoing activities.â&#x20AC;? Major projects in the year included the completion of the Lewis Centre expansion and renovation, as well as the start of a multi-year asset management process assessing the condition and remaining life of the Cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s capital assets such as roads, water, sewer, storm drains, buildings, and fleet vehicles. Annual Reports are a requirement of the Province of B.C.â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Community Charter. The draft report for Courtenay will be reviewed and adopted by City Council at the committee of the whole meeting on June 30. It can be read on the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s website at http:// www.courtenay.ca/news/city-releases-2013-annual-report.aspx Council will also consider any submissions from the public at the meeting.

Bridging Employment Services Services Includes: t Individual sessions with empathetic, professional counselors t Practical help in overcoming the impacts of abuse or violence

(Continued from page 1) The service operated by BC Transit in partnership with Comox Valley Regional District. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Now itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s more convenient than ever to enjoy the great recreation opportunities we have in the Comox Valley,â&#x20AC;? said McRae. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Just pack up sunscreen, water, towels, other necessities and board the Beach Bus.â&#x20AC;? The chair of the regional district board, rural Area C director Edwin Grieve, added: â&#x20AC;&#x153;Traffic and parking at Goose Spit on weekends in the summer can be pretty frustrating. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The bus to the beach is a great alternative to those hassles, and a great option for anyone to just jump on board and get to the park to enjoy some time at the beach all summer long.â&#x20AC;? And BC Transit president and chief executive Manuel Achadinha commented: â&#x20AC;&#x153;We are pleased to partner with the CVRD to deliver this popular seasonal service. We hope our customers enjoy summer with BC Transit by exploring the Comox Valley. Regular fares will apply - $1.75 for adults and $1.50 for seniors and youth.â&#x20AC;? In order to promote transit use year-round, Comox Valley residents are also being invited to enter a contest to win a monthly bus pass. The contest runs throughout Beach Bus season, with monthly draws from among those who have entered online at www.bctransit.com/regions/ com/contest For more information on Goose Spit Park Beach Bus or other transit schedules in the Comox Valley go to www. bctransit.com/regions/com or call 250-339-5453.

95 MINI $ PEDICURE 24 LOWER LEG $ 95 29 WAX offers expire June 21/14

Grad 2014 â&#x20AC;&#x153;Cinderella Program" Participant (book now)

WARRANTY APPROVED CONVENIENT CAR MAINTENENANCE SERVICE Â&#x2021;2LO&KDQJHV Â&#x2021;)OXLG)OXVKHV Â&#x2021;DQG025( 12$332,170(176

t A welcoming safe place to develop confidence and practical skills t Workshops to prepare you for work t Assistance in exploring career options t Peer support

From

What you bring: t The desire for good work or education/training

Accepting New Clients

Enter a Draw for a chance to win BBQ

OF $650 VALUE Winner will be drawn end of day June 30th 2014

t Readiness to participate

And best of all... t Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s free and tailored to your needs and interests

Interested? Call 250-897-0511 NEXT WORKSHOP SERIES Begins October 21st

For more information call Alisa at 250-897-0511

Understanding. Business. Accounting. Tax. 2040 A Guthrie Rd., Comox â&#x20AC;˘ 250.941.3444 â&#x20AC;˘ jerad@jeradlangille.ca

Part of the Employment Program of BC The Employment Program of British Columbia is funded by the Government of Canada and the Province of British Columbia.

581 Ryan Road, Across from Superstore, 250-334-9969

Need help with an Estate? We can help.  TH3TREET #OURTENAYs   www.ivesburgerlaw.com


Comox Valley Echo Tuesday, June 17, 2014 A3

News

Patrick Chenier, who is seeking the Conservative Party nomination for the new Courtenay-Alberni Riding

Duncan challenged for Conservative nomination in new riding John Duncan is not getting a free ride in his bid to be the Conservative Party’s candidate for the new Courtenay-Alberni riding in next year’s general election. A challenger has emerged for party members’ support just days ahead of the close of nominations set by the local association. Following the federal boundaries reshuffle, which split away part of the Vancouver Island North riding he currently represents, Duncan decided he would seek re-election in 2015 and had to choose in which redrawn riding to run. He selected the one that includes the City of Courtenay, the Village of Cumberland and parts of the Comox Valley to the south - including Denman and Hornby Islands, Union Bay and Fanny Bay - in addition to areas further south and west, including Qualicum Beach, Parksville, Port Alberni and Tofino. As nominations close on Thursday of this week, it looked as though he would be chosen by acclamation, but now Patrick Chenier of Errington, near Parksville, has stepped forward as an alternative choice.But Duncan told the Echo last night: “I’m in this to win it - I’m fully filed and ready to go, and I’ve got a good team together who are watching out for my best interests.” Chenier suggests that “mid-island constituents believe it is time for renewal - and I completely echo this sentiment. We need more than just the status quo because it is not increasing opportunities for mid-islanders. “This nomination is not just about the next election or another four year term, but about renewal for the next twenty years.” Chenier has been involved in municipal and provincial elections before, but this is his first run for a federal nomination. He urged as many supporters as possible to sign up as party members in Courtenay-Alberni before the June 26 cut-off to enable them to take part in the nomination voting process. “I have an excellent history throughout the community, grassroots initiatives, capital markets, the Aboriginal community and sport,” he said. And he claimed “hands-on, robust experience in community leadership and politics over the span of two decades.” Chenier said his priorities reflected those shared by many local people - a need to create jobs for young families to fulfill their dreams; to create security for people in their mid and late career stages; and to protect and improve the lifestyle of retirees. “We need to focus on a strong stable government that has a net positive effect on mid-islander lifestyle,” he added. Outside politics, Chenier is an active Rotarian and member of the Parksville and District Chamber of Commerce. He has served as president of the Parksville Newcomers Club and as a member of Parksville and District Community Awards Committee. In the past, he has also been a board member of SportBC and BC Athletics, a trustee of the Greater Victoria Public Library, and president of the Saanich Community Legacy Foundation. In politics, he is a board member of the Conservative Party of Canada’s Courtenay-Alberni Electoral District Association and also first vice-president of the BC Liberals’ Alberni-Pacific Rim Riding Association. While there is still time for further candidates to emerge before Thursday’s nomination deadline, Chenier told the Echo that apart from John Duncan he had not heard of anyone else intending to throw their hat into the ring. Party supporters wanting more information about Chenier or his campaign to secure the nomination can contact him by email at patrick. chenier@shaw.ca or call 250-9272725.If both Chanier and Duncan are confirmed as accepted candidates after Thursday, the ballot of members is likely by mid-July. pround@comoxvalleyecho.com

A bird’s eye view above Slegg Lumber of the participating motorcycles in the 2014 Ride for Dad that took place last Saturday.

Ride for Dad raises funds to fight prostate cancer By Michael Briones Echo Staff A little rain wasn’t enough to dampen the indomitable spirits of the close to 300 bikers that came out for the annual motorcycle Ride for Dad that took place over the weekend in Courtenay. The ride is a fundraiser for the fight against prostate cancer. The array of motorcycles with their

shining chrome and deafening roar converged at Slegg Lumber before thundering down the road en masse all the way to Home Depot on Ryan Road. Parade coordinator Wayne Virtue said “they were totally impressed with the turnout.” “A lot of armed forces people from Victoria showed up. We also had riders from Manitoba, Alberta and the United States. There were a lot of

cancer survivors.” Wayne said they have raised more than $20,000. However, the final tally won’t be available soon because money is still coming in until the end of June. Last year, the local organizers of the ride donated $20,000 to the BC Cancer Foundation. But this year, they will be using the money raised locally and on the Island to enhance awareness and

research. The top individual fundraiser was Grant Bestwick who led the list with $4,150. The other riders in the top five were Warren Orr ($1,525), Diane McCharles ($1,445), Terry Bennett ($600.00) and George Fulford ($582). Wayne said that next year is the fifth anniversary of the ride. They plan to have live bands and more events lined up.

Notice of Annual General Meeting St. Joseph’s General Hospital’s Annual General Meeting will be held on

Monday, June 23, 2014 at 1:00 pm in the Edith McNish Boardroom, 2137 Comox Avenue, Comox, BC

Interested members of the public are welcome to attend

Find your place in the sun! Great local destinations only minutes away. Transit Passes available at the following locations: Comox

Courtenay

t Town of Comox Municipal Office

t t t t t t

t Rexall Pharmacy t CANEX, 19 Wing Comox

Adult s s Day Pa

! $4.50 4058-1

By Philip Round Echo Staff

Cumberland t Village of Cumberland Municipal Office

www.bctransit.com

Comox Valley Regional District Office City of Courtenay Municipal Office North Island College (Student Only) CV Aquatic Centre CV Sports Centre Lewis Centre


A4 Comox Valley Echo Tuesday, June 17, 2014

just for

SENIORS SE

TAME THE FIRES OF AUTOIMMUNE DISEASE NATURALLY By Dr. Deidre Macdonald, ND Autoimmune Disease is a major health problem in our society. One in twelve people in general, and one in nine women, will be diagnosed with an autoimmune disease. There are over one hundred different autoimmune disorders, including multiple sclerosis, Lupus, Rheumatoid arthritis, Inflammatory Bowel diseases and Celiac disease. Together these conditions affect more people than cancer or heart disease and can rob patients of their quality of life, mobility and even take their lives. Scientists worldwide are puzzled over the alarming rise in the rates of autoimmune disease, particularly in the Western world. The rates have more than doubled in the last three decades. Genetics can no longer be blamed as the only cause of autoimmune disease since our genetics canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t change that quickly. As a naturopathic physician, I have treated many patients with a variety of autoimmune

diseases in my years of practice. The path to living well or even recovering from autoimmune conditions focuses on correcting the underlying stress factors that may be driving the dysregulation of the immune system. The immune system has well developed mechanisms to attack foreign invaders. In autoimmune disease, the immune system loses its ability to differentiate our own normal tissues from foreign invaders, and provokes an inflammatory response. Exciting research was recently presented at a gastroenterology convention I attended in Victoria. That ability to temper the immune systemâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s inflammatory reactions to invaders is something our bodies must learn. And strangely enough, in fact, the teacher lives in our guts. The bacterial lining of the intestines (the intestinal microbiome) is responsible for educating our immune systems, letting them know when to attack and when to cease fire. Humans are created in a sterile womb, devoid of bacteria and we acquire our first dose of beneficial bacteria in the birth canal. Abundant research has shown that there are

increased rates of asthma and autoimmune disease in C-section born babies. Antibiotics are the other Western phenomenon that disturbs the intestinal microbiome and is linked to autoimmune disease. We know not what we do when we take an antibiotic for an infection without consideration of the trillions of beneficial bacteria that form an integral part of our digestive and immune systems. Naturopathic physicians have long emphasized the importance of correcting deficiencies in the intestinal microbiome. Programs to repair the intestinal mucosal lining, replenish probiotics and kill off harmful elements of the microbiome have long been a mainstay of the treatment of autoimmune disease. Identifying and eliminating food allergies can also help calm the immune system. For my patients with joint pain associated with autoimmune disease, cold laser therapy is an excellent way to manage pain, reduce joint destruction and improve joint function. A recent Canadian expert panel determined that this painless form of physical therapy is an effective treatment for rheumatoid arthritis. I have been using a high tech laser

light treatment for my patients for five years. It is very effective for most patients with back and joint pain, osteoarthritis and is part of a comprehensive treatment plan for inflammatory arthritis too. Natural anti-inflammatory medicines may reduce the dependence on prescription drugs with potentially devastating side effects. A turmeric extract called Meriva, Fish oil, antioxidant nutrients and Vitamin D all have been shown to reduce the inflammatory symptoms of autoimmune disease. Adrenal support through meditation and herbal medicine helps to improve energy and reduce inflammation. Science is beginning to shed light on the complexities of the immune system and ways that we can influence the health of it. Take care of your immune system and if you have an autoimmune disease, learn ways to tame your inflammation - naturally. Dr. Deidre Macdonald is a naturopathic physician who has been practicing medicine for 16 years in downtown Courtenay. For more information contact the Macdonald Centre for Natural Medicine at 897-0235 or via www. getwellhere.com

DONâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;T BE AFRAID FRA RA OF THE DENTIST is here â&#x20AC;&#x153;NuCalmâ&#x20AC;? is a revolutionary technology proven to relax the body into a deep presleep state. The experience is very safe and allows the individual to maintain a relaxed state without the use of any drugs. Best of all, â&#x20AC;&#x153;NuCalmâ&#x20AC;? isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t just for nervous people - almost anyone can beneďŹ t from it. 4-1841 Comox Ave, Comox 250.339.2252 www.DrPhilTheDentist.com

Highlights! Paris city tour including a visit to the top of the Eiffel Tower Versailles tour the palace and its Gardens Ile de la CitĂŠ walking tour including Notre Dame Cathedral Louvre tour the worldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s finest museum Montmartre walking tour of the district and the SacrĂŠ-Coeur Basilica Reims see the cathedral Inclusions Roundtrip flight in Economy Class Roundtrip transfers between the airport and the hotel 7-day Paris Metro pass 7 cold buffet breakfasts (B), 2 lunches (L), 3 dinners (D), including 1 welcome dinner and 1 farewell dinner 7 nightsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; double accommodation (European standards) with single beds or a double bed with private facilities

Flavours of Paris Wine class with six different wine tastings Chocolate-making class at the chocolate museumlunch cruise scenic luncheon cruise along the Seine Gourmet dinner in an Alsatian restaurant, sample choucroute, flammekueche or baeckeoffe Baking class learn the basics to make pastry, cake and dessert Parisian market & cooking class gather fresh ingredients to prepare a three-course lunch Champagne cellars tour two cellars in the famed Champagne region

BOOK BY JULY 15!

Some restrictions apply, see in-store for details.

3AME'rEAT3ERVICE .EW#ONVENIENT,OCATION >ch^YZLVabVgi8djgiZcVn

OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK WWWCOMOXVALLEYWALKINCLINICCOM

Monday to Friday - 8:30 AM to 7 PMs3ATUrday &3UNDAY!M to 3 PMs3TATs 10 AM to 3 PM


just for

Comox Valley Echo Tuesday, June 17, 2014 A5

SEN SE NIO IORS RS JOINT PAIN RELIEF WITH LASER THERAPY By Dr. Deidre Macdonald, ND Joint pain slowing you down? There may be more options for treatment available than you know. There is a relatively new physical therapy modality called laser therapy that can create rapid healing of joint problems. It is a painless, effective therapy for the treatment of a wide array of muscle, joint, back and skin issues. In my practice, it has been an invaluable tool for helping my patients. Most of my patients who have utilized laser therapy for their joint problems have had relief from pain, increased range of motion, and are able to return to exercise and work Also, in my experience, laser therapy is the only therapy that shows consistent benefit for arthritis sufferers. This technology uses superluminous and laser diodes to bathe abnormal tissue with photons. Photons are particles of energy that are absorbed by the cell. Once inside the cells, light energy can be converted into biochemical energy to accelerate cell function. The therapeutic light beam permits penetration of deep tissues without adversely affecting normal cells and the body’s natural tissue healing processes are enhanced. The therapy doesn’t just mask symptoms. It is curative and as logic dictates, symptoms resolve. The Meditech laser device that I selected for my naturopathic medical clinic is a top of the line, Health Canada approved unit that is used in hospital physiotherapy clinics and burn units around the world. The Toronto Raptors have their own Meditech laser for treating their injured basketball players. Let’s look at a number of common joint problems and how they can be addressed with laser therapy: Jaw pain: In a published placebo

controlled study, laser therapy was shown to significantly reduce pain, increase range of motion and decrease tender points in patients with MRI confirmed temporo-mandibular joint pathology. Shoulders: Shoulder pain can be caused by tendonitis (biceps tendonitis for example), rotator cuff injuries (often a torn supraspinatus muscle), bursitis, or deep joint problems. Often several of these mechanisms can coexist. Laser therapy can effectively address each of these mechanisms and result in improved range of motion and decreased pain. Many of my patients have also reported that they sleep better since their shoulders don’t hurt at night. Golfer’s and Tennis Elbow: These conditions are medically called epicondylitis, inflammation of the tendon that attaches to the medial and lateral bumps of the elbow. A placebo controlled study in Switzerland found that total relief of the pain and improved function was achieved in 82% of the acute cases. Carpal Tunnel Syndrome (hand and wrist pain / numbness): The treatment of this condition with laser therapy has been extensively studied. In a review of 5 significant studies, it was found that the average success rate was 84%. The patients had pain for an average of two years prior to entering the studies. I have had several patients able to cancel surgery for carpal tunnel syndrome after about 9 treatments with laser therapy. Bursitis of the hip: This condition causes pain when sleeping on the affected side and also with activity. It is the condition that I have found responds most consistently to laser therapy. All the patients we have treated for this condition have improved, and I too have used it successfully for the same issue. Knee Pain: Osteoarthritis of the knee is a very common cause of significant disability for many seniors. Who wants to wait until the condition is so bad

that surgery is the only option? In fact, studies have shown that with laser therapy, surgery can be avoided in many cases. In humans, a meta-analysis of 36 randomized placebo-controlled trials found that 2-4 weeks of laser therapy offered significant pain relief compared to placebo controls. Trials showed significant decrease in pain, reduction of swelling, increased range of motion and circulation. Animal studies show that laser actually regenerates worn cartilage, increasing the thickness of cartilage. Since real healing is what occurs with laser therapy, the results are sustained. I have certainly seen the long term effects myself and in my patients. Arthritis patients return for more treatments, but usually it is for a different joint! Plantar fasciitis: This painful condition affects the bottom of the foot. I usually recommend stretches, exercises and massage for patients with this condition, along with laser therapy. Research shows that patients report significantly less pain after a series of laser treatments. A placebo controlled study found that the thickness of the plantar fascia was reduced. Another study showed that 90% of patients experienced relief: 64% of patients had no pain and another 26% were significantly improved. Unlike other treatments for plantar fasciitis, laser therapy is a painless process. So why suffer? Laser therapy is a safe and effective tool that can help you get back to the life you desire. For more information about Dr. Macdonald’s state of the art laser therapy machine, click on laser therapy on her website www.getwellhere.com. To book a free 15 minute consultation to see if laser therapy is the right treatment for you, call her medical office at 250 897-0235. Dr. Deidre Macdonald is a naturopathic physician with a medical practice in downtown Courtenay.

BALLROOM DANCING: A COMPLETE MIND, BODY, SOUL EXPERIENCE Ballroom dancing is a unique form of exercise because it provides the heart-healthy benefits of an aerobic exercise while also allowing you to engage in a social activity. This is especially stimulating to the mind. A 21-year study published in the New England Journal of Medicine found dancing can even reduce the risk of Alzheimer’s disease and other forms of dementia in the elderly. Interestingly, dancing was the only physical activity out of 11 in the study that was associated with a lower risk of dementia. Ballroom dancing in particular may be a triple benefit for the brain. Not only does exercise increase the level of brain chemicals that encourage nerve cells to grow, but dancing that requires you to remember dance steps and sequences boosts brain power by improving memory skills which are crucial for brain health. The social aspect of ballroom dancing leads to less stress, depression and loneliness. Studies have shown that strong social ties and socializing with friends contribute to high self-esteem and a positive outlook. Ballroom dancing provides many opportunities to meet other people. Joining a dance class can increase self-confidence and build social skills. The Mayo Clinic and the National Heart, Blood and Lung Institute agree that Ballroom dancing reduces stress, increases energy, improves strength, increases muscle tone and coordination, lowers risk of coronary heart disease, decreases blood pressure, helps you manage your weight and strengthens the bones of your legs and hips. Ballroom dancing in particular improves posture and balance which can prevent falls, builds and increases stamina, increases flexibility and improves coordination. Dance is not only a great stress-reducer and body conditioner but once it captures your heart and soul it can be magical and transforming. The pure joy you feel when you dance is rejuvenating for the soul. It can make your spirit soar. Ballroom dancing is the ultimate contact sport. Join the crowd and get off the sidelines and get in the game! ValDance Ballroom, Latin and Swing school is located at the Native Sons Hall in the Comox Valley. Check the website for classes, workshops, and dances. Sept. 4th is a complimentary lesson open to the public. Val Halme Professional Ballroom Dance Instructor ValDance www.valdance.com • info@valdance.com 250-338-9279

250-338-8026

terranovaplumbing.ca

Style. Safety. Comfort.

We can install walk-in tubs with jets!

FREE IN-HOME CONSULTATIONS Discover how easy downsizing & moving can be DELANEY RELOCATION SERVICES WILL TAKE CARE OF EVERYTHING FROM SORTING, PACKING, UNPACKING & FULL SET-UP TO HIRING A MOVING TRUCK

Want to move for FREE?? Move to Casa Loma, CVSV, Nanaimo Seniors Village Your whole cost will be covered! Want to be moved-in and set-up by suppertime? Call Anne Delaney

Delaney Relocation & Home Support Services Inc.

Office 250 339 1188 Cell 250 338 3359 Servi ng Cent ral and N ort h I sl and


just for

A6 Comox Valley Echo Tuesday, June 17, 2014

SEN SE NIO IORS RS VOLUNTEERING OPPORTUNITIES FOR RETIREES Today’s retirees recognize that an active retirement tends to be more rewarding than simply sitting around the house, and that attitude is reflected in the vast number of retirees who volunteer with various nonprofit organizations and other programs across the globe. The following are a handful of volunteering opportunities for those retirees who want to give back and make the most of their retirements. Habitat for Humanity Habitat for Humanity is a nonprofit organization that builds and repairs homes for people in need. It has a program titled “Care-AVanners” in which volunteers typically spend two weeks traveling around the United States and Canada in rented RVs (retirees who own RVs may be able to drive their own vehicles) building and restoring homes. Volunteers must pay their own way and bring along their own supplies, such as work shoes, gloves, tool belts, and some tools (power tools are typically provided by the local Habitat for Humanity chapter), and free or low-cost RV parking is provided by Habitat for Humanity. Adventurous retirees who enjoy hitting the open road may find “Care-A-Vanners” matches their love of travel with their desire to give back. Work with children Many retirees, especially those without grandchildren or who live far away from their grandchildren, find volunteering with children to be especially rewarding. The opportunities to work with kids are numerous, and retirees can choose a volunteering opportunity where their own life experiences come in handy. For example, retirees who worked in the medical field might want to volunteer their time at a local children’s hospital, where they can assist families as they cope with a child’s illness and spend time with the children themselves, whether’s it’s tutoring sick children, reading them stories or helping them understand their illnesses. Retirees with considerable experience in the business world may want to work with a mentoring pro-

gram that matches them up with career-minded youngsters. Service vacations Retirement is often seen as a time to travel and see the world, and many retirees have started to combine that love of travel with service opportunities. Globe Aware, a 501(c) (3) nonprofit organization, develops short-term volunteer programs in international environments. Each activity aims to promote cultural awareness and promote sustainability in needy communities. Volunteers work to address issues identified by the host communities as particularly pressing, interacting with the local residents in ways that are often impossible on more traditional vacations. Meals on Wheels Retirees tend to have their mornings and afternoons free, making them ideal candidates to volunteer with programs such as Meals on Wheels, a nonprofit organization devoted to delivering nutritious meals to those with limited mobility who are unable to prepare their own meals. The program delivers more than one million meals per day across the United States, and Canada has its own meal delivery programs as well. Many Meals on Wheels volunteers are retirees, who can decide their level of involvement upon volunteering. Disaster relief Disaster relief programs may be less predictable than more routine volunteer programs, but retirees often make great volunteers at disaster relief sites. Unlike working professionals who cannot travel to disaster relief sites without ample planning ahead of time, retirees often find the flexibility of retirement allows them to pitch in when an unforesee natural disaster strikes and volunteers are needed seemingly overnight. Many disaster relief programs need volunteers who are certified in CPR or have other unique lifesaving skills, but even retirees without such skills can help by handling supplies or by comforting and assisting survivors of natural disasters.

GUT’S MICROBIOME AFFECTS WEIGHT GAIN By Dr. Deidre Macdonald, ND We all have trillions of bacteria, yeasts and fungi in our bodies, particularly in our intestines. The mix of these microbes makes up our microbiome. New research shows that this microbiome may have more to do with your weight than what you eat. Farmers around the world have long known that feeding antibiotics to chicken and cows fattens them up. Human trials have shown the same thing and scientists now have the research to find out why. Antibiotics, as well as certain dietary choices, change the bacterial lining of the intestines. Those changes allow more calories to be extracted from food. They also increase cravings and appetite by changing hormones. This research gives hope to those who wish to bolster their ability to lose weight. You can change your intestinal microbiome and therefore help your body lose weight. We now know that our intestinal microbiome affects many important processes, such as digestion, destruction of parasites, mood and brain function, immune system regulation, and prevention of autoimmune diseases. Naturopathic physicians have been working for decades to educate patients about the importance of the microbiome and now scientists around the world are using new technology to understand the microbiome and learn how to foster and protect it.

Why is it that some people seem to put on weight while others lose weight easily? The answer may be that those who lack good bacteria in the intestines seem to extract more calories from food. Recent research shows that thin mice who receive a microbiome transfer from obese mice, gain weight, despite being on a calorie controlled diet. It appears that the microbiome of the obese mice has an increased capacity to harvest energy from the diet. Another factor in weight gain is the appetite stimulating hormone ghrelin. A healthy microbiome regulates appetite by reducing this hormone. But using antibiotics that alter the microbiome increases ghrelin and is associated with weight gain. So how do we encourage the growth of an abundant and diverse microbiome? We need to begin at birth. Babies in the womb are “sterile”. The birth canal provides the baby’s first inoculation with the bacteria he or she will need to digest breast milk. Babies born by c-section, who miss out on that bacteria, may be more prone to weight problems as they age. C-sections are a welcome lifesaver at times but I recommend all my c-section babies be given appropriate probiotic supplements (intestinal microbiome powder) as soon as possible after birth. Humans given antibiotics are more prone to weight gain, just like chickens. Of course antibiotics are another modern medical necessity in some cases. The benefit of antibiotics is generally perceived to be much greater than it actually is for common infections. There are natural medi-

cines that can strengthen the immune system and fight infection without damaging the microbiome. So try to avoid antibiotics and take probiotics if you can’t avoid them. The foods we eat also cause our microbiome to adapt and change. High refined sugar diets promote the growth of bacteria that influence ghrelin, the appetite-stimulating hormone. Healthier diets help the healthier bacterial to grow. Cats fed higher carbohydrate diets had kittens which ate more and became fatter. (Since we are finding now that mothers can pass on their microbiome to their children, women are well advised to work on enhancing their microbiome even prior to conception.) A whole food diet that is low in both refined carbohydrates and animal fat promotes the healthiest microbiome thus helping to regulate appetite. I have found that many patients who had difficulty losing weight have an altered microbiome. They often have related symptoms such as digestive issues, allergies, or depression. There are simple tests that can help determine the state of the microbiome. If needed, I coach patients on how to use low carb nutrition and helpful supplements to re-establish the healthy microbiome. When the microbiome comes into balance, cravings are lessened and weight loss is much more easily attained. Dr. Deidre Macdonald is a naturopathic physician who has practiced medicine in downtown Courtenay for 17 years. For more information, contact Dr. Deidre Macdonald’s office at 250 897-0235 or via www.getwellhere.com.

Macdonald Centre for Natural Medicine

You can feel better.

Bank Trust Insurance Wealth Management

Call for a FREE ‘Meet the Doctor” visit

A faster way to save!

Dr. Deidre Macdonald, *

2.25%

Tax-Free Savings Account Want a fast, tax-free way to save for a vacation, home renovation or a new car? Our TFSA products can help you achieve your goals. Ask us for more details! Courtenay / 470 Puntledge Road / P: 250.334.8888 cwbank.com A CWB Group Company *Rate subject to change without notice. WestEarner TFSA Account Only. Interest calculated daily, paid monthly. Available in-branch only.

www.getwellhere.com 448 10th St., Courtenay

250.897.0235


just for

Comox Valley Echo Tuesday, June 17, 2014 A7

SEN SE NIO IORS RS THINGS TO CONSIDER BEFORE DOWNSIZING YOUR HOME The decision to downsize a home is often bittersweet. Many couples who downsize their homes do so after raising a family. A home might be filled with memories, but downsizing a home helps couples save more money, and that financial flexibility often allows men and women to more fully enjoy their retirement. But in spite of the financial impact of downsizing a home, there’s more than just money at stake for homeowners thinking of downsizing their homes. The following are a handful of factors homeowners should consider before downsizing to a smaller home. Real estate market The real estate market can be a seller’s friend or foe. Many sellers have a sale price in mind when they decide to sell their home, but the real estate market can be fickle, so homeowners should do their research before putting their home up for sale. Will the current market make it easier for you to get the most for your home, or will you have to settle for less than you prefer? How fast are similar homes in your area selling? When studying the real estate market, it’s also a good idea to study the market for smaller homes. If you plan on moving into a condominium but the market is not flush with properties, you might end up paying more than you want to for your new home, which might negate the savings you can expect from downsizing. Furniture When downsizing to a smaller home, many couples realize their current furniture is unlikely to fit into a smaller home. That means couples will have to sell or donate their current furniture and then buy all new items for their new home. If it’s been a while since you purchased new furniture, you might be in for some sticker shock on your first visit to the furniture store. Another thing to consider regarding your furniture is which items you simply can’t live without. An antique dinner table might have been the centerpiece for your family holidays over the last several

decades, but there’s no guarantee it will fit into your smaller home. You may want to pass this down to your son or daughter, but that’s only possible if he or she has the room for it. Before deciding to downsize, consider your attachment to certain items that you may or may not be able to take with you to your new home and the emotional toll that selling such items might take if you’re left with no other options. Proximity to family When downsizing to a smaller home, many couples move out of the suburbs and into cities or towns with more ready access to culture and restaurants. While that accessibility is great, grandparents may find that it comes at the cost of less time with their grandchildren. That’s a steep price to pay for doting grandparents, and it may also impact your children if they frequently rely on grandma and grandpa for babysitting. Before downsizing, consider if you’re willing to move further away from your family. If not, you likely can still find a smaller home in close proximity to your current home and any nearby family members. Medical care Many older men and women must also consider the effect that moving may have on their medical care. Downsizing to a home in the country may make it harder to maintain contact with your current physician, and rural areas typically have less medical practitioners than more densely populated towns and cities. In addition, if you have been visiting the same physician for years, you may not want to move and have to start all over again with a physician who is unfamiliar with your medical history. Consider how much maintaining your existing relationship with your physician means to you, and if your next home will provide the kind of access to medical care you’re likely to need. Downsizing a home is not just about moving into a smaller property. To ensure you’re making the right decision, many factors must be considered before downsizing.

HOME ALONE? By Linda Rutherford, Berwick Retirement Communities. Nothing is more important than the place we choose to call “home”. Whether it’s a mansion or a single room, it’s where we create and keep our memories and treasures, where we feel comfortable and secure, a place where we can warmly welcome family and friends. At its best it should provide us with a sense of community and belonging, but at its worst, when we become isolated socially, it can feel like solitary confinement. Regardless of age, social isolation can have devastating impact on health and wellbeing. A study in the US by AgeWave showed that low social interaction by seniors can be as bad for your health as smoking 15 cigarettes a day, as dangerous as alcoholism, as harmful as not exercising, and can be twice as dangerous as obesity. The American Association of Retired People (AARP) commissioned a study that revealed that loneliness and isolation is a significant predictor of poor health with links to depression, anxiety, panic attacks, eating disorders and overall chronic illness.

As the population ages, universities in Australia, the UK, America and other nations are continuing research into the negative impact of being alone, and in March 2014 the National Seniors Council (www.seniorscouncil. gc.ca) announced that it will be studying the effects of isolation on the health and well-being of seniors in Canada. “Aging In Place” seems to be the latest buzzword being used by a variety of sectors when talking about housing options for seniors, which can imply that staying put is the ultimate goal (regardless of where ‘put’ actually is..). It might be time to talk about Aging In The Ideal Place, so that we can start a conversation about what is working for seniors at their particular age and stage of life. A family home, with yard, or patio might be an ideal place for a couple or single in their 70’s when they are still driving, physically active, socially involved with friends and neighbours, and enjoying the daily routines of meal preparation, gardening, and household chores. However, a decade later may have seen many changes including loss of a spouse or partner, loss of a driving license, concerns about vision, or

mobility and the onset of loneliness as activities become more of a challenge. Now that family home or retirement condo may not be the ideal place for someone to create a home that provides them with the supports and services that will enhance their ability to connect and enjoy life to the fullest. There are many seniors that may do very well on their own in their family homes, with lots of support and companionship from family. But many of today’s seniors do not live close to family, do not have an ability to get out and socialize in the community, and are now finding the loneliness associated with many hours alone at home is becoming an overwhelming challenge. It’s time to encourage our seniors and their families to have honest discussions about needs, wants and desires when it comes to a lifestyle that will promote health, well-being and wellness, and what and where will become the “ideal’ home in those later years. Berwick Comox Valley Tel: 250-339-1690 Toll Free: 1-866-625-1690 www.berwickretirement.com

SENIOR PEER SUPPORT Comox Valley Senior Peer Counselling, or “support” as we like to call it, is a “Seniors Helping Seniors” organization that has provided emotional support to local seniors for more than 20 years. After receiving special training, each peer counsellor is carefully matched with a senior that they then spend an hour each week with. Time spent might involve conversation, sharing tea or coffee, playing cards, reading aloud, going for a walk – and it certainly involves lots of good quality listening. Too many of

our seniors feel isolated and lonely with unhappiness and depression possible consequences. An hour a week with someone who understands and cares can make a world of difference. Senior Peer Counselling also supports caregivers who provide care for a senior person – be this a spouse, parent, grandparent, or friend. The challenges of being a full-time caregiver are many and spending time with others who have direct experience and understanding

of caregiving can be a powerful and supportive experience. Senior Peer Counselling facilitates Caregiver Support Groups for women and for men that meet once or twice a month. Senior Peer Counselling is only a phone call or email away. All of our programs and services are free. 250897-5940; seniorpeercounselling@ shaw.ca We are always looking for volunteers. If you are interested, please get in touch. We have important, fulfilling and fun work for you to do!

Comox Valley Senior Peer Counselling Seniors Helping Seniors All services •Emotional Support FREE •Information & Referral •Caregiver Groups & Support 491-B 4th Street, Courtenay, 250-871-5940 seniorpeercounselling@shaw.ca


A8 Comox Valley Echo Tuesday, June 17, 2014

just for

SEN SE NIO IORS RS MEMORY LOSS IS NOT AN AUTOMATIC SIDE EFFECT OF AGING

TIPS FOR RETIREES TRAVELING ABROAD

Staying socially active after 50 can benefit the brain and even reduce a person’s risk of dementia.

No one, regardless of age, is immune to random bouts of memory loss. While misplaced car keys or forgetting items on your grocery list are nothing to get worked up over, many men and women over 50 do start to worry about memory lapses, especially when they start to occur with more frequency than they might have just a few years ago. But while memory loss might be quickly associated with aging, increased forgetfulness is not an inevitable side effect of getting older, a fact that those at or approaching retirement age should find comforting. When considering the relationship between memory and aging, it’s important that men and women recognize the distinction between memory lapses and dementia, as the two are not one and the same. As a person ages, his or her hippocampus, the region of the brain involved in the formation and retrieval of memories, often deteriorates. This can affect how long it takes to learn and recall information. But just because this process is slower does not mean it’s a warning sign of dementia, which is the loss of certain mental functions, including memory. Though taking longer to recall information can be frustrating, many people still retain their ability to recall information. In addition, while dementia brought on by conditions such as Alzheimer’s disease or Parkinson’s disease is untreatable, there are things men and women can do to strengthen their memories and reduce their momentary lapses in memory. * Start playing games. Games that test the mind have long been believed to benefit the brain, though some remain skeptical about the true impact of brain games. However, a University of Iowa study funded by the National Institute on Aging found that brain games may in fact pay numerous and long-term dividends. In the study, 681 healthy volunteers over the age of 40 were divided into four groups. One group played computerized crossword puzzles, and three other groups played a brain training video game from Posit Science designed specifically to enhance the speed and accuracy of visual processing. The volunteers showed less decline in visual processing as well as in other tests that measured concentration, memory and the ability to shift quickly between tasks, and the benefits from the training games lasted as long as seven years after training. Brain games

are now more accessible than ever before, as players can access such games on their smartphones, tablets, ereaders, and computers. And in addition to being effective, the games also provide entertainment value. * Alter your routine. Many working professionals recognize that each day tends to have its mundane moments. The brain can grow accustomed to these moments, which tend to be a routine part of the day. But altering your daily routine can jar the brain awake, forcing it to focus during those times that had become mundane but now present new challenges. Something as simple as alternating driving routes to work from day to day or preparing some new, yet healthy, breakfast each morning can help the brain stay alert and sharp. * Become a social butterfly. Maintaining a social life as you age is a great way to keep in touch with friends and family. But there’s another reason to continue to be socially engaged. A 2008 study spearheaded by the clinical trials administrative director at Southern California Kaiser Permanente Medical Group and published in the American Journal of Public Health found that older women who maintained large social networks were 26 percent less likely to develop dementia than women with smaller social networks. In addition, those who had daily contact with friends and family cut their risk of dementia by nearly half. The study also noted that regular social interaction can delay or possibly even prevent cognitive impairment. * Continue your career. While the idea of retiring poolside and watching the world go by might seem nice, such a scenario is not necessarily good for your brain. Numerous studies have shown the benefits that staying engaged in professional activities can have on brain health. The brain does not thrive if it’s sitting on the sideline. Staying active in your career will continue to provide the challenges your brain needs to stay sharp and avoid memory loss and struggles with concentration. Men and women who want to leave office life behind can branch out on their own and work as consultants or put their years of experience to use by teaching at a nearby university or secondary school. But heading off for the hammock once you have hung up your briefcase can prove troublesome for your brain.

Men and women often dream of jetsetting around the world when they retire. Traveling the globe without worrying about timelines or what’s going on back at the office is something many retirees reward themselves with after a life of hard work. As liberating as world travel can be, retirees still must exercise caution when traveling abroad. The following are a few safety tips for retirees who are ready to make their dream retirements a reality by setting off for parts unknown. * Stay in touch. Escapism is a big part of the attraction of travel for travelers young and old. But while you may want to avoid contact with the outside world on your travels, it’s still necessary to stay in touch with your loved ones. Retirees who plan to take extended trips overseas should purchase an international mobile phone plan that allows them to use their phones regardless of what country they happen to be in. A quick text message to a son or daughter back home is all it takes to let your family know you are safe and having the time of your life. Work out a communication plan with your loved ones back home before departing, agreeing to contact them via phone call, email or Skype at least once per week for the duration of your trip. This is a good way to share your experiences and help your relatives rest easy knowing that you are safe. * Don’t store all of your important documents in one place. When traveling overseas, it can be convenient to keep important items like traveler’s cheques, credit cards, passports, and identification in one place. However, storing all of your sensitive documents or financial items in one place is very risky, as a lost or stolen bag can leave you without identification or access to your

funds. When traveling, couples should carry their own passports on their persons and split up credit cards and traveler’s cheques. This way you still have access to your funds, and one of you still has identification should items be lost or stolen. * Do your homework. Unplanned day trips are common among travelers who have been traveling for long periods of time. While such jaunts can add an element of spontaneity to a trip, they also can be quite dangerous if travelers have not done their homework on a particular destination. You do not want to end up in a place where tourists are not welcome or frequent targets of criminals. In addition, you don’t want to visit a city or town and know nothing of its customs or etiquette. For example, locals may react negatively to visitors who have ignored accepted local standards for attire. You can still make spontaneous trips, but make sure you gather some background information, be it from the Internet, locals where you are currently staying or the hotel concierge, on a given locale and its customs before visiting. * Make sure your health will not be compromised. Retirees cannot travel in the same manner they did in the carefree days of their youth. Before traveling abroad, visit your physician and get a full physical. Refill any medications you will need during your trip, and speak with your physician about how to handle any medical emergencies while overseas. Carry your physician’s name and telephone number with you at all times, so local medical professionals can contact him or her should you experience a medical emergency. Once you have arrived at your destination, it’s important that you continue to prioritize your health. Make sure the water is safe to drink before taking a sip, and investigate local cuisine to ensure it won’t enflame any existing medical conditions you may have. The quality of medical care varies greatly across the globe, so you must prioritize your health whenever leaving the country and avoid anything that might put your health in jeopardy. * Travel with friends or family if possible. If you have friends or family who also are retirees with time on their hands, organize a group trip abroad. Groups are less likely to be targeted by criminals than couples, and overseas trips with friends or family members can make trips overseas that much more memorable and enjoyable. Overseas travel is a popular goal of men and women on the verge of retirement or those who have already called it a career. But safety must remain a priority when traveling abroad.

Jan Lefeber Denturist Over 30 years rs in the Comox Valley

• Complete & Partial Dentures • Implant Supported Dentures • Relines & Repairs All Dental Plans accepted

Call for FREE Consultation and Appointment Open Monday – Saturday

250-339-7233

EVERYDAY is Senior Day (55 years old +)

Green Fee Special 2 can golf for $80 with coupon, expires July 31, 2014

For more information 250-339-6515 www.glaciergreens.com Follow & Like Us on Facebook for ongoing Green Fee Specials!

204 - 1819 Beaufort Ave Comox BC


just for

Comox Valley Echo Tuesday, June 17, 2014 A9

SEN SE NIO IORS RS Hear. . . what you’ve been missing.

ENTER TO

WIN! Hearing Aids valued at $5000

WINNER DRAWN MONTHLY See website for contest rules.

Susan Sinclair, MA, Aud (C) Registered Audiologist, RHIP

See how discreet today’s d ’ hearing h aids can be be.

FREE HEARING TEST Fully Refundable 90 Day Trial period. No Money Down for the first 21 days. COURTENAY 250.871.2285 325B 11th St.

CUMBERLAND 250.400.5451 2765A Dunsmuir Ave. Located in Dunsmuir Medical Clinic

Working with your Physician for Better Hearing

nexgenhearing.com


A10 Comox Valley Echo Tuesday, June 17, 2014

Opinions ECHO

THE COMOX VALLEY ECHO Publisher Dave MacDonald Editor Debra Martin Advertising Manager Keith Currie Office Administrator Deb Fowler Circulation Manager Hedi MacDonald Production Manager Ryan Getz Phone 250-334-4722 Fax 250-334-3172 Classifieds 250- 334-4215 Circulation 250-334-4734 E-mail: echo@comoxvalleyecho.com

An independently owned and operated newspaper published by Echo Publications at 407-D Fifth Street, Courtenay, B.C. V9N 1J7 All material herein is protected by copyright. Reproduction in whole or in part is not permitted without written authorization from the publisher.

Canadian Publications Mail Agreement Number #0661538

Letters

Bring on review of governance As I read through the Friday, June 13 edition of the Echo I knew that I just had to comment on a few items that caught my eye. All of these items have reinforced my support for the Chamber of Commerce in their endeavor to have a governance review for the Comox Valley. We currently have four separate jurisdictions each with their own sets of politicians, administrators, staff, and buildings. There are emerging issues which, to me, speak to a consolidation of administration for the Valley. First was the front page article about “gagging” of regional district officials over the repeated attempts by 3L Developments Ltd. to browbeat the regional district into allowing them to build their development on the banks of the Puntledge River. I say to 3L that we have a Regional Growth Strategy that concentrates development within existing municipal boundaries and until those areas are built out let’s refuse to be intimidated by those who want to push development where it is not wanted or needed. Sell the land and move to Surrey where they might appreciate your efforts - the Comox Valley does not need you. Next were the various beefs about a third fire hall in the Comox Valley. Raiding the piggy bank for this facility is not a good idea at this time with all the other infrastructure issues that need attention. And why on earth can we not use the facilities in Courtenay, Comox, and the base to handle our fire fighting needs. This is a big waste of taxpayers money. And then we have Courtenay councillors complaining about paying their share of the plan for future transit in the Comox Valley. We need to spend the money now to expand routes, add routes, and get smaller buses so that there will be viable options for those who want to get out of their cars. If you don’t build it they can’t use it. And last, but not least, the railroad. If anybody actually thinks that we are going to get passenger rail service to Courtenay again they need to get real. The only way a rail service will work on an island with less than 800,000 people (most of whom are concentrated in the southern half of the island) is for it to be attractive to commercial traffic. There are just not enough people to support passenger service. Will that commercial traffic include coal? I hope not! I say bring on the governance review and let’s start working together as one Valley. Pamela Munroe Courtenay

MISINFORMATION ON SMART METERS I would like to respond to some misinformation recently published about smart meters. The radio-frequency signals BC Hydro’s meters use to communicate are safe and similar to those used for decades by televisions, radios and other common household devices. B.C.’s Provincial Health Officer, Health Canada and the World Health Organization all confirm the wireless meters pose no known health risks. BC Hydro’s meters have been independently tested and were shown to communicate for about 1.4 seconds per day at a signal strength less than 0.5 per cent of Health Canada’s Safety Code 6 - the official radio frequency exposure limit within Canada. To put this into context, passengers taking the ferry between Horseshoe Bay and Departure Bay ferry terminals are exposed to the equivalent of 35 years’ worth of BC Hydro smart meter radio frequency in a single hour and forty minute journey. More than 99 per cent of BC Hydro customers now have a new meter and are already seeing the benefits of the modern system. The new automated billing system is eliminating routinely estimated bills and manual data-entry errors, ensuring customers are billed only for the power used in a billing period. And customers who have signed up for a secure MyHydro account can use the more-timely information about their electricity use to help identify new ways to conserve energy and save money. Ted Olynyk Community Relations Manager BC Hydro

MOST HONOURABLE OCCUPATION I think that teachers are wonderful people! I think they have the most important profession in society. Teachers and Professors have always been revered and honoured, and we seem to be forgetting that passing on wisdom to our precious children is the most honourable and praiseworthy of occupations. As a Parent and Grandparent I can’t possibly do all this myself, and I rely on professional teachers to do it for me. Thirty years ago my kids were in elementary school here in the Valley, and there were adequate staff, (2 or more in EACH classroom and more if needed), music lessons, ukulele and violin group lessons, library sessions, swimming lessons for Grades 1 and 4, plenty of PE and sports, expeditions and field trips, and a 5 day camp at the end of Grade 6. Also there was excellent teaching, and happy kids. Now my grandkids are in the same system, and I see little of these conditions. I see stressed teachers trying to make do with perhaps one Educational Assistant in a classroom of 28 Grade 3 students, of whom 2 have diagnosed ADHD, and 2 have types of autism requiring special help. (Everyone knows that these two conditions have increased in numbers in the last 10 - 20 years). It’s just not possible to give these kids all the help they need! I don’t see the extras that made school exciting; music, dance, plays, field trips. And where’s the emphasis on library time and physical fitness? The whole philosophy of making do with less and whittling away at public services is impacting my precious Grandchildren! I really wish they were not growing up in British Columbia at the moment, as I can’t see the present conditions helping them to reach their full potential. Increase my taxes if necessary and for heaven’s sake pay the teachers what they deserve. Increase the staff in the classrooms, make the teachers’ jobs easier, and let them get on with it! Liz Naish Courtenay

Letters to the Editor

A disappointed Legion member This is directed to the youngsters, I presume, who “tagged” Bowser Legion Branch 211 and our tennis court buildings, on Friday ,June 13th of this year and viciously attacked our memorial trees with a knife and left your empty beer cans and hockey sticks on the property. Just so you know, we are all very upset with what you have done. You may not be aware of who we are and what we do, so I will enlighten you. Yes, we are a private club, BUT anyone can join if they are Canadian Citizens AND are of legal drinking age. Most of us are seniors and retired, but not all by a long shot. Our primary function is to provide support and financial aid to the Veterans, their dependents, the sick or disabled, and others in need in the community. We are a small group of dedicated members whose sole purpose is to raise funds so we can give back to our community. We are not allowed to keep any of the money we raise and thus we support also, the fire departments, the schools, the cadets corps, various charities in the local area and we give scholarships and bursaries to eligible students. This totals approximately $25,000 yearly that we raise and give back. What you have done is clearly an act of defiance and full of disrespect toward the Legion, its members and those who fought and died for your freedoms in life. Now another job for the work party, ALL seniors, to remove your idea of art.

I trust you will eventually grow up to realise the idiocy of your current behaviors and how you have distressed many who are helping you and your community. Oh, and by the way, you and your family are welcome to come to the Open House at the Legion, on Sunday June 22nd at 1 pm and see first hand what we do. Mary Robertson, Member Bowser Legion Branch 211

GET INVOLVED IN CANADA DAY Canada Day EH? As Chair of the Courtenay July 1st Committee I am writing this to remind everyone that there is still time to get involved with the annual July 1st Celebrations on Canada Day. Parade applications are free and available at City Hall or on line at wwwcomoxvalleycanadaday.ca. With over $2,000.00 in prizes, your entry could win. Food and Craft booth applications are also on line or you can can pick up at the counter although they are going fast. The 19 years and under “Battle of the Bands” give local youth a shot at making a professional record and having it played on local radio. There is still room for three more bands to enter ... and it’s free! Make sure you come down and take in this annual fun, free, family event. With music in Simms Park Saturday, Sunday and Monday night as well as shows at the Sid Williams and the

Native Sons Hall on Canada Day Tuesday, July 1st it’s too good to miss .... and it’s all free!! See you there EH? Edwin Grieve, Chair Courtenay July 1st Committee

WHY NOT TRUCKS FIRST? Hasn’t anyone wondered why the Comox Valley needs more than two training centres for our Volunteer Fire Departments? The Comox hall has a great one, access to the CFB when needed, and books training sessions for firefighters from all over BC. It appears that the new Satellite Hall to be built up on Waters will not have an actual First Responder committment for two more years, after the training center is built. Am I confused—are they not planning on putting trucks and first responders into that spot immediately? Why do we have to take taxpayers money to duplicate each service that individual municipalities will need, when it’s only a matter of minutes to access the well used Comox one? Rididulous use of our tax dollars! Please, people—a new satellite hall is needed, with staff to man it, but another training center isn’t. Chief Schreiner and his crew do an excellent job and are a credit to the Valley—and have the facility to train people that need trained. Patricia Armstrong Courtenay

Low-income schools are in dire straits Dear Peter Fassbender, We need more money for education. Why? My daughter loves school. Her school is in a low income area. Our books are over 20 years old but there is no money to replace them. Our play-based learning toys are old, broken and beyond repair. There is no money to replace them. Our library books are old, outdated, and at times politically incorrect. There is no money to replace them. The carpet in our library is a tripping hazard and likely over twenty years old but there is no money to replace it. Our toilets are likely from 1953 and use copious amounts of water but we don’t have money to replace them. We would like field trips but that costs money too. We would like new sports uniforms but that costs money. We would like more school supplies but that costs money. Without more money the BC school system is failing our low-income and at-risk students. Education is the key to overcoming poverty. I am tired of applying for grants and not winning them. That means no funding for our community garden, no outdoor learning space, no new library books, and no field trips. Fundraising from poor school communitites is insensitive and ineffective. Please help all BC schools, students,

and teachers. We need more money for education. I know there are many schools in BC that need more money not more cutbacks. Respectfully, Kindle Parsons, Parent volunteer at Courtenay Elementary School

RETIRING TEACHER SPEAKS Mr. Johnson’s questions to teachers in last Friday’s Echo struck me as both sincere and honest. In that spirit I feel obliged to share my response as an elementary teacher who is on the threshold of retirement. What is our motivation for seeking a wage increase at this time? Firstly, if wages drop too low in relation to the cost of living, we’ll no longer attract a high calibre of young people to the profession. We need intelligent, capable, multi-talented young people with a heart and mind dedicated to service and a love of children. We need creativity, energy, ingenuity and compassion, just for a start, and we need enough of these young recruits so that we can be selective. Quality teaching isn’t easy, and it can’t all be taught. Secondly, the level of respect the profession of teacher garners in society is important. It determines many things, including intangibles such as parent and student respect, morale, and concrete factors such as the level of funding that a

society is willing to provide for its children. Again, wages are part of, but not all of this. Too high a wage can backfire by attracting the wrong type of recruit. You can’t be a happy teacher if your prime motivation is your pay check. Neither you nor the kids would survive that one. We need balance and fairness. We need to protect the teaching profession from the erosion that an obvious lack of respect from the government and a steady downgrading of salary leads to. These are the reasons I am willing to stand up for a wage increase at this time, even though I will not benefit much personally. And that being said, what galvanizes me even more, Mr. Johnson, is indeed the brutal cuts in direct services to kids, including the long steady dismantling of services to special needs students. This is not a ruse. I remember when students were taken out of their special programs in the eighties, and now I see them left stranded in crowded classrooms with their supports withdrawn. This is not integration, it is abandonment and it disturbs me terribly. The situation is reaching a breaking point. I started teaching when I was 21, and every day I have been happy to get up and go meet my kids. Yet as I exit the profession, I am so sad to have to report on such a state of affairs in our beautiful resource and people rich province. Here’s my question: is this necessary? Catherine Jackson Courtenay


Comox Valley Echo Tuesday, June 17, 2014 A11

News

Teachers go on full-scale strike today By Michael Briones Echo Staff Negotiations between the BC Teachers’ Federation and B.C. Public School Employers’ Association failed to reach a deal over the weekend. BCTF president Jim Iker said a full-scale school strike is “imminent” meaning a full withdrawal of services that starts today. What that means for the remainder of the school year is not certain. Unless a last-minute deal is struck, it means school is over for many. Meanwhile, members of the Comox District Teachers’ Association came together in a study session on Monday, to hear the latest update about collective bargaining and to develop plans for future steps. The study session was part of the province-wide rotating strike action that has been mounted by the BC Teachers’ Federation over the past three weeks. “Teachers don’t take job action lightly but, after more than a decade of cuts, we are on strike for a fair deal that provides much-needed support for our students,” says Steve Stanley, President of the CDTA. Stanley notes that in our district we are losing up to 20 teaching positions this year as a direct result of government underfunding. Teachers are standing up against a government that has illegally stripped our contract and that has violated our constitutional rights not once but twice. _”We are very disappointed that the government did not come to the table last weekend to bargain in good faith. The proposals that government put on the table actually represent a step backward for teachers,” Stanley said. Teachers lined the bridges in Courtenay on Monday at lunch to highlight their determination to achieve a collective agreement that provides improved classroom conditions and more support for students a fair and reasonable salary increase for teachers. Pickets will be set up at school sites around the Comox Valley today. The escalated job action has created concerns especially for students that are going to take provincial exams and are graduating. School District 71 superintendent Sherry Elwood told parents through letters sent out to students last week that provincial exams will occur and that students can use the district buses to access the exams at their schools. The Labour Relations Board has deemed those exams, as well as grading them, essential services that teachers need to perform. Elwood said the teachers are obligated to provide marks for Grade 12 students but will not be required to hand out report cards. The LRB said school districts will need to determine the number of teachers necessary to supervise provincial exams and enter final grades, with an effort to minimize the number required. The LRB ruling also prevents teachers from picketing in front of entrances designated for students to get to exams and says it is essential that staff and teachers determine which students should be

designated as special needs for the fall. Education Minister Peter Fassbender had said they will lift the lockout to allow summer school to proceed last week. But BCTF has only said they remain committed to getting a deal by the end of June, not saying what will happen if June 30 passes without a deal. Iker said decisions are still being made about how teachers will proceed. Education Minister Peter Fassbender told reporters Monday morning that the government tabled a “comprehensive” proposal Sunday and was waiting to get the BCTF’s response. “The ball is squarely in their court at this stage,” he said. Iker’s position is that a weekend of bargaining with the employers failed to produce a deal. He said the employers’ group “squandered an opportunity” for a settlement after the BCTF tabled a number of new proposals, including an increase in the contract term to five years and a salary of eight per cent - down from about 12 per cent over six years. The BCTF also asked for a $5,000 signing bonus. “Our proposal put us within one per cent of the government’s proposal,” Iker said. “This shows a willingness to get a deal, to be reasonable.” He said the BCTF also proposed the creation of an education fund to address such issues as class size, class composition (which includes the number of special-needs students) and numbers of specialist teachers. Rather than bargaining 24/7 as promised over the weekend, Iker said the government side - represented by BCPSEA - “sat on their hands for two days.” Fassbender released few details of the government’s offer, saying only that it made a move on salary and included elements dealing with class size and composition. “I think we have a proposal that is about as good as it’s going to get in terms of what we’re prepared to do,” he said. “We have made moves and we hope that the BCTF recognizes

Teacher Shawn Holland addresses the public about the ongoing contract negotiations between the BC Teachers’ Federation and the provincial government during the Comox District Teachers’ Association’s unity day last Friday.

Juno Award winner Helen Austin and her daughter Daisy on the fiddle entertained the crowds during the Comox District Teachers’ Association’s unity day last Friday. The association dedicated Friday’s strike day to uniting community in support of kids.

Cumberland finalizes school campus road closure By Drew A. Penner Echo Staff The hubbub along Cumberland’s streets had been building over the planned removal of trees along Egremont, part of the plan to integrate the community’s two public schools into a single K-9 campus. So when Village councillors asked to about updates to the community school project plan in the midst of the final look-over of the road closure plan at their regularly scheduled meeting June 10, school board officials were prepared. Unrolling an updated aerial map once proceedings moved into Committee of the Whole format, Ian Heselgrave, School District 71 director of operations, Russell Horswill, the board’s secretary treasurer and Rick Grinham, Cumberland’s trustee, explained the design tweaks they’ve gone with. “We recognize that this is a community that has a deep connection to their forests and their green space,” Heselgrave said. “We’ve come up with a vision and a plan that will ensure that we have a lot of green space. We’re going to add more trees than are coming out.” While counting cars that will arrive to drop-off

kids, it became clear some trees must be eliminate to meet safety objectives. “We find that in fact we need a little bit of parking and drop-off space,” Heselgrave said. “We need to refine our school bus drop-off loop, and we need a way that we can clearly see and have good sightlines who are in kindergarten and Grade 1 to a band practice at the junior school.” The ultimate goal is to keep Cumberland kids attending school in the community, getting vibrant education. Construction work, slated to begin July 7 with an end date of Aug 31, is meant to blend the new green space to be established with pedestrian connections and playground equipment. Council passed fourth and final reading of the road closure bylaw unanimously. “We’re really pleased that the Village has finalized the road closure,” said Horswill. “It was an important part of our plan. Without being able to close the road we weren’t going

CVRD gets approval to borrow funds for curling centre work The Comox Valley Regional District got the green light to borrow funds to improve the Comox Valley Curling Centre. The endorsement to adopt a bylaw to borrow $1.9 million for the project was gained through the alternative approval process that closed on June 13. Less than 10 per cent of the total number of electors in the CVRD, excluding Denman and Hornby Islands, signed and submitted elector response forms opposing the CVRD board’s adoption of the bylaw. “There are 47,372 electors in the service area, and the number of responses that opposed the bylaw is 423, which is less than the required 10 per cent, and therefore elector approval was obtained,” said James Warren, corporate legislative officer. “We will be providing a follow up staff report to the June 24 board meeting at which time the board can then consider adopting the bylaw to borrow the money.” The curling centre facility is over 50 years old and main components of the refrigeration plant are well beyond their life expectancy and are in need of replacement. Energy efficient building and mechanical upgrades will add an estimated 30 years of life to the CVRD facility and ensure that a multipurpose year round facility, with curling as its main focus, is available to the residents of the Comox Valley. Borrowed funds will be paid back over 20 years through tax requisition, which is estimated to be $0.0138 per $1,000. For a property assessed at $300,000 the cost would be $4.14 per year per household.

This amount would be in addition to the $103.32 that the same property currently pays annually for the Comox Valley recreation complexes service. Later this summer an RFP process will begin for consulting services, followed by a project tender process in late fall. The project contract will be awarded in early 2015 with the plan to begin the upgrades following the close of the 2015 curling season in spring, with completion in time for the start of the season in the fall of 2015.

to be able to create a campus. This allows us to move forward and hopefully be ready for September when school starts.” Heselgrave said the tender for the roadwork closes next week. Grinham said he’s excited to see the bylaw get the final stamp of approval. “I think this puts into place an opportunity for this municipality to have their kids as close to home as possible for their first 10 years of education,” he said. “I think the community is going to be the winner in the end with recreation and sports facilities and the green space that were going to develop on the confines of the community school.” Over 40 trees have been marked for removal, but only about 22 trees will need to be removed and just five of these are considered “high value” trees, officials said. These five trees will be turned into lumber for school projects such as garden planters. The smaller trees will be sold as firewood in a fundraiser.

CALL FOR INTEREST Moving Ahead Together

Public Advisory Committee Members Liquid Waste Management Planning (LWMP) – South Sewer Project The Comox Valley Regional District (CVRD) and the Village of Cumberland are working with the K’ómoks First Nation to develop and implement the south sewer project (SSP), a new wastewater collection, treatment, discharge and resource recovery project for the communities in the south region of the CVRD. As part of this process, the CVRD is initiating a liquid waste management plan (LWMP) process. The LWMP will establish the long-term planning framework for liquid waste management in the south region. The CVRD invites letters of interest from local individuals living in and around Royston, Union Bay and Cumberland who wish to sit on the public advisory committee (PAC). Members of the PAC will have an important liaison role with the responsibility to inform the members of the communities they have been selected to represent. The role of PAC members is to support and provide recommendations to the steering committee for the duration of the LWMP process. This is a volunteer (non-paid) role that will take part in 6-8 meetings over the planning process. Interested persons should submit a brief letter stating why they would be a good candidate. A package outlining the responsibilities and time requirements is available via e-mail request: southsewer@comoxvalleyrd.ca Letters of interest must be received by 4pm on June 30, 2014. Please drop off or e-mail them to: CVRD South Sewer Project Team 3843 Livingstone Road, Royston, BC V0R 2V0 E-mail: southsewer@comoxvalleyrd.ca Tel: 250-334-6056


A12 Comox Valley Echo Tuesday, June 17, 2014

Community

‘Go Smart Day’ set for downtown Sunday afternoon Sunday, June 22 is the date for the Valley’s “Go Smart Day”, a street festival that provides opportunities for people to literally play in the streets. Segments of select streets are closed to vehicular traffic from noon to 4pm so that other ‘people uses’ may take place in the streets of downtown Courtenay. Imagine Comox Valley is hosting the event in partnership with a number of community partners and invites all citizens of all ages to enjoy a fresh perspective in Downtown Courtenay! Experience something new by participating in the Road Runner’s Fun Run or the open criterium, by helping your kids decorate their bikes, creating street art, listening to live music, enjoying a street café meal or a Community Garden potluck, or riding the One Thirty Three/Jump Camp skate park. The event will be held on 4th, 5th and 6th Streets as well as the cross streets of Duncan Avenue, England Avenue and the portion of Fitzgerald Avenue between 4th and 6th street. See map inset. Portions of the route will provide opportunities for the races. Such festivals are organized all over the world as a way to bring communities together in the roads and streets of our cities, towns and villages. The absence of traffic can make the streets a pleasant place to congregate, as they are quieter and there is less air pollution than on a typical day. The recently held popular Elevate the Arts festival in downtown Courtenay showed just how lively and enjoyable our streets can be! To learn more about this relaxing afternoon visit our website at www.imaginecomoxvalley.ca and join our facebook event page Go Smart Day. An event like Go Smart Day requires community support and engagement, and the organisers welcome feedback and ideas. If you want to be a part of the event, you can get involved by signing up to be a sponsor, vendor or volunteer, entertainment or activity provider all of which can be done by sending an e-mail to imaginecomoxvalley@gmail.com. Connect online: Event Website - http://imaginecomoxvalley.ca Facebook Event page - https://www.facebook.com/ events/624490074297191/ Imagine Comox Valley group on Facebook - https:// www.facebook.com/groups/198030611797

Celebrate Midsummer night at Black Creek Black Creek is getting ready to host its first annual Midsummer Celebration on Saturday, June 21. This outdoor event features live music from Corwin Fox, of Cumberland, Courtenay singer-songwriter Joey Clarkson, and Juno-winner Helen Austin. Families are invited to bring in the first day of summer with salmon burgers, local beer and mead, fire spinning, flower head-wreath making, and lots of kids activities. On the beautiful acres at the Black Creek Community Centre (2001 Black Creek Rd), Midsummer Celebration runs from 4 p.m. to 9 p.m. Tickets are $10.00 for adults; 5.00 for children and $25.00 for a family pass. All profits go towards cultural and recreational programming for children and adults. Get your tickets by calling the Black Creek Community Centre at (250) 337-5190 or visit www.facebook.com/ blackcreekcommunitycentre for details.

Food, arts, culture at Aboriginal Day For many years the people of the Comox Valley have come together to celebrate the vibrant cultures and diversity of the First Nations, Métis and Inuit peoples of Canada on National Aboriginal Day. This year join the K’omoks First Nation in partnership with the Kumugwe Cultural Society on June 21, from 11 am to 6 pm at 3320 Comox Road (the village site of the K’omoks First Nation). This year’s event will feature FREE special events for the whole family, including performances from local and visiting dance troupes, storytelling, a kids’ tent and play area, an Indigenous Fashion show and much more. Browse the arts and crafts tents of Aboriginal artists and enjoy some excellent traditional cuisine - wild Sockeye salmon cooked over an open fire, buffalo burgers, candied salmon and fresh bannock with homemade berry jam. There is something for everyone at National Aboriginal Day. Find the event on Facebook at K’omoks National Aboriginal Day, June 21.

You never know what you’ll find around the next curve in the path on the annual Gardens in Bloom tour this weekend

Tour the ‘Gardens in Bloom’ Comox Valley Horticultural Society invites you to 10 special properties By Isabel Petch Special to the Echo It’s June and the Comox Valley is in bloom. Every year, since 2008, the Comox Valley Horticulture Society has invited the public to enjoy touring ten special gardens. We have shown nearly seventy different gardens opened by their owners who generously donate two days of their time and their properties to this charity based tour. Over the years recipients of funds from Gardens in Bloom have been Cumberland Lodge, the Views at St. Joseph’s Hospital, school programs in Courtenay/Comox, Beachcombers School in Fanny Bay, Dawn to Dawn Community Garden and the garden at Glacier View Lodge, which will also be on the tour this year. The 2014 Gardens in Bloom garden tour is indeed the Comox Valley in Bloom. Gardens will be open from Ships Point in the south to Black Creek and Merville in the North. We will take you up to Forbidden Plateau and down to Lazo. You will visit a new small urban garden in Crown Isle and a well-established country garden in Royston. You will be able to admire ocean front and river front, ornamental plantings and food production. The gardens are mature, middle-aged and young. One is nearly half-a century, others less than a decade. What all the owners of these special gardens have in common is a love of plants, a sense of artistry, the dedication to create and the willingness to share their individual paradise with others. The basic elements of all gardens are a space, some trees, shrubs, large and small plants. Add to this a path, a pond, possibly an arbour and perhaps some pots. It’s amazing the unique arrangements green-fingered gardeners can create with such basic materials. Mix in imagination and the magic of gardens is created. One such magical place is the garden on Forbidden Plateau, which is carved out of the forest. The forest is the background and it provides the structure and canvas on which the garden is built. The property sits on the Brown River which shimmers and rushes by. Paths, narrow and wide, traverse the mossy West Coast forest. The forest floor is carpeted with indigenous plants. But it is who and

DIAMOND

n t t he e s e r P

l 27th Annua TS TICKE

$

10

EACH

and PLATINUM

Business Services (1995) Ltd.

JULY 1st Lewis Park • 1:00 pm Tickets available every weekend in JUNE at Thrifty’s, Quality Foods and Canadian Tire 1st Prize Cruise Vacation: 7 days Oasis of the Seas Eastern Caribbean cruise for 2 adults or $5,000 cash. 2nd Prize Disneyland Vacation: 4 days Fairfield Inn Anaheim, 3 days Disney Hopper tickets for family of four or $3,500 cash. 3rd prize Las Vegas Vacation: 4 days Luxor Hotel & Casino, for 2 adults or $1,000 cash. Prizes 4-10 Assorted prizes including Kayak and Paddle, Cusinart BBQ, 10 piece set of Pots and Pans and more. For details go to www.Ducky500.ca Tickets sell out every year - Get yours early!

e

GOLD Bayview Chiropractic Brian McLean CV Echo CV Record First Insurance Insurance Centres The Eagle 97.3 The Medicine Shoppe Used Comox Valley Woofy’s Pet Foods

Chances are 1 in 6000 (total tickets for sale) to win a grand prize. BC Gaming Event License #62482

Know your limit, play within it. 19+ Problem Gambling Help Line 1-888-795-6111

www.bcresponsiblegambling.ca

what inhabits this woodland that sets this garden apart. The owners are artists. One is a logger and the tool of his artistry is a chainsaw. This husband and wife team have carved charming creatures who emerge out of the burls and logs and stumps to take up residence in the woods. Some creatures are eccentric and charming. Others are visitors from Harry Potter’s universe. Added to the charm is the workshop, a one-of-a-kind

somewhat round chubby building with a fabulous front door fashioned out of a collection of burls. And you must not miss the painted rocks. They make fitting companions for the forest gallery’s other inhabitants. The owners on Forbidden Plateau have followed a cardinal rule of gardening: “garden to the site”. They have created a feeling of place. A few traditional garden beds have been created, but the forest is the real inspiration for this wonderfully eccentric Comox Valley garden. The Comox Valley Horticultural Society invites you to visit all ten of the very unique gardens in the 2014 Gardens in Bloom tour. You can tour the gardens on Saturday, June 21 and Sunday, June 22 from 10 to 4. Tickets can be purchased for $15 at Art Knapp Plantland and Home & Garden Gate in Courtenay, Blue Heron Books in Comox and Arrowsmith Greenhouses in Qualicum. Isabel Petch is the past president of the Comox Valley Horticultural Society.


Extra ECHO

Comox Valley, BC

The COMOX VALLEY ECHO ❑ Tuesday, June 17, 2014

etc. ECHO

Local Facebook group marks a milestone

On June 9th, 2008, Mark Erickson began the Facebook group “You know you’re from the Comox Valley when...” as a fun, light-hearted way for anyone who has or had any connection to the Comox Valley to share stories, pictures, videos, news, anecdotes, jokes, etc. “I had not had any high expectations for the group at the time. Five years later, after seeing a modest growth of membership of about 100 per year, I had noticed that the requests to join were a little more frequent. Last year in June, there were 550+ members and I decided to keep track as the growth continued”. The group is now marking its sixth anniversary and is just shy of the 3,400 member milestone. Over the last year, and indeed further back, members from pioneer and heritage families have joined the group and have shared their private collections from all aspects of Comox Valley life. It has become a venue for nostalgia, reunions, and memories given from member to member, whether or not they still live here. “I invite people on Facebook to join the group if you’ve lived in, grew up, or moved to the Comox ValleyHave fun. Explore. Share. Like. Comment. Invite. No spamming please”, said Erickson. Go to: h t t p s : / / w w w. f a c e b o o k . c o m / groups/20625696630/

First of summer’s night markets Thursday in Comox The first of the summer monthly Comox by the Sea Night Markets goes 4-7 pm this Thursday, June 19. Every 3rd Thursday from June to September come on down to Comox Avenue and enjoy the fun. Special guests are from the Comox Valley Farmers’ Market. This month’s Musical Guest is Anela Kahiamoe.

Plan to enter the annual July 1st Fifth Street Mile The annual Fifth Street Mile Fun Run is happening on Canada day right before the parade. Just imagine running down Fifth Street with thousands of people cheering you and your family on. Again this year the title sponsor is The Joint Physiotherapy and the fastest person under four minutes will get a free pair of shoes from Extreme Runners. Free registration at 5th Street and Woods Ave from 9:00-9:45am. Finishing at Simms park across the bridge. Start at 10:00 am. Awards and draw prizes right afterwards.

Grad: Fall from the sky and don the orange beret 19 Wing mints fresh crop of Search and Rescue Technicians By Drew A. Penner Echo Staff Eight students and their instructor jumped out of a Buffalo soaring through the skies above Comox, twisting and whirling along with their parachutes in a controlled descent to the airfield below where military top brass were waiting with a promotion. It’s been 11 months of exhausting Search and Rescue Technician training at 19 Wing Comox for the men and women, but on June 12 it all seemed worth it, as family members gathered for the graduation ceremony. Following staff to the ground, the military members folded their parachutes carefully and walked to the flat space in front of 14 Hangar at the Comox Valley’s military base. Epaulettes were changed out as the corporals were officially given the title master corporal. Proud parents looked on as Brigadier-General Bruce Ploughman, from 2 Canadian Air Division inspected the line of grads, making comment on the weather, congratulating the bunch or making friendly jokes about their background. The Newfie stepped up to the podium to speak to those in attendance in both French and English. “This is not the end,” Ploughman said in his speech. “This is the beginning.” The 47th SAR course is a test of physical and psychological endurance, as students push themselves to their limits and are graded on their air maneuverability and precision. “You must continue to hone your craft,” he said. “Never stop learning.” Ploughman impressed upon the graduates the importance of picking up lessons from both the positive experiences and the bad ones. “And never let anyone stand in your way,” he said. “Rescue! Thank you very much.” The position of SAR Tech is a coveted one, and just a third of those selected for advance consideration are allowed to attend the course. And for that reason and more besides it attracts a varied bunch. The students have a reputation for being outdoors enthusiast, but in reality their military backgrounds are generally nothing to be set aside either. Cpl. Ashley Barker, for example, joined the military after several years

as a tree planter. But she’s already been a jump medic, spending four years in Petawawa. In the case of Cpl. Daryl Jambrich, he was a combat engineer who was posted in Valcartier, Que., participating in operations Athena and Hestia to Afghanistan and Haiti respectively, he’s now able to move to Trenton to be part of the 424 “Lion” Squadron. For Sam Howard, who was an Infantryman with the second batallion Royal 22 Regiment, after serving in Bosnia, and who spent time in Afghanistan in 2009 as a sniper, he’s looking forward to his new career as a SAR Tech. Make no mistake the training was tough, he says while holding his daughter Megan in his arms. “Sniper is three months training,” he says, putting things in perspective. “SAR Tech is 11 months training. There’s always some kind of training every day.” This was a special moment for him. “It’s been hard on my family,” he said. “It’s a great day.” Local residents may see Cpl. Cameron Hiller (now Master Cpl. Cameron Hiller) around town, since he will be posted at 19 Wing as part of 442 Squadron. (Continued on page B4)

Students drop in where family members and military brass await to congratulate them on passing their training. (Photos by Drew A. Penner)

Ashley Barker joined the military after several years as a tree planter.

Write your exam July 1st for boat operator card The Cape Lazo Power and Sail Squadron invites you to write the exam for your Pleasure Craft Operator Card during Canada Day celebrations on July 1, in Courtenay’s Lewis Park. The exams can be written between 10:30 a.m. and 3:30 p.m. All operators of motorized vessels, including personal water craft, are required to have a Pleasure Craft Operator Card (PCOC). Cost for the exam is $35. Registration is not required. The Boating Handbook to study for the exam is available at Staples. For more information check our website at www.capelazocps.ca or contact Barb at 250339-2333.

The intensive training has been hard on Sam Howard’s family, and they’re glad it’s paid off.

Brigadier-General Bruce Ploughman, from 2 Canadian Air Division, inspected the line of grads.


B2 Comox Valley Echo o Tuesday, Tuesd y, June 17, 2014

4 x $25 Gift Certificates S H U T T L E

4 x $25 Gift Certificates

S E R V I C E

S H U T T L E

4 x $25 Gift Certificates

S E R V I C E

S H U T T L E

S E R V I C E

PHONE 250-339-5252 CURRENT BID: $0.00 LOT#001 VALUE: $100.00

PHONE 250-339-5252 CURRENT BID: $0.00 LOT#002 VALUE: $100.00

PHONE 250-339-5252 CURRENT BID: $0.00 LOT#003 VALUE: $100.00

4 x $25 Gift Certificates

2 Nights Accommodation

2 Nights Accommodation

S H U T T L E

*Subject to availability

*Subject to availability

S E R V I C E

PHONE 250-339-5252 CURRENT BID: $0.00 LOT#004 VALUE: $100.00

$2 X 50 GIFT CERTIFICATES

w w w. a p r i l p o i n t . c o m CURRENT BID: $0.00 VALUE: $336.00

w w w. a p r i l p o i n t . c o m CURRENT BID: $0.00 VALUE: $336.00

LOT#005

LOT#006

2 X $50 GIFT CERTIFICATES

$200 Gift Certificate toward Pacific Energy Woodstove or Insert and Installation 1 coupon per stove or insert & install.

741 McPhee Ave., Courtenay

250-334-3621 CURRENT BID: $0.00

2 0 6 4 C O M O X AV E • 2 5 0 8 9 0 9 2 0 0

LOT#007

CURRENT BID: $0.00

VALUE: $100.00

$200 Gift Certificate toward Pacific Energy Woodstove or Insert and Installation

LOT#010

HOW IT WORKS The Comox Valley Echo Cool Summer Auction will take place June 17th through June 27th at

$200 Gift Certificate toward Pacific Energy Woodstove or Insert and Installation

1 coupon per stove or insert & install.

741 McPhee Ave., Courtenay

741 McPhee Ave., Courtenay

741 McPhee Ave., Courtenay

LOT#011

250-334-3621 CURRENT BID: $0.00

VALUE: $200.00

www.coolsummer.ca

250-334-3621 CURRENT BID: $0.00

VALUE: $200.00

FITNESS STARTER KIT Includes: Intro to Fitness Personal Training Session, 1 month

limited FitCamp & Nutrition and Lifestyle Coaching

limited FitCamp & Nutrition and Lifestyle Coaching

BODYNETIX 250 871 2400

LOT#013

BODYNETIX.COM CURRENT BID: $0.00

VALUE: $185.00

BODYNETIX 250 871 2400

LOT#014

BODYNETIX.COM CURRENT BID: $0.00

VALUE: $185.00

FITNESS STARTER KIT Includes: Intro to Fitness Personal Training Session, 1 month

FITNESS STARTER KIT Includes: Intro to Fitness Personal Training Session, 1 month

limited FitCamp & Nutrition and Lifestyle Coaching

limited FitCamp & Nutrition and Lifestyle Coaching

BODYNETIX LOT#016

BODYNETIX.COM CURRENT BID: $0.00

VALUE: $185.00

250 871 2400

LOT#017

BODYNETIX.COM CURRENT BID: $0.00

VALUE: $185.00

Air Compressor 199-1588

250-338-0101 278 N. Island Hwy., Courtenay

LOT#019

250 871 2400

LOT#015

LOT#020

1 Bedroom Cabin for 3 Nights Stay for up to 4 people Valid January 1 to June 1, 2014

www.cabinswest.ca 1-888-726-7770 CURRENT BID: $0.00 VALUE: $417.00

LOT#018

$100 GIFT CERTIFICATE TOWARD ANYTHING IN THE STORE Central Builders’

MON - FRI 7-6, SAT 8-5, SUN 9-5

Locally owned and operated for over 80 years 610 Anderton Ave., Courtenay • 250-334-4416

CURRENT BID: $0.00

VALUE: $219.99

BODYNETIX.COM CURRENT BID: $0.00

VALUE: $185.00

250-338-0101 278 N. Island Hwy., Courtenay

CURRENT BID: $0.00

VALUE: $129.99

BODYNETIX

BODYNETIX

Sony Microsystem

LOT#021

CURRENT BID: $0.00

VALUE: $100.00

$100 GIFT CERTIFICATE

$100 GIFT CERTIFICATE

$100 GIFT CERTIFICATE

TOWARD ANYTHING IN THE STORE

TOWARD ANYTHING IN THE STORE

TOWARD ANYTHING IN THE STORE

Central Builders’

Central Builders’

MON - FRI 7-6, SAT 8-5, SUN 9-5

Locally owned and operated for over 80 years 610 Anderton Ave., Courtenay • 250-334-4416

LOT#022

CURRENT BID: $0.00

VALUE: $100.00

Central Builders’

MON - FRI 7-6, SAT 8-5, SUN 9-5

Locally owned and operated for over 80 years 610 Anderton Ave., Courtenay • 250-334-4416

LOT#023

CURRENT BID: $0.00

VALUE: $100.00

MON - FRI 7-6, SAT 8-5, SUN 9-5

Locally owned and operated for over 80 years 610 Anderton Ave., Courtenay • 250-334-4416

LOT#024

CURRENT BID: $0.00

VALUE: $100.00

$100 GIFT CERTIFICATE

$100 GIFT CERTIFICATE

1 Full Play

TOWARD ANYTHING IN THE STORE

TOWARD ANYTHING IN THE STORE

Golf Membership

Central Builders’

Central Builders’

MON - FRI 7-6, SAT 8-5, SUN 9-5

Locally owned and operated for over 80 years 610 Anderton Ave., Courtenay • 250-334-4416

LOT#025

CURRENT BID: $0.00

VALUE: $100.00

1 Full Play Golf Membership 1718 Balmoral Ave, Comox 250.339.4444 www.comoxgolfclub.ca LOT#028

CURRENT BID: $0.00

VALUE: $1020.00

LOT#026

Stay & Play Package:

Social Membership

Call the Golf Shop for details

Call the Golf Shop for details

250.703.5031 LOT#029

250.703.5031 CURRENT BID: $0.00

VALUE: $294.00

LOT#030

1 Hour Guided Tour of Baynes Sound aboard “MV Chetlo” for 12 people

1 bedroom cabin for 3 night stay for up to 4 people LOT#032

1 bedroom cabin for 3 night stay for up to 4 people CURRENT BID: $0.00

LOT#035

CURRENT BID: $0.00

VALUE: $250.00

LOT#033

CURRENT BID: $0.00

VALUE: $250.00

$125 Gift Certificate

1 Hour Guided Tour of Baynes Sound aboard “MV Chetlo” for 12 people

DR

CURRENT BID: $0.00

LOT#036

VALUE: $250.00

CURRENT BID: $0.00

VALUE: $395.00

Valid Oct 2014 to June 1 2015

CURRENT BID: $0.00

CURRENT BID: $0.00

VALUE: $1020.00

Discounted Green Fees throughout the year; Unlimited Driving Range; First Round of Golf Free. Valid July 1, 2014 to March 31, 2015 Join Now! Play Now!

250.703.5031

VALUE: $250.00

LOT#027

1 Night Deluxe Fairway Room with 1 Round of Golf for 2, Cart Included.

Call the Golf Shop for details

VALUE: $395.00

CURRENT BID: $0.00

VALUE: $100.00

Discounted Green Fees throughout the year; Unlimited Driving Range; First Round of Golf Free. Valid July 1, 2014 to March 31, 2015 Join Now! Play Now!

LOT#031

1718 Balmoral Ave, Comox 250.339.4444 www.comoxgolfclub.ca

MON - FRI 7-6, SAT 8-5, SUN 9-5

Locally owned and operated for over 80 years 610 Anderton Ave., Courtenay • 250-334-4416

Social Membership

LOT#034

Highest bidders will be contacted before Wednesday July 2nd. You will have until Friday July 11th to claim your item or the next bidder will be contacted and awarded the item. To claim your purchase, come to the Echo office between 9:00 am and 5 pm Monday to Friday. You will be asked to sign a purchase agreement and be given a certificate to pick up your item. Method of payment: Cash, certified check, Visa, Mastercard, American Express or Interac. *Applicable taxes are not included on your bid price. There is no tax on the purchase of Gift Certificates.

LOT#012

FITNESS STARTER KIT Includes: Intro to Fitness Personal Training Session, 1 month

Valid Oct 2014 to June 1 2015

Payment arrangements

$200 Gift Certificate toward Pacific Energy Woodstove or Insert and Installation

limited FitCamp & Nutrition and Lifestyle Coaching

How it works Bids will be accepted online until 7pm Friday, June 27th. No bids will be accepted after that time. When placing a bid include the following information: Bids will increase in the following increments: up to $120: $2 $121 to 300: $5 $301 to $1,000: $10 $1,001 and up: $25 • All bids must be placed online. • Minimum Reserve Bid in effect. • No limit to the number of bids placed. • Updated bids will be printed in the Echo on June 17th, 20th, 24th and 27th. • Bids that don't contain a legible name, address, bid, or phone number will be disqualified. The Comox Valley Echo will not be responsible for errors in description, authenticity or condition of goods purchased. Any problems should be taken up with the merchant or manufacturer of the product. Applicable fees and other charges are the responsibility of purchaser. Decision of judges is final. Before bidding on-site you must read and accept the Terms and Conditions of Bidding. Read these terms carefully. When you submit bids on the site you enter into a binding legal agreement with the Comox Valley Echo.

VALUE: $200.00

1 coupon per stove or insert & install.

199-9273

• • • •

LOT#009

FITNESS STARTER KIT Includes: Intro to Fitness Personal Training Session, 1 month

250 871 2400

www.coolsummer.ca

CURRENT BID: $0.00

VALUE: $100.00

1 coupon per stove or insert & install.

250-334-3621 CURRENT BID: $0.00

VALUE: $200.00

LOT#008

towards pension consulting services

DR Pensions Consulting Helping you make the best pension decisions

www.drpensions.ca CURRENT BID: $0.00

VALUE: $125.00

$125 Gift Certificate

$125 Gift Certificate

$125 Gift Certificate

towards pension consulting services

towards pension consulting services

towards pension consulting services

DR LOT#037

DR Pensions Consulting Helping you make the best pension decisions

www.drpensions.ca CURRENT BID: $0.00

VALUE: $125.00

Gift Voucher

$100 *

DR LOT#038

DR Pensions Consulting Helping you make the best pension decisions

www.drpensions.ca

Gift Voucher

Present this travel voucher at Flight Centre Courtenay and receive $100* off your next air & hotel, tour or cruise booking.

$100 *

Flight Centre Courtenay | 1 866 538 0102

VALUE: $100.00

LOT#039

DR Pensions Consulting Helping you make the best pension decisions

www.drpensions.ca

Gift Voucher

Present this travel voucher at Flight Centre Courtenay and receive $100* off your next air & hotel, tour or cruise booking.

$100 *

Unit 8, 795 Ryan Road, Courtenay

*Valid only at Flight Centre Courtenay. Limit one (1) coupon per booking. Not combinable with any offer. Valid on new bookings only. Air and hotel package must include 4 nights accommodation or more. Tour or cruise must be minimum 7 days or longer. Expiry date December 31, 2014.

LOT#041

CURRENT BID: $0.00

VALUE: $100.00

Present this travel voucher at Flight Centre Courtenay and receive $100* off your next air & hotel, tour or cruise booking.

Flight Centre Courtenay | 1 866 538 0102

Unit 8, 795 Ryan Road, Courtenay

CURRENT BID: $0.00

CURRENT BID: $0.00

VALUE: $125.00

Flight Centre Courtenay | 1 866 538 0102

Unit 8, 795 Ryan Road, Courtenay *Valid only at Flight Centre Courtenay. Limit one (1) coupon per booking. Not combinable with any offer. Valid on new bookings only. Air and hotel package must include 4 nights accommodation or more. Tour or cruise must be minimum 7 days or longer. Expiry date December 31, 2014.

LOT#040

CURRENT BID: $0.00

VALUE: $125.00

DR

*Valid only at Flight Centre Courtenay. Limit one (1) coupon per booking. Not combinable with any offer. Valid on new bookings only. Air and hotel package must include 4 nights accommodation or more. Tour or cruise must be minimum 7 days or longer. Expiry date December 31, 2014.

LOT#042

CURRENT BID: $0.00

VALUE: $100.00

$100 Gift Certificate

$100 Gift Certificate

$100 Gift Certificate

for Dinner

for a Ladies Luncheon

for a Business Breakfast

1175 Cliffe Ave, Courtenay 250-338-1500 LOT#043

VALUE: $100.00

CURRENT BID: $0.00

1175 Cliffe Ave, Courtenay 250-338-1500 LOT#044

CURRENT BID: $0.00

VALUE: $100.00

1175 Cliffe Ave, Courtenay 250-338-1500 LOT#045

CURRENT BID: $0.00

VALUE: $100.00

$125 Gift Certificate

$125 Gift Certificate

$125 Gift Certificate

$125 Gift Certificate

$125 Gift Certificate

320 Fifth Street Downtown Courtenay

320 Fifth Street Downtown Courtenay

320 Fifth Street Downtown Courtenay

320 Fifth Street Downtown Courtenay

320 Fifth Street Downtown Courtenay

250-334-2611

250-334-2611

250-334-2611

250-334-2611

LOT#046

VALUE: $125.00

CURRENT BID: $0.00

LOT#047

8 8 Ultimate Ultimate Car Washes Car Washes - $120

LOT#051

VALUE: $120.00

CURRENT BID: $0.00

LOT#052

VALUE: $100.00

LOT#056

VALUE: $100.00

$100 GIFT CERTIFICATE

QUALICUM SCALLOPS

QUALICUM SCALLOPS

CURRENT BID: $0.00

Island Technologies Computer Systems

1TB EXTERNAL HARD DRIVE 755 Fitzgerald Ave., Courtenay 250-334-3825 LOT#061

VALUE: $105.00

CURRENT BID: $0.00

CURRENT BID: $0.00

LOT#057

250-757-9811

VALUE: $100.00

CURRENT BID: $0.00

LOT#053

LOT#058

LOT#066

VALUE: $125.00

CURRENT BID: $0.00

$100 GIFT CERTIFICATE

You’re Busy... We’re Fast!

QUALICUM SCALLOPS

COURTENAY • CORNER OF 29TH & CLIFFE • 250-871-8700

LOT#054

VALUE: $100.00

CURRENT BID: $0.00

$100 Gift Certificate

$100 Gift Certificate

$100 Gift Certificate

FOR COMPUTER SERVICE

FOR COMPUTER SERVICE

VALUE: $100.00

CURRENT BID: $0.00

755 Fitzgerald Ave., Courtenay 250-334-3825 LOT#059

VALUE: $100.00

CURRENT BID: $0.00

CLOTHES CLOSET

$100 Gift Certificate

Port Alberni 4716 Johnston Road 250-723-5231

LOT#067

Downtown Courtenay 231 5th Street 250-338-2624

VALUE: $100.00

Campbell RIver 230-1400 Dogwood, 778-346-3332

CURRENT BID: $0.00

VALUE: $849.00

CLOTHES CLOSET

CURRENT BID: $0.00

LOT#064

$100 Gift Certificate

LOT#068

Downtown Courtenay 231 5th Street 250-338-2624

VALUE: $100.00

CURRENT BID: $0.00

VALUE: $100.00

TOWARD ANYTHING IN-STORE (in-store credit only)

107-364 8th St. Courtenay • 250.338.2942

Campbell RIver 230-1400 Dogwood, 778-346-3332

CURRENT BID: $0.00

VALUE: $1149.00

CLOTHES CLOSET

www.jimsclothescloset.com Port Alberni 4716 Johnston Road 250-723-5231

LOT#060

Comes with letter of authentication. 3 carat diamond appraised value $2300

107-364 8th St. Courtenay • 250.338.2942

LOT#063

FOR COMPUTER SERVICE 755 Fitzgerald Ave., Courtenay 250-334-3825

5-$25 GIFT CERTIFICATES

Island Traders

CURRENT BID: $0.00

250-757-9811 CURRENT BID: $0.00

VALUE: $100.00

Island Technologies Computer Systems

Island Traders

VALUE: $185.00

QUALICUM BAY LOT#055

Island Technologies Computer Systems

Island Traders LOT#062

for

for Oil Change

MARQUEE CUT DIAMOND RING

107-364 8th St. Courtenay • 250.338.2942

CURRENT BID: $0.00

VALUE: $125.00

Island Technologies Computer Systems

755 Fitzgerald Ave., Courtenay 250-334-3825

www.jimsclothescloset.com

581 Ryan Road 250-334-9969

CURRENT BID: $0.00

LOT#050

5-$20 Gift 8 Ultimate Certificates Car Washes - $120

PEAVY SP4G PRO CONCERT SPEAKERS

5-$25 GIFT CERTIFICATES

ACROSS THE STREET FROM SUPERSTORE

VALUE: $120.00

250-334-2611

CURRENT BID: $0.00

VALUE: $125.00

GRIZZLY WATER PUMP

TOWARD ANYTHING IN-STORE (in-store credit only)

LOCALLY OWNED & OPERATED

LOT#049

You’re Busy... We’re Fast! COURTENAY • CORNER OF 29TH & CLIFFE • 250-871-8700

for

QUALICUM BAY

CURRENT BID: $0.00

8 8 Ultimate Ultimate Car Washes Car Washes - $120

You’re Busy... We’re Fast! COURTENAY • CORNER OF 29TH & CLIFFE • 250-871-8700

$100 GIFT CERTIFICATE

250-757-9811

VALUE: $125.00

for Oil Change

for

QUALICUM BAY

LOT#048

5-$20 Gift 8 Ultimate Certificates Car Washes - $120

You’re Busy... We’re Fast! COURTENAY • CORNER OF 29TH & CLIFFE • 250-871-8700

CURRENT BID: $0.00

VALUE: $125.00

CURRENT BID: $0.00

LOCALLY OWNED & OPERATED

LOT#065

$100 Puma Gift Certificate

LOT#069

Downtown Courtenay 231 5th Street 250-338-2624

VALUE: $100.00

Campbell RIver 230-1400 Dogwood, 778-346-3332

CURRENT BID: $0.00

VALUE: $125.00

CLOTHES CLOSET

www.jimsclothescloset.com Port Alberni 4716 Johnston Road 250-723-5231

ACROSS THE STREET FROM SUPERSTORE

581 Ryan Road 250-334-9969

CURRENT BID: $0.00

$100 Puma Gift Certificate

www.jimsclothescloset.com Port Alberni 4716 Johnston Road 250-723-5231

LOT#070

Downtown Courtenay 231 5th Street 250-338-2624

VALUE: $100.00

Campbell RIver 230-1400 Dogwood, 778-346-3332

CURRENT BID: $0.00


Comox Valley Echo Tuesday, June 17, 2014 B3 $100 Michael Kors Gift Certificate

CLOTHES CLOSET

www.jimsclothescloset.com Port Alberni 4716 Johnston Road 250-723-5231

LOT#071

Downtown Courtenay 231 5th Street 250-338-2624

Campbell RIver 230-1400 Dogwood, 778-346-3332

CURRENT BID: $0.00

VALUE: $100.00

LOT#072

towards any

www.jimsclothescloset.com

LOT#076

Campbell RIver 230-1400 Dogwood, 778-346-3332

CURRENT BID: $0.00

VALUE: $100.00

www.jimsclothescloset.com Port Alberni 4716 Johnston Road 250-723-5231

LOT#073

Downtown Courtenay 231 5th Street 250-338-2624

Campbell RIver 230-1400 Dogwood, 778-346-3332

CURRENT BID: $0.00

VALUE: $100.00

Subject to availability, blackout dates apply. No Cash Value. Cannot be used in conjunction with any other promotion or offer, discount or Costco gift certificate. Must be used in one visit, no credit to be carried forward or separated. Valid until Oct. 1, 2014 - Nov 15, 2014

Subject to availability, blackout dates apply. No Cash Value. Cannot be used in conjunction with any other promotion or offer, discount or Costco gift certificate. Must be used in one visit, no credit to be carried forward or separated. Valid until Oct. 1, 2014 - Nov 15, 2014

Subject to availability, blackout dates apply. No Cash Value. Cannot be used in conjunction with any other promotion or offer, discount or Costco gift certificate. Must be used in one visit, no credit to be carried forward or separated. Valid until Oct. 1, 2014 - Nov 15, 2014

CURRENT BID: $0.00

VALUE: $170.00

1.800.663.7929 • www.kingfisherspa.com

LOT#078

CURRENT BID: $0.00

VALUE: $170.00

1.800.663.7929 • www.kingfisherspa.com

LOT#079

Subject to availability, blackout dates apply. No Cash Value. Cannot be used in conjunction with any other promotion or offer, discount or Costco gift certificate. Must be used in one visit, no credit to be carried forward or separated. Valid until Oct. 1, 2014 - Nov 15, 2014

1.800.663.7929 • www.kingfisherspa.com

CURRENT BID: $0.00

VALUE: $170.00

1.800.663.7929 • www.kingfisherspa.com

LOT#083

$100 Gift Certificate 2937 Kilpatrick Ave | 250-871-6074 | www.la-z-boyvi.com LOT#087

CURRENT BID: $0.00

VALUE: $100.00

CURRENT BID: $0.00

VALUE: $170.00

LOT#088

CURRENT BID: $0.00

VALUE: $100.00

2 Adult Fares

2 Adult Fares

– ANY SAILING –

– ANY SAILING –

Advanced Reservations Required q

Advanced Reservations Required q

Advanced Reservations Required q

5425 Argyle Street, Port Alberni

5425 Argyle Street, Port Alberni

5425 Argyle Street, Port Alberni

250-723-8313

250-723-8313

250-723-8313

www.ladyrosemarine.com

www.ladyrosemarine.com

www.ladyrosemarine.com

LOT#092

CURRENT BID: $0.00

VALUE: $156.00

*PICK UP ONLY

LOT#093

CURRENT BID: $0.00

VALUE: $156.00

CURRENT BID: $0.00

LOT#097

CURRENT BID: $0.00

VALUE: $226.50

LOT#098

HP DeskJet 3533 All-in-one printer

$100 Gift Certificate

HP p/n CX057A 3-2760 Cliffe Ave, Courtenay

250-334-2322

2230 Cliffe Ave, Courtenay • 250-338-1482 VALUE: $100.00

CURRENT BID: $0.00

LOT#102

COUPLES GET-A-WAY:

CURRENT BID: $0.00

2 Nights Accommodation *Subject to availability

LOT#107

CURRENT BID: $0.00

VALUE: $417.00

LOT#108

CURRENT BID: $0.00

VALUE: $417.00

1 Microdermabrasion Facial

2 Nights Accommodation w w w. p a i n t e r s l o d g e . c o m CURRENT BID: $0.00 LOT#112 VALUE: $356.00

130 Minute Tanning Package

1 BioStrat® Peel & 1 Skincare Kit

Pearl Cove LOT#116

526-C Cumberland Rd, Courtenay

VALUE: $100.00

CURRENT BID: $0.00

BioStrat® Deep Pore Facial

Pearl Cove LOT#121

250•871•1122

$

CURRENT BID: $0.00

125 Gift Certificate

LOT#126

VALUE: $125.00

526-C Cumberland Rd, Courtenay

VALUE: $250.00

CURRENT BID: $0.00

PILON TOOLL RENTALS

BEARCAT WT24 WHEELED TRIMMER

LOT#117

LOT#122

$

CURRENT BID: $0.00

VALUE: $599.95

125 Gift Certificate 2601 Cliffe Ave, Courtenay 250-334-8087

www.platescatering.com

www.platescatering.com

4 x $25 Gift Certificates 1089 Braidwood Rd

LOT#127

CURRENT BID: $0.00

VALUE: $129.00

CURRENT BID: $0.00

VALUE: $125.00

$500 CREDIT TOWARDS

www.ladyrosemarine.com

CURRENT BID: $0.00

526-C Cumberland Rd, Courtenay

VALUE: $100.00

CURRENT BID: $0.00

PILON TOOL RENTALS

BEARCAT LS21 LOG SPLITTER

LOT#118

CURRENT BID: $0.00

VALUE: $156.00

$200 GIFT CERTIFICATE TOWARDS HOME REPAIRS

OR RENOVATIONS

OR RENOVATIONS

250-218-1054 • larrypoirier.ca

LOT#094

CURRENT BID: $0.00

VALUE: $200.00

LOT#099

LOT#095

CURRENT BID: $0.00

VALUE: $200.00

$100 Gift Certificate

2230 Cliffe Ave, Courtenay • 250-338-1482

CURRENT BID: $0.00

VALUE: $125.00

380 Old Island Highway (next to Value Village) CURRENT BID: $0.00 VALUE: $125.00

LOT#100

CURRENT BID: $0.00

VALUE: $100.00

COUPLES GET-A-WAY:

2 Nights Stay in Oceanview Studio Cabin, Alert Bay Plus 2 Days Use of 2 Kayaks.

CURRENT BID: $0.00

LOT#104

LOT#105

PAC SAFE CAMERA BAG

PAC SAFE CAMERA BAG

• eXomesh® slashguards • Slashproof Carrysafe® strap • Smart zipper security™ • Dual release security buckle • RFIDsafe™ blocking pocket

CURRENT BID: $0.00

VALUE: $160.00

VALUE: $300.00

• eXomesh® slashguards • Slashproof Carrysafe® strap • Smart zipper security™ • Dual release security buckle • RFIDsafe™ blocking pocket

5th & Duncan Downtown Courtenay • 250.703.2141

LOT#109

5th & Duncan Downtown Courtenay • 250.703.2141

LOT#110

1 Microdermabrasion Facial

130 Minute Tanning Package

Pearl Cove

Salon & Esthetics Studio 250•871•1122

LOT#114

526-C Cumberland Rd, Courtenay

CURRENT BID: $0.00

VALUE: $129.00

Salon & Esthetics Studio 250•871•1122

LOT#115

1 Cold Laser Facial

LOT#119

CURRENT BID: $0.00

VALUE: $149.00

CURRENT BID: $0.00

1 Cold Laser Facial

Pearl Cove

Salon & Esthetics Studio 526-C Cumberland Rd, Courtenay

526-C Cumberland Rd, Courtenay

VALUE: $100.00

Pearl Cove 250•871•1122

CURRENT BID: $0.00

VALUE: $160.00

Pearl Cove

Salon & Esthetics Studio 250•871•1122

LOT#090

250-218-1054 • larrypoirier.ca

Pearl Cove

250-338-5361 Foot of Mission Hill 123 N. Island Hwy., Courtenay

2601 Cliffe Ave, Courtenay 250-334-8087 CURRENT BID: $0.00

526-C Cumberland Rd, Courtenay

130 Minute Tanning Package

250-338-5361 Foot of Mission Hill 123 N. Island Hwy., Courtenay

526-C Cumberland Rd, Courtenay

VALUE: $100.00

LOT#113

Salon & Esthetics Studio

Salon & Esthetics Studio 250•871•1122

250•871•1122

Pearl Cove

Salon & Esthetics Studio

250-723-8313

www.ladyrosemarine.com

$200 GIFT CERTIFICATE TOWARDS HOME REPAIRS

Salon & Esthetics Studio

w w w. p a i n t e r s l o d g e . c o m CURRENT BID: $0.00 LOT#111 VALUE: $356.00

5425 Argyle Street, Port Alberni

250-723-8313 VALUE: $156.00

Pearl Cove

*Subject to availability

2 Adult Fares

5425 Argyle Street, Port Alberni

Rechargeable cards, automatic or wand wash, just swipe and go!

2 NIGHT STAY IN 2 BEDROOM CABIN FOR UP TO 4 ADULTS AND 2 CHILDREN

CURRENT BID: $0.00

VALUE: $100.00

– ANY SAILING –

5x $25 Gift Cards

380 Old Island Highway (next to Value Village) CURRENT BID: $0.00 VALUE: $125.00

2937 Kilpatrick Ave | 250-871-6074 | www.la-z-boyvi.com LOT#085

Advanced Reservations Required q

Rechargeable cards, automatic or wand wash, just swipe and go! LOT#103

$100 Gift Certificate

Advanced Reservations Required q

5x $25 Gift Cards

2 NIGHT STAY IN 2 BEDROOM CABIN FOR UP TO 4 ADULTS AND 2 CHILDREN

2 Nights Stay in Oceanview Studio Cabin, Alert Bay Plus 2 Days Use of 2 Kayaks. VALUE: $300.00

CURRENT BID: $0.00

VALUE: $100.00

LOT#089

CURRENT BID: $0.00

VALUE: $170.00

– ANY SAILING –

250-871-7622 • madchefcafe@shaw.ca 444 5th Street, Courtenay

CURRENT BID: $0.00

VALUE: $125.00

1.800.663.7929 • www.kingfisherspa.com

LOT#080

2 Adult Fares

$125 GIFT CERTIFICATE $125 GIFT CERTIFICATE 250-871-7622 • madchefcafe@shaw.ca 444 5th Street, Courtenay

VALUE: $226.55

CURRENT BID: $0.00

VALUE: $170.00

2937 Kilpatrick Ave | 250-871-6074 | www.la-z-boyvi.com

– ANY SAILING –

CURRENT BID: $0.00

1.800.663.7929 • www.kingfisherspa.com

LOT#084

$100 Gift Certificate

2 Adult Fares

VALUE: $156.00

250•871•1122

CURRENT BID: $0.00

VALUE: $170.00

Subject to availability, blackout dates apply. No Cash Value. Cannot be used in conjunction with any other promotion or offer, discount or Costco gift certificate. Must be used in one visit, no credit to be carried forward or separated. Valid until Oct. 1, 2014 - Nov 15, 2014

CURRENT BID: $0.00

CURRENT BID: $0.00

VALUE: $100.00

Subject to availability, blackout dates apply. No Cash Value. Cannot be used in conjunction with any other promotion or offer, discount or Costco gift certificate. Must be used in one visit, no credit to be carried forward or separated. Valid until Oct. 1, 2014 - Nov 15, 2014

Subject to availability, blackout dates apply. No Cash Value. Cannot be used in conjunction with any other promotion or offer, discount or Costco gift certificate. Must be used in one visit, no credit to be carried forward or separated. Valid until Oct. 1, 2014 - Nov 15, 2014

VALUE: $100.00

Campbell RIver 230-1400 Dogwood, 778-346-3332

ONE PASS TO OUR SIGNATURE SPA SERVICE, THE PACIFIC MIST HYDROPATH PLUS A ONE HOUR RELAXATION MASSAGE.

Subject to availability, blackout dates apply. No Cash Value. Cannot be used in conjunction with any other promotion or offer, discount or Costco gift certificate. Must be used in one visit, no credit to be carried forward or separated. Valid until Oct. 1, 2014 - Nov 15, 2014

LOT#082

LOT#075

Downtown Courtenay 231 5th Street 250-338-2624

ONE PASS TO OUR SIGNATURE SPA SERVICE, THE PACIFIC MIST HYDROPATH PLUS A ONE HOUR RELAXATION MASSAGE.

*PICK UP ONLY

LOT#106

CURRENT BID: $0.00

VALUE: $100.00

www.jimsclothescloset.com Port Alberni 4716 Johnston Road 250-723-5231

ONE PASS TO OUR SIGNATURE SPA SERVICE, THE PACIFIC MIST HYDROPATH PLUS A ONE HOUR RELAXATION MASSAGE.

2 HOT-N-READY PIZZAS OF YOUR CHOICE WITH CRAZY BREAD AND 2 DIPS ONCE A MONTH FOR A YEAR*

LOT#101

Campbell RIver 230-1400 Dogwood, 778-346-3332

ONE PASS TO OUR SIGNATURE SPA SERVICE, THE PACIFIC MIST HYDROPATH PLUS A ONE HOUR RELAXATION MASSAGE.

2 HOT-N-READY PIZZAS OF YOUR CHOICE WITH CRAZY BREAD AND 2 DIPS ONCE A MONTH FOR A YEAR*

LOT#096

LOT#074

Downtown Courtenay 231 5th Street 250-338-2624

ONE PASS TO OUR SIGNATURE SPA SERVICE, THE PACIFIC MIST HYDROPATH PLUS A ONE HOUR REFRESHING FACIAL.

CURRENT BID: $0.00

towards any

CLOTHES Buffalo Clothing CLOSET

www.jimsclothescloset.com Port Alberni 4716 Johnston Road 250-723-5231

ONE PASS TO OUR SIGNATURE SPA SERVICE, THE PACIFIC MIST HYDROPATH PLUS A ONE HOUR REFRESHING FACIAL.

VALUE: $170.00

$100 Gift Certificate

$100 Tommy Bahama Gift Certificate

CLOTHES CLOSET

ONE PASS TO OUR SIGNATURE SPA SERVICE, THE PACIFIC MIST HYDROPATH PLUS A ONE HOUR REFRESHING FACIAL.

2937 Kilpatrick Ave | 250-871-6074 | www.la-z-boyvi.com

LOT#091

CURRENT BID: $0.00

$100 Tommy Bahama Gift Certificate

ONE PASS TO OUR SIGNATURE SPA SERVICE, THE PACIFIC MIST HYDROPATH PLUS A ONE HOUR REFRESHING FACIAL.

$100 Gift Certificate

LOT#086

Campbell RIver 230-1400 Dogwood, 778-346-3332

1.800.663.7929 • www.kingfisherspa.com

LOT#077

1.800.663.7929 • www.kingfisherspa.com

LOT#081

Downtown Courtenay 231 5th Street 250-338-2624

VALUE: $100.00

$100 Gift Certificate

Downtown Courtenay 231 5th Street 250-338-2624

CLOTHES CLOSET

www.jimsclothescloset.com Port Alberni 4716 Johnston Road 250-723-5231

CLOTHES Buffalo Clothing CLOSET Port Alberni 4716 Johnston Road 250-723-5231

$100 Michael Kors Gift Certificate

CLOTHES CLOSET

Salon & Esthetics Studio 250•871•1122

LOT#120

526-C Cumberland Rd, Courtenay

CURRENT BID: $0.00

VALUE: $149.00

100

100

$

$

Fun in the Sun package

Package CURRENT BID: $0.00

COMOX 250.339.3422 | COURTENAY 250-871-7771 CURRENT BID: $0.00 LOT#124 VALUE: $100.00

COMOX 250.339.3422 | COURTENAY 250-871-7771 CURRENT BID: $0.00 LOT#125 VALUE: $100.00

4 x $25 Gift Certificates

4 x $25 Gift Certificates

4 x $25 Gift Certificates

1089 Braidwood Rd

1089 Braidwood Rd

1089 Braidwood Rd

www.theprimechophouse.com

www.theprimechophouse.com

www.theprimechophouse.com

250 871 7292

250 871 7292

LOT#123

VALUE: $1999.95

(across from the Royal Bank on Ryan Rd in Courtenay)

LOT#128

CURRENT BID: $0.00

VALUE: $100.00

$500 CREDIT TOWARDS

250 871 7292

(across from the Royal Bank on Ryan Rd in Courtenay)

LOT#129

CURRENT BID: $0.00

VALUE: $100.00

$500 CREDIT TOWARDS

(across from the Royal Bank on Ryan Rd in Courtenay)

LOT#130

CURRENT BID: $0.00

VALUE: $100.00

$500 CREDIT TOWARDS

Oceania Cruises

Seabourn Cruises

Viking Cruises

West World Tours

(New Bookings Only. Must be used by February 28th 2015)

(New Bookings Only. Must be used by February 28th 2015)

(New Bookings Only. Must be used by February 28th 2015)

(New Bookings Only. Must be used by February 28th 2015)

www.theprimechophouse.com

250 871 7292

SQUARE 1 TRAVEL & CRUISE

(across from the Royal Bank on Ryan Rd in Courtenay)

LOT#131

VALUE: $100.00

CURRENT BID: $0.00

LOT#132

4X18 HOLE GREEN FEES AND 2 POWER CARTS VALUE: $289.00

CURRENT BID: $0.00

$250 GIFT CERTIFICATE TOWARDS WALK-IN-TUB PURCHASE & INSTALL

VALUE: $250.00

LOT#137

CURRENT BID: $0.00

VALUE: $289.00

$250 GIFT CERTIFICATE TOWARDS WALK-IN-TUB PURCHASE & INSTALL

LOT#142

CURRENT BID: $0.00

CURRENT BID: $0.00

VALUE: $250.00

250-897-8121 • 823 McPhee Ave., Courtenay www.titaniumcrossfit.blogspot.com LOT#147

CURRENT BID: $0.00

VALUE: $140.00

2 Vaccines with Health Check ($85 value) 4-$25 Gift Certificates *Cannot be combined with any other offer or promotion.

6635B Island Highway North, Merville BC

778 428 6401

Good Friends* Good Value* All Animals

LOT#151

VALUE: $100.00

LOT#133

tsolumvet@shaw.ca Visit us on Facebook

CURRENT BID: $0.00

5th Street, Courtenay • 250.897.0081 www.unionstreetgrill.ca

LOT#152

VALUE: $100.00

CURRENT BID: $0.00

COURTENAY BC 250-334-0355

CURRENT BID: $0.00

4X18 HOLE GREEN FEES AND 2 POWER CARTS 300 McGimpsey Road, Campbell River, BC Pro Shop: (250) 923-3673 • Toll Free: 1-866-923-3674

LOT#138

SQUARE 1 TRAVEL & CRUISE

BC Reg 3140-4

VALUE: $500.00

CURRENT BID: $0.00

VALUE: $289.00

$250 GIFT CERTIFICATE TOWARDS WALK-IN-TUB PURCHASE & INSTALL

LOT#134

CURRENT BID: $0.00

VALUE: $250.00

TRATTORIA

$100 Gift Certificate

COURTENAY BC 250-334-0355

CURRENT BID: $0.00

VALUE: $500.00

COURTENAY BC 250-334-0355

SQUARE 1 TRAVEL & CRUISE

BC Reg 3140-4

LOT#135

Full Play Membership

BC Reg 3140-4

CURRENT BID: $0.00

VALUE: $500.00

Full Play Membership

OPEN TO THE PUBLIC

OPEN TO THE PUBLIC

SUNNYDALE

SUNNYDALE

GOLF & COUNTRY CLUB

250 334 3232 LOT#139

5291 North Island Hwy

VALUE: $1210.00

CURRENT BID: $0.00

$250 GIFT CERTIFICATE TOWARDS WALK-IN-TUB PURCHASE & INSTALL

250-338-8026 LOT#143

1 MONTH UNLIMITED MEMBERSHIP

250-897-8121 • 823 McPhee Ave., Courtenay www.titaniumcrossfit.blogspot.com VALUE: $140.00

CURRENT BID: $0.00

VALUE: $500.00

250-338-8026

CURRENT BID: $0.00

1 MONTH UNLIMITED MEMBERSHIP

LOT#146

TRAVEL & CRUISE

300 McGimpsey Road, Campbell River, BC Pro Shop: (250) 923-3673 • Toll Free: 1-866-923-3674

250-338-8026 LOT#141

SQUARE 1

BC Reg 3140-4

4X18 HOLE GREEN FEES AND 2 POWER CARTS

300 McGimpsey Road, Campbell River, BC Pro Shop: (250) 923-3673 • Toll Free: 1-866-923-3674

LOT#136

COURTENAY BC 250-334-0355

GOLF & COUNTRY CLUB

250 334 3232 LOT#140

VALUE: $250.00

CURRENT BID: $0.00

CURRENT BID: $0.00

$250 GIFT CERTIFICATE TOWARDS WALK-IN-TUB PURCHASE & INSTALL

250-338-8026 LOT#144

5291 North Island Hwy

VALUE: $1210.00

250-338-8026 LOT#145

CURRENT BID: $0.00

VALUE: $250.00

$100 Gift 1 Horse Teeth Float ($160 value) Certificate 778 428 6401 *Cannot be combined with any other offer or promotion.

TRATTORIA

6635B Island Highway North, Merville BC

Featuring Fine Italian Cuisine 140 Port Augusta, Comox • 250-890-7575 CURRENT BID: $0.00 LOT#148 VALUE: $100.00

Featuring Fine Italian Cuisine 140 Port Augusta, Comox • 250-890-7575 CURRENT BID: $0.00 LOT#149 VALUE: $100.00

LOT#150

2-$50 Gift Certificates

2-$50 Gift Certificates

$100 Gift Certificate

5th Street, Courtenay • 250.897.0081 www.unionstreetgrill.ca

5th Street, Courtenay • 250.897.0081 www.unionstreetgrill.ca

5th Street, Courtenay • 250.897.0081 www.unionstreetgrill.ca

LOT#153

VALUE: $100.00

CURRENT BID: $0.00

LOT#154

VALUE: $100.00

CURRENT BID: $0.00

Good Friends* Good Value* All Animals

LOT#155

tsolumvet@shaw.ca Visit us on Facebook

CURRENT BID: $0.00

VALUE: $160.00

CURRENT BID: $0.00

VALUE: $100.00

$

100 GIFT CE CERTIFICATE

BRAND NAME ELECTRONICS • PERSONAL SERVICE

BRAND NAME ELECTRONICS • PERSONAL SERVICE

BRAND NAME ELECTRONICS • PERSONAL SERVICE

104-2270 Cliffe Ave, COURTENAY

BRAND NAME ELECTRONICS • PERSONAL SERVICE

250.897.0239 LOT#156

VALUE: $500.00

CURRENT BID: $0.00

$

100 GIFT CERTIFICATE CE

LOT#161

VALUE: $100.00

Framing & Gallery

LOT#166

VALUE: $100.00

VALUE: $500.00

CURRENT BID: $0.00

$

100 GIFT CERTIFICATE CE

LOT#158

VALUE: $500.00

CURRENT BID: $0.00

$

100 GIFT CERTIFICATE CE

104-2270 Cliffe Ave, COURTENAY

104-2270 Cliffe Ave, COURTENAY

104-2270 Cliffe Ave, COURTENAY

250.897.0239

250.897.0239

250.897.0239

CURRENT BID: $0.00

$100 GIFT CERTIFICATE

Whyte’s

LOT#157

1225 Lazo Rd Comox 250.339.3366 info@whytesframing.com www.whytesframing.com

CURRENT BID: $0.00

LOT#162

VALUE: $100.00

CURRENT BID: $0.00

$100 GIFT CERTIFICATE

Whyte’s Framing & Gallery

LOT#167

VALUE: $100.00

1225 Lazo Rd Comox 250.339.3366 info@whytesframing.com www.whytesframing.com

CURRENT BID: $0.00

LOT#163

VALUE: $100.00

CURRENT BID: $0.00

$100 GIFT CERTIFICATE

Whyte’s Framing & Gallery

LOT#168

VALUE: $100.00

1225 Lazo Rd Comox 250.339.3366 info@whytesframing.com www.whytesframing.com

CURRENT BID: $0.00

LOT#159

VALUE: $500.00

CURRENT BID: $0.00

LOT#160

BRIGGS & STRATTON EM10 10KW STANDBY GENERATOR

100 GIFT CERTIFICATE

662 Anderton Rd. Comox 250-339-4518 2981 Moray Ave. Courtenay 250-331-0708

VALUE: $5229.00

CURRENT BID: $0.00

5 X $25

LOT#165

VALUE: $100.00

CURRENT BID: $0.00

GIFT CERTIFICATES

Comox & 2 Courtenay Locations

VALUE: $125.00

332 - 5th St, Courtenay 250-338-1233 www.whalestaletoys.com

5 X $25

GIFT CERTIFICATES LOT#169

CURRENT BID: $0.00

$

(includes transfer switch and battery)

LOT#164

VALUE: $100.00

Comox & 2 Courtenay Locations

CURRENT BID: $0.00

LOT#170

VALUE: $125.00

CURRENT BID: $0.00


B4 Comox Valley Echo Tuesday, June 17, 2014

What’s On

Blackwood Two: Megan McCaffrey and Dan Belgue

‘Music in the Cottage’ with Richard Garvey and The Blackwood Two on June 18 Some of the Valley’s finest musicians pay tribute to Herb Alpert this Thursday night at The Little Red Church

Enjoy a tribute to Herb Alpert and the Tijuana Brass on Thursday night The Beltone Jazz Series continues this Thursday at 7:30, with a tribute to “Herb Alpert and The Tijuana Brass”, one of the most successful bands of 20th century music, selling more than 72 million albums worldwide. Interestingly, 50 years later, the Tijuana Brass sound remains fresh today. Take in a great evening of music and enjoy the sounds of Herb Alperts greatest hits, like “Spanish Flea”, “The Lonely Bull”, “Taste of Honey” and “The Lonely Bull” to name a few. This tribute band last played to full house performances at the Elks Lounge, so get your tickets early! The Band consists of some of the Valley’s best musicians. On Guitar is Rick Husband, who has performed extensively in Big Bands and Combos including Indigo Jazz, the Jenn Forsland Group, Jazztet, Jazz Noir and the CR Big Band. Rick’s incredible skills, improvisational technique and musical ideas, elevate bands to another level of presentation. On Keyboard is Michael Eddy, holder of the distinguished “Associate of Piano Performance” . Mike is a highly skilled and very active local musician and performs with The Lensmen, Jazztet, DMN & Friends and Ralph Barrat & The Sharp Seven. Mike’s musical career includes 10 years as an award winning Musical Director at Keyano College in Alberta. In addition to

bringing high calibre professional skills to each band, Mike also contributes a great attitude and positive spirit to all bands he performs with. On Drums is Neil Clark, who has worked with some of the best jazz musicians in the Victoria Jazz scene. Neil has extensive experience performing on cruise ships, supporting professional entertainers, while cruising the world. The band is honoured to have Neil contributing his wealth of experience and skill on the drums, in support of this special performance. Legend has it, that Neil had the privilege of attending several Buddy Rich master classes ! On the Bass is multi-talented Grahame Edwards, who is equally skilled in acoustic and electric bass. Grahame also plays Percussion and Trumpet. Graham is a major contributor to the local music scene and well known for his fine musicianship with The Wire Choir, Jenn Forsland Group, Just in Time Choir, to name a few. Graham’s strong musicianship, perfectly compliments the Herb Alpert tribute band. On Valve Trombone and Trumpet, is local musician Michael Johnson. Raised in Wisconsin, Michael also specializes in guitar and has toured professionally. Michael also performs with the Latin Dance band Luzna as well as the acoustic/electric collaboration with Jim Papp in the Fabulous Mutts. The sound track of Michael’s

youth was the Tijuana Brass, so what a great fit for the this fabulous tribute band. On trumpet is the very talented Jake Masri, who drew early years inspiration from the music of the Tijuana Brass. Jake’s passion for music and Trumpet is rooted in the brilliance of artists such as Harry James, Miles Davis and Chet Baker. A veteran of the local music scene, Jake has been a major contributor to the success of 6th Street, Quintessence Brass, Forbidden Jazz, Campbell River Big Band, Strathcona Symphony and the Luzna Dance band. “Serendipity Jazz” will open the show, with vocalist Jackie Lambeth, a well established vocalist whose performance genres range from Opera to Celtic, Jazz and Musical Theatre. Jacqueline’s exceptional vocal skills will be supported by Ken Newman on Piano. The Beltone Jazz Series is a family friendly venue, located at The Little Red Church hall in Comox. Tea, coffee, soft beverages and goodies, by donation to the Comox Valley Therapeutic Riding Society. The Beltone Jazz Series is presented with the generous support of Jeff and Sharon Germain, owner of Beltone Hearing Care Centres. Advance tickets are $10 and available at Bop City in Courtenay and The Red Carpet Boutique in Comox. Doors open at 7:00 and performance begins at 7:30.

Applewood Cottage is very excited to host an evening of great music. Ontario musician Richard Garvey who is currently on his west coast tour and The Blackwood Two residing in Victoria at present will be here in the Comox Valley, June 18 for an intimate house concert. Richard Garvey’s voice will melt you deep into your seat with a sigh of relief. Then he’ll wake you up with his positive upbeat acoustic folk music and inspire you to sing-along with all your heart in the chorus! Richard Garvey is Kitchener’s hardest working folk/roots musician dedicated to building community through music. His down-to-earth and genuine voice echoes a generation of youth that longs for environmental justice and social change. He has shared songs and stories at rallies, markets, festivals, bars, and soft-seated venues. Comparisons to Pete Seeger and David Francey are frequently made, and he has opened for Juno Award nominee Craig Cardiff and Juno Award Winning Old Man Luedecke. He is working on his seventh self-produced album, has gone on four Canadian tours, and two tours around Ontario entirely via bicycle! 2014 marks a new era for The Blackwood Two. Megan McCaffrey (fiddle/vocals) and Dan Belgue (guitar, clawhammer banjo, vocals) have been performing their unique brand of old-timey folk-grass together for over four years. Growing as players, writers, and performers, their sound has evolved significantly since the day they met busking on the streets of Victoria, BC. They’ve taken their signature style of folk music from coast to coast multiple times, including stops at festivals such as ArtsWells (Wells, BC), Winterfolk (Toronto, ON), Vancouver Island

Richard Garvey Music Festival (Courtenay, BC), and more, as well as participating in Via Rail’s ‘On Board Entertainment’ program performing on trains from Toronto to Vancouver. Rooted in an ongoing passion for old-time fiddle tunes and songs originating from the southern states of America, their music thoughtfully meanders through multiple folk traditions. You’ll hear the organic rhythms of old-time fiddle and banjo as well as guitar picking and lonesome harmony singing heavily influenced by bluegrass. Proudly shaped by the music-makers of old, the regional, the progressive, and the obscure, The Blackwood Two recognize that folk music continues to thrive because it’s a living and breathing tradition, which is evident in their thoughtful original songwriting and distinctively modern approach. Applewood Cottage, a refurbished barn nestled in the trees, is a cosy and intimate setting for an unforgettable live music experience. Light refreshments will be served and feel free to bring something to share. Doors 7:00...Music 7:30. Seating is limited, pre-sale tickets are $10, available by contacting Suzanne at (250) 334-8687 or by e-mailing applewood_cottage@yahoo.ca.

Local conservationists to speak at Comox Town Residents AGM Members of the Comox Town Residents Association, a small but active group of engaged Comox residents, invite the public to join them on Thursday June 19th from 7-9pm in Room A of the Comox Recreation Centre, 1855 Noel Avenue, for their Annual General Meeting. Doors open

at 6:30pm and the meeting begins at 7pm. Our Guest Speakers will be David Stapley and Alison Millham, of the Comox Valley Conservation Strategy (CVCS) Community Partnership. The Comox Valley is one of the fastest growing communities in BC.

The CVCS is working tirelessly for the protection and restoration of our local natural areas. They will be making a presentation on how their vision for a network of protected natural areas can be implemented by local governments through land use policies and

Council of Canadians AGM to focus on landmark medicare court case Right now, there’s a legal challenge in motion that could erase the principle of Canadian Medicare, as we know it - a health care system based on need, not on ability to pay as in the US. Dr. Brian Day, owner of Vancouver’s for-profit Cambie Surgery Centre and a leading proponent of privatized health care, has launched a constitutional challenge to Medicare law in BC. This chal-

SAR Techs (Continued from page B1) He jokes that after mentoring the Afghan Army in 2011 it was time to exit his battalion and sign up for SAR. “It just takes over your whole life,” he says of the SAR training. “That’s where all your thought goes to.” It’s not all fun and games by any stretch. During a training session in Hinton, Alta. he was blown past the “drop zone” where he was supposed to land and had to fight his way back through a farmer’s field to get back in touch with his crew. That’s the kind of important experience that helps the students to get on top of the lifesaving skills they will need to succeed in a real emergency. Another big part of it is having a team with complementary abilities, he notes. “Everybody has their own strengths and weaknesses,” he said, noting while he excels in the bush others are more knowledgeable in the medical arena. “It all helps out.” At the end of the morning of official photographs and handshakes, the students left their blue berets behind them, proudly sporting new orange berets on their heads, “Rescue” ever on their minds.

lenge aims to strike down provincial health legislation that limits the for-profit delivery of medically necessary services. Although this case is being heard in BC, it’s very likely it will be appealed and end up in the Supreme Court of Canada. This could produce the defining Charter interpretation that would apply across the country - and be one that destroys equal access to our health care system. The case is being called the most significant constitutional challenge in Canadian history. The trial date is now set for September 2014. The BC Health Coalition and Canadian Doctors for Medicare are interveners in this case. This means that they are able to fight for

Medicare in the Dr. Day court case by calling on experts to provide evidence in support of our public health care system. At their June 19 AGM, the Comox Valley Council of Canadians presents Pat Savage of the BC Health Coalition who will speak on this significant legal challenge to Medicare. The public is encouraged to attend this informative session, which will bring to light all that’s at stake with this case. It will highlight the importance of speaking out together to support Medicare. Everyone is welcome to attend this meeting, Thursday, June 19 at 7:00 pm in the Rotary Room of the Florence Filberg Centre. FMI www. cvcanadians.org

regulations. The presentation will also touch on measures to protect the Comox Lake watershed that residents of Comox rely on for their drinking water. Care of drinking water quantity and quality is a major issue for citizens of the Comox Valley and will become even more important as climate change proceeds. The presentation will be based on the CVCS’s report Nature Without Borders, second edition,released in 2013 which outlines the environmen-

tal science and land use policies needed to conserve the Valley’s biodiversity for future generations. We live in a very special area of our Province. Please attend our Annual General Meeting and meet the members of the Comox Town Residents Association, and discover first-hand what is being done to conserve the best of the natural assets of our Valley for all species of life. For more information, contact Kerry Dawson, President, at (250) 339-1029.

2014

Comox Harbour Tide Guide All proceeds help support CV Marine Search & Rescue Convenient Pocket Size More Durable Paper

CONGRATULATIONS

GREAT FOR:

Nick & Brendan Dewitt From Courtenay

Used Exclusively by Local Fishing Guide Steve Veloso Island Pursuit Sport Fishing

s Tide Bites s"OAT,AUNCHING s+AYAKING s"EACHCOMBING

AVAILABLE AT ANY OF THESE LOCALLY MINDED BUSINESSES:

WINNERS OF A BBQ AND A STEAKS PACKAGE PRIZES SUPPLIED BY

Fanny Bay Oysters First Insurance Locations Nautech Pacific Playgrounds A&E Marine Wolf Boats Don McRae, MLA office Tyee Marine Fishing Hunting Outdoors WestView Ford (top of Mission Hill) Co-Op (top of Mission Hill & Comox)

Pilon Tool Rentals Bates Beach Oceanfront Resort Thrifty Foods Eldorado Upholstery Courtenay Fish & Game Association Rice Toyota St. Jean’s Cannery Sunwest RV Sunwest Auto River Sportsman Campbell River Boatland


Sports and Recreation

Comox Valley Echo Tuesday, June 17, 2014 B5

GOLF NEWS HOLE IN ONE FOR MARG WALKER AT COMOX GOLF CLUB Marg Walker aced hole #5 at the Comox Golf Club for her first Hole in One during the annual Dorothy Olive Franklin Trophy. This is a Net Tournament sponsored by Zone 6. When asked how she did it, her face lit up and she said, â&#x20AC;&#x153;it just rolled up and into the holeâ&#x20AC;?. As the result of that shot Marg won the tournament with a 68 tied with Peg Runquist and June Fraser who lost in the count back. Mary Ann Aikman and Yvonne Baker tied with 69 for 4th and 5th. 6th and 7th - Brenda Good and Barb Buchanan -70; 8th and 9th - Pat Everett and Rosalie Williams - 71; 10th and 11th - Gi Carlson, Patti Harris and Linda Verdenhalven - 72; 12th and 13th - Suzy Venuta and Sue Leakey-73. Louise Luster took the only low gross prize with an 88. The skill prize winners were: Closest to the bucket Brenda Good, Closest to the hole on #4 and #3 in 3 shots for low handicap was Louise Luster; Closest to the hole #5 and #14 for low handicap was June Fraser; Closest to hole on #7 and #16 in 4 shots for high handicaps was Pat Belanger; Longest putt for everyone on #8 and #17 was Marva Opperman and closest to the hole on #9 and #18 in 2 shots was Gi Carlson. Of course we could not do all this if it wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t for our incredible sponsors: The Tee Box Restaurant, Gibbyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Pro Shop, Chinook Forest Products, Playtime Gaming, Looneyrama, Kathy Branch Hairstyling, Arizona Gifts, Panago Pizza, and Thrifty Foods. These businesses donate to both Tuesday and Thursday Leagues so make sure you thank them and shop locally. On a beautiful Thursday night June 12th, 28 members and guests set out to conquer the course. Jan Dafoe won Low Gross with 42 and Carmen deWinter had low net with 32. Second low gross was won by Sharon Crowe and Karen Vanetta who were tied at 44. Second low net was won by Brenda Good with 33. Nancy Riva won low putts with 12 for the evening. Our draw for a free guest pass went to Barb Siska. Our skill prizes were won by: longest putt #2 - Kathy Branch, Longest putt #8 - Nancy Riva, Longest drive #3 for 24+Katy Doran, 3rd shot on #4 - Laurie Appleyard, closest to the hole #5 - Joanne Furby, Longest drive 0-23 - Jan Dafoe, closest to the bucket - Karen Vanetta (prize donated by the Bulk Barn). Chip=ins and winners of the coveted chocolates for their groups were Marg Siddall, Suzy Venuta and Linda Broadbent. Come and join us for the evening and enjoy dinner on our patio before or after your game. Our shot gun is at 6 pm so call and sign up in the Pro Shop 250-339-4444. - Submitted by Nancy Riva

Peter Wehmeier of the 12th Man sprints for the end zone as Megan Jansen of the Multiple Scoregasms tries to swipe his flag in the Comox Valley Sports & Social Clubâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Flag Football League. The Scoregasms won this game, but eventually lost 40-31 in the playoff finals against the Young

& Old, while 12th Man finished in 8th place. Registration is open until Monday at www.comoxvalleysports.ca for the summer Flag Football League, as well as co-ed leagues in ultimate Frisbee, Soccer, Beach Volleyball and Slo Pitch.

TAE KWON DO BLACK BELTS EARNED On June 7, 2014 Paul Sitko and Dylan Sitko of Red Dragon Tae Kwon Do Comox Valley each tested for their black belt. Paul received his 4th degree and Dylan received his 1st degree. Master Darrell Marsh World Tae Kwon Do Federation 6th degree black belt came from Salmon Arm to administer the five hour test which included kicking and punching combinations, patterns, board breaking, sparring and kick boxing. As part of the test, Paul demonstrated his power breaking by breaking seven bricks with Dylan breaking 2. Paul is the instructor of the Red Dragon club which has been active in the Comox Valley for 7 years. They train at Queneesh Elementary three days a week. For more information contact Paul at 250 218-6968 or paul750@live.ca

SUNNYDALE THURSDAY NIGHT LADIES PLAY BACK NINE Sunnydale Thursday Night Ladies June 12 played the back nine and had a great evening! Welcome new ladies! Prizes were given out for: Hole 10 closet to the pin 1st shot to Marilyn Curley Hole 11 for water shot to Barb Dixon Hole 12 for longest putt to Cora Hawkins Hole 13 for closest to tree on right to Maureen Mason Hole 16 for longest drive to Bev Slater Hole 17 for closest to the pin 2nd shot. Lowest Putts went to Jenny Lavery and the Most Honest Golfer was Nicole Poirier. Draw Prizes were from: Boston Pizza to Margie Anderson Curls N Cuts to Barb Dixon Fluids Bar & Grill to Jean Wheaton Investors Group/Locals Restaurant to Mary Lynn Jo Klassenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s to June Fuller and Deb McMahon Monte Cristo to Coral Tanner Panago Pizza to Marilyn Curley Quality Foods-Comox to Maureen Mason Rhodos Coffee to Monique Walker Royston Roasting Co. to Fran Wright Pro Shop to Ardene Larison Donation to Diane Bowley Thursday Night Ladies sign up at 5:00 pm, tee off at 5:30 pm Everyone welcome! - Submitted by Mary Lynn Doubinin

Summer hoops camp coming up

Master Darrell Marsh, Dylan Sitko and Instructor Paul Sitko. WOW. Birthday celebration for 90-yearold Suds Sutherland. Congratulations to all. 48 players participated with the following results. 0-16 Low Gross Nick Usher 66 Lawry Willis 69 17 + Low Gross Kevin Loga 74 Don Vanetta 76 Low Nets Don Gates 61 Marty Petersen 61 Terry Christie 63 Pat Riva 63 Vic Crisp 63 Dan Bailey 64 Burt Meek 64 KP Prizes 10 2nd shot 0-16 Marty Petersen Bowlzy Brkfst Comox Pacific Express 11 3rd shot 17+ Don Vanetta, Chads

12 Long Drive 17+ Adam Bowles, Westview Ford Sales 5 All Don Vanetta , Menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Club 14 All Adam Bowles, Menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Club 15 2nd shot 17+ Keith (Horton) Welch, Bowlzy Brkfst Comox Pacific Express (2nd week in a row) 16 Long Drive 0-16 Dan Bailey, Westview Ford Sales 17 2nd shot All Don Vanetta 9 All Don Gates, Menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Club 18 All Lawry Willis, Menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Club Results show course in great shape. Well done John and fellow workers. Tee Box cooked up another great Breakfast. See you on the 22nd. - Submitted by Vic Crisp

GLORIOUS SUNNY NIGHT FOR COMOX MENâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S CLUB Forty-four golfers played Stableford points system (Back Nine) at Comox on a glorious sunny menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s night evening. Congratulations to Rick Siddell, winning yet again. 1st Rick Siddall 24, Brian (Bergsy) Haslett 24, Rick (Chaichi) McCaughan 23, Lawry Willis 22, Ron Pratt 22, Rob Rasmussen 22 KP Prizes 10 2nd shot 0-16 Gord Harrisl BlackFin Pub 11 3rd shot 17+ Greg Hart Thriftyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 12 Long Drive 17+ Rob Rasmussen Menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Club 13 2nd shot 0-16 Rick Siddell Boston Pizza 14 All Vernon Dean Menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Club 15 2nd Shot 17+ Bob Bird Little Beaverâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Pizzeria 16 Long Drive 0-16 Marc (Skinny) Vandervoort Scott Fraser Royal Lepage 18 All Lawry Willis Shilo Painting/ Glacier Gutters Thanks as always to our sponsors Please sign up for food PRIOR to playing. See you June 18th 5.30 for 6 pm - Submitted by Vic Crisp

Attention all boys and girls who are basketball enthusiasts: Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Summer Fun Time coming up again June 30th to July 4th! All basketball players going into grades 4 through 7 have a basketball camp opportunity at Lake Trail Middle School starting Monday June 30th, and boys and girls going into grade 8 through 12 have a similar opportunity at G.P. Vanier, boys in the mornings, and girls in the afternoon. FMI: email larrystreetcar@gmail.com or phone 250-703-3646. Forms can also be picked up at the Community Centers, and at all the schools.

CARRIERS WANTED No collection required. Great exercise! Call Comox Valley Echo â&#x20AC;˘ 250-334-4734 or drop by 407-D 5th Street, Courtenay COURTENAY â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Between 17th & 13th - McPhee, Grieve, 16th, 14th â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Fitzgerald, Grieve 17th to 13th â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 1st, Rod & Gun, Robert Lang Dr. â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Archery Cr., Timberlane Rd. COMOX Rt. 1102A â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Bolt, Lindshart, Martin, Noel, Anderton Rt. 2103 Summer Sub â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Murphy, Beaton, Park (Beside Hospital Rt. 2125 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Cortez, Sonora, Savory, Texada Rt. 2129 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Sylvan, Parry, Aspen, Idiens Rt. 2144B â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Gardener Way, Mason Ave, Potter Pl. Rt. 2152 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Aspen, Neptune, Tracker, Labrador, Grumman CROWN ISLE Rt. 3120 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Monarch, Royal Rt. 3134 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Crown Isle Dr., Birkshire, Sussex VALLEYVIEW Rt. 3110 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Back Road, Glen Urquhart, 10th St. E., Hobson, 6th St. E., Aston Rt. 3113 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Elkhorn Ave, 9th St. E., Malahat, Arrowsmith Rt. 3122 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Swan, Trumpeter, Sparrow, Valley View Rt. 3123 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Nechako, Chemainus, 5th St. E., Cowichan, 6th St. E. Rt. 3135 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Hawk, Swallow, Whiskeyjack Rt. 3136 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Bluejay Place COLEMAN ROAD AREA Rt. 4106 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Sea Terrace, Avonlee, Loxley MISSION HILL Rt. 5110 Summer Sub â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Paula Pl, Tatton Rd, Adrian Rd, Rt. 7107 Rt. 7108 Rt. 7124 Rt. 7140

GREAT FATHERâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S DAY IN COMOX Earn extra $$$$ for all that fun stuff that mom won't buy!

Comox Menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Day highlights from Sunday: Don Vanetta achieves first ever score below 80 and sweeps 4 K.P. prizes 16 Deuces recorded. Lawry Willis wins best dressed golfer. Those pants,

Comox Valley Transit

Beach Bus Effective June 21 to Sept. 7, 2014

Get to Goose Spit Park

every day all summer long. Enter to win a monthly pass.

4122

Visit www.bctransit.com or pick up a Riderâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Alert on board.

5SBOTJU*OGPrrtXXXCDUSBOTJUDPN


B6 Comox Valley Echo Tuesday, June 17, 2014


Comox Valley Echo Tuesday, June 17, 2014 B7

CARRIERS WANTED EARN $$$$$$$$ COURTENAY Rt. 7107 – Between 17th & 13th - McPhee, Grieve, 16th, 14th Rt. 7108 – Fitzgerald, Grieve 17th to 13th Rt. 7124 – 1st, Rod & Gun, Robert Lang Dr. Rt. 7140 – Archery Cr., Timberlane Rd. COMOX Rt. 1102A – Bolt, Lindshart, Martin, Noel, Anderton Rt. 2103 Summer Sub – Murphy, Beaton, Park (Beside Hospital Rt. 2125 – Cortez, Sonora, Savory, Texada Rt. 2129 – Sylvan, Parry, Aspen, Idiens Rt. 2144B – Gardener Way, Mason Ave, Potter Pl. Rt. 2152 – Aspen, Neptune, Tracker, Labrador, Grumman CROWN ISLE Rt. 3120 – Monarch, Royal Rt. 3134 – Crown Isle Dr., Birkshire, Sussex VALLEYVIEW Rt. 3110 – Back Road, Glen Urquhart, 10th St. E., Hobson, 6th St. E., Aston Rt. 3113 – Elkhorn Ave, 9th St. E., Malahat, Arrowsmith Rt. 3122 – Swan, Trumpeter, Sparrow, Valley View Rt. 3123 – Nechako, Chemainus, 5th St. E., Cowichan, 6th St. E. Rt. 3135 – Hawk, Swallow, Whiskeyjack Rt. 3136 – Bluejay Place COLEMAN ROAD AREA Rt. 4106 – Sea Terrace, Avonlee, Loxley MISSION HILL Rt. 5110 Summer Sub – Paula Pl, Tatton Rd, Adrian Rd,

No Collection Required Call COMOX VALLEY ECHO 250−334−4734 or drop by 407−D 5th Street, Courtenay


B8 Comox Valley Echo Tuesday, June 17, 2014

Sports and Recreation Investors Blue Jays continue undefeated vs Happy’s Reds

The 11th Annual ‘12 Hours of Cumberland’ race draws ountain bikers from near and far for individual or team competition

12 Hours of Cumberland race June 21 The 11th annual running of the 12 Hours of Cumberland takes place June 21, and mountain bikers from near and far are gearing up for one of the Comox Valley’s most anticipated bike races. In the 12 Hours of Cumberland, riders of all ages and abilities compete to see who can complete the most circuits of the racecourse over a 12-hour period. Riders can compete in the solo category for the prestigious Twelve Hour Cup, or they can vie for a selec-

tion of equally coveted Beardsley Pottery mugs as a team of two or four. Teams are as follows: Female, Male or Mixed “This is always a great event with a really fun atmosphere,” says UROC vice-president Martin Ready. “Our famous 12-Hour Barbecue is going to be in full effect, and there are lots of great prizes to be won. And because you can’t ride for 12 hours without properly fueling your body, we’ll have some hearty, healthy snacks from Seeds Grocery available

all day.” Pre-registration is available online by clicking the 12 Hours of Cumberland link at www.unitedridersofcumberland.com The cost is $40 per rider before June 19th and $50 per rider after June 19th. Kids under 12 race for free and ages 13 to 17 race for half price. All participants must be registered by June 20. This year’s race follows the same user-friendly course as last year, with each loop starting and finishing at

Cumberland’s No. 6 Mine Park. The course covers some of Cumberland’s most iconic singletrack trails, including Entrails, Rugburn, Crafty Butcher, Black Hole and Space Nugget. The 11th annual 12 Hours of Cumberland race starts at 8 a.m. on June 21 at the No. 6 Mine Park and runs until 8 p.m. For more details, visit www.unitedridersofcumberland.com or follow the United Riders of Cumberland on Facebook.

Last Friday night in the Comox Valley Mens Baseball League the Happys Source for Sports Reds looked to slow down the undefeated Investors Group Blue Jays. The Reds’ pitching staff of Scott Judson (2IP, 0ER) and Ryan Mackinnon (1IP, 0ER) were able to hold off the Blue Jays’ bats early but the Jayss’ bats didn’t stay quiet for long. The Reds kept the game close with Jake Dojack (2-3, 2B, 1B) providing offence but the Investors Group Blue Jays proved to be too tough as the Jays won 4 - 3 to keep their undefeated record intact at 4 -0. The second game of the night had the Dependable Lawn Care Rockies up against the Temprite Climate Solutions Orioles. Both teams have started slow this season but the Rockies’ offence finally woke up in this game. The Dependable Lawn Care Rockies scored 6 runs on the Orioles’ pitching staff and were able to shut down the bats of the Temprite Orioles as well. The final score of the game was the Dependable Lawn Care Rockies 6 and the Temprite Climate Solutions Orioles 1. CVMBL - week 4 standings: W - L Investors Group Blue Jays 3 - 0 Happys Source for Sports Reds 2 - 2 Dependable Lawn Care Rockies 1 - 2 Daryl Robbins CGA As 1 - 2 Temprite Climate Solutions Orioles 1 - 2


Comox Valley Echo - June 17, 2014