Page 1


AGED CARE CORE COMPONENT IN UNDERGRADUATE NURSING CURRICULA PRINCIPLES PAPER


Aged Care Core Component in Undergraduate Nursing Curricula Principles Paper ISBN: 1 74107 053 8

Copyright Š Queensland University of Technology School of Nursing 2004 Apart from fair dealing as permitted under the copyright law of your country, and as necessary for the operation of the program, no part of this document nor the information contained in it may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted, in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, reprographic or otherwise, without the prior permission of the Queensland University of Technology School of Nursing, Victoria Park Rd, Kelvin Grove, Qld, 4059, Australia, http://www.hlth.qut.edu.au/nrs/.

ii


This Principles Paper was commissioned by the Australian Government Department of Health and Ageing. PROJECT TEAM Principal Consultant:

Professor Helen Edwards, Head, School of Nursing, Queensland University of Technology

Senior Consultant:

Professor Mary Courtney, Director of Research, School of Nursing, Queensland University of Technology

Senior Consultant:

Ms Robyn Nash, Director of Academic Programs, School of Nursing, Queensland University of Technology

Research Assistant:

Ms Kathleen Finlayson, School of Nursing, Queensland University of Technology

PROJECT PARTICIPANTS Academic Representatives Professor Jennifer Abbey, Professor in Aged Care, School of Nursing, Queensland University of Technology and Prince Charles Hospital & Health Service District Professor Lynn Chenoweth, Professor of Aged and Extended Care Nursing, University of Technology, Sydney Professor Judith Clare, Associate Dean Research and Higher Degrees, School of Nursing & Midwifery, Flinders University Professor Doreen McCarthy, Foundation Head, Notre Dame School of Nursing, University of Notre Dame Professor Rhonda Nay, Director, Gerontic Nursing Professorial Unit and Clinical School, Director Australian Centre for Evidence Based Aged Care, La Trobe University and Bundoora Extended Care Centre Professor Alan Pearson, Director, La Trobe University Bundoora Nursing Studies Unit, LaTrobe University Professor Irene Stein, Director, Aged Care Research and Education Services, School of Nursing and Midwifery, University of Newcastle Industry Representatives Ms Meigan Lefebure, Chief Executive Officer (Victoria), Australian Nursing Homes & Extended Care Association Ms Jill Pretty, Manager, Policy and Consultancy, Aged & Community Services Association Consumer Representatives Ms Toni Cannon, Special Projects Officer, Queensland Council of Carers, Carers Australia Ms Ann Patterson, National President, Geriaction Ms Jodie Thomson, National Program Manager, Alzheimer’s Association Queensland Professional Nursing Organization Representatives Professor Patrick Crookes, Representative for the Council of Deans of Nursing Ms Marilyn Gendek, Chief Executive Officer, Australian Nursing Council Australian Government Department of Health and Ageing Representative Dr Joanne Ramadge, Clinical Advisor in Aged Care

iii


iv


CONTENTS

Summary …………………………………………………………………………

vi

1. Introduction

…………………………………………………………………

1

2. Background ……………………………………………………………………

2

3. Core Values ……………………………………………………………………

3

4. Learning Outcomes of Aged Care Content………………………………….

4

5. Principles for Learning and Teaching Aged Care Content…………………

7

6. Benchmarks for Inclusion of Aged Care Content …………………………..

9

7. Resources / Materials to Support the Principles ……………………………

10

8. Strategies for Implementation ………………………………………………… 11

9. Barriers to Implementation ……………………………………………………. 12

Appendix 1 - Project Participants ……………………………………………….. 13

Appendix 2 – Specific Teaching Resources: Topics Needed ………………..

14

Appendix 3 – Costing for Development of Resources and Implementation … 15

References ………………………………………………………………………… 37

v


SUMMARY

The predicted future population profile of Australia reveals a progressively ageing population and highlights the demand for services to meet the health care needs of older people. The nursing profession, as primary health carers of the elderly, have a responsibility to be well prepared to provide quality care for the older person in all health care settings. Demographic trends indicate the majority of patients requiring health services are aged over 65 years. Therefore it is essential for all undergraduate student nurses to receive appropriate education in aged care1. The Australian Government has recognised the need to promote nursing and nurses caring for older people to address the issues of recruitment and retention of nurses in aged care nursing; inconsistent or ‘hidden’ aged care content within undergraduate nursing curricula; and the poor image of aged care nursing. In response to these issues, in February 2003 a project to develop principles for a core component of aged care in undergraduate nursing curricula was commissioned. The purpose of this project was to develop a Principles Paper outlining desirable aged care content for inclusion in undergraduate nursing curricula; appropriate resources/material to support the principles; barriers to the future implementation of principles and resources; and future strategies for the implementation of the principles and resources. This project involved consultation with a number of representatives from Schools of Nursing in Australian Universities that focus on aged care/ageing, as well as representatives from aged care industry associations, aged care professional associations, consumer associations and nursing organisations. Participants met to identify and discuss core values, desirable aged care content, principles of learning and teaching aged care, resources needed, barriers to implementation and strategies for implementation of the principles. This paper represents the outcome from the project. This Principles Paper outlines the core values and learning outcomes for aged care education within undergraduate nursing curricula. Principles for the learning and teaching of aged care content in undergraduate nursing curricula and benchmarks for the inclusion of aged care content in undergraduate nursing curricula are also provided. Appropriate resources to support the principles and future strategies to facilitate the implementation of the principles are recommended.

1

In referring to ‘aged care’ throughout this paper we are incorporating general issues of ageing and the nursing care of older people in all care contexts.

vi


1. INTRODUCTION The demographic profile of the Australian population has changed significantly over the past century. Longer life expectancies and declining birth rates have resulted in an increasingly ageing population1. The number of people aged over 65 years is expected to continue to rise from 2.4 million in 2001 (12.5% of the total population) to 6.5 million (~ 25% of the total population) in 50 years time1. The predicted future population trends highlight the increasing demands for services to meet the health care needs of older people. The nursing profession, as primary health carers of the elderly, have a responsibility to be well prepared to provide quality care for the older person in all health care settings. The Australian Government has recognised the need for the healthcare workforce to respond to the changing requirements of the Australian population. In 2001, representatives of the Australian Government and the Council of Deans of Nursing met on several occasions to discuss the need to enhance aged care education for all aged care workers, and particularly for nurses, to meet the demand for improved quality in nursing services for the older population. Issues for consideration that were raised from this discussion included:  the general lack of awareness of the aged care content within individual university courses;  a lack of enthusiasm among nurses to work in or study aged care; and  the poor image of aged care nursing both within the nursing profession and the general community2. To address these issues the Australian Government recognised there was a need to promote nursing and nurses caring for older people. A sum of $26.3 million was allocated in the 2002-2003 budget to encourage more nurses to enter or re-enter aged care nursing, including the provision of undergraduate aged care nursing scholarships. In September 2002, representatives from academia, the Nurses Registration Boards, Council of Deans in Nursing and national aged care sector stakeholders met to determine the extent of aged care content in nursing undergraduate curricula in Australian universities and how best to support the Government’s budget initiatives. The following issues were raised:  how well aged care nursing content was integrated into undergraduate nursing curricula around Australia was questioned;  teaching of aged care nursing within Australian universities was highly individualistic;  aged care nursing content in undergraduate nursing curricula tended to be biased toward acute nursing care practices; and  the capacity of universities to teach aged care was questioned3.

In response to these issues, in February 2003 a project to develop principles for a core component of aged care in undergraduate nursing curricula was commissioned. This paper represents the outcome from that project. The project involved consultation with experts in aged care from academia and representatives from professional nursing organisations, aged care industry organisations and consumer organisations (A list of participants is provided in Appendix 1).

1


This Principles Paper outlines: 

the core values underpinning the learning and teaching of aged care in undergraduate nursing curricula;



desirable learning outcomes from aged care content in undergraduate nursing curricula;



principles for the learning and teaching of aged care in undergraduate nursing curricula;



benchmarks for inclusion of aged care content in undergraduate nursing curricula;



appropriate resources/materials to support the principles; and



strategies to facilitate the implementation of the principles into undergraduate nursing curricula.

2. BACKGROUND Australia’s population is progressively ageing. The current trends of increasing life expectancy and decreasing birth rates have prompted predictions of a significant growth in the number of aged persons in the future – from 2.4 million in 2001 (12.5% of the total population), to 4.2 million (18% of the total population) in 20 years time1. During the next 20 years, the number of people aged over 65 years is predicted to increase at three times the rate of the population between 15 – 64 years4. Longer life expectancies will also affect the population numbers of the very old (over 80 years), which is likely to double during the next 20 years, and triple over the next 50 years5. The demographic shift towards an increasingly older population has implications for the nation’s health care system. The number of hospitalisations and length of hospital stay generally increase with age1 and specialised aged care services are necessary to assist older people to live with chronic disease and disabilities commonly associated with old age. People over 65 years currently use 46% of acute hospital bed days and are responsible for 33% of hospital separations, although they consist of only 12% of the total population1. In 2000, 20% of all people over 70 years also received specialist aged care services, either community or residential6. Appropriate health care services are required to respond to the specific health care needs of the older person. Nurses are the predominant group of health professionals caring for this population, particularly in the hospital, community and residential health care sectors. As the present demographic profile indicates a significant proportion of clients requiring health care services in all health care settings are likely to be over 65 years, it is essential for all nurses to receive appropriate education in aged care. Reviews of undergraduate nursing curricula in Australia suggest that the current educational preparation of student nurses in aged care is not always adequate. The review by Pearson et al.6 on Australian aged care nursing identified that undergraduate nursing education concentrated on primary health care and acute hospital services, rather than aged care topics. Similarly, a recent review by the Nurses’ Board of Victoria (NBV) of aged care content in undergraduate nursing curricula in Victoria found an absence of identifiable educational strategies to ensure student nurses were prepared and competent in the care of older people7. Difficulties obtaining quality clinical placements in aged care with positive learning environments have been highlighted in both Nay et al.’s (2002) review7 and Fitzgerald et al.’s (2001) systematic review of nursing curricula clinical education in Australia8. Lack of recognition of the need for

2


aged care preparation and the poor image of aged care nursing may also influence the degree of aged care content within undergraduate nursing curricula. The NBV report noted that aged care subjects or clinical placements were often scheduled in the first year of the Bachelor of Nursing degree, giving students the impression that aged care was simple and of lesser importance7. A shortage of qualified nurses working in aged care has been reported9, at a time when demands for aged care health services are increasing6. The National Review of Nursing Education Discussion Paper10 noted that the aged care nursing workforce was affected to a greater degree than the general nursing workforce, with a 8.2% rate of decline of employment of nurses in aged care, compared to a 5.5% decline in the general nursing workforce10. Historically, there has not been a high level of demand or interest from nurses to practice or specialise in gerontological nursing. Aged care nursing generally has a poor image among student nurses, qualified nurses and within the broader community2,6. Contributing factors include ageism11, the perceived lack of status and/or excitement associated with non-acute nursing12-14 and poor rates of pay and working conditions within the aged care sector6,15. It was against this background that the Australian Government recognised the need to promote nurses caring for older people2. The provision of quality health care services for older people is a goal relevant to every member of the Australian population and all health care professionals. Addressing undergraduate nursing education in aged care is one strategy to achieve this goal.

3. CORE VALUES Core values underpinning the care of older persons and the learning and teaching of aged care in undergraduate nursing curricula are outlined below. These values should be identified and examined by students during their undergraduate nursing course.

3.1 Core Values Underpinning Aged Care Nursing 3.1.1 To respect personhood at all times. The following key elements were identified by the workshop participants. 

The older person is entitled to be cared for with the same dignity and respect as all members of humanity.



The older person has the same rights as other adults, including the right to take risks if desired.



The older person is entitled to have choice and control in their environment, manner of living and health care.



The individuality, diverse backgrounds and natural networks of older people are recognised and respected.

3


3.1.2 To have the right to quality care in all settings. The following key elements were identified by the workshop participants. 

Quality care incorporates the commitment to evidence based practice.



Quality care reflects the respect for personhood identified above in No. 3.1.1.



Quality care incorporates culturally appropriate, holistic care.



Quality care incorporates care that is therapeutic and safe.



Quality care incorporates individualised care, provided by skilled, specialised multi-disciplinary teams of aged care health professionals.

3.2 Core Values Underpinning the Learning and Teaching of Aged Care 3.2.1 Aged care content should be a significant compulsory component of the undergraduate nursing curriculum and be integrated throughout the undergraduate nursing curriculum. Aged care content should be clearly identifiable and incremental across each year of study. 3.2.2 The learning and teaching of aged care should reflect the core values ‘to respect personhood at all times’ and ‘to have the right to quality care in all settings’ (Nos. 3.1.1 and 3.1.2 above). 3.2.3 The provision of positive role models and messages related to ageing in university and clinical environments are essential to the learning and teaching of aged care in undergraduate nursing curricula. 3.2.4 Good partnerships between universities and clinical organisations are a necessary attribute of learning and teaching aged care and linkages with multi-disciplinary teams are highly valued. 3.2.5 Aged care content should be taught from an evidence-based approach. 3.2.6 A focus on student learning outcomes is necessary. 3.2.7 Aged care content should be of equal status with other areas of clinical specialty.

4. DESIRED LEARNING OUTCOMES OF UNDERGRADUATE NURSING CURRICULA

AGED

CARE

CONTENT

IN

Nurses in Australia are regulated and accountable to the community for providing high quality care through safe and effective work practice16. The Australian Nursing Council (ANC) has developed national standards that provide a framework for professional nursing practice. These include the ANC National Competency Standards for Registered and Enrolled Nurses. The competency standards encompass the various roles and functions that nurses fulfil, and identify the attributes that a competent nurse is expected to demonstrate16. Education courses leading to registration, or enrolment, are accredited by nurse regulatory authorities. Importantly, the regulatory authorities and education programs require graduates to demonstrate the ANC competency standards. This assists in providing a framework for course development and ensuring that registered nurses are fit to provide safe, competent care in a variety of settings. The following desired learning outcomes of aged care content in undergraduate nursing curricula are related to the appropriate ANC competency standards.

4


At the completion of a Bachelor of Nursing degree, the graduate nurse will: 4.1 Demonstrate knowledge and respect of the rights of the older person to enable the older person to maintain control over their environment, manner of living and health care. ANC Competencies (2000) Professional and Ethical Practice: 

Unit 1: Functions in accordance with legislation and common law affecting nursing practice;



Unit 2: Conducts nursing practice in a way that can be ethically justified;



Unit 3: Protects the rights of individuals and groups in the health care setting.

Enabling: 

Unit 11: Contributes to the maintenance of an environment which promotes safety, security and personal integrity of individuals and groups.

4.2 Plan and deliver evidence-based nursing care relevant to older people in a variety of settings. ANC Competencies (2000) Critical Thinking and Analysis: 

Unit 6: Values research in contributing to developments in nursing and improved standards of care.

4.3 Plan and deliver nursing care that incorporates respect and understanding of the older person’s individual beliefs, background and choices. ANC Competencies (2000) Professional and Ethical Practice: 

Unit 3: Protects the rights of individuals and groups in relation to health care.

4.4 Plan and deliver nursing care which incorporates physical, psychological, social, cultural and spiritual aspects/knowledge pertaining to the older person. ANC Competencies (2000) Professional and Ethical Practice: 

Unit 3: Protects the rights of individuals and groups in relation to health care.

Management of Care: 

Unit 7: Carries out a comprehensive and accurate nursing assessment of individuals and groups in a variety of settings;



Unit 8: Formulates a plan of care in collaboration with individuals and groups;

5




Unit 9: Implements planned nursing care to achieve identified outcomes within scope of competency;



Unit 10: Evaluates progress toward expected outcomes and reviews and revises plans in accordance with evaluation data.

Enabling: 

Unit 13: Manages effectively the nursing care of individuals and groups.

4.5 Apply his/her knowledge of safe and therapeutic care when planning and providing nursing care for the older person. ANC Competencies (2000) Professional and Ethical Practice: 

Unit 1: Functions in accordance with legislation and common law affecting nursing practice;



Unit 4: Accepts accountability and responsibility for own actions within nursing practice.

Management of Care: 

Unit 8: Formulates a plan of care in collaboration with individuals and groups;



Unit 10: Evaluates progress toward expected outcomes and reviews and revises plans in accordance with evaluation data.

Enabling: 

Unit 11: Contributes to the maintenance of an environment which promotes safety, security and personal integrity of individuals and groups.

4.6 Identify and respect the natural networks of the older person and involve them in that person’s care. ANC Competencies (2000) Professional and Ethical Practice: 

Unit 3: Protects the rights of individuals and groups in relation to health care.

4.7 Communicate and network with multidisciplinary teams of health professionals skilled in aged care when planning, delivering and assessing care of the older person. ANC Competencies (2000) Enabling: 

Unit 12: Communicates effectively with individuals and groups;



Unit 14: Collaborates with other members of the health care team.

6


4.8 Act as an advocate for the positive aspects of ageing. ANC Competencies (2000) Enabling: Â?

Unit 11: Contributes to the maintenance of an environment which promotes safety, security and personal integrity of individuals and groups.

4.9 Understand the complexity of gerontological nursing and be aware of its importance as a clinical speciality. ANC Competencies (2000) Critical Thinking and Analysis: Â?

Unit 5: Acts to enhance the professional development of self and others.

5. PRINCIPLES FOR LEARNING AND TEACHING UNDERGRADUATE NURSING CURRICULA

AGED

CARE

IN

5.1 Expertise in aged care is necessary to facilitate the integration of aged care content and for teaching the aged care content in undergraduate nursing curricula. 5.2 The involvement of industry and clinicians in aged care is important in the teaching of aged care in undergraduate nursing curricula. 5.3 Evidence of evaluation of aged care content in consultation with industry, professional bodies and consumers should be provided regularly, eg. annually or at the time of each review of the undergraduate nursing curriculum. 5.4 Aged care content within the undergraduate nursing curriculum should be: 5.4.1 5.4.2 5.4.3 5.4.4

a significant compulsory component; integrated across the curriculum; incremental throughout each year of study; and a significant core component of the senior year of study.

5.5 Students need opportunities to integrate theories of ageing and clinical practice in aged care settings. 5.6 It is necessary to include aged care issues in relevant subjects throughout the undergraduate nursing curriculum (eg. mental health, pharmacology). 5.7 Evidence of assessment of both theoretical and clinical components of aged care content should be present and identifiable over the three years of the Bachelor of Nursing course. 5.8 The following eight areas of aged care content have been identified as essential components of aged care content in undergraduate nursing curricula. 5.8.1 Global Ageing For example: Demographics and epidemiology; Social, political and economic influences; Theories of ageing; Positive contributions of older people; Discrimination; Cultural diversity. 5.8.2 Normal Ageing For example: Social; Physical; Psychological; Spiritual; Healthy ageing.

7


5.8.3 Common Challenges of Old Age For example: Frailty; Co-morbidities; Physical and mental illness; Acute and chronic illness; Symptom presentation differences in the older person; Misdiagnosis / differentiating illnesses; Cognitive impairment; Mobility; Pain; PolyPharmacy; Safety; Quality; Risk management; Poverty; Loss, grief, death and dying; Isolation and dysfunctional families; Dislocation; Loss of independence / personhood; Longer recovery and rehabilitation. 5.8.4 Specific Clinical Interventions Relating to Common Challenges of Old Age For example: Fostering independence; Health education and promotion for the older person, Early intervention programs, Comprehensive health assessment; Focused health assessments; Communication; Care planning; Managing unmet need behaviours (eg. wandering, resistance, aggression); Differential diagnosis; Palliative care; Oral care and Nutrition; Evaluation; Working with networks. 5.8.5 Care Structures For example: Health education and promotion; Acute / sub-acute structures; Community / family / professional care structures; General community facilities; Primary care structures; Day care / Respite care; Rehabilitation / Restorative structures; Residential care; Palliative care. 5.8.6 Managing the Care Continuum Across Contexts For example: Case management; Admission and discharge planning; Transitional care (eg. between acute and long term aged care structures); Comprehensive assessment; Documentation / communication including electronic health records. 5.8.7 Positive Messages Related to Ageing as a Part of Life For example: The older person’s contributions to general society eg. voluntary work, paid work; The older person continues to participate in lifelong adult learning activities eg. University of the 3rd Age; The older person contributes to family functioning and structures eg. grand-parenting; Meaningful living and happiness; Productive living. 5.8.8 Legal, Professional and Ethical Issues For example: Professional Codes of Conduct and Ethics; Advance health directives; Balancing between Duty of care vs Dignity of risk; Issues of restraint and elder abuse; End of life planning and decisions.

8


6. BENCHMARKS FOR INCLUSION OF UNDERGRADUATE NURSING CURRICULA

AGED

CARE

CONTENT

IN

These benchmarks could be adopted by the Australian Nursing Council and the state registration authorities. The benchmarks have been developed from the Principles for Learning and Teaching Aged Care in Undergraduate Nursing Curricula. Benchmark 1 Aged care content forms a significant component of the undergraduate nursing curriculum. Source of data: Undergraduate curriculum documents, Unit Outlines, Assessments, Clinical placement records and schedules Benchmark 2 Academic staff with expertise in aged care and clinical practitioners with expertise in aged care are available to guide and teach the aged care content in undergraduate nursing curricula. Source of data: Undergraduate curriculum documents, School of Nursing teaching schedules, Clinical placement records Benchmark 3 Evidence is present of the inclusion of the following eight topics in undergraduate nursing curricula: global ageing; normal ageing; common challenges of old age; specific clinical interventions relating to common challenges of old age; care structures; managing the care continuum across contexts; positive messages related to ageing; and legal, professional and ethical issues pertaining to aged care. Source of data: Undergraduate curriculum documents, Unit Outlines, Assessments Benchmark 4 The aged care content within undergraduate nursing curricula is evidence-based. Source of data: Undergraduate curriculum documents, Unit Outlines, Assessments Benchmark 5 Evidence is present of clinical experience related to the theoretical aged care content of the curriculum. Source of data: Undergraduate curriculum documents, Unit Outlines, Clinical placement records and schedules, Clinical experience objectives and/or performance criteria Benchmark 6 Evidence of aged care content appears in each year of the Bachelor of Nursing degree. Source of data: Undergraduate curriculum documents, Unit Outlines, Assessments

9


Benchmark 7 Aged care content is incremental through the three years of the Bachelor of Nursing degree. Source of data: Undergraduate curriculum documents, Unit Outlines, Assessments Benchmark 8 Evidence of assessed student learning in both theoretical and clinical components of aged care content is present over the three years of the Bachelor of Nursing degree and evidence of assessed student learning of aged care appears in each year of the Bachelor of Nursing degree. Source of data: Assignments and other assessment materials, Clinical placement records and assessments Benchmark 9 Representatives from aged care industry, professional and consumer organizations are included in the consultative processes used to review and evaluate undergraduate nursing curricula and to provide feedback to the teaching staff of the School of Nursing on an annual basis. Source of data: Minutes / records of School of Nursing curricula evaluation meetings, Industry stakeholder’s committee meeting minutes (For example, representatives from organizations such as: Aged Care and Community Services Association, Australian Nursing Homes & Extended Care Association, Geriaction, Alzheimer’s Australia, Carers Australia).

7. APPROPRIATE RESOURCES / MATERIALS TO SUPPORT PRINCIPLES 7.1 Results of Survey of Teaching Resources During the course of this project a survey was conducted to determine the available teaching resources for use in teaching aged care in undergraduate nursing curricula. The current results of this survey are presented in Appendix 3. As a result of this survey and following consultation with the project participants, the following have been identified as lacking to support the principles and deliver the curriculum. 7.1.1 Specific resources aimed at undergraduate nursing students – Many current resources are designed for continuing education programs for carers working in residential aged care and are not appropriate for novice practitioners, and are also limited to the residential care setting. 7.1.2 Interactive resources – Including demonstration of clinical skills and interventions related to the core aged care content Nos. 5.1.3. Common challenges in old age and 5.1.4. Specific clinical interventions, eg CD-ROMs, Web-based activities. 7.1.3 Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Background (CLDB) Resources – Resources are needed addressing indigenous and CLDB ageing issues. 7.1.4 Flexible delivery materials – CD-ROMs, videos, Web-based materials. 7.1.5 Textbooks and/or collections of readings written from the Australian context.

10


7.2 Supportive Resources The preceding section has identified the gaps in specific teaching resources and it is acknowledged there is also a need for supportive structures and resources to be in place to facilitate the implementation of the principles. For example: 7.2.1

Database of teaching resources - A comprehensive database of teaching resources needs to be developed and maintained. Although work on development of a database of teaching resources has already commenced as a result of the survey, there are still resources to be identified and incorporated into an easily accessible database for use by all Schools of Nursing.

7.2.2

Capacity building in collaboration with the aged care industry to provide and support quality educational experiences for student nurses during clinical placements - It has been identified that there are difficulties accessing clinical placements with quality learning environments related to aged care. Support for preceptors, preceptorship programs and student travel subsidies would help overcome these difficulties. This is consistent with Recommendation 24 (clinical education funding) from the National Review of Nursing Education17.

7.2.3

Staff expertise in aged care - Staff development and continuing education programs for academics and clinicians are necessary to promote an optimum learning environment for nursing students. This is consistent with Recommendations 16 (Continuing clinical development of nurses: aged care) and 18 (Lifelong learning and nursing competency) from the National Review of Nursing Education17.

8. STRATEGIES FOR IMPLEMENTATION

8.1 Develop the specific teaching resources as identified from the survey of teaching resources (Listed in Section 7.1). A list of specific subjects required can be found in Appendix 2. 8.2 Establish a clearing house of teaching resources for aged care which would incorporate the construction and maintenance of the database of teaching resources. The clearing house could also provide lists of journals and newsletter contacts (contact industry etc to access these), lists of websites with evidence based practice sheets available; and legal, ethical and professional resources relating to aged care. 8.3 Organise meetings/workshops with the Council of Deans of Nursing to explain and discuss the findings and outcomes from this project. 8.4 Organise meetings/workshops with the Australian Nursing Council to explain and discuss the findings and outcomes from this project and recommend the findings from this paper be included by the ANC in the ANC National Competency Standards, which form the basis of a national framework for undergraduate nursing curricula. This is consistent with Recommendations 4 (Nationally consistent scope of practice) and 6 (National ANC principles to underpin nursing legislation and regulation) from the National Review of Nursing Education17.

11


8.5 Organise meetings/workshops with the State Registration Boards to explain and discuss the findings and outcomes from this project. We would advocate that the findings from this paper be considered and included in the registration boards’ curriculum accreditation process. 8.6 Organise meetings/workshops with Industry Stakeholders to explain and discuss the findings and outcomes from this project and encourage the development of linkages between universities and industry, including involvement in curriculum review. This is consistent with Recommendation 3 (Nursing education and workforce forums) from the National Review of Nursing Education17. 8.7 Disseminate the findings from this paper to all Schools of Nursing and recommend they consider and include the findings in their future curriculum development and course evaluation activities.

9. BARRIERS TO FUTURE IMPLEMENTATION

9.1

The Bachelor of Nursing is currently a three-year course and there are many competing demands within the curriculum. There is therefore ongoing debate on which content should be included.

9.2

Ageism and the poor image of aged care nursing can be a continual barrier to placing aged care as a priority in undergraduate nursing curricula.

9.3

There is broad variation in the quality of aged care clinical placements available for students. Undergraduate nursing students need a supportive ‘best practice’ clinical environment during clinical placements with sufficient mentors / preceptors available.

9.4

There is a national and international shortage of academic staff with aged care expertise as well as post-graduate clinicians with aged care expertise.

9.5

A variety of curriculum models for undergraduate nursing courses are used throughout Australia. This may pose challenges to implementation of curriculum changes in a standardised manner.

9.6

Because of the recency of nursing education in the tertiary sector, the last 20 years has seen an enormous amount of curriculum development at both undergraduate and postgraduate levels. Many academics may perceive further modification to the curriculum to be a challenge.

12


Appendix 1 PROJECT TEAM Professor Helen Edwards, Head, School of Nursing, Queensland University of Technology Professor Mary Courtney, Director of Research, School of Nursing, Queensland University of Technology Ms Robyn Nash, Director of Academic Programs, School of Nursing, Queensland University of Technology Ms Kathleen Finlayson, SRA, School of Nursing, Queensland University of Technology PROJECT PARTICIPANTS Academic Representatives Professor Jennifer Abbey, Professor in Aged Care, School of Nursing, Queensland University of Technology and Prince Charles Hospital & Health Service District Professor Lynn Chenoweth, Professor of Aged and Extended Care Nursing, University of Technology, Sydney Professor Judith Clare, Associate Dean Research and Higher Degrees, School of Nursing & Midwifery, Flinders University Professor Doreen McCarthy, Foundation Head, Notre Dame School of Nursing, University of Notre Dame Professor Rhonda Nay, Director, Gerontic Nursing Professorial Unit and Clinical School, Director Australian Centre for Evidence Based Aged Care, La Trobe University and Bundoora Extended Care Centre Professor Alan Pearson, Director, La Trobe University Bundoora Nursing Studies Unit, La Trobe University Professor Irene Stein, Director, Aged Care Research and Education Services, School of Nursing and Midwifery, University of Newcastle Industry Representatives Ms Meigan Lefebure, Chief Executive Officer (Victoria), Australian Nursing Homes & Extended Care Association Ms Jill Pretty, Manager, Policy and Consultancy, Aged & Community Services Association Consumer Representatives Ms Toni Cannon, Special Projects Officer, Queensland Council of Carers, Carers Australia Ms Ann Patterson, National President, Geriaction Ms Jodie Thomson, National Program Manager, Alzheimer’s Association Queensland Professional Nursing Organization Representatives Professor Patrick Crookes, Representative for the Council of Deans of Nursing Ms Marilyn Gendek, Chief Executive Officer, Australian Nursing Council Australian Government Department of Health and Ageing Representative Dr Joanne Ramadge, Clinical Advisor in Aged Care

13


Appendix 2 Development of specific teaching resources: Topics needed Indigenous and CLDB ageing issues Specific assessments, differential diagnosis and management of challenging behaviours in the older person Comprehensive assessment of the older person. Medications and issues of polypharmacy in the older person. Pain assessment and management in the older person and in particular in the person with a cognitive impairment Wound management in the older person Continence issues in the older person Nutrition and hydration in the older person Communication with older people Residential care - the positives The transitional care continuum Palliative care in the person with end-stage dementia Loss, grief, death and dying Quality, safety and risk management

14


Appendix 3 Results from Survey of Teaching Resources Survey Responses (as at June 2003)

Organisation

Resource Title

Resource Type

Content Summary

Contact and Access Details

Costs Involved

University of Technology Sydney

Understanding behaviour: Nursing the cognitively impaired patient © 2002

Video and Education Package

The package aims to help nursing staff with managing challenging behaviours of older, unwell patients. It is used during in-service education programs. The education resource is based on research by four international aged care nurse experts: CarisVerhallen, Algase, Hallberg and Cohen-Mansfield. It also has information provided by and discussion with Australian nurse experts, the Guardianship Board, and the Alzheimers Association.

The package is marketed by Training Health & Educational Media P/L. PO Box 205, Heathcote, VIC, 3523 Phone: 03 5433 3854 Email: mike_white@themedia.com .au or contact Prof. Lynn Chenoweth, UTS

Please contact for information on costs.

Deakin University School of Nursing

Bachelor of Nursing HNN305 The Ageing Process & Nursing © Deakin University School of Nursing 2003

CD-ROM

The CD-ROM facilitates student learning in three problem based learning scenarios by: • Showing video footage of the client • Providing progress notes, assessment data and patient’s histories • Supplying links to useful websites • Requiring students to prepare management plans for clients • Providing an expert opinion on the three scenarios shown

Lauren McTier, School of Nursing, Deakin University 221 Burwood Hwy, Burwood, Vic, 3125 Phone: 03 92446990 Email: laurenm@deakin.edu.au

Please contact for information on costs.

15


Organisation

Resource Title

Resource Type

Content Summary

Contact and Access Details

Costs Involved

Australian Government Department of Health and Ageing

Continence resources

Web page produced by National Continence Management Strategy with links to research reports on continence, brochures and resource information

The National Continence Management Strategy web page includes links to: final research reports on interventions to address incontinence, brochures and fact sheets, information resources, resources for indigenous communities, resources for people from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds, links to specific continence and aged care projects, practice guidelines for GPs and physiotherapists

http://www.incontinence.he alth.gov.au/ncms/ncmsres. htm#innovative

Nil

‘How to do it’ Manual

The manual provides a means for assessing the Linda Grenade or needs and concerns of residents living in aged care Kristin Chave, facilities using either a self-complete questionnaire or Centre for Research into personal interview approach. It includes validated and Aged Care Services, Curtin tested survey instruments for use with residents (or University of Technology their representatives), summary forms for collating the GPO Box U1987 information obtained and advice regarding how to Perth, WA 6845 select residents for a survey and how to analyse the Phone: 08 9266 3549 or results. Suggestions for possible feedback and follow- 08 9266 3771 up strategies are also provided. Email: L.E.Grenade@curtin.edu.au or k.chave@curtin.edu.au

Centre for Research into Aged Care Services, Curtin University of Technology

Last Web Update: 28th April 2003

Exploring Residents’ Views in Aged Care Facilities: A Practical Guide Version 1, 2002: Boldy,D.P. and Grenade,L.G.,

The manual is sold for $198 (GST included) plus $7 postage and packaging

16


Organisation

Resource Title

Resource Type

Content Summary

Contact and Access Details

Costs Involved

Queensland Health, Queensland Government

Falls Prevention: Best Practice Guidelines For Public Hospitals and State Government Residential Aged Care Facilities

CD-ROM and/or printed manual, including assessment tools and information brochures

The Falls Prevention Best Practice Guidelines for Public Hospitals and State Government Residential Aged Care Facilities were developed under Queensland Health’s Quality Improvement and Enhancement Program and have been endorsed nationally by the Australian Council for Safety and Quality in Health Care. The Guidelines identify three key components of falls prevention programs: • Risk identification • Falls prevention • Injury prevention strategies A range of workplace tools has been provided as part of these Guidelines for you to download and customise

Further information is available from fallsprevention@health.qld. gov.au

Please contact for information on costs.

CD-ROM

The Dementia and Family Care CD-ROM uses problem based learning activities which seek to: • Simulate specific ‘real life’ issues, problems or situations meaningful to nursing; • Develop the personal and interpersonal skills required in exploring these situations; • Further develop an understanding of the problem-solving skills within a context of care of a client with Alzheimer’s Disease and their family; • Promote a reflective approach to nursing practice; • Develop a collaborative approach to learning.

Dr Ursula Kellett, School of Nursing, Queensland University of Technology, Victoria Park Rd, Kelvin Grove, Qld, 4059 Phone: 07 3864 3896 Email: u.kellett@qut.edu.au

© State of Queensland, Queensland Health, 2001 ISBN: 073452960 0

Queensland University of Technology

Dementia and Family Care Version 1.0, March 2000, © Queensland University of Technology 2000

Or www.safetyandquality.org

Development of CDRom undertaken through a Commonwealth Australian University Teaching Grant. Available at cost for CD copy, handling and postage.

17


Organisation

Resource Title

Resource Type

Content Summary

Contact and Access Details

Costs Involved

Queensland University of Technology

Promoting Independence: A learning resource for aged care workers Š Commonwealth of Australia 1999

Facilitator Manual / Module Materials and Video

The program consists of a series of eight sessions aimed at assisting aged-care workers to provide care that promotes independence and well-being. Modules cover: Ageing and Older People; Ageism, Myths and Stereotypes; Moving to an Aged Care Facility; Dependence and Independence; Strategies for Promoting Independence; Evaluating Independence Enhancing Plans and Enhancing Community Links.

Dr Helen Chapman, School of Nursing, Queensland University of Technology, Victoria Park Rd, Kelvin Grove, Qld, 4059. Phone: 07 3864 5956 Email: h.chapman@qut.edu.au

Development of manual undertaken through a Commonwealth Dept. of Health and Aged Care Grant. Available at cost for copy, handling and postage.

University of Notre Dame Australia

Teaching about dementia [kit]: A facilitator’s package to ensure you deliver quality care. Garratt,S. & HamiltonSmith,E. 1997, Melbourne: Ausmed

Video

1 video 13 minutes Companion to book: Rethinking dementia: An Australian approach.

University of Notre Dame Australia Broome library

Inter-campus library loans

ISBN 0646311093

18


Organisation

Resource Title

Resource Type

Content Summary

Contact and Access Details

Costs Involved

Geriaction

A Matter of Attitude: Older People Confronting the Fear of Frailty Š Department of Families, Youth and Community Care Qld 1999

Video

A frank half-hour documentary that identifies a positive attitude as the key to living with frailty.

The video is an International Year of Older Persons collaboration between the Queensland Office of Ageing and ABC Television, and available from Geriaction or Dept. of Families, Youth and Community Care, Qld. For details please phone (02) 9412 2145 (Geriaction), or (07) 3224 7959 (Dept. Families, Youth and Community Care Qld).

Please contact for information on costs.

Geriaction

The Heart Has No Wrinkles. Health Media, N.S.W. Department of Health, 1988

Video

A drama set in a retirement hostel where two people are in the early stages of forming a relationship. It is designed to address various misconceptions about sexuality and the aged - the main one being of course that older people are asexual

Contact details and order form available from Geriaction website http://members.ozemail.co m.au/~geriactn

$66 A number of other publications for both consumers and professionals are also for sale on this website.

19


Organisation

Resource Title

Resource Type

Content Summary

Contact and Access Details

Costs Involved

Northern Territory University

Introduction to Gerontology

Distance Education Materials

The subject aims to familiarise students with the historical and legislative framework that underpins aged care in Australia. Demographic trends that are influencing aged care policy and service provisions will also be discussed. The normal ageing process as well as the impacts of aged related changes on individuals will be addressed from a holistic perspective.

Dr. Louis Wong, Northern Territory University, Darwin NT 0909 Phone: 08-89466143 Email: louis.wong@ntu.edu.au

Development of this teaching material through Northern Territory University, School of Health Sciences. Copies available to enrolled undergraduate B. Nursing students.

Queensland University of Technology

Key Issues in Aged Care

Distance Education Materials/ Online Resources Web Support

Flexible learning package module and reading materials for postgraduate students. This learning package has been jointly developed with industry partner, Blue Care. This unit uses a primary health care approach to examine issues related to the pursuit of healthy ageing. The goal is to emphasise how individuals, communities, and policy makers can work together to provide appropriate and reliable sources of support for older people in society.

Dr. U. Kellett, School of Nursing, Queensland University of Technology, Victoria Park Rd, Kelvin Grove, Qld, 4059. Phone: 07 3864 3896 Email: u.kellett@qut.edu.au

Materials are only available to students enrolled in the course

Queensland University of Technology

Health Assessment in Aged Care

Distance Education Materials / Online Resources Web Support

Flexible learning package module and reading materials for postgraduate students. This learning package has been jointly developed with industry partner, Blue Care. This unit provides aged care practitioners with learning opportunities to develop and expand their understanding of the health care assessment of older adults. Participants will be offered learning opportunities aimed at developing a strong theoretical foundation on which to assess the health care needs of older people.

Dr. U. Kellett, School of Nursing, Queensland University of Technology, Victoria Park Rd, Kelvin Grove, Qld, 4059. Phone: 07 3864 3896 Email: u.kellett@qut.edu.au

Materials are only available to students enrolled in the course

20


Organisation

Resource Title

Resource Type

Content Summary

Queensland University of Technology

Principles of Aged Care Practice

Distance Education Materials / Online Resources Web Support

Flexible learning package module and reading materials for postgraduate students. This learning package has been jointly developed with industry partner, Blue Care. This unit critically examines aspects of pathological ageing with consideration of the wider social and policy implications of these morbidities.

Dr. U. Kellett, School of Nursing, Queensland University of Technology, Victoria Park Rd, Kelvin Grove, Qld, 4059. Phone: 07 3864 3896 Email: u.kellett@qut.edu.au

Materials are only available to students enrolled in the course

Griffith University

Art and Skill of Dementia Care

Distance Education Materials / Web Materials

Flexible learning package modules and reading materials for Masters and Graduate Certificate Gerontological Nursing students. Also used for undergraduate students who undertake a 10CP elective. These modules explore the dementing syndrome and the associated challenges such as care giving

Dr. Wendy Moyle, Faculty of Nursing and Health, Griffith University Phone: 07 3875 5526 Email: w.moyle@griffith.edu.au

Materials are only available to students enrolled in the course

Griffith University

Challenges of Ageing

Distance Education Materials Web Support

Flexible learning package modules and reading materials for Masters and Graduate Certificate Gerontological Nursing students. Also used for undergraduate students who undertake a 10CP. Modules look at the myths of ageing, normal ageing, physiological, psychological and sociological aspects of ageing

Dr. Wendy Moyle, Faculty of Nursing and Health, Griffith University Phone: 07 3875 5526 Email: w.moyle@griffith.edu.au

Materials are only available to students enrolled in the course

Contact and Access Details

Costs Involved

21


Organisation

Resource Title

Resource Type

Content Summary

Contact and Access Details

Costs Involved

Griffith University

End of Life Studies

Distance Education Materials Web Support

Flexible learning package modules and reading materials for Masters and Graduate Certificate Gerontological Nursing students. Also used for undergraduate students who undertake a 10CP elective. Modules explore death and dying from several perspectives

Deborah Mooney, Griffith University, Gold Coast Phone: 07 555 28932 Email:

Materials are only available to students enrolled in the course

This subject expands students’ view of older people as well as prompting reappraisal of traditional models of care. Nursing interventions and related knowledge has moved from a geriatric medicine approach to a more broadly focused gerontological perspective.

Glenn Ross (gross@csu.edu.au) Charles Sturt University (Riverina), Faculty of Health Studies, School of Clinical Sciences, PO Box 588, Wagga Wagga, NSW, 2678 02 69332805 (direct), 02 69332874 (secretary), 02 69332866 (FAX)

Charles Sturt University (Riverina)

Gerontology and Care of the Aged

Distance Education Materials

d.mooney@griffith.edu.au

Please contact for further information

22


Organisation

Resource Title

Resource Type

Content Summary

Contact and Access Details

Costs Involved

LaTrobe University

Fundamentals of Nursing Practice

Unit/ Module Materials

In this foundation subject students will learn how to assist older clients to meet their activities of daily living. Students will study how the individual’s resources, impact of ageing and multiple pathology can help us understand their ability to self-care. Using an issues based learning approach, students are introduced to therapeutic nursing practices which are designed to promote, maintain and improve health status and provide comfort. Emphasis will be placed on the importance of personhood when providing nursing care. Related topics include alterations in comfort, hygiene, nutrition, elimination, respiration, circulation, body temperature and infection control. Students will also develop their professional role in individualised care as a beginning member of the nursing team with awareness of legal, ethical and professional responsibilities.

Dr Susan Koch, Gerontic Nursing Clinical School Phone: 9495 3209 Email: s.koch@latrobe.edu.au

To be confirmed

LaTrobe University

Ageing and Communities

Distance Education / Unit / Module Materials

The subject provides an introduction to the community focus of care delivery. Students are introduced to the concepts of prevention, rehabilitation, recreation and provision of care to frail older people in the community. The content introduces core concepts in primary health care and health behaviours. Knowledge of these core concepts is integrated with the process of producing critical analysis of health and well-being and health care practice. It then provides an opportunity to develop skills in health education, promotion and rehabilitation.

Dr Susan Koch, Gerontic Nursing Clinical School Phone: 9495 3209 Email: s.koch@latrobe.edu.au

To be confirmed

23


Organisation

Resource Title

Resource Type

Content Summary

Contact and Access Details

Costs Involved

LaTrobe University

Aged Care Management

Distance Education / Unit / Module Materials

In this subject, students examine theoretical frameworks, concepts and research findings from the general and nursing literature and consider the implications for managing care provided for older people. Emphasis is on effective utilisation of human, material, financial and information resources to manage staff who provide quality care in complex organisations. This subject facilitates personal skill development in dealing with management issues and provides an understanding of current management practice. Approaches to continuous quality improvement and benchmarking are explored.

Dr Susan Koch, Gerontic Nursing Clinical School Phone: 9495 3209 Email: s.koch@latrobe.edu.au

To be confirmed

LaTrobe University

Normal Ageing and Rights of Older Persons

Distance Education / Unit / Module Materials

An individual ages biologically, psychologically, sociologically and spiritually. In this subject theories and perspectives of ageing are discussed, including the philosophies of healthy ageing, and the pathophysiologies which affect individuals' ability to care for themselves. More specifically the direct care needs related to these changes will be explored within a context of the principles of the rights of individuals to make care choices.

Dr Susan Koch, Gerontic Nursing Clinical School Phone: 9495 3209 Email: s.koch@latrobe.edu.au

To be confirmed

LaTrobe University

Alterations to Health: Care Interventions in Ageing

Distance Education / Unit / Module Materials

The topics covered in this subject include the integument, nutrition, elimination, metabolism and functional mobility. Further themes for exploration include pain management, fluid and electrolyte balance and issues surrounding ageing. Cultural, social, psychological, ethical and legal aspects of care are considered when planning and implementing individualised

Dr Susan Koch, Gerontic Nursing Clinical School Phone: 9495 3209 Email: s.koch@latrobe.edu.au

To be confirmed

24


Organisation

Resource Title

Resource Type

Content Summary

Contact and Access Details

Costs Involved

LaTrobe University

Gerontic Nursing Practice

Unit / Module Materials

In this subject students will consider the health needs of older people in diverse settings. The examination of the social, psychological, and biological aspects of ageing; demographics of ageing, health and ageing, ageing in place, and the principles of long-term care and of rehabilitation will be included. The importance of the nurses' role in promoting, maintaining, and restoring the health of older adults will be stressed. The students will be encouraged to focus on the independent role of the nurse and an interdisciplinary approach to the planning and implementation of client care.

Dr Susan Koch, Gerontic Nursing Clinical School Phone: 9495 3209 Email: s.koch@latrobe.edu.au

To be confirmed

LaTrobe University

Controversies in Gerontic Nursing Practice

Unit / Module Materials

In this subject students will consider sexuality and ageing; substance and alcohol abuse; aids and dementia; abuse of older people; bed-blocker phenomenon and ageing; depression and suicide; homelessness and ageing; creativity, recreation and lifestyle choices; competency assessment and legal determinants. The students will be encouraged to focus on the independent role of the nurse and an interdisciplinary approach to the planning and implementation of client care.

Dr Susan Koch, Gerontic Nursing Clinical School Phone: 9495 3209 Email: s.koch@latrobe.edu.au

To be confirmed

LaTrobe University

Complementary Therapies in Aged Care

Unit / Module Materials

Complementary therapies in Aged Care (particularly massage, aromatherapy, relaxation techniques, music therapy); Guidelines for practice of massage in nursing clinical placements.

Dr Pauline McCabe, School of Nursing and Midwifery Phone: 9479 5941 Email: p.mccabe@latrobe.edu.au

Please contact for further information

25


Organisation

Resource Title

Resource Type

Content Summary

Contact and Access Details

Costs Involved

LaTrobe University (Bendigo)

Online teaching site for undergraduate aged care subject.

Unit / Module Materials

Online teaching site for undergraduate aged care subject. New subject currently being developed. Once developed 'guest' account could be created for access.

Amanda Kenny, LaTrobe University Bendigo, PO Box 199 Bendigo Phone: 54447545 Email: a.kenny@bendigo.latrobe.e du.au

Please contact for further information

Curtin University, WA

Gerontological Nursing: Clinical Decision Making

Unit / Module Materials / Distance Education Materials and Video

The course is designed around 2 conceptual frameworks: the Problem Solving Approach and Gordon’s Functional Health Patterns. Provides a comprehensive guide to care of older people, those who are well and those with minor or temporary health problems.

Dr P. Rapley, School of Nursing and Midwifery, Curtin University, WA 6102 Phone: 089 266 2079 Email: prapley@nursing.curtin.edu .au

$550.00 inclusive of guide and reader and marking assignments

Curtin University, WA

Gerontological Nursing: Clinical Aspects of Gerontological Nursing

Unit / Module Materials / Distance Education Materials and Video

It is expected that this course will enhance nurses’ level of care in three ways. Firstly, by making nurses more aware of the complex, interrelated needs of chronically ill and disabled older people. Secondly, by complementing and extending nurses’ existing knowledge of the nursing care appropriate for this group of older people. Thirdly, by increasing nurses’ confidence and skill in decision making, by allowing them to examine problems from a comprehensive and integrated approach.

Dr P. Rapley, School of Nursing and Midwifery, Curtin University, WA 6102 Phone: 089 266 2079 Email: prapley@nursing.curtin.edu .au

$550.00 for guide, reader and marking of assignments

26


Organisation

Resource Title

Resource Type

Content Summary

Contact and Access Details

Costs Involved

Aged and Community Services, Australia (ACSA)

NSW Workcover Manual Handling in Aged Care

Module Materials & Video

Training manual for assessing competencies of staff in aged care

Aged & Community Services NSW & ACT, Level 1 391 Liverpool Rd Ashfield 2131 Phone: 02 9799 0900 Email: mail@agedservices.asn.au

$ 650 includes one day training

Aged and Community Services, Australia (ACSA)

A Practical Manual and Quality Guide and infection prevention and control in Aged Care facilities

Unit / Module Materials

Guidelines to assist in staff training and education, it also provides information for relatives and carers

Infection Prevention & Control Unit, Locked bag 1 Hunter Region Mail Centre Phone: 02 4921 4473 Email: HAHSINFCON@doh.health .nsw.gov.au

Costs will need to be confirmed with Hunter Area Health

Aged and Community Services, Australia (ACSA)

Best Practice Food and Nutrition Manual for Aged Care Facilities

Unit / Module Materials

Addresses nutritional, hydration and catering issues in accordance with the Standards and Guidelines for Aged Care services, Commonwealth Department of Health and Ageing

Rudi Bartl, Nutritional department, Central Coast Health, PO Box 361 Gosford, NSW 2250 Phone: 02 4320 3691

Not yet published. No costs available

27


Organisation

Resource Title

Resource Type

Content Summary

Contact and Access Details

Costs Involved

Centre for Education and Research on Ageing, Concord Hospital & University of Sydney

1. Putting Your Best Foot Forward (1998)

Guidelines & tools to promote practice change, lesson plans, overheads and handouts for teaching.

A comprehensive falls prevention manual for use in aged care facilities. Includes: framework for assessing risk of falling and developing care plans for residents; practical guidelines on use of walking aids, promoting activity, restraints, footwear and clothing; information for residents and families.

Order forms and contact details available from CERA, www.cera.usyd.edu.au

$33

Centre for Education and Research on Ageing, Concord Hospital & University of Sydney

2. The TECH Approach to Dementia Care

Guidelines and tools to promote practice change, also lesson plans, overheads and handouts for teaching.

A training package which aims to improve the quality of care of residents with dementia in aged care facilities. Includes check-list to help staff understand factors contributing go challenging behaviours and suggests strategies for dealing with these behaviours; background information on dementia, guides to implementing the TECH approach; simple lesson plans and handouts.

Order forms and contact details available from CERA, www.cera.usyd.edu.au

$49.50

Centre for Education and Research on Ageing, Concord Hospital & University of Sydney

3. Swallowing.. on a Plate (1998)

Guidelines and tools to promote practice change, also lesson plans, overheads and handouts for teaching.

Training package aimed at improving the quality of care residents with swallowing problems in aged care facilities. Includes: information about swallowing and management of swallowing problems; forms and protocols (SOAP program); lesson plans and handouts.

Order forms and contact details available from CERA, www.cera.usyd.edu.au

$66

28


Organisation

Resource Title

Resource Type

Content Summary

Contact and Access Details

Costs Involved

Centre for Education and Research on Ageing, Concord Hospital & University of Sydney

4. Cultural Diversity and Dementia

Training Package

The aim of this 83 page resource is to assist residential care staff to provide appropriate care to residents with dementia who come from a non-English speaking background. It contains sections on settling in and assessment of new residents, culturally appropriate environments, social and recreational programs, staff training, developing care plans and developing broad facility plans. It also has a section on resources available in the community.

Order forms and contact details available from CERA, www.cera.usyd.edu.au

$33

Age Concern Pty Ltd.

1. Recognising and Managing Alzheimer’s Type Dementia

Training Manual

This manual is a fully self-contained lecture on Alzheimer's type dementia, and includes information on: • Symptom presentation • Stages • Behaviours • Appropriate activities Included are overheads, exercises to include and hand-outs for the participants

Order forms and contact details available from Age Concern www.ageconcern.com.au

Cost: $AU45 plus $9 handling and postage.

M.Smith, K.Buckwalter & S.Mitchell Published by Abbe Inc.

29


Organisation

Resource Title

Resource Type

Content Summary

Contact and Access Details

Costs Involved

Age Concern Pty Ltd.

2. Assessment and Management of Aggressive Behaviours

Training Manual

This manual is a fully self-contained lecture on assessment and management of aggressive and acting out behaviours, which includes information on: • the many variations of aggressive behaviours • assessment details • identifying triggers • setting goals Included are overheads, exercises to include and hand-outs for the participants

Order forms and contact details available from Age Concern www.ageconcern.com.au

Cost: $AU45 plus $9 handling and postage.

a. Disease process, symptom presentation, possible causes, risk factors, screening tools and research on treatments. b. Symptom presentation, disease duration of frontal lobe dementia, Lewy body disease and vascular dementia plus others c. Usual and unusual symptom presentation in the elderly, risk factors, screening tools, treatment options d. Age related changes in drug metabolism, use and side effects to monitor, when medication will not be useful e. What are ethics and how do they apply to daily practice in aged care f. Explains evidence based practice and how to use it to support your care strategies

Order forms and contact details available from Age Concern www.ageconcern.com.au

1 or 2 videos @ $88 ea plus $10 postage and handling. 3 or 4 videos @ $66 ea plus $15 postage and handling. 5 or 6 videos @ $55 ea plus $15 postage and handling. Due to copyright restrictions, agencies with multiple campuses should call Age Concern Pty. Ltd.

M.Smith, K.Buckwalter & S.Mitchell Published by Abbe Inc. Age Concern Pty Ltd.

3. Videos: a.Alzheimer’s Disease b.NonAlzheimer’s Dementia c.Depression in the Elderly d. Medication in the Elderly e.Introduction to Ethics f.Introduction to Evidence Based Practice and Research

Videos

30


Organisation

Resource Title

Resource Type

Home and Community Care Resource Unit

Dementia Care Learning Program

Leader’s Handbook , Learner’s Handbook and a series of booklet Learning Modules

Video – 20 minutes

Home and Community Care Resource Unit

Early Onset Memory Loss: A Conversation with Letty Tennis

Content Summary

Contact and Access Details

Costs Involved

Module 1: Introduction to Dementia : This module is intended as a basic program in understanding dementia, and in good practice in dementia care. It can be used for all direct care workers, carers and volunteers, regardless of their level of experience. The booklet contains 8 activities that give a broad introductory overview to understanding what dementia is and how it can be best managed. Module 2: The Person with Dementia Module 3: Communication Module 4: The Worker Module 5: The Workplace

Home and Community Care Resources Unit Web Site: http://www.health.qld.gov.au/ hacc/sell.htm

Leader’s Handbook - $12 Each Booklet Price: Package: 10 copies for $25.00 + $2.50 GST (Booklet 1 – Learner’s HandbookBooklet 2 – Module 1Booklet 3 – Modules 2-5)

In this video Ms Tennis courageously and honestly presents her reactions to her progressive memory loss. This 20 minute video represents her effort to reach out to others affected by memory loss and to break down public misconceptions about people with memory impairing illnesses.This video is excellent viewing for families and professionals involved with Alzheimer's Disease, especially those dealing with early onset Alzheimer's.

Home and Community Care Resources Unit Web Site: http://www.health.qld.gov.au/ hacc/sell.htm

Produced by: Commonwealth Department of Human Services and Health

$25

Produced by: Joseph and Kathleen Bryan Alzheimer's Disease Research centre USA

31


Organisation

Resource Title

Resource Type

Content Summary

Contact and Access Details

Costs Involved

Australian Government Department of Health and Ageing

Multiple titles as listed in content column

Policy Framework Documents

1. National Strategy for an Ageing Australia: An Older Australia, Challenges and Opportunities for all, February 2002 2. Commonwealth, State and Territory Strategy on Healthy Ageing, March 2000 3. National Strategy for an Ageing Australia Discussion Papers: - Healthy Ageing Discussion Paper, October 1999 - National Strategy for an Ageing Australia Background Paper, April 1999 - Attitude, Lifestyle & Community Support, September 2000 - Independence and Self Provision, November 1999 - Employment for Mature Age Workers Issues Paper, 1999 - World Class Care, April 2000

Available via the internet www.health.gov.au or can be requested via the Aged Care Community Information Hotline on (freecall) 1800 500 853.

Nil

Australian Government Department of Health and Ageing

Ageing and Economic Implications – multiple titles

Reports

1. Access Economics - Population Ageing and the Economy, January 2001 2. Ageing Gracefully: an Overview of the Economic Implications of Australia's Ageing Population Profile, 1999 3. The Ageing Australian Population and Future Health Costs: 1996-2051, August 1999

Available via the internet www.health.gov.au or can be requested via the Aged Care Community Information Hotline on (freecall) 1800 500 853.

Nil

32


Organisation

Resource Title

Resource Type

Australian Government Department of Health and Ageing

Multiple titles as listed in content column

Aged Care Overview Publications

Australian Government Department of Health and Ageing

Community Care Documents

Reports, Guidelines and information sources

Content Summary

Contact and Access Details

Costs Involved

• The Australian Health Care System: An Outline, Sep 2000 • Aged Care in Australia - August 2002 • Health and Aged Care in Australia, 1999 • Ageing in Australian Society, 2002 • Older Australia at a Glance, 2002 • Continence (Website link) • The use of Hospitals by Older People: a Casemix Analysis, June 2000 • Measuring Remoteness: Accessibility/Remoteness Index of Australia (ARIA), October 2001 • Submission to the House of Representatives Standing Committee on Ageing, January 2003 • Report on the Operation of the Aged Care Act 1997, 1 July 2001 to 30 June 2002 • A review of healthy ageing research in Australia Report prepared for the Community Services Ministers' Advisory Council, 2000

Available via the internet www.health.gov.au or can be requested via the Aged Care Community Information Hotline on (freecall) 1800 500 853.

Nil

• Aged Care Assessment Teams • Home and Community Care (HACC) Program • Getting it Right: Guidelines for the Home and Community Care Program National Service Standards • Community Aged Care Packages • Commonwealth Carelink Centres • Commonwealth Carer Resource Centres & Commonwealth Carer Respite Centres • Day Therapy Centres • Extended Aged Care at Home (EACH) Program (Website link)

Available via the internet www.health.gov.au or can be requested via the Aged Care Community Information Hotline on (freecall) 1800 500 853.

Nil

33


Organisation

Resource Title

Resource Type

Content Summary

Contact and Access Details

Costs Involved

Australian Government Department of Health and Ageing

Residential Care Documents

Reports, guidelines and policy documents

• • • • • • • •

Available via the internet www.health.gov.au or can be requested via the Aged Care Community Information Hotline on (freecall) 1800 500 853.

Nil

Available via the internet www.health.gov.au or can be requested via the Aged Care Community Information Hotline on (freecall) 1800 500 853.

Nil

• • • • •

Australian Government Department of Health and Ageing

Indigenous Matters

Website information and brochures

Aged Care Certification Guidelines, 1999 Aged Care Complaints Resolution Scheme Quality Residential Aged Care Residential Classification Scale Aged Care Advocacy Charter of Residents Rights and Responsibilities The Residential Care Manual Code of Ethics and Guide to Ethical Conduct for Residential Aged Care, 2001 Two Year Review of Aged Care Reforms, 2001 Ageing in Place: a guide for providers of residential care, 2002 Documentation and Accountability Manual (Website link) Standards and Guidelines for Residential Aged Care Services Manual (Website link) Review of Pricing Arrangements in Residential Aged Care, 2003: - Background Paper 1 - The Context of the Review - Background Paper 2 - The Commonwealth Legislative Framework

• Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health (Website link) • Commonwealth Carelink Centres Indigenous brochure • Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Aged Care Strategy (Website link)

34


Organisation

Resource Title

Resource Type

Content Summary

Contact and Access Details

Costs Involved

Australian Government Department of Health and Ageing

Hearing Services Information

Reports, information brochures / booklets

• Understanding the Features of a Hearing Aid • Understanding the Commonwealth Hearing Services Program • The Commonwealth Hearing Services Program Information Booklet • Office of Hearing Services Customer Service Charter

Available via the internet www.health.gov.au or can be requested via the Aged Care Community Information Hotline on (freecall) 1800 500 853.

Nil

Australian Government Department of Health and Ageing

Aged Care Workforce Information

Reports, reviews, guidelines

• Recruitment and Retention of Nurses in Residential Aged Care (LaTrobe Report) - Final report - Commonwealth Response • A Review of the Current Role of Enrolled Nurses in the Aged Care Sector: Future Directons • Quality of Working Life for Nurses: Report on Qualitative research • Evaluation of the National OHS Strategy for Residential Aged Care • Implementing Occupational Health & Safety in Residential Aged Care: The Guide • Guidelines for medication management in residential aged care facilities (Australian Pharmaceutical Advisory Council) • Aged Care Enrolled Nurse Working Party: A Report to the Minister for Ageing (Aged Care Enrolled Nurse Working Party) • Better Health and Safety Awards: Case Studies • Ministers Aged Care Awards for Excellence in Professional and Staff Development: Case Studies • National Review of Nursing Education: Our Duty of Care • Commonwealth Aged Care Nursing Scholarship Schemes (accessed via www.rcna.org.au)

Available via the internet www.health.gov.au or can be requested via the Aged Care Community Information Hotline on (freecall) 1800 500 853.

Nil

35


Organisation

Resource Title

Resource Type

Content Summary

Contact and Access Details

Costs Involved

Australian Government Department of Health and Ageing / Dementia Services Development Centre

Challenge Depression Kits

Manual, video and poster

The 220 page manual introduces a number of approaches to reducing depression in aged care homes. The website has been established to provide an opportunity for anyone interested in reducing depression in aged care homes to 'post' their comments or suggestions so that others can share them.

Order forms available through Dementia Services Development Centre www.dementia.com.au

The video, manual and poster cost $50 per box plus $5 GST. An additional $10 is charged for postage and packing.

Australian Government Department of Health and Ageing

Multiple titles

Websites

Australian Government Department of Health and Ageing: http://www.health.gov.au Office for an Ageing Australia: http://www.olderaustralians.gov.au The Ageing and Aged Care Division: http://www.ageing.health.gov.au Seniors Portal: http://www.seniors.gov.au

Nil

36


REFERENCES 1. Australian Institute of Health and Welfare (AIHW). 2002 Older Australia at a Glance. AIHW Cat no. AGE 25. Canberra: AIHW & DOHA. 2. Commonwealth Department of Health and Ageing. 2002 Department of Health and Ageing's Budget Initiative Meeting: Background Paper - 'Ageing'. Canberra: Commonwealth of Australia. 3. Commonwealth Department of Health and Ageing. 2002 Report on Budget Initiatives Meeting "More Aged Care Nurses" Undergraduate Scholarships. Canberra: Commonwealth of Australia. 4. Commonwealth of Australia. 2001 National Strategy for an Ageing Australia: An older Australia, challenges and opportunities for all. Canberra: Commonwealth of Australia. 5. Commonwealth of Australia. 2002 Ageing in Australian Society. Canberra: Commonwealth of Australia. 6. Pearson A, Nay R, Koch S, Ward C, Andrews C, Tucker A. 2001 Australian Aged Care Nursing: A Critical Review of Education, Training, Recruitment and Retention in Residential and Community Settings. National Review of Nursing Education, Web Document, http://www.dest.gov.au/highered/nursing/pubs/aust_aged_care/1.htm, Accessed 2nd June, 2003. 7. Nay R, Bennett M, Garreffa J, Price H, Creber J, Dunning T, et al. 2002 Review of Aged Care Nursing Component of the Undergraduate Nursing Program: Final Report. Melbourne: Nurses Board of Victoria. 8. FitzGerald M, Pincombe J, McCutcheon H, Evans D, Wiechula R, Jordan Z. 2001 An Integrative Systematic Review of Nursing Curricula Undergraduate Clinical Education and Transition Support for New Graduates. University of Adelaide and the Joanna Briggs Institute for Evidence Based Nursing and Midwifery, Web Document, http://www.joannabriggs.edu.au/pubs/systematic_reviews.php, Accessed 30th May, 2003. 9. Department of Employment and Workplace Relations. 2003 National and State Skill Shortages List Australia 2003. Department of Employment and Workplace Relations, Web Document, http://www.workplace.gov.au/WP/Content/Files/WP/EmploymentPublications/NSSFeb20 03.pdf, Accessed 2nd June, 2003. 10. Commonwealth of Australia. 2001 National Review of Nursing Education: Discussion Paper. Canberra: Commonwealth of Australia. 11. Gething L. 1999 Ageism and health care: The challenge for the future. Australasian Journal on Ageing, 18(1):2-3. 12. Burke K. 1998 Can gerontological nursing survive? The Canadian Nurse,:47-48. 13. Fagerberg I, Winblad B, Ekman S. 2000 Influencing aspects in nursing education on Swedish nursing students' choices of first work area as graduated nurses. Journal of Nursing Education, 39(5):211-218. 14. Pearson A, Nay R, Koch S, Rosewarne R. 2002 Recruitment and Retention of Nursing in Residential Aged Care - Final Report. Canberra: Commonwealth Department of Health and Ageing. 15. Courteney V. 2000 Employment in private care homes. Elderly Care, 12(3):28. 16. Australian Nursing Council. 2002 ANC National Nursing Competency Standards. Australian Nursing Council, Web Document, http://www.anci.org.au/competencystandards.htm, Accessed 20th June, 2003.

37


17. Commonwealth of Australia. 2002 National Review of Nursing Education 2002: Our Duty of Care. Commonwealth of Australia, http://www.dest.gov.au/highered/nursing/pubs/duty_of_care/default.html, Accessed 30th May, 2003.

38

Aged Care Core Component Principles Paper  

AGED CARE CORE COMPONENT IN UNDERGRADUATE NURSING CURRICULA PRINCIPLES PAPER Aged Care Core Component in Undergraduate Nursing Curricula Pri...

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you