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August 23 - September 4, 2 0 1 3

Vol. 10 Issue 238

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FEATURES

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The Magical Mystical Calendar Ride

In my experience, there are basically three types of people in this world: those who are sleepwalking, those who are waking up, and those who are awake. Mia Adler Ozair

28 Straight A’s Just as you wouldn’t send your child to school without pencils, paper, or their school uniform, you shouldn’t enter the new year on Rosh HaShana without at leasttrying to start out as a tzaddik.

RABBI JONATHAN GEWIRTZ

MA, LPCC, NCC

THE COMMUNITY LINKS is published biweekly and is distributed free to the Jewish Community of Southern California. THE COMMUNITY LINKS accepts no responsibility for typographical errors or reliability of Kashrus of any advertisers. All submissions become the property of THE COMMUNITY LINKS and may be shortened and/or edited for length and clarity. Articles published in THE COMMUNITY LINKS express the views of the individual writers and may not necessarily represent the views of THE COMMUNITY LINKS. No artwork or any part of the magazine may be reprinted or otherwise duplicated without the written permission of the publisher.

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The Magical, Mystical Calendar Ride MIA ADLER OZAIR, MA, LPCC, NCC

W

ith Rosh Hashanah fast approaching I thought it important to address the holiday in some way. I began to consider how I can incorporate the concepts of Rosh Hashanah with my profession as a therapist and very quickly my vision grew from thinking about this one holiday to consideration of the entire Jewish calendar. I’ve studied for many years about the Jewish holidays with my husband— he fills me in on all of the interesting Gemarot and halachot (commentaries and laws) about the holidays and even feeds me bites of wisdom from more mystical sources here and there. Over the years I’ve pieced together my perception and understanding of the Jewish calendar from these various angles and I’d like to share it with you now as we get ready for a Jewish new year and participate in the process of doing teshuva (correcting our actions) and asking for selicha (forgiveness) from others and from HaShem. Our beloved Jewish calendar is filled with an abundance of observances which include holy days that are observed some through celebration

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and some through restriction. Most of our holidays incorporate elements of prayer as well as feast, and involve time spent with our immediate families as wells as our greater synagogue communities. To quickly run through the majors in the line-up: Rosh Ha-

In my experience, there are basically three types of people in this world: those who are sleepwalking, those who are waking up, and those who are awake. shanah, Yom Kippur, Sukkot/Hoshanah Raba/Simchat Torah, Channuka, Purim, Passover, Shavuot. There are a handful of other less major but nonethe-less meaningful holidays sprinkled throughout the year. Then, of course, above and beyond all holidays is the holiest of days that we are privileged to observe and experience every single

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week: Our Queen, Shabbat. To my knowledge, no other religion in the world has a calendar with such an extensive network of holidays, and with such a highly demanding schedule of observance. To be an observant Jew is not simply a flight of fancy, but rather it is a marathon of involvement meant to tap both our physical and spiritual endurances. If we understand the ultimate goal of why HaShem created this system for us, then we can also understand that it takes years to train for this marathon—in fact, it takes a life time . . . and, if I may be so bold, what follows is my interpretation of why. In my experience, there are basically three types of people in this world: those who are sleep-walking, those who are waking up, and those who are awake. Please allow me to explain. SLEEPWALKERS: Those who are sleep-walking are people who live their daily lives with little conscious awareness of their actions. Behaviors and routines are route, done from memory and habit, and are little more than robotic. Every now and then something

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will “nudge” them to wake up—some bad news, some event of some kind— but in the end they are lulled back to sleep and continue in their original state. In general, the sleep-walkers do not like to take responsibility for their actions and their lives, tend to blame others for their misfortunes, and walk through life in a victimmentality trance that protects them from ever having to grab the reins of their own involvement. Life is twodimensional, like a flat piece of paper or a pencil tracing the same line over and over again. WAKING UP: Those who are waking up are people who have been sleep-walking but that “nudge” that was sent to them actually worked and has begun the process of bringing the conscious mind to the forefront of activity. Slowly the person begins to realize concepts of cause and effect, mindfulness, taking responsibility for one’s actions, learning how to apologize and ask forgiveness, learning how to forgive, and generally begins to put meaning and substance into daily activities. A new perspective is developing and a new depth of understanding how people and places are connected starts to bloom. Feelings emerge and dimensions shift as the soul stirs and demands more. Life is no longer two-dimensional, but the view is still a bit unclear— and often riddled with a combination of joy and pain. AWAKE: People who are awake are not perfect nor do they claim to be, they are simply aware of their imperfections and are willing to take the necessary steps at improving. They take full responsibility for their actions and the state of their lives. When challenges arise they face them head-on and look for ways to grow under the circumstances. Events—

good or bad—are opportunities to reflect and refine. Daily activities are three-dimensional; life becomes somewhat magical as HaShem hints at His presence in even minor daily interactions and happenings. Interactions with others, even a simple hello with the grocery clerk, are moments of sacred contact with another being of G-d’s creation. The impact of individual actions is conceptualized in the scope of humanity as a whole. Our actions—our mitzvot (good deeds) and our aveyrot (wrongdoings, G-d forbid)—are placed in a greater context with an understanding that we do not exist in a vacuum but rather in an elaborate matrix that connects us all. It is in this third state—the state of being awake and conscious—that we can begin to heal ourselves and others, make tikkunim (corrections), understand the cycle of our souls, and appreciate that we each have a curriculum and path to follow and fulfill in this lifetime that no one else can do for us. Are you still with me? I know, that is a lot to take in. And depending upon where you are on this scale of sleep-walking to being fully awake, you may be feeling a range of emotions from utterly annoyed and bored to elated and intrigued. But the real question is: how does all of this relate to the Jewish calendar? This is where things start getting very interesting. For this next part I need visual aids . . . Again, based solely on my own interpretation of what G-d intended for us, I have come to understand the Jewish calendar not as a place-marker for time, but rather as a highly crafted instrument for spiritual refinement and development. If used properly with the proper level of consciousness and awareness, the calendar is a means for fulfilling our purpose and elevating ourselves to the highest levels possible over the course of the

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years we are given to make our corrections and complete our mission. For those who are sleep-walking, the experience of the Jewish calendar looks like this:

A flat, repeating series of events that go around and around each year with little if any change or personal growth experienced. The holiday prayers and activities are the same year after year. If things do change it is more than likely a result of non-action and reactivity as opposed to proactive, intentional measures. There is usually some meaning in the holidays and the focus is centered primarily around the checklist of prayers and “to-do” actions as well as time spent with family and friends enjoying meals together. Of course these things are important and provide a sense of accomplishment, yet it is potentially missing one of the most crucial elements intended for us during this period of time: cheshbone nefesh (literally translated as “calculations of the soul”) and actual tikkune and teshuvah (correction and repentance). For those who are in the process of waking, or who have already awoken, the Jewish calendar experience is more like this: The Jewish calendar, when fully engaged, is a living, dynamic tool meant to elevate us towards our fullest potential with each passing year. Each holiday brings with it its own focus and area of spiritual development so that by the end of one full calendar year we have been given the opportunity to examine every aspect of ourselves in an effort to correct and overcome our personal areas of necessary improvement. For Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur specifically, we are focusing

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on the physical manifestation of our lives—our health, our wealth, our marriages, our children, and our very lives. We are hopefully inscribed in the Book of Life for a prosperous and abundant year to come. In addition to the check list of prayers to say and meals to share, we are meant to truly embody the words that we are saying and to allow for the food (and Rosh Hashana Seder for some) to enrich us physically. Our prayers surround the concept of cheshbone nefesh (“calculations of the soul”) where we, in detail, constructively review our thoughts, actions, and intentions over this past year and literally calculate where we have succeeded and where we have fallen short. Without this process of cheshbone nefesh bringing meaning and depth to our prayers, the prayers are merely words like any other. This is why a person who is actively partaking in this personal review, asking for forgiveness for past actions, and setting clear and honest intentions for the coming year can stand humbly before our King’s court and ask for assistance, mercy, and blessings in the coming year to be elevated through the cycle of the calendar. We are about to enter into a very special time of year where, through our prayers and spiritual work, we have the power to literally change our lives. The truth is, we can do this at any point in the year, however for the Jewish soul this is required course work at this time of year with a final grade given at the completion of the Yamim Noraim (10 Days of Awe between Rosh Hashana and Yom Kippur). The month of Elul is given to us as a study period of 30 days to prepare, review, and move forward with confidence. And we are given until the end of Sukkot to completely get our acts together before our next year is sealed. In this matter, G-d is more than generous giving us ample time to wake up and do our necessary work. It has been my pleasure and honor to write to and for you during this past year. I apologize if anything I have written has offended or upset you as this is never my intention. Wishing each and every one of you a sweet, blessed, and abundant New Year. May you be inscribed in the Book of Life for a healthy, happy, and prosperous year. May it be one that brings you to new heights in your personal experience, your family life, level of wellness, and your closeness to G-d. Shanah Tovah u’metukah!

Mia Adler Ozair, MA, LPCC, NCC is a licensed clinical psychotherapist and educator with a private practice in Beverly Hills, California. Mia is licensed in both California and Illinois and she can be reached through her website at www.bhcounselingcenter.com or followed on Twitter @MiaAdlerOzair.

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True Tallent Ta A

s a young boy growing up in St. Louis, Robert Tanenbaum spent many hours after school at his grandfather’s kosher butcher shop. David Drumlevitz was a kind, patient “zaydeh” and while he worked as a schochet and butcherr, Tanenbaum drew pictures in a small back room. Anything he saaw there, whether it be a broom, a meat slicer or a stack of Jewish nespapers, he drew exactly as he saw them, much to his grandfather’s surprise. At the age of ten, he did a large drawing of Moses and the Teen Commandments without any lessons or formal training. His first formal art classes were ggiiven in college at Washington University, School of Fine Arts, where he won numerous awards for portraiture. Portraits are his specialtyy, some of which include a posthuumous full lenggtth life-size portrait of Howard Hughes for Hughes Aircraft, three CEOs for UPS and two for Texaco Oil. For twenty years, he was one of the top illustrators of movie posters when they were all done by hand, which included such stars as Goldie Hawn, Robert Redford, Mel Brooks, Paul Newman, Bette Midler aan nd John Wayne. The Franklin Mint aan nd John Wayne Trust hired him to do a collectible Plaate series of 24 portraaiits of Wayne which sold over a million copies. As his reputation grew, so did the breadth of his work. He covered advertising assignments with 32 paintings for Levi’s Corporation ads, 35 paaiintings for AT&T T T, 33 National ad campaigns for the NFL and the Collectible market, 150 Portraaiits for the NBA, MLB, NFL, Nascar and Horse racing, ranging from Michaael Jordan to Mickey Mantle, Tiger e Woods, and many others. Tanenbaum always had a dream, from a young age, to create Jewish art and now his dream has become a realityy. Working with his partnerr, Yaakov Shaallman, Taan nenbaum has started to create beautiful oil paaiintings of the rebbees, chassidim, tzad18

dikim, aan nd Jewish scenes unmatched in their richness, true to life likenesses and warmth. “This project has been a wonderful way to connect o my Jewish heritage and utilize my G-d given talent to paint Jewish subjects,” said Tanenbaum. While the originaal oil paintings are not for saale just yet, their new enterprise called “Canvas 26” is selling canvas giclee rints of his Jewish paaintings to the public. They are available exclusively online right now at www w. canvas26.com or at https://www w..faacebook. com/Canvas26.

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This Elul, join over 10,000 women aspiring for change. The Ohr Naava Avinu Malkeinu Event. I

t’s that time of year again. Jewish men and women worldwide are charged with a mission: take stock of your spiritual inventory. Face your flaws; set goals; make resolutions. But in the freneticism of our daily lives, does it really happen? Do we manage to prepare ourselves before meeting the King—or do we stumble into shul on Yomim Noraim empty-handed? Ohr Naava—the legendary worldwide network of Jewish women’s education founded in memory of Naava Katlowitz a”h—has once again stepped up to the plate. Galvanized by Rabbi Zechariah Wallerstein, its beloved founder and director, the innovative organization launched its first Avinu Malkeinu evening of inspiration eight years ago, offering women of the tri-state area a transformative, largescale event of awakening. Since that hugely popular start, attendance at the gathering has shot up each year, and Avinu Malkeinu has been duplicated in nearly every major Jewish community across America—including Los Angeles.

“People were thirsting for this kind of program,” says Avivit Mikhli, Ohr Naava’s Director of Operations. “It provides the impetus—the drive—you need to engage in real change.” This year, the Los Angeles Avinu Malkeinu event will take place on Wednesday, August 28 in the Nessah Synagogue, sponsored l’iluy nishmas Mrs. Avigayil Rechnitz a”h. The legendary wife, mother and community doer who

revived the Ladies Bikur Cholim and spent her days steeped in chessed, Avigayil was the driving force behind LA’s very first Avinu Malkeinu event three years ago—and it’s therefore particularly fitting that the evening of inspiration will be dedicated in her memory. Doors are scheduled to open at 7:30 pm, followed by the program—open to both men and women—at 8:00, featuring two internationally-renowned speakers known for hard-hitting, riveting presentations: Rabbi Zechariah Wallerstein and and Mr. Charlie Harary. “For many women, it’s become a mainstay of their Yom Tov preparation,” says Sarit Rubinstein of the event. “They won’t go into Yom Kippur without it.” Parallel Avinu Malkeinu events are scheduled in Baltimore, Lakewood, Toronto, Monsey, and Yerushalayim, all spotlighting dynamic speakers who masterfully combine charisma and content, including Rabbi Paysach Krohn, Rebbetzin Esther Jungreis, Rabbanit Yemima Mizrachi, Rabbi Moshe Tuvia Lieff, and of course, Rabbi Wallerstein. (With the exception of the Baltimore, LA, and Toronto gatherings, where the entire program is open to men, the events are for women only.) For women in all other locations worldwide, the Brooklyn and Israel programs can be viewed live from the comfort of their own home, or at a satellite location arranged in advance with Ohr Naava. For more information about the event call 323.899.5390 or visit www.ohrnaavaevents.com.


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The Observant Jew

Straight A’s RABBI JONATHAN GEWIRTZ

T

he editor of one of the magazines that publishes my articles asked me for a “Back to School” theme. I thought about it and was hard-pressed to come up with anything. I’m not going to write a humorous perspective about the difficulties of finding all the items teachers dream up that the kids will never use, nor about the tumult of running to ten different stores to save a nickel on #2 pencils, or how all the mothers do a happy dance on the first day of school when they can finally reclaim some peace and quiet and maybe get around to doing two months of cleaning that didn’t happen when they had the kids on their heads. That’s not my style, and I’ve got readers who may not have kids going back to school. I was drawing a blank until I saw a Dvar Torah written by Rabbi Dovid Lewin of Ramat Beit Shemesh in his weekly sheet “Yesodos m’Hasedra,” [You can sign up through www.ahavasyehonoson.com.] It quoted a famous question from R’ Yitzchak Blazer z”l. If on Rosh HaShana the righteous are instantly sealed for good while the wicked are instantly sealed for bad and the ten days between Rosh HaShana and Yom Kippur are just for the people with the same amount of mitzvos and sins, [called a “bainoni,” or in-between person], why do we need to repent? Let’s just do a few more mitzvos, tip the scales in the right direction and move on! The answer floored me. Rabbi Lewin suggested the following: The bainoni’s problem is not that he had the same amount of mitzvos and aveiros. If that were the case then perhaps do-

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ing a few more mitzvos would suffice. The bainoni is faulted, though, for allowing himself to enter Rosh HaShana as a middling fellow. How could he have approached Rosh HaShana without scrambling for a few more mitzvos, more time guarding his tongue, and making efforts to be a tzaddik? For THAT, one must do Teshuva. And that’s when I got the inspiration for my “Back to School” topic. Before a new school year, we go out and buy clothes, knapsacks, pencils, paper and notebooks galore. Why? So our child is prepared for the year ahead, ready to do well, study hard, and get good grades. We want straight A’s, or as close to that as possible, and we want to give our children the tools they need to succeed. I doubt anyone would ever decide, “I’m not getting school supplies this year; let my son use a shopping bag to carry his things.” We don’t figure they can use just pens that we swipe from banks or write notes on pads we get from hotel rooms we’ve visited. You don’t hear people say, “I’m hoping my daughter doesn’t take school too seriously and only picks up about half of what the Morah says.” That’s because we realize that education is important, that we WANT our children to learn, and we WANT them to be excited about the opportunities they have. Not coincidentally, right around the time we’re doing all this preparation for them to be successful students comes Elul, when we are supposed to be preparing

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ourselves to be successful Jews. We should be prepared for the New Year just as we prepare for the new year. Back to School isn’t a crazy tumultuous affair for naught. Perhaps HaShem rigged it to be a clarion call for those of us who didn’t quite get the message of the Shofar that we need to be ready to start the new year on the right foot. Nobody thinks they can start the school year and then pick up supplies over the next week or two. OK, maybe some people do, but I’m guessing the school Social Worker will have a particular interest in their children. Just as you wouldn’t send your child to school without pencils, paper, or their school uniform, you shouldn’t enter the new year on Rosh HaShana without at least trying to start out as a tzaddik. Some parents start shopping for school supplies in August, while others have been shopping since January. It’s the same here. Don’t wait until the last minute to get ready. Start as early as you can, and aim for success. You wish people, “Good Morning,” not, as a slightly-jaded teen might wish someone, “Boker Mediocre.” You want to have

a great day, not one with equal parts of happiness and aggravation. Maybe that’s the lesson we can share in preparation for the Yemei HaDin. Go for the gold, aim to be a tzaddik from day one, and don’t wait until later. Go back to school and see what you can pick up to help yourself get not just a passing score, but straight A’s, on the biggest exam day of the year

Go back to school and see what you can pick up to help yourself get not just a passing score, but straight A’s, on the biggest exam day of the year.

Jonathan Gewirtz is a freelance writer whose work has appeared in publications around the world. He also operates JewishSpeechWriter.com, where you can order a custom-made speech for your next special occasion. HELP PUBLISH THESE ARTICLES! We are currently gearing up for publication of a book of Obervant Jew articles. Reread your favorites; laugh, cry, scratch your head in confusion, just like the very first time! Sponsorship opportunities are available and necessary. For more information, or to sign up for the Migdal Ohr, his weekly PDF Dvar Torah in English, e-mail info@JewishSpeechWriter.com and put Publication Sponsorship or Subscribe in the subject. © 2013 by Jonathan Gewirtz. All rights reserved.

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Jewish Joy YOSSY GOLDMAN

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his week we read about Bikkurim, the first fruit offerings Jewish farmers in the Holy Land were commanded to bring in thanksgiving to G-d for the land and its produce. On a basic level, Bikkurim remind us never to become ungrateful for the things we are blessed with in life. Interestingly, the law only took effect fourteen years after the Jewish people entered the Promised Land. It took seven years to conquer and another seven to apportion the land amongst the twelve tribes of Israel. Only when that process was completed did the law of the first fruits become applicable. But why? Surely there were quite a few tribes who were settled earlier. No doubt, some of the farmers who had received their allotted land had planted and seen the first fruits of their labors. Why then were they not required to show their appreciation immediately by bringing the Bikkurim offering? The Rebbe explains that in commanding this mitzvah the Torah uses the phrase, “And you shall rejoice with all the good that the L-rd your G-d has given you.” In order to be able to fully experience the joy of his own blessings in life, a Jew needs to know that his brothers and sisters have been blessed as well. As long as one Jew knew that there were others who had not yet been settled in their land, he could not be fully content. Since simchah, genuine joy, was a necessary component in the mitzvah of Bikkurim, it could only be fulfilled when everyone had been satisfied. Only then can a Jew experience true simchah, a sincere and genuine joy. Knowing that our friends and cousins are still fighting to conquer the land -- or even not yet enjoying their own share in of land -- somehow takes away the appetite for celebration, even if we personally may have reason to rejoice. One Jew’s satisfaction is not complete when he knows that his brother has not yet been taken care of. I remember reading a story from the diary of the previous 32

Lubavitcher Rebbe, Rabbi Yosef Yitzchak Schneerson, describing his arrest and imprisonment by the Communists in Russia back in 1927. Rabbi Yosef Yitzchak was the heroic spiritual leader of Russian Jewry at the time, and the Soviets sentenced him to death for his religious activities on behalf of his people (miraculously, that sentence was subsequently commuted and the Rebbe was released after three weeks in prison and after serving only nine days of a three-year sentence of exile). Rabbi Yosef Yitzchak was an expressive writer and he described his incarceration and the tortures he suffered at the hands of the sadistic warders in that notorious Soviet prison. One of the prison guards was unbelievably cruel. He himself told the Rebbe that when he would beat and torture a prisoner, he would derive so much pleasure watching the man suffer that he would drink his tea without requiring its usual dose of sugar. Just watching the torture sweetened his tea... Such was a vicious anti-Semite. But a Jew experiences the reverse sensation. He cannot enjoy his tea or his first fruits knowing that his fellow Jew is still unsettled. The sweetest fruits go bitter in our mouths feeling the need of our brethren. So, if you have a job, think of someone who doesn’t. If you are happily married, think of those still searching for their bashert and try making a suitable introduction. And as the holiday season is almost upon us, if you will be privileged enough to be able buy new outfits for your family, spare a thought for those who cannot contemplate such a luxury. And when you plan your festive holiday meals with your family and friends, remember to invite the lonely, the widow and the single parent, too. In this merit, please G-d, we will all be blessed with a joyous and sweet new year. Excerpted from the book From Where I Stand by Rabbi Yossy Goldman, published by KTAV, and available at leading Jewish booksellers or from amazon.com.

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A Glass of Milk “As she prayed profusely before G-d, Eli ... thought her a drunkard. And he said to her: How long shall you be drunken? ... And Chanah replied: No, my lord... I have poured out my soul before the face of G-d... I Samuel 1:12-15

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he chassid Rabbi Shmuel Munkes was traveling to spend Rosh Hashanah with his Rebbe, Rabbi Schneur Zalman of Liadi, when he was stranded in a small shtetl over Shabbat. Soon after Shabbat was over, the village retired to an early bed. Several minutes before midnight, the shamash began making his rounds with a lantern in one hand and a wooden mallet in the other, pounding on the shutters of each home and calling, “Wake up! Wake up! Wake up to the service of the Creator!” The entire village climbed out of bed, dressed swiftly, and hurried to the brightly lit synagogue for Selichot, the solemn prayer that opens the High Holiday season. In the home of Rabbi Shmuel’s host there was much confusion. The entire family had dressed and gathered at the door, prayerbooks in hand, ready to depart for the synagogue; but their prestigious guest had yet to emerge from his room. Finally, the villager knocked softly on Rabbi Shmuel’s door. No response. Slowly he entered the room. To his amazement, he found the chassid sound asleep. “Reb Shmuel, Reb Shmuel,” he urged, shaking his guest awake. “Come quickly. Selichot.” Rabbi Shmuel’s only response was to burrow even more deeply under the covers. “Hurry, Reb Shmuel,” his host persisted. “They’re about to

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begin in the synagogue any moment now.” “Begin what?” asked Rabbi Shmuel, quite obviously annoyed. “It’s the middle of the night. Why are you waking me in the middle of the night?” “What’s the matter with you?” cried the villager. “Tonight is Selichot! A fine Jew you are! Why, if I hadn’t woken you, you would have slept through the entire Selichot!” “Selichot?” asked Rabbi Shmuel. “What is Selichot?” Rabbi Shmuel’s host was beside himself with incredulity. “Are you making a mockery of me? Don’t you know that today was the Shabbat before Rosh Hashanah? Every man, woman and child of the village is now in the synagogue, trembling with trepidation. Soon the baal tefillah will begin chanting the Selichot prayers and the entire community will burst into tears, praying and begging G-d to bless them with a good year...” “So that’s what this commotion is all about?” asked Rabbi Shmuel. “You’re going to the synagogue to pray? What’s so urgent that can’t keep until morning? What are you praying for?” “There’s so much to pray for, Reb Shmuel,” sighed the villager. “I pray that the cow should give enough milk to keep my children healthy. I pray that the oats should fetch a good price on the market this year, for soon I shall have a daughter to marry off. I pray that my horse should not break a leg, G-d forbid, as happened the year before last...” “I don’t understand,” interrupted Rabbi Shmuel. “Since when do grown men wake up in the middle of the night to ask for a bit of milk?”

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THE VILLAGER WAS RIGHT

es as a desire for “a dwelling in the lower realms”--a home in Rabbi Shmuel Munkes wished to impress upon his host the physical world. Why the physical world? Because only that there is more to preparing for Rosh Hashanah than in the physical arena does true choice exist. The world of praying to G-d for one’s material needs. Rosh Hashanah spirit is naturally inclined toward its Divine source. Thus, is the day on which we proclaim G-d king of the universe our service of G-d in the spiritual areas of our lives is a and commit ourselves to obey and serve Him. It is a time “compelled” service, driven by the natural inclinations of for teshuvah, for repenting for one’s sins and failings and our spiritual selves. On the other hand, when we invite G-d resolving never to repeat them. Is this the time to approach into our physical lives, when we serve Him through physical deeds and with the materials of our physical existence, G-d with a “shopping list” of our material needs? And yet, a glance at the Rosh Hashanah prayerbook we are truly choosing to submit to Him, for such servitude shows that it abounds with requests for life, health and goes against the very grain of our physical nature. Thus, one who considers it “unbecoming” to entreat sustenance. For on Rosh Hashanah, the Divine energy that G-d for milk for his children on Rosh Havitalizes all of creation is “renewed” for anrejects a most fundamental aspect other year, and every creature is allotted How, indeed, are shanah of the Divine sovereignty. Crowning G-d its share of life, happiness and wealth. The king means accepting Him as sovereign we to reconcile simple villager was right: Rosh Hashanah in all areas of our lives, including -- and is the time to pray that the cow should the loftiness of primarily -- our most mundane needs and give milk and the oats should fetch a good the day with the requirements. It means acknowledging our price in the marketplace. How, indeed, are we to reconcile the mundane subject of utter dependence upon Him not only for our spiritual nurture, but for the piece of loftiness of the day with the mundane a significant part of bread that sustains our physical existence. subject of a significant part of its prayers? Seen in such a light, our needs are not its prayers? But the very concept of prayer carpersonal needs, and our requirements are ries the same paradox. Prayer is the soul’s not selfish requirements. Yes, we are recommunion with its Creator, its island of heaven in an otherwise earth-bound day. Indeed, the He- questing food, health and wealth; but we are requesting brew word for “prayer,” tefillah, means “attachment,” it be- them as a subject requests them from his king -- as a sering the endeavor to rise above our pedestrian concerns and vant asking his master for the means with which to betconnect to our Divine source. Yet the essence of prayer, ter serve him. We ask for money to observe the mitzvah the foundation upon which its spiritual edifice rests, is our of charity; for strength to build a Sukkah; for food to keep beseeching the Almighty to provide us with our everyday body and soul together so that our physical lives may serve as a “dwelling in the lower realms” that houses His presence needs. The paradox of prayer is magnified a thousand fold in our world. when it comes to the prayers of Rosh Hashanah. On Rosh Hashanah, we are not only standing before G-d; we are crowning Him king, pledging to Him the total abnegation of our own self, and all its desires, to His will. What place is there on this day for the very notion of personal need?

A DWELLING BELOW As discussed at length in our previous Rosh Hashanah essays, only man can make G-d king, for only man possesses the capacity for free choice--without which the very concept of “kingship” is devoid of significance. By freely submitting to the Divine sovereignty on Rosh HaShanah, we reawaken His desire to be king and infuse a new vitality into His involvement with the whole of creation. The Divine desire to be king is also described by our sag-

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The haftarah (reading from the Prophets) for the first day of Rosh Hashanah tells the story of Chanah, the mother of the prophet Samuel: Chanah, the childless wife of Elkanah, came to Shiloh (where the Sanctuary stood before King Solomon built the Holy Temple in Jerusalem) to pray for a child. She prayed to G-d, weeping profusely. And she vowed a vow, and said: “O L-rd of hosts... If You will give Your maidservant a man child, I shall dedicate him to G-d all the days of his life...” Eli, the High Priest at Shiloh, watched as she prayed profusely before G-d... Only her lips moved; her voice was not heard. Eli thought her a drunkard. And he said to her: “How long

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shall you be drunken! Put away your wine!â&#x20AC;? Chanah replied: part. You are standing in the most holy place on earth, Eli â&#x20AC;&#x153;No, my lord... I have drunk neither wine nor strong drink. I was implying, in the place where the Divine presence has chosen to dwell. Is this the place to ask for your personal have poured out my soul before the face of G-d...â&#x20AC;? needs? And if you must ask for them, is Eli blessed her that G-d should grant her request. That year, Chanah gave birth G-dâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s fulďŹ llment of this the place to â&#x20AC;&#x153;pray profusely,â&#x20AC;? with and passion? to a son, whom she named Samuel (â&#x20AC;&#x153;asked Chanahâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s prayer on suchYoutenacity misunderstand me, answered Chafrom G-dâ&#x20AC;?). After weaning him, she fulďŹ lled her vow to dedicate him to the ser- this day encourages nah. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I have poured out my soul before the vice of G-d by bringing him to Shiloh, us to indeed avail face of G-d.â&#x20AC;? I am not merely asking for a son; I am asking for a son that I might â&#x20AC;&#x153;dediwhere he was raised by Eli and the priests. ourselves of the cate him to G-d all the days of his life.â&#x20AC;? Samuel grew up to become one of the Our sages tell us that Samuel was greatest prophets of Israel. awesome moment conceived on Rosh Hashanah. G-dâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s fulThe â&#x20AC;&#x153;Prayer of Chanah,â&#x20AC;? as this readof G-dâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s coronation ďŹ llment of Chanahâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s prayer on this day ing is called, is one of the fundamental biblical sources for the concept of prayer, to approach Him encourages us to indeed avail ourselves moment of G-dâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s coronaand many of the laws of prayer are derived with requests for our oftionthetoawesome approach Him with requests for from it. Indeed, the dialogue between Eli everyday needs. our everyday needs. For on this day, our and Chanah touches on the very essence â&#x20AC;&#x153;personalâ&#x20AC;? needs and our desire to serve of prayer, and of prayer on Rosh Hashaour Master are one and the same. nah in particular. Eliâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s accusation of â&#x20AC;&#x153;drunkennessâ&#x20AC;? can also be understood as a critique of what he saw as an excessive indulgence in the wants and desires of the material self on Chanahâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Courtesy of MeaningfulLife.com

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local residents roam on their daily business. Like in most places in Israel, Haifaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s residents come from all over the world and represent a variety of political, religious and personal outlooks on life. This is especially evident in the corridors of Haifaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s largest hospital, Rambam Health Care Campus -- a microcosm of the city it is nestled in. At Rambam, patients and staďŹ&#x20AC; come from all walks of life. As the largest full-service facility in Northern Israel, it is the major treatment hospital with state-of-the-art tools for surgery and revolutionary innovations to care for the entire region. Its practitioners provide the utmost attention to patients, moving the institution to the status of an international frontrunner in medical research and development.

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According to 2009 census data, more than 2,130,000 people live within Rambam’s regional span. At least 1,175,000 of these people are Jewish, but 655,000 are Muslim, 123,000 are Christian, 123,000 are Druze and another 75,000 are not affiliated with a religion.

“Rambam is committed to spreading universal Jewish values by delivering the highest standards of health care for everyone.” — Prof. Rafi Beyar Specifically at Rambam, employees represent the different populations of Northern Israel and bring a diverse set of perspectives and experiences to treat patients, indiscriminately, within the hospital’s walls. Of the hospital’s 4,600 employees in 2012, 80 percent were Jewish, 9 percent were Muslim, 7 percent were Christian and 1 percent was Druze, according to the hospital’s 2012 annual report. “Rambam is committed to spreading universal Jewish values by delivering the highest standards of health care for everyone,” said Prof. Rafi Beyar, CEO and director general of the Rambam Health Care Campus. “We treat all of Israel’s residents, regardless of religion or background, with thorough and compassionate care,” Beyar explained. “At Rambam, developing cutting edge innovations and advancing medical research are also among our top priorities and we have many research groups working on population-specific diseases.” Despite the negative reputation of Israel among international news agencies, this June the Israeli Health Ministry announced an initiative that is yet another step toward complete equality within the health care system. The law now requires that all Israeli hospitals open Muslim prayer rooms within the next 18 months, in response to a petition submitted to the High Court. Both Rambam in Haifa and Soroka University Hospital in Beer Sheva have Muslim prayer rooms already in use, while all of the other hospitals will need to allocate space on site to meet the national requirement. Meanwhile, as tensions have been brewing on the northern front, Israel has reaffirmed its commitment to humanitarian aid. Some 100 wounded Syrians have crossed into Israel for health care since the fighting began in 2011. Many Syrians are treated at Ziv Medical Center in Safed, while others are treated by an Israeli Defense Forces field hospital in the Golan. According to Israeli news sources, a small number of more severe cases are transferred to larger hospitals, like Rambam, though government and hospital officials prefers to keep these events quiet for security reasons.

This is not an exceptionally unique situation for Israeli hospitals. While rockets from Gaza fell into Southern Israel last fall, pediatricians at Rambam were busy treating four Gazan children who were awaiting kidney transplantation and had severe complications from organ failure. Mahdi Tarabia, head nurse at the pediatric nephrology unit, said the children received “lifesaving” treatment while at Rambam. “The hemodialysis treatment that these children were given before their arrival at Rambam was associated with medical complications, resulting in a worsening of their condition and many hospitalizations,” he explained. “Now [after care at Rambam], these families have the skills to administer peritoneal dialysis, which represents a significant improvement in the children’s circumstances and will enable them to function almost normally.” Tarabia added that there was great cooperation between the staff at Rambam and the local medical authorities in Gaza. In February, a 27-year-old man from Nablus was transported to Hadassah Medical Center in Jerusalem, following clashes between Palestinians, Israeli residents and IDF soldiers. Originally treated in a Nablus hospital, the man’s condition, caused from his severe gunshot wounds, deteriorated significantly and doctors suggested he get more sophisticated care at Hadassah. However, the patient needed to be transferred with an accompanying physician to monitor his anesthetics and respirator. Palestinian doctors did not have access to the appropriate equipment and called upon Hadassah for assistance. The situation got more complicated due to security restrictions for travel within Palestinian-controlled areas of the West Bank. Dr. Micha Shamir, a senior Hadassah anesthesiologist, agreed to do the transfer. First, Shamir was driven and escorted by Palestinian security personnel to the Nablus hospital. The patient was put into a Palestinian ambulance and met Shamir prior to crossing a checkpoint outside of Nablus, where an Israeli Air Force helicopter flew them to Hadassah’s intensive care unit in Ein Kerem.

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Such situations are not uncommon for medical professionals in Israel, according to Dr. Aaron Krom, a resident in anaesthesiology and intensive care at Hadassah’s Ein Kerem facility. “On the simplest level, by working side by side with Palestinians from the West Bank in the hospital, I’ve gotten to build relationships with people who I would not usually meet or talk to,” said Krom, who studied at Oxford and made aliyah from England last August. “One of the most fascinating aspects of working in a multicultural team is the ability for the hospital to treat everyone equally and yet benefit from their differences,” he said. “On the one hand, we rarely discuss politics, and doctors from all different backgrounds care for Jewish and Arab patients the same. On the other hand, a hospital policy arranges that Jewish employees provide more coverage during Muslim festivals so that Muslims can take leave, and likewise, Muslim physicians cover patients during Jewish holidays for Jewish employees to take vacation.” Cooperation is key in medicine, and there are countless stories of Israelis ignoring religion or race for the sake of saving a life and giving top health care. One such story occurred in May, when physicians at Rambam performed Israel’s first-ever “crossover kidney transplant.” In this procedure, one patient’s family member donates a kidney to another recipient whose relative donates a kidney in return to the first patient. It is a revolutionary alternative transplant surgery when no blood relative is a suitable match for donation. Haifa residents Muhammad Akrat, 32, and David Ben-Yair, 57, had never met before they shared a hospital room following a kidney transplant. In a three-hour surgery, Akrat’s wife Rasha gave her kidney to Ben-Yair, and in return, her husband received a kidney from Ben Yair’s son Shmuel. “Whoever saves a life is sacred, whether Jewish or Arab. G-d’s blessing will prevail,” said Muhammed Akrat about this extraordinary procedure. This cooperation and commitment to providing aid reaches the burgeoning field of medical research. In conjunction with last year’s Ramadan holiday, Prof. Naim Shehadeh, director of Rambam’s pediatric unit and the pediatric diabetes and obesity clinic, released new research that found that fasting spurs health complications among diabetics. In his clinical study of patients using three types of insulin, Prof. Shehadeh found that the risk of health complications, such as dizziness, fatigue and low sugar levels, among diabetics is 7.5 times higher during the fast itself than during the non-fast period. This research has obvious implications for the Jews as well, given the occurrence of religious fast days throughout the year. Overall, Israeli physicians, researchers and caregivers rec-

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ognize that all residents – no matter what beliefs they hold, where they live and what their socioeconomic status is – have shared experiences. Even the worst of situations provide a platform for strangers to join together.

Overall, Israeli physicians, researchers and caregivers recognize that all residents – no matter what beliefs they hold, where they live and what their socioeconomic status is – have shared experiences. As a testament to Israel’s integrity and compassion, children battling cancer are given respite and support among their peers and with the help of social workers. At the Akko Beach Hotel, the not-for-profit organization To Fight Together hosted 17 children diagnosed with cancer and receiving treatment at Rambam for a therapeutic weekend camp. In the program were workshops on issues, such as self image, fears, future planning, intimacy and interpersonal relationships, as well as fun activities. The staff, comprised of social workers from Rambam’s pediatric hematology-oncology department, remarked how the group of Jews and Arabs between ages 11 and 20 became so cohesive by the end of the weekend, and that they are sure that this program forged relationships among the participants. These stories are just a sampling of what leaders in Israeli health care are doing to positively impact the country’s residents and its sometimes hostile neighbors. In a time when the news is constantly criticizing Israel, these leaders are shining light on how the country’s roots in the Jewish values of compassion, justice and integrity percolate the medical field. Tikkun olam – the Torah-based principle of repairing the world – and pikuach nefesh – saving a life -- reach hospital wards and research laboratories both in times of crisis and calm.

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The Song that Testifies NAFTALI SILBERBERG

“And I will surely hide My face on that day . . . So now, write this song for yourself and teach it to the Children ofIsrael, place it in their mouth, so that this song shall be for Me as a witness regarding the Children of Israel” —Deuteronomy 31:18-19.

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e inhabit a world where nothing is as it superficially seems, where the consciousness of every entity is at odds with its essence and its raison d’etre. The most basic concern of every species and every individual entity is its own preservation. Satisfying its needs and wants naturally trumps all other considerations. In truth, however, “All that the Holy One, blessed be He, created in His world, He created solely for His glory” (Ethics 6:11). Every creation is a cog in G-d’s master plan, whose objective is to bring glory to the Creator. The Torah and the Jew share a unique bond because they both are exceptions to this rule. The Torah is G-d’s missive to this world; it has no personal selfish agenda. Its every word clearly expresses its purpose -- serving the Creator. And the Jew? Thousands of years of anti-Semitism, humiliation, persecution and pogroms quickly dispel the notion that self-preservation is his primary motivation. Within the heart of every Jew blazes a divine soul which recognizes that serving G-d is its ultimate calling, and all personal needs, even life itself, is of secondary importance. This relationship between the Jew and Torah expresses itself in the deep love and respect the Jew has for Torah. We are now

in the High Holiday season, when many Jews who don’t step foot in a house of worship throughout the year pay a visit to their synagogue. Pay attention to these precious Jews as the Torah is taken out of the Ark and passes their way. Watch as they lovingly and reverently kiss its velvet cover. The past year’s Saturdays spent on the golf course... the non-kosher restaurants... the non-Jewish spouse... None of these matter at this moment. Right now, the Jewish soul has found its holy counterpart, and lovingly acknowledges this truth. “And I will surely hide My face on that day.” G-d told Moses that the day would come when He would hide His face, when His presence and providence would be utterly concealed. This is true in a global sense, but as is the case with every word of the Torah, it is true in a personal sense as well. There will come a time when G-d’s face which is within every one of His children will be hidden; when skeptics will doubt the very existence of a Jewish soul. “So now, write this song for yourself . . . so that this song shall be for Me as a witness regarding the Children of Israel” Write a Torah scroll. See how the Jew naturally reveres it. The testimony is incontrovertible. The Jewish soul still burns bright within the hearts of the progeny of Abraham. “Teach it to the Children of Israel, place it in their mouth.” Now that the Jew’s relationship with G-d and Torah has been established, it is time to live accordingly. The adoration for Torah should not be relegated to the High Holidays. Study Torah and place it in your mouth. Your lifestyle will then be in harmony with your truest self. Courtesy of www.chabad.org.


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Touro-LA T ouro-LA Corner Corner

“Never Abandoned”— “Never Abandoned”— The Educational Educationaall Philosophy ooff T oouro Philosophy Touro RABBI HA R OLD RABINOWITZ

T

he Jewish community is quite accustomed to there being various ways of studyingg—this is certainly the case with regard to the basic methods used to understand and interpret the text of a subject in Talmud,, and in the methodology used to derive from that text the Halachah in any given instance. True, we gen e erally do not derive Halachah directly from the Talmudic discussion, any more that we would consider it proper to derive Halachah from some interpretation of the text of of the Torah. “Ayn Dorsshim Taaima diirectly from D’kra”—“we do not interpret [and derive Halachah] d the nuances of langgu uage of the Posuk—the text of the Torah.”” We ua rely on a chain of interpretive tradition in which Sagees operating over the course of centuries h haave first mastered to a very high degree the discussion in the Talmud, and then mastered what succeediing generations of Rabbinic interpreters haave made of those texts, deriving codes of behaavior that show its quintessence—its source—ffrom that history of Halachic discourse. Coming to a conclusion with regard to Halachic behaavior without strict and devoted mastery and adherence to the chain of tradition in analysis of this literature would be as unthinkable as—as making up the rules out of whole cloth or on the basis of what seems reasonable to any particular individual at any moment. Of course, in our time, there is no lack of people cooking up reasons for the Mitzvos that they derive from their own mentality and their own reasoning—or from thin air! But why is that objectionable? Isn’t there a long and revered tradiition of understanding the reasons for the Mitzvos? There is, in fact a famous dispute regarding a Mitzvah about which we just read in Parshas Ki Tei e tzei, and this diispute revolves around the question, what is the reason for this Mitzvah? The Mitzvah is “Shilu’ach HaKaan” (Devarim 22:6–7)—the requirement to send away a mother bird from a nest when taking the offspring (for the purpose of eating them)—and the dispute is between the Rambam (Maimonides) and the Ramban (Nachmanides): The Rambam says the reason is to show mercy on the mother bird and spare her the pain of watching her offspring being taken e from herr. The Ramban asks, if that were the reason, then we would haave been prohibited from eating the birds—mother or

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chick—in the first place. (Besides, won’t the mother feel the pain of losing her chicks when she returns to the nest later and finds them gone?) The Ramban concludes that the reason for the Mitzvah is not to show mercy for the mother bird, but to inculcate in us a quality of mercy by consideringg,, if only momentarily, the angguish of the mother bird. Now out of this discussion, one might derive all sorts of conclusions about the Torah’s attitude toward the rights of animals and the requirement to show them mercy and treat them humanely. In our societyy, such conclusions would be easy to make and promote; mode dern humanity has developed a sensitivity to this subject that may strike some as hypocritical (given the abysmal way people treat each other), even as it seems to others enlightened and spiritually sensitive. Philosophers and theologians attuned to the values of our times that resonate with the values implicit in the Mitzvah of Shilu’ach HaKan might well jump to all sorts of directives and prescriptions for behaavior based on nothing more than personal sensibilities about how animals ought to be treated. But that’s not how Halachah works. The Halacha developes through the painstaking analysis of what the Poskim—the rabbinic adjudicators of proper behaavior—haave determined over the course of geenerations and centuries in the careful application of previous Halachic decisions to new and d novel situations. Reason and d the application of personal opinion, philosophy and ethical values may be instructive and illuminating—but they are not deecisive in determining how we are to behaave. In spite of all the importance the modern world places on individual autonomy and the authority of each person to “do his own thing” (a phrase that I realize dates me a bit), Jewish learning follows its own historical course—uninterrupted for thousands of years; adheres to its own standards—standards that can stand up to those of any discipline of any culture known; and makes its own determinations (a.k.a. Piskei Halachah) according to the ongoing discussion and argumentation within its own channels

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and within (and this is important) its own halls—halls known as Yeshivos. In the Bais Midrash at Touro College-Los Angeles, there’s a poster that proclaims, “From the earliest days of our ancestors,” the poster reads (in Hebrew), “the Jewish People have never abandoned [lo azva] the institution of the yeshiva—the hall of study of Torah and the Halachah.” This statement (attributed in the Gemara, Kiddushin, 32a, to Rabbi Chama, son of Rabbi Chanina), expresses the belief that throughout its history—from the days of the Patriarchs to the bondage of Egypt and in all subsequent places and circumstances in which the Jewish People have found themselves, they have established and availed themselves of the institution of the yeshiva: the hall of study in which scholars, students and sages all study together, engrossed in early-morning to late-night argumentation and analysis dedicated to understanding and integrating the teachings and rulings of the Torah. The yeshiva is a very different institution than an academy or a college: the student is as interested in partaking in the ongoing chain of tradition and devoted to establishing an ongoing personal conversation and a participatory argumentation with people—people with specific names, authors of specific works, sages from particular other Yeshivos who have engaged in the same sort of learning and spiritual development. The yeshiva student is interested in the give-and-take as it winds its way through generations of minds and spirits—not in simply knowing the right textbook answer for the purpose of blackening a box on a standardized test. The method (which still admits many different styles of learning) calls for an understanding that begins with the text of the Torah and follows an idea’s development over the course of centuries. One might have thought that this method is extremely timeconsuming and lengthy—couldn’t a student come away with a great deal more knowledge by using a “cut-to-the-chase” course of study that leaves out all the detailed analysis of all the various rivers of thought that have been explored and traveled in the course of this centuries-long trek? It will probably surprise many, in fact, to discover that the Halachic values regarding proper treatment of the environment and humane treatment of animals is in the Halachic literature eons ahead of the current prevailing values in this area, even by animal-rights activists! The prevailing Halachic opinions in this area derive from the landmark writings of the Chasam Sofer (Rabbi Moses Schreiber, 1762–1839), which influenced Rabbinic authorities right up to and beyond Rav Moshe Feinstein, zt”l, the pre-eminent authority of the late 20th century, who criticized the treatment of animals in Kosher slaughterhouses to the extent of banning veal when produced in inhuman conditions. (That much of Jewry—like the world in which we live— ignores Rav Moshe’s opinions in this area, even as it reveres and follows his opinions in other areas, is not Rav Moshe’s fault; the

fault, dear Burich, is with us.) This belief in the authority, independence and brilliance of the yeshiva environment as a means of determining correct method is what lies at the heart of the structure and commitment of Touro College—in Los Angeles. and in all the other branches of Touro University around the world. Instead of diluting the study of Torah by applying secular values and methods, Touro encourages study by young men in Yeshivos and young women in advanced Mechonim institutions dedicated to advanced and intense Jewish learning— while still affording them an accredited and quality college education that qualifies them for further professional study or for the working world in general. It does this by giving opportunities and credit for time spent immersed in Torah study in Yeshivos in Israel and here in the United States—particularly of late in Los Angeles. Yes, it will offer some courses in which some of the tools of modern academia and secular scholarship will help illuminate problems and issues in Jewish areas of interest: archaeology will be used to explain passages of the Bible; mathematics and game theory will be used to analyze and understand concepts and rulings in business ethics; the tenets of human psychology will be brought to bear on concepts of personal responsibility and issues of the human soul. But in all these instances, the source of the Jewish content of the course will be the world of the Yeshiva—and not the halls of the university. In its ninth year in Los Angeles, and today part of a world-wide university system that proudly includes five medical schools and a host of graduate and professional institutions that trains people in many profession areas in health, law, business, and the professions Touro places itself in service to both the community of young men and women students of Los Angeles and Southern California, and to the pillars of Jewish learning throughout the ages: it has never abandoned the Yeshiva as the source of that learning.

Touro places itself in service to both the community of young men and women students of Los Angeles and Southern California, and to the pillars of Jewish learning throughout the ages.

“Touro-LA Corner” is edited by Rabbi Harold Rabinowitz, a member of the TCLA Faculty. Rabbi Rabinowitz, a product of Yeshiva Torah Voda’ath and of Yeshiva University, where he was able (“zocheh”) to study with Rabbi Joseph B. Soloveitchik, zt”l, for a decade; served as the Rabbi of Cong. Beth Israel of Malden, Massachusetts, in the 1970s and translated the work of the eminent Yiddish writer, the late Chaim Grade, culminating in a work which was awarded the First Runner-up Citation for the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction. He has served as a member of the Massachusetts Beth Din; Executive Editor of several large publishing houses, including The Jewish Publication Society and McGraw-Hill; Edi torial Director of his own Judaica imprint at Macmillan Publishing; and President of The Reference Works/BookWorks, a leading book producer where he has produced over 60 titles for major trade publishers, nearly a dozen under his authorship.

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Dear Community, We thank you for working with Aquabe Swim school. We do appreciate your business and we are looking forward to continue our work with you in the next year..

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JEWISH APPLE CAKE Times Prep Time : 45 min Cook Time : 1 hour Ready Time : 1 hour, 45 min Ingredients 5 medium Macintosh Apples 6 tablespoons sugar 4 teaspoons cinnamon Mix well and set aside

3 cups flour, all purpose 3 teaspoons baking powder

Servings 12

2 cups white sugar 1 cup oil 4 large eggs 1/4 cup orange juice 2 1/2 teaspoons real vanilla 1/2 cup walnuts chopped

Directions Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Grease a angel food pan or bundt pan. Peel, core and chop apples into chunks. Toss with cinnamon and sugar and set aside. Stir together flour, baking powder and salt in a large mixing bowl. In a separate bowl, whisk together oil, orange juice, sugar and vanilla. Mix wet ingredients into the dry ones, then add eggs, one at a time. Scrape down the bowl to ensure all ingredients are incorporated.

Pour half of batter into prepared pan. Spread half of apples over it. Pour the remaining batter over the apples and arrange the remaining apples on top. Bake for about 1 hour, or until a tester comes out clean. Cool on rack and then plate up. Serve with whipped cream and confectioners sugar dusted on top. Better the second day after being wrapped well. Reprinted with permission from www.joyofkosher.com.

TRIPLE A SALAD  ASPARAGUS AND APPLES Times Ready Time : .5 hour Ingredients 1/2 cup honey 1/2 cup apple cider vinegar 1 small purple onion, peeled and sliced (This gives the salad dressing a lovely pink tinge) 1/2 tsp dry mustard powder 1/2 tsp salt 1 cup vegetable oil 2 large apples (I use Pink Lady) 8 0z fresh asparagus, cut into 1 inch slices 14 0z baby spinach (any other spinach is too bitter) 2 avocado pears, peeled and sliced 1/2 cup dried cranberries

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Directions Combine the honey, vinegar, onion, mustard, salt and oil in a glass bowl. Blend with a hand blender or in a food processor for about 2 minutes until well combined. Check for sweetness – you may prefer to add a little more honey. Chop up the apples (skin on) and immediately place them into the honey dressing to prevent them from going brown. Place the cut asparagus in a separate bowl and cover with boiling water. Count to 10 and then discard the boiling water and immediately fill the bowl with ice-cold water. Wait 10 seconds and discard that too. Place the spinach on a platter, followed by a layer of asparagus, half the apples in honey dressing, all the avocado and the other half of the apples. Finally, top with the cranberries. Reprinted with permission from www.joyofkosher.com. August 23, 2013• 323-965-1544 •

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P POMEGRANATE OMEGRANATE B BARBECUE ARBECUE CHI CHICKEN CKEN T imes Times Prep Time : 20 min Cook Time : 40 min Ready Time : 1 hour S ervings Servings 6 Ingredients Ingredients 2 tablespoons olive oil 8 garlic cloves, thinly sliced 2 onions, chopped 1 cup ketchup 2 tablespoons mustard (yellow or Dijon) ¼ cup pomegranate molasses 2 tablespoons honey ½ teaspoon cinnamon Salt and pepperr, to taste 2 chickens, cut up into eighths Pomegranate seeds, for o garnish

COOKING TIP: If you don’t have pomegranate molasses, you can substitute 3 tablespoons apple cider vinegar plus 1 tablespoon pomegranate syrup. Directions D irections Preheat the oven to 425° F. Heat the olive oil in a large, heavy saucepan. Sauté the garlic slices until golden brown. Remove with a slotted spoon and set aside. Sauté the chopped onions in saucepan until translucent. Add the ketchup, mustard, pomegranate molasses, and honey to the onions. Add the cooked garlic. Mix the sauce well and bring to a boil. Stir occasionally until thickened.

Lay out the chicken pieces in a roasting pan in a single layer and season with salt and pepperr. Thickly brush each piece of chicken with the pomegranate barbecue sauce. Cook in preheated oven n for o 30–40 minutes until juices run clear when pierced with a kniffe, or until a meat thermometer registers 160° F. Garnish with the pomegranate seeds. Reprinted R eprinted with with permission permission from from www www.joyofkosher.com. w.joyoffkkosher.com.

! r e d n i Rem

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DoubleTake

Can you spot the differences in these two pictures? Super fun end of Summer Camp this week at A TIME FOR DANCE's Summer Arts Experience! A Time for Dance is kicking off our 10th season! Join our open house celebration Sunday September 1 at 7269Beverly Blvd. and receive free registration! Offering ballet, tap, gymnastics, zumba, hip hop, acting workshop for girls and women. 3 conveient studio locations. For a full schedule of classes or to register online go to www.atime4dance.com. Classes begin Sept. 3!

Have your picture double taked! Please email us your pictures to Info@communitylinks.info

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CHANGES KEEP SCORE

qqq q qqq q qq 1. A paintbrush in front of girl in blue shirt is missing. 2. The Counselor’s watch is missing. 3. The desk in the background now has an extra leg. 4. The big brush with red handle on table - the bristles are now blue. 5. A black line is missing from the girl’s orange shirt. 6. A paintbrush handle on table at bottom of picture was added. 7. There is now aa fourth slat on the chair. 8. The girl with the blue shirt now has a tree on her picture. 9. There are now green brush strokes on the painting where no one is sitting. 10. There's a record under the table on the floor in the background. 78

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BRIS - ,hr c

MOHEL

Traditional Ritual Circumcision Rabbi Nachman B. Kreiman Certified Mohel - vjnun kvun

~ Home: 323.934.9329 Cell: 323.896.5098 www.expertmohel.com

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NOW HIRING

NY CAR SERVICE

Looking for additional income? Want a career? Work from home online. We train you. Please visit www.careerunlimited.org for more information.

Coming to New York or New Jersey? Prompt & reliable Shomer Shabbos car service available for pickups at airports, simcha halls, Lakewood, etc. Late night & early morning service available.

VIDEO & PHOTOGRAPHY

Please call: Harry Schonfeld 917-776-6260

Shaul video & photography 323-3564102 cell: 323-9316832 Bar & Bat Mitvah, Simchas events. 3 hours --$390

Certified Personal Trainer for Women only, individual or groups. For more info please contactSarit: 424-653-8705 or email Sarit1911@hotmail.com

-1438-

DANCE A Time for Dance is kicking off our 10th season! Join our open house celebration Sunday September 1 at 7269 Beverly Blvd. and receive free registration! Offering ballet, tap, gymnastics, zumba, hip hop, acting workshop for girls and women. 3 conveient studio locations. For a full schedule of classes or to register online go to www.atime4dance.com. Classes begin September 3.

MUSIC BY MENDEL SIMONS 310-595-5490 LIVE@ MUSICBYMENDEL.COM

Yosef Y. Shagalov

Are you looking for a babysitter who you can trust with patience and not be worried for hours to care of your dear children?Full Day and Extended hours available, Kosher & healthy snacks.Beautiful & Spacious outdoor play area. Call Roya G. 310999-2971.1701 S. Bedford St.

Traveling Notary Public & Home Signing Agent.

Orthodox woman available to watch your children full time or part-time hours, at your location. Excel. references. 323-651-9389

August 23, 2013• 323-965-1544 •

WIG & HAIR STYLIST Wig & hair stylist specializing in coloring, cutting and styling wigs. Call Lilly 323-930-1240 or 818430-5876

NOTARY

BABYSITTER

BABYSITTER

CERTIFIED PERSONAL TRAINER

Cell:(323)934-7095 email: yys770@aol.com

Abi Notaries Public Your place/ Our place 24/6!! No appointment need it!! (Eng. Spanish-French-ItalianYiddish-Portuguese-Hebrew). 524 N. La Brea Ave Los Angeles, CA 90036 323-930-0444 (office) 323-646-2356 (Cell/after hours)

STUDIOFOR RENT Studio unit now available. Full Bathroom, Kitchen, and Closet. Just renovated, painted and new floors. Non-smoker (everywhere) Looking for someone who is Shomer Shabbos. Please call 310-999-2971

ROOM WANTED Single religious lady looking for room to rent in the Pico-Robertson/West LA area. With bathroom or use of bathroom. Please call 818-344-4887

• www.thejewishlink.com • info@communitylinks.info


PRO AUTO

BODY SHOP ONE PHONE CALL DOES IT ALL

REP PAIR A x BODY CAR RENT TAL A x CAR LEASING 2 5419 W Pico Blvd Los Angeles, CA

920 S La La Brea Av Ave Los Angeles, CA

323-954-1414

323-932-8862

Y YORAM, O R A M, A AVIV VIV A AND ND A AMIR MIR C COHEN OHEN

August 23, 2013 • 323-965-1544 • info@communitylinks.info • www.thejewishlink.com

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August 23, 2013• 323-965-1544 •

• www.thejewishlink.com • info@communitylinks.info


August 23, 2013 • 323-965-1544 • info@communitylinks.info • www.thejewishlink.com

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Issue 238 virtual  

Rosh Hashana Edition

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