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Table of Contents

CommunityLink.com

1 800-455-5600

WHAT’S INSIDE

production vp of production operations Amanda White director of publication design Kelly Friederich

copy consultant Jay Nehrkorn photography Lenore Hotchkiss

managing editor Laura Wilcoxen

lead design Kacey Wolters

copywriting Mark Allen Amanda Knoles

website creation & support Josh Chandler director of media purchasing Diana Vaughn

proofreader Christina Reese

Welcome.. ......................................................................1

photography coordinator/

business development director of business development George Prudhomme

customer service director Kathy Risley

director of outside sales Debbie Moss

customer service representative Angela Kelley

business development manager Bonnie Ebers

Message From the President

Community Profile......................................................2 A Mountain Paradise

marketing consultant Sean Corrigan

Demographics..............................................................3

advertising ad design Mindy Brock Josh Mueller Kacey Wolters

ad research Mary Kopshever Amy SchwartzkoPf ad traffic Carol Smith

administrative support administrative support Kathy Hagene Carol Smith

human resources assistant Teresa Craig mailroom technician Melinda Bowlin

account support Terri Ahner Tricia Cannedy

A Digital Portrait of Woodland Park

Business & Commerce.. ...............................................4 A Great Place To Do Business

Health Care..................................................................6 Quality Care With a Vision

information technology

Education.. ....................................................................9

publishing systems specialist Christopher Miller

A High-Flying Future

executive leadership chairman and founder Craig Williams

chief financial officer Rhonda Harsy

ABOUT   This book is published by CommunityLink and distributed through the Greater Woodland Park Chamber of Commerce. For advertising information or questions or comments about this book, contact PMS Color 7407 PC PMS at Color800-455-5600 4485 PC CommunityLink or by e-mail at PMS Color 349 PC info@CommunityLink.com.

Tourism & Recreation...............................................12 Pikes Peak Playground

Government.. ..............................................................18 Embracing Opportunities & Challenges

Real Estate.................................................................20 The Greater

Woodland Park

Chamber of Commerce

FOR INFORMATION    Greater Woodland Park Chamber Fonts Used: of Commerce,Didot 210Italic East Midland Ave., Woodland Park, Copperplate Light CO 80866-9022, Telephone 800-551-7886, Fax 719-687-9885, www.woodlandparkchamber.com

© 2012 Craig Williams Creative, Inc., 4742 Holts Prairie Road, Post Office Box 306, Pinckneyville, IL 62274-0306, 618-357-8653. All rights reserved. No portion of this book may be reproduced without the expressed written consent of the publisher.

Visit Woodland Park Online

www.communitylink.com/woodland-park-colorado

Find Your Dream Home in Teller County

Worship.......................................................................22 Communities of Service

Arts & Culture...........................................................24 Let Us Entertain You

Calendar of Events..................................................28 What’s Going On

Close...........................................................................30 The Wonders of Woodland Park and Teller County

Directory of Display Advertisers.........................32 Please Support These Valued Members

Preferred Business Listings..................................33 Thank You For Your Support! The Greater Woodland Park Chamber of Commerce


Welcome

MESSAGE FROM THE PRESIDENT

O

n behalf of the residents of Teller County and the Greater Woodland Park Chamber of Commerce, I would like to welcome you to our “piece of heaven”. We thank you for your interest in our community and region. In the following pages you will learn of a place we call home. We have prepared this publication to offer you a glimpse of Woodland Park/Teller County and all we have to offer. Our members and our community leaders believe in this region and have made a considerable investment in it as you will soon discover throughout this book. Teller County is a region with proximity to a major metropolitan area, a dedicated workforce and a quality of life that is second to none. We truly are a base camp for tourists seeking the best in hospitality amenities of the area. You can enjoy the natural splendors of Colorado and the Rocky Mountains right here in Teller County. With the Pike National Forest area abundant within the boundaries of Teller County, there is no lack of outdoor activity for family and friends – no matter what time of year. At an elevation of 8,465 feet, the city of Woodland Park adopted a new tag line incorporating the word “Elevate”. True to our history – they continue the utilization of “City Above the Clouds” as well. We experience over 300+ days of sunshine a year. Cripple Creek serves as the county seat for Teller County and is home to many casinos as well. Just outside of Victor is one of the largest gold mining operations in our Country. The Cripple Creek & Victor Gold Mine is a true “gem” for our region. Scattered throughout Teller County we have other pastoral communities, each with its own character and history. Although Teller County is just 557 square miles and has a population of approximately 24,000, we host within our borders thriving businesses, proactive governments, modern amenities, excellent schools, a state of the art hospital and extensive cultural heritage. Indeed, Teller County has much to offer. You will find a kindred spirit when you arrive that will entice you to spend time visiting with the locals, exploring our pristine outdoor beauty and wondering how soon you can relocate here. Whatever your interest, the Greater Woodland Park Chamber of Commerce believes you will find the Teller County region to be a vibrant backdrop for business, education or culture, making it the perfect place to live, work and raise a family. I invite you to stop by and chat with us when you’re in the area. Let us help you make the most out of your exploration of Woodland Park and the Teller County region.

Debbie Miller, IOM, ACE President Greater Woodland Park Chamber of Commerce

Armentrout Construction LLC Septic Systems, Water Lines, Road Work All Types of Back Hoe Work Dozer and Grader Work

Free Estimates P.O. Box 2081 Woodland Park, CO 80866

Kayo Armentrout (719) 687-0502

EMERGENCY PHONE NUMBERS WOODLAND PARK • 687-9277 OR Call Toll Free 1-800-332-9540 www.woodlandparkchamber.com

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Community Profile

A Mountain Paradise

S

urrounded by miles of picturesque forest and boasting over 300 days of sunshine each year, Woodland Park and the Teller County region is both a popular yearround destination for outdoor recreation and a thriving center of commerce. The largest city in Teller County combines irresistible small-town charm with comfortable summers, mild winters, and amenities that enhance the quality of life for residents and visitors. With a population of over 7,200, it is a family-friendly city with a workforce with a broad range of specialties, including tourism, mining, construction, education/health/social services, retail, real estate, and light manufacturing. Situated along U.S. Highway 24 and State Highway 67, Woodland Park is located just 18 miles west of Colorado Springs. Known as a bedroom community, it has evolved into a destination as well, and it’s the perfect base for exploring nearby attractions like Pikes Peak, Mueller State Park, and the Florissant Fossil Beds National Monument. The city’s diverse population includes singles, young families, retirees, corporate CEOs, artists, musicians, medical and legal

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professionals, active military, and part-time residents who have bought vacation homes. Michael Harper, president of Michael Harper Real Estate and 2011 chairman of the board of the Greater Woodland Park Chamber of Commerce, has lived in the city for more than 30 years. “It’s the perfect place to live, work, and raise a family,” he said. “The natural beauty that surrounds us, the abundance of activities, healthy lifestyle, and the friendliness of the people who live here set our city apart from almost anywhere else in the country.” City Manager David Buttery says Woodland Park is a community that “takes pride in its past while taking steps to ensure a prosperous future.” The city’s mountain Western architecture ranges from historic log cabins and mining structures to Southwestern, Victorian, and Craftsman style buildings that complement the gorgeous forest backdrop. A carefully managed Downtown Redevelopment Plan ensures that all new construction adheres to design standards and does not pose a hazard to the natural surroundings. Buttery adds that the Woodland Park City’s Comprehensive Plan provides a framework

The Greater Woodland Park Chamber of Commerce

for the future based on extensive input from city leaders, expert consultants, and members of the community. “The plan focuses on improving the city, attracting new business, and providing residents with a high quality of life; but it also addresses controlled land use and growth and both economic and environmental sustainability.” The city has a deep appreciation for its culture and history, often bringing residents and visitors together at festivals and seasonal events. A strong group of civic organizations, including the Greater Woodland Park Chamber of Commerce, regional churches, and nonprofit organizations, works together to promote community spirit and support local charities. We invite you to learn more about Woodland Park and the Teller County region — the unparalleled quality of life, award-winning schools, vibrant arts community, and growing economy. In the following pages you’ll learn why so many people who visit Woodland Park fall in love with this mountain paradise and choose to make it their new home.


Demographics

Important Phone Numbers

Greater Woodland Park Chamber of Commerce........... 719.687.9885

City of Woodland Park City Hall (utilities)..................................719.687.9246 Police Department (non-emergency).........719.687.9262 Parks and Recreation..............................719.687.5225 Ute Pass Cultural Center..........................719.687.5284

Teller County Administrative Office...............................719.689.2988 Sheriff’s Office......................................719.687.9652 Assessor’s Office....................................719.689.2941 Public Works and Facilities.......................719.686.7950

Community Services Woodland Park School District RE-2...........719.686.2000 Cripple Creek-Victor School District RE-1.....719.689.2685 Northeast Teller County Fire Protection District...........................719.687.1866 Woodland Park Public Library...................719.687.9281

Utilities Black Hills Energy (natural gas)...............800.303.0752 Colorado Natural Gas (Cripple Creek)........800.720.8193 Intermountain Rural Electric Association.....719.687.9277 CenturyLink (telephone, television, Internet)...800.475.7526 Peak Internet (telecommunications)...............719.686.0250 Baja Broadband (television and Internet)....800.480.7020

Climate Elevation 8,465 feet

Temperature Summer (June–Aug.) High....................................................... 75.3°F Low...........................................................39°F Warmest month.............................................July High.......................................................78°F Low........................................................41°F Winter (Dec.–Feb.) High....................................................... 39.7°F Low.............................................................4°F Coolest month..........................................January High.......................................................38°F Low..........................................................3°F

Precipitation Annual average.................................... 24.05 inches Wettest month.............................................. August Average precipitation................................4 inches Driest month...............................................January Average precipitation........................... 0.57 inches

A Digital Portrait of Woodland Park Community Snapshot Educational Attainment

Population

percent of population

by region

25 years & older

2000 2010 Percent Woodland Park.........6,515........ 7,200....... +10.51% Teller County...........20,555...... 23,350........ +13.6% by gender

Total Percent Male............................3,568....................... 49.6% Female.........................3,632....................... 50.4% by age

Total Percent Under 5 years................. 424............................ 5.9 5 to 9 years................... 438............................ 6.1 10 to 14 years............... 494............................ 6.9 15 to 19 years............... 530............................ 7.4 20 to 24 years............... 289............................ 4.0 25 to 29 years............... 317............................ 4.4 30 to 34 years............... 304............................ 4.2 35 to 39 years............... 428............................ 5.9 40 to 44 years............... 550............................ 7.6 45 to 49 years............... 685............................ 9.5 50 to 54 years............... 676............................ 9.4 55 to 59 years............... 682............................ 9.5 60 to 64 years............... 578............................ 8.0 65 to 69 years............... 343............................ 4.8 70 to 74 years............... 210............................ 2.9 75 to 79 years............... 141............................ 2.0 80 to 84 years................ 64............................. 0.9 85 years and older........... 47............................. 0.7 Median age.................................................... 43.4 Source: U.S. Census Bureau: 2010 Census

Woodland Park United States 24.8%

25 20

15%

15

11.4% 11% 9.5%

10

9%

5 0

Associate Degree

Bachelor’s Degree

Graduate or Professional Degree

Source: U.S. Census Bureau: 2010 Census

Household Income $80,000

Woodland Park

$75,788

$70,000

$70,096

United States $58,454

$60,000

$51,425

$50,000 $40,000 $30,000 $20,000 $10,000

Cost of Living u . s . average for all indices is

100

Composite................................................. 91.8 Groceries................................................... 93.2 Housing..................................................... 87.3 Utilities..................................................... 89.6 Transportation............................................. 97.0 Health care.............................................. 102.2 Miscellaneous............................................. 93.1 Source: ACCRA Cost of Living Index, 2Q2011

0

Mean Income

Median Income

Source: U.S. Census Bureau: 2005–2009 American Community Survey

Housing Median mortgage.........................................$1,592 Median rent.................................................. $821 Median home value..................................$235,900 Source: U.S. Census Bureau: 2005–2009 American Community Survey

www.woodlandparkchamber.com

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Business & Commerce

C

A Great Place To Do Business

hat casually with nearly anyone in Woodland Park and it’s quickly evident that one of the best parts of the business environment is the environment. Although the people who are enjoying its benefits rank near the top as well. “Those are the two words that come to mind — people and the environment,” said Debbie Miller, president of Greater Woodland Park Chamber of Commerce. “When you think about our environment, it is literally like we’ve been dropped down in heaven. It is the best of all worlds.” The heavenly surroundings are top of mind too for Michael Faber, owner of Joanie’s Mountain Gourmet Deli.

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“The setting is spectacular, with unbelievable views of the north face of Pike’s Peak around every corner,” he said. “It’s a wonderful place to do business. There’s nothing like selling pastrami at 8,465 feet! The outside tables at Joanie’s have the best view!” Tanner Coy, owner of Tweeds Fine Furnishings, says that it’s hard for him to list all the reasons he loves doing business in Woodland Park. “I love Woodland Park,” he said. “It’s a community that thrives in the cool, high altitude Colorado climate. Clean air, fresh water, and peaceful beauty permeate the city, attracting a great variety of people to the area who simply love to be here. People who are both sophisticated and tough and, together,

The Greater Woodland Park Chamber of Commerce

elevate the meaning of community. I’m proud to own a business in Woodland Park. ” Miller also credits the community for being welcoming to newcomers and new businesses. “The residents here, for the most part, come from other areas of the country,” she said. “Those of us who are transplants have chosen this location to become our home. It was a cognizant choice to come here. This choice results in such a kindred spirit among the residents of the city and county.” She describes the business community in one word: “Engaging. I say that because the merchants are some of the friendliest business owners you will find anywhere in the country. Most of them know the locals by name; but for those who are tourists, the business owners engage them through questions like ‘Where are


Business & Commerce you from?’ It is always amazing when you ask someone where they hail from. You typically find out that it is much like the description of six degrees of separation; we transplants are always meeting people from the places we came from. We enjoy hearing ‘This is one of the friendliest communities we’ve ever been in’ from our tourists.” Faber also praises the solidity of the community. “There are a lot of caring people in this town. They come in force to all events and celebrations and are loyal to our local merchants during the quieter winter months. It’s a very special place to live, work, or visit.” The treasure of this mountain community isn’t all scenery, savory foodstuffs, and great conversations: There’s gold in these hills — literally. And it forms an important part of the economic foundation. Cripple Creek & Victor Gold Mining Company has hundreds of employees and a great ripple effect. “As one of the largest employers in the county, with a year-around operation, CC&V is a major contributor to the region,” said Jane Mannon, CC&V Manager of Community Affairs. “We currently have 430 employees. Studies estimate that for each mining job, an additional 4.6 jobs are generated. CC&V pays over $7 million in taxes locally and to the state, and makes contributions to groups in the area each year.” The mine recently celebrated its 4 millionth ounce and shows no signs of slowing as it strives for number five. “It would be fair to say we would reach that milestone in four to five years,” Mannon said. Planning for the future, CC&V is submitting applications in 2012 that will extend operations well into the next decade.

“Our current permits anticipate mining until 2016; the new permit approvals would extend that mine life to approximately 2025,” Mannon said. Such extension and expansion will mean more work for the community. “The expansion plans include 50 to 75 new jobs,” Mannon said. “We see a bright future for CC&V. We have an aggressive exploration program continuing to find new areas of opportunity for mining. We have a dedicated, skilled workforce who deserve the credit for our success. And we enjoy the support of the community.” While Woodland Park hasn’t been immune to the national economic downturn, tourism

Faber joins the united front. “The local economy pretty much reflects the slow growth of the national economy. But local government leaders are working closely with our Chamber and Economic Development office to attract new businesses, residents, and tourists. As a member of the Downtown Development Authority Board, I am committed to this effort.” Beth Kosley, of the Office of Economic and Downtown Development, noted that although Woodland Park lost four storefront businesses in the months leading to August 2011, it gained a whopping 22 new businesses. And once again, it all circles back to a great environment. It’s the tremendous location that’s kept Woodland Park literally above it all.

“There are a lot of caring people in this town. They come in force to all events and celebrations and are loyal to our local merchants during the quieter winter months. It’s a very special place to live, work, or visit.” – Michael Faber and the service sector have stayed strong, and business and community leaders remain committed to growth. “We have been affected in our area by the recession much like other areas of the country,” Miller said. “What has helped us is the large service sector offered here. Our retail base is small, and those owners have done a great job in keeping their storefronts open. I think the prospects for the future look great.”

“I think we’ve benefited from a great area that’s fun to come to,” Stackhouse said. “If you’re an outdoors person, it’s just a great place to camp, fish, hunt, relax — do what you want to do, basically.” “It’s quite the sight to look out my window and see Pikes Peak. It’s hard to describe,” Miller said.

www.woodlandparkchamber.com

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Health Care

Quality Care With a Vision

Photo provided by Neil Podoll Photography

Pikes Peak Regional Hospital and Surgery Center www.pikespeakregionalhospital.com

Pikes Peak Regional Hospital and Surgery Center (PPRH) in Woodland Park is a success story that many other medical centers would love to emulate. Over the last four years the community hospital has expanded its services to include four family practice clinics along with specialty clinics for pain management and wound care. According to CEO Dolores Horvath, in 2010 the hospital had more than 6,000 emergency room visits, performed 550 surgeries, and conducted 52,000 lab tests and more than 10,000 radiologic procedures. “While many hospitals throughout the country are struggling to survive, we are continuing to grow, ” she said.

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IASIS Healthcare purchased the hospital from Brim Holdings Inc. in 2010. IASIS, which owns or leases 15 acute-care hospitals throughout the United States, has a net revenue of $2.5 billion. Horvath says the acquisition opened up new expansion opportunities for the hospital, including the addition of 10 inpatient beds, two additional operating rooms, equipment upgrades, and more outpatient procedures. PPRH offers the latest in innovative technology, including diagnostic services, emergency medicine, outpatient medical care and rehabilitation, surgical services, and transition care. The special care unit focuses on medically complex cases, including diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and respiratory problems. A Pulmonary Function Testing Laboratory, open since August 2011, specializes in analyzing patients at high altitude in an outpatient setting. Commonly

The Greater Woodland Park Chamber of Commerce

used to identify and treat patients with asthma, cystic fibrosis, and other lung disorders, a PFT is also used to monitor the response to different therapies prescribed and can help measure the effects of certain drugs on the lungs. “Our leadership has long had a vision to provide health care services tailored to the residents of our community, which is situated at over 8,000 feet in elevation,” explained Horvath. “This vital testing tool will allow physicians to better treat patients from this area.” A nursing home adjacent to the hospital is scheduled to open in the summer of 2012. Situated on 2.17 acres, the building is the first LEED-certified nursing home in Colorado and is expected to create 100 full-time and part-time jobs in Woodland Park. Twenty units are slated for specialized care of Alzheimer’s patients. The project, developed and managed by Mid-States


Health Care Senior Living, will include 80 living units with private bathrooms, a convenience store, and conference room. PPRH has achieved full national accreditation from DNV Healthcare, a new Medicare-approved hospital accreditation program. “Prior to DNV, the hospital sought accreditation from the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations (JCAHO), but DNV is more consistent with our long-term commitment to patient safety and total quality,” noted Horvath.

Peak Vista Community Health Centers Family Health Center at Divide www.peakvista.org Celebrating its 40th anniversary in 2011, Peak Vista Community Health Centers annually offers primary medical, dental, and behavioral health services to more than 63,000 El Paso and Teller County residents, most from working families without health insurance. The concept for Peak Vista originated in 1971 with a group of volunteer physicians and nurses who operated the Free Clinic of Colorado Springs two evenings a week. By 1975 it became a full-time clinic with a full-time staff, and by 1993 it expanded its services to the homeless. A new Center at Divide was built in 2006 to better serve all Teller County residents. Among the services provided are chronic disease care and management; preventive physical exams and immunizations; diagnosis and treatment of sudden, minor illnesses and injuries; wellbaby and well-child checkups; newborn care; treatment of acute illnesses; dental and lab

services; prescription services; routine follow-up care; and referrals to community specialists. Peak Vista Community Health Centers Foundation raises money to support the programs and services provided by Peak Vista Community Health Centers and other organizations with similar missions. Visit www.peakvistafoundation. org for more information.

True Life Medicine www.truelifemedicine.com

True Life Medicine (TLM) uses integrative, science-based principles that include the best of conventional Western medicine and the cuttingedge, evidence-based tools of functional and nutritional medicine. “Our collaborative approach focuses on what the body needs that it is not getting and what it is getting that it doesn’t like,” explained Dr. Randy James. “We started TLM with the goal of helping people find their individual definition of living a true life. We are there for our patients during an illness or disease, but we also encourage them to achieve vitality and true wellness through a healthy lifestyle and preventive care.” TLM focuses on the full spectrum of family medicine, including walk-in care for acute conditions; women’s health; full-service pediatric care; sports, school, and camp physicals; and treatment of work-related injuries. Other services include male and female hormone replacement therapy; office-based minor surgery, including vasectomy and skin care; nutritional medicine and personalized weight loss consultations; and science-based supplement strategies.

www.woodlandparkchamber.com

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Health Care

Cripple Creek Rehab & Wellness Center www.ccrehab.org

When Feeling Better is Urgent Penrose Mountain Urgent Care offers everything you’d expect from the region’s most trusted name in health care: • No appointment necessary • Urgent and acute care for fractures, sprains, animal bites and minor illnesses • State-of-the-art imaging and digital radiology • Laboratory and diagnostic services • Outpatient ultrasounds • Partner with Colorado Sports and Spine Centers and Colorado Springs Health Partners (CSHP), both located on site at Langstaff-Brown Medical Campus • Part of Penrose-St. Francis Health Services, named one of “HealthGrades 2011 America’s 50 Best Hospitals” Our medical staff looks forward to caring for you and your family. Open daily. Conveniently located in the heart of downtown Woodland Park at the intersection of Highways 24 and 67. 41 State Highway 67 Woodland Park, CO 80863 (719) 686-0551 penrosestfrancis.org/urgentcare

DECKERS

HIGHWAY 67

E. LAKE AVE.

S.. BALDWIN STREET

W. MIDLAND

AVE.

HWY 24

Y 24 DIVIDE

24

W. HIG H

WA

W. HIGHWAY

S. PARK STREET

WOODLAND PARK

COLORADO SPRINGS

In Cripple Creek, call Penrose Urgent Care at Cripple Creek at 719-776-4300. Non-Discrimination Statement Centura Health complies with the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, and no person shall be excluded from participation in, be denied benefits of, or otherwise be subjected to discrimination in the provision of any care or service on the grounds of race, religion, color, sex, national origin, sexual preference, ancestry, age, familial status, disability or handicap. Copyright © Centura Health, 2011

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The Greater Woodland Park Chamber of Commerce

Cripple Creek Rehab & Wellness Center is a 59-bed licensed skilled nursing facility offering a comprehensive array of services, including 24/7 nursing care, physician exams and visits, physical therapy, occupational therapy, respite care, and an inpatient and outpatient alcohol and drug rehabilitation program. Featuring a family-like atmosphere with each patient receiving personalized attention from a skilled team of caregivers, the center also offers salon services, housekeeping, dental and vision care, mental health therapy, and assistance with dressing and personal hygiene. Residents enjoy a variety of activities, including church services, arts and crafts, puzzles and games, movies, music, and a library. In addition, the center offers opportunities for cooking, gardening, exercise, and regular outings. “Our caregiving team is comprised of registered nurses, certified nursing assistants, and many team members providing for each resident’s physical, psychosocial, and spiritual well-being,” explained director Gary Dickey. “The team is directed by a geriatric physician and family practitioner and assisted by dietary, housekeeping, administrative personnel, and volunteers. We offer psychosocial and spiritual support and allow our residents to maintain their usual daily routine as much as possible.”


Education

A High-Flying Future

WPSD Facts • There are 226 certified and 132 non-certified staff. • More than 60 percent of all certified staff members have obtained master’s degrees or higher. • Award-winning activities include art, band, drama, forensics, and vocal music. • There are programs for Gifted and Talented as well as services for students who are struggling with academics. • All three elementary schools have preschool programs for children 3 and 4 years of age. • All of the District’s educational facilities have been extensively renovated or constructed since 1988. • Woodland Park students consistently hold the fourth-highest score position of all districts in the Pikes Peak region on the Colorado Student Assessment Program (CSAP).

Woodland Park School District Reaching for the Skies www.wpsdk12.org America’s winged warriors aim high, a beacon to the many graduates of Woodland Park High School who enter the United States Air Force Academy each year. “I think that the proximity of the Air Force Academy has played a major role in the exposure our students have to an elite, selective school,” said Principal Del Garrick of the academy, which is closer as the crow flies but still a short drive down from the mountains. “Not many students get the opportunity to see or explore schools on the East Coast but can take 30 minutes to drive to the academy. Then, of course, as the cadets return home to Woodland Park, they recruit as well,” he said. Woodland Park High School’s quality has served her nation well.

“I think an argument can be made that the rigor of our curriculum rivals that of any school in our area,” Garrick said. “Our students are prepared to compete at even the most selective schools in the nation. It also speaks to the quality of student that we have at WPHS — hardworking and driven students that have their future clearly in focus.” The wild blue yonder is a frequent destination for graduates, but it’s not the only place they land. The district is well suited to serve those on their way up. “We consistently have students accepted and excelling at elite schools,” Garrick said. “We currently offer 10 Advanced Placement classes: world history, u.s. history, u.s. government, language and composition, literature and composition, environmental science, biology, chemistry, physics, and calculus. These classes in particular prepare students for the rigor of college classes.” www.woodlandparkchamber.com

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Education

Cripple Creek-Victor School District Breaking Down Boundaries www.ccvschools.org In a short time, Soaring Without Limitations (a 21st Century Community Learning Center for sixth through eighth grades) has quickly helped junior high students lift themselves to new heights, where they can see a great future. Students have flocked to the program and shown great improvement not only in academics, but also in discipline and skills not traditionally seen as under the educational system’s purview. Started in 2010 under a five-year state grant, nine of the program’s 10 goals are aimed at improving math and reading scores. The 10th goal is to improve self-esteem, something

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Morrill sees as a foundation for building the other nine goals. “We lift their spirits and have them feel like they’re in a safe place,” said Debbie Morrill, director of Soaring Without Limitations, part of Cripple Creek-Victor School District. “My main focus is on self-esteem. If their self esteem is in the toilet and left there, their math and reading scores will never go anywhere,” she said. But indeed, math and reading skills are soaring. Based on pre- and post-testing the first year, students boosted their reading scores 79 percent and math scores 65 percent. Much of the after-school program’s appeal for students is the apparently limited scholarly duties: They focus on math for 30 minutes and reading for 20 minutes. Their reward? A vast

The Greater Woodland Park Chamber of Commerce

array of activities — beauty school, cooking, crime-scene investigation, drama, fishing, frisbee golf, geocaching, hiking, horseback riding, indoor skydiving, rope course, rocketry, video production, and whitewater rafting. But even the fun is carefully tied to mathematics, reading, and science. “It’s almost like they’re learning academics without realizing they’re learning academics,” Morrill said. Much of the goal is to open a vista of possibilities. “My passion has been to assist these students in learning who they are, what they’re passionate about and that all dreams are possible,” Morrill said.


Education

CCVSD Facts • School-based health center offers free health care to students and their siblings ages 0 to 21. • Mountain eCademy online program is designed for students who desire education outside of the traditional school. • Participates in area vocational program. • Small group instruction available. • Activities include competitive athletics, drama, music, and art. • Early Head Start and Head Start programs are available. • State-of-the-art technology lab.

Soaring Without Limitations collaborates with a life-skills class called Odyssey, which focuses on the practical skills some junior high students may lack. “It’s to teach them things like how to speak properly, how to shake hands, how to set a table, how to give a speech, how to work with the public. These are all skills we want to give them to take them into the 21st century.”

Colorado Springs Christian School of Woodland Park www.cscslions.org

The Woodland Park campus of Colorado Springs Christian School serves not only Woodland Park, but the entire Teller County community.

Students from Florissant, Divide, Cripple Creek, and Victor join with their Woodland Park classmates in a K–8 school that provides an excellent education from a Christ-centered Biblical perspective and prepares young people for life-long service. Students from CSCS-WP participate in community events such as the Christmas parade, the Empty Bowls program, and the annual Bicycle Rodeo. The campus has hosted the Teller County Relay for Life, sponsored by the American Cancer Society, for the past two years. In the summer of 2011, the school even formed a relay team to further partner with the Relay for Life. CSCS-WP also partners with the Parks and Recreation Department of Woodland Park to provide facilities for youth sports programs through the winter. www.woodlandparkchamber.com

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Tourism & Recreation

“Visitors are drawn to the area for its family-friendly atmosphere, abundance of outdoor recreation, and the breathtaking scenery.”

Pikes Peak Playground

T

here is no shortage of things to do in Teller County. Visitors are drawn to the area for its family-friendly atmosphere, abundance of outdoor recreation, and the breathtaking scenery. Locals often boast that Woodland Park has the best views of Pikes Peak. Whether you are driving a picturesque highway, staying at one of the lodges or bed and breakfasts, or attending an event at the Ute Pass Cultural Center, there are panoramic views from many vantage points around town. Biking, fishing, and horseback riding are all easily accessible, as is a variety of winter sports. There are endless opportunities for hiking and enjoying nature, and for those who want to explore the area’s history, the mining towns of Victor and Cripple Creek are nearby.

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The Greater Woodland Park Chamber of Commerce


Tourism & Recreation

Mueller State Park

www.parks.state.co.us/parks/mueller/ Pages/MuellerHome.aspx Mueller State Park spans 5,000 acres and features 55 miles of trails for biking, hiking, hunting, and horseback riding. In winter it’s a favorite spot for snowshoeing, cross-country skiing, sledding, and snow tubing. The park also hosts numerous special events like the Full Moon Snowshoe Hike in February. “The Visitor Center, located in the heart of the park at Big View Overlook, is a scenic

destination itself,” said Susie Yost, who frequently leads nature programs at the park. Nestled in the shadow of Pikes Peak, The Visitor Center features an outdoor Watchable Wildlife kiosk and exhibits with information on the park’s habitats, cultural heritage, and wildlife. Black bears, elk, hawks, and mule deer are a few of the species frequently spotted. The park offers a choice of short, familyfriendly walks or the challenge of full-day hikes. Enjoy a quiet hike through timbered forest, a self-guided nature walk, or trails with abundant

Eleven Mile State Park

www.parks.state.co.us/parks/elevenmile Open year-round and offering spectacular Rocky Mountain scenery, Eleven Mile State Park’s big draw is fishing but it’s also a fun spot for sailing, windsurfing, hiking, and bird watching. Many visitors use it as a base camp for day trips to Pikes Peak, Garden of the Gods, and other nearby attractions. One of Colorado’s largest reservoirs, it boasts nine campgrounds offering a variety of facilities. Three boat ramps serve the reservoir, and an amphitheater at the North Shore Campground presents educational programs, including boat certification and safety classes every weekend throughout the summer. The marina provides boat mooring, boat slip rentals for park guests, and fishing guide service. The park has over a dozen picnic sites and a small playground for children. In winter the meadows and fields are popular spots for crosscountry skiing and snowshoeing, and the frozen reservoir provides miles of surface for ice skating

wildlife and wildflower viewing vantage points. Twenty-seven trails are designated for horseback riding, and 19 miles are reserved for bicyclists. The park offers 132 campsites, with 17 open for winter camping. Three cabins (ranging from two to four bedrooms) offer fully equipped kitchens and baths, high vaulted ceilings, a gas fireplace and an outdoor deck with a barbecue grill. Pets are welcome at campgrounds, picnic areas, two tubing areas, and along park roads, but they are not permitted on hiking trails or in the backcountry.

and ice fishing. Hunting of big game, small game, and waterfowl is allowed by permit in season, and hikers may explore more than five miles of trails. Eleven Mile is also a mecca for bird watchers. “Many migratory and resident birds inhabit the park, including songbirds, raptors, waterfowl, and shorebirds,” said park manager Kevin Tobey. “We also have observed the bald eagle, American peregrine falcon, and white pelican.” Tobey says the 25 backcountry camping sites are a favorite with those who like to backpack or boat in. “It’s one of the most scenic areas of the park and well worth the hike.” Offering outstanding fishing and frequent tournaments, the lake rewards anglers with rainbow trout, cutthroat, and pike. It is also one of the few reservoirs in Colorado stocked with kokanee salmon. Nearby Spinney Reservoir, a day-use park open spring through fall, features a Gold Medal Trout Fishery and a productive Pike Fishery. www.woodlandparkchamber.com

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Tourism & Recreation

Dome Rock State Wildlife Area

http://wildlife.state.co.us Named for the 700-foot granite face at the halfway point of the Dome Rock Trail, Dome Rock State Wildlife Area spans almost 7,000 acres and ranges from 8,000 to 9,700 feet in elevation. Popular activities include fishing, hunting, hiking, and wildlife viewing. The Dome Rock-Spring Creek Loop, an old stagecoach route, is a seven-mile round-trip trail. Hikers and horseback riders enjoy the varied terrain, including 10 creek crossings, beaver dams, beautiful meadows, majestic aspen stands, abandoned ranch buildings, and old

mines. There are frequent photo opportunities with views of wildlife like bighorn sheep and the dusky blue grouse. Hunting for deer, elk, rabbit, and grouse is permitted in season, and brown trout fishing is allowed in the stream. Public access is limited on Spring Creek, Dome View, and Dome Rock trails from Jack Rabbit Lodge from December 1 through July 15. Camping, dogs, fires, and rock climbing are prohibited. Access is by foot or horseback from the parking lot and trails from Mueller State Park.

Altitude Adjustment

Florissant Fossil Beds National Monument

www.nps.gov/flfo/index.htm Florissant Fossil Beds National Monument is one of the richest and most diverse fossil deposits in the world. Located at an elevation of 8,400 feet, it features 6,000 sprawling acres of forests, meadows, and wildflowers in addition to the wonders found beneath the ground. Up to 1,700 different fossils have been discovered at the site, ranging in size from small, fragile insects to massive petrified Sequoia trees. Situated in the montane life zone, the area is dotted with ponderosa pine, aspen, fir, and spruce trees. Prominent wildlife includes elk, coyotes, foxes, bears, mountain lions, mule deer, and a variety of birds. Scientific research has been conducted at Florissant since the 1870s, and the current paleontology program continues to inventory and monitor fossil sites, educate the public, and oversee research done at other institutions. Current projects include fossil mammals, diatom and volcanic ash studies, and the preservation of petrified stumps.

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After four decades housed in an old building that once served as a contact station for the Pike National Forest, the Visitor Center will open in a new building in the summer of 2013. The energy-efficient, sustainably designed building will include large fossil displays and interactive exhibits, a research lab and storage facility, and a bookstore. “The building has been in the works for a long time,” said Keith Payne, superintendent of the monument. “Our park partners and communities have been fighting for years to get it built because they know that Florissant Fossil Beds visitors deserve the best experience they can have — and the fossils deserve the best protection possible.” Last year more than 65,000 people from all over the world saw the Florissant Fossil Beds, and the new facility is expected to attract even more visitors. The monument will continue to be open 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily during construction, and regular park programs and visitor services will continue as usual.

The Greater Woodland Park Chamber of Commerce

The thinner air of this Rocky Mountain region can present challenges to those not accustomed to it. Altitude sickness is characterized by headache, dizziness, nausea, shortness of breath, loss of coordination, and fatigue. If you’re new to the “high life,” it’s important to be aware of the potential for altitude sickness. Fortunately, there are some things you can do to minimize your risk.

Tips •A  cclimatize gradually. Don’t head for the top on your first day; spend a day or two at lower elevations first. The CDC recommends, if possible, spending a day at each 1,000-foot gain if possible before moving up. • S tay away from alcohol. • D rink plenty of water. • T ake it slow while climbing or engaging in exercise, and take frequent breaks. • If symptoms worsen as you climb, head back to lower levels. If symptoms persist, seek medical attention immediately.


Tourism & Recreation

Pike National Forest: Rampart Reservoir

www.fs.usda.gov/psicc Pike National Forest spans over 1 million acres of Teller, Clear Creek, Park, Jefferson, Douglas, and El Paso counties, and Rampart Reservoir is one of the most popular recreation areas in the Pikes Peak region. Located on a granite plateau 9,000 feet above sea level, it offers a variety of recreational activities year-round, including incredible Pikes Peak views, biking, hiking, picnicking, and wildlife viewing in summer and cross country skiing, snowshoeing, and ice fishing in winter. Canoes, kayaks, and non-motorized boats are allowed in season, and the Colorado Division of Wildlife stocks fish regularly.

Colorado Wolf and Wildlife Center

www.wolfeducation.org Darlene Kobobel founded Colorado Wolf and Wildlife Center in 1993 as a rescue center for wolves and wolf dogs. Today the 35-acre facility is the only Colorado animal sanctuary certified by the Association of Zoos and Aquariums. Evolving over the years from a rescue mission to an educational center focused on conservation and preservation, the CWCC actively participates in the Species Survival Program by providing homes to endangered Mexican grey wolves and Swift foxes. Known for its fun, educational tours and programs on wolf and wildlife preservation, the center conveys its conservation message to more than 40,000 people annually. “It’s important to educate people about wolves and other misunderstood canids and the significance of their roles in our ecosystems,” said Kobobel. “We teach people how wolves affect the populations of other predators, prey, scavengers, and vegetation.” In addition to conducting public tours of the facility and hosting popular events like the Walk on the Wild Side Hike, CWCC presents educational programs at schools in nearby

counties and provides an outreach program to metropolitan areas where inner-city children get a chance to see an ambassador wolf up close. “We are gaining worldwide recognition not only for the education we offer, but also for the natural setting we provide for the animals,” Kobobel said. The large enclosures designed with rock formations, shady trees, dens, and lush aspen groves exceed the requirements of the U.S. Department of Agriculture and the Division of Wildlife. www.woodlandparkchamber.com

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Tourism & Recreation

Rocky Mountain Wildlife Foundation

www.visionswest-art.com Rocky Mountain Wildlife Foundation is a wolf sanctuary founded by Mark Johnson. Nicknamed “Wolf” by the locals, Johnson adopted a female wolf pup named Cheyenne from a sanctuary in Arizona, and over the years she inspired him to become more involved in conservation and preservation efforts. Although Cheyenne passed away in 2009, Johnson is convinced her encounters with thousands of people helped them find courage and hope. With a mission to educate the public about wolves, how to live safely with wildlife, and the important role humans play in the survival of wolf populations, the foundation provides

opportunities for people of all ages to interact safely with wolves. Resident wolves Apache and Cherokee traveled 42 days last year for appearances at schools, pow-wows, Air Force and Army bases, senior centers, civic clubs, and farmers markets. “As the main ambassadors of the foundation they are carrying on the tradition of Cheyenne in meeting people and creating more awareness about wolves,” Johnson said. Visits to the sanctuary are free and by appointment only, weather permitting. Johnson says visitors should wear clothing they aren’t afraid to get dirty, sturdy shoes, and expect to spend about 2.5 hours.

Photo provided by Rocky Mountain Dinosaur Resource Center

Rocky Mountain Dinosaur Resource Center www.rmdrc.com

The Rocky Mountain Dinosaur Resource Center is a 20,000-square-foot museum featuring fossils from North America’s Cretaceous Period, including dinosaurs and marine reptiles. Since it opened in 2004, the museum has welcomed more than 100,000 visitors a year and conducted more than 250 school tours annually. A popular destination for both tourists and researchers, the center’s displays include the world’s largest Mosasaur, the world’s only Pachycephalosaurus, a 3-D giant Xiphactinus, and a 40-foot Tyrannosaurus Rex. A sought-after expert on paleontology, museum founder and Woodland Park resident Mike Triebold has appeared on several episodes of Paleoworld and Bonehead Detectives on the Discovery and Learning channels. He began collecting fossils as a child growing up in North Dakota and, with his brother J.J., established Triebold Paleontology Inc. (TPI), a fossil-collecting and exhibit company in 1989. TPI provides services for museums around the world, ranging from paleontological exploration,

data collection, and excavation to restoration, skeletal mounting, and mold making. “Members of our staff venture into the field to excavate Cretaceous period fossils,” Triebold said. “We have made many remarkable discoveries, and visitors to the center can read about the various specimens and view the working lab where recent finds are being freed from rock and undergoing restoration.” Over 40 skeletons and restorations are on display, with colorful graphics and detailed descriptions to help visitors better understand the animals and the environment where they

lived. A children’s playroom provides a variety of hands-on educational activities, and visitors will find the largest inventory of dinosaurrelated merchandise in Colorado at the gift shop “Prehistoric Paradise.” Special events are held frequently, and traveling exhibits, such as the Challenger Learning Center portable planetarium, provide fun learning experiences for children and adults. Voted the second-best dinosaur museum in the United States by Best of America, the center is open year-round seven days a week.

www.woodlandparkchamber.com

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Government

Embracing Opportunities & Challenges 18

The Greater Woodland Park Chamber of Commerce

T

he governing bodies in Teller County have made great strides in meeting the unique challenges and opportunities of this region of Colorado. As a popular tourist destination, Teller County has embraced opportunities for increased visitor traffic and revenue by allowing casino gambling, while Woodland Park, as a home rule community, maintains unique rights such as collecting and administering its own sales tax. Also important in this semi-arid climate is the fact that Woodland Park and Cripple Creek each maintains its own water department for judicious management of this precious resource.


Government

Teller County City of Cripple Creek www.cripple-creek.co.us

City of Woodland Park

www.city-woodlandpark.org Woodland Park is a home rule community with a city-manager form of government. A council consisting of a mayor and six council members enacts and enforces ordinances, while the city manager administers day-to-day municipal affairs. The city holds elections every two years by mail-in ballot. Council members serve fouryear terms with election on a rotating basis. The mayor is elected every two years. Several municipal committees and departments preserve and enhance Woodland Park’s beauty, including the Historic Preservation and Keep Woodland Park Beautiful committees. Woodland Park Planning Commission plays a crucial role in preserving aesthetics, ensuring new growth is compatible with the community and developing and upholding construction ordinances that prevent overly intrusive or disruptive construction. Residents point to the town’s Walmart as evidence of the commission’s success. The building features a rock-and-timber facade and hunter-green roof that blend with the conifer-covered mountain in the distance. The extensive landscaping, including a bronze mule-deer sculpture and a creek, become as one with the scenery. Woodland Park’s government has also been successful in maintaining safety. The city has a very low crime rate, and the police department remains resolute in keeping it that way. Woodland Park Police Department employs 18 sworn officers in patrol, investigations, and administration, as well as 10 support staff.

The municipal city of Cripple Creek strives to support the community by being responsive to the needs of its residents, businesses, and the region while operating in a cost-effective and professional manner. Cripple Creek offers premier Colorado gaming, heritage tourism, and an unforgettable Colorado experience to its visitors, which the municipal city strives to support and encourage. The Cripple Creek municipal government consists of a mayor and four council members who are responsible for enacting municipal policies and regulations. A city administrator is appointed by the council as the city’s chief executive officer and is responsible for implementing policies adopted by the council as they relate to daily operations. The city holds staggered elections every two years in coordination with Teller County. The mayor and council members serve four-year terms. Several departments provide a multitude of services to the community. Public safety is of the utmost importance, and the Fire Department, Police Department, and Dispatch Office provide fast, reliable, professional support, 24 hours a day. The city’s Public Works Department and Water/Wastewater treatment plants work to maintain and improve the community’s infrastructure as well as to provide a state-ofthe-art system for providing potable water and acceptable wastewater treatment to meet the demands of the residents and fire protection. Additional services provided extend to Parks & Recreation facilities, with numerous programs for all age groups as well as maintenance of the city’s parks and cemetery. Cripple Creek has a strong mining history that made a significant impact on the development of the area during the Gold Rush, and the Historic Preservation Department works to preserve the historic environment and ambiance.

www.co.teller.co.us Teller County is one of only two of Colorado’s 64 counties to host casino gambling. It has a budget of $25 million that funds 32 departments and 235 employees. Officials are elected to four-year terms and include three commissioners, clerk, treasurer, assessor, sheriff, and coroner. Commissioner elections are held every two years, with two positions in one election and the other six positions elected two years later. County services include marriage licenses, driver’s licenses, voter registration, property tax assessment, and animal control. “Reverse 911” allows residents to register their home or cellular telephone to be notified of emergencies. Teller County offers services to counter forest fires, which may occur more frequently in the region due to lightning in high elevations. Eight fire-protection districts are equipped with the latest technology to discern the condition of vegetation and potential fuel, home susceptibility, water supply, and emergency access, enabling them to develop customized responses in districtwide wildfire plans.

200 S Chestnut Woodland Park, CO 80863 (719)

687-2272

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Real Estate

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ramed by the natural beauty of the forest and the Rocky Mountains, Woodland Park boasts stunning views of Pikes Peak and a laidback ambience that makes visitors feel at home from the moment they arrive. An outdoor lover’s paradise with easy access to hiking, climbing, biking, and fishing, it offers a healthy lifestyle with fresh air and state-of-the-art medical facilities, plus a thriving business community and the convenience of short commutes to nearby Colorado Springs and Denver. In fact, 60 percent of residents work elsewhere but choose to live in Teller County for the outstanding quality of life.

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Find Your Dream Home in Teller County REALTOR® Michael Harper’s extensive knowledge of Teller County and available properties has helped many buyers make their Rocky Mountain dream home a reality. “Pikes Peak is literally right outside your window, along with gorgeous views of forests and meadows,” he said. “We have great schools, fun community events for every season, a parks and recreation department with programs for all ages and interests, and opportunities for outdoor fun all year round.” The small-town feel is one of the things Harper loves most. “People are warm and friendly, and it’s nice to go about your everyday errands and shopping

The Greater Woodland Park Chamber of Commerce

and know the person you are doing business with by name.” Along with fresh air and gorgeous surroundings Woodland Park offers a surprising array of entertainment for its size — art galleries and exhibitions, music, theater and dance performances, and a number of community festivals and cultural events. Woodland Park is the largest city in Teller County, but local agents can also help you find a single-family home or vacation retreat in nearby Divide, Florissant, Lake George, and Cripple Creek. Lenore Hotchkiss of Lenore Hotchkiss Real Estate has lived in the area for over 17 years.


Real Estate

“Our beautiful mountain location is very popular with buyers from around the country,” she said. “Some are looking to relocate, and many are in the market for vacation properties.” Hotchkiss has found homes for buyers from Arizona, California, Florida, Kansas, Nebraska, Missouri, and Texas. “People have different reasons for moving — job transfers, retirement, wanting to be closer to family, or finally deciding it’s time to fulfill their lifelong dream to live in the mountains, ” she said. A housing boom took place in Woodland Park peaking between 1980 and 1990, which is when 28 percent of all Woodland Park homes were constructed. The choice of homes available today includes custom-built luxury estates, single-family homes in a variety of price ranges, townhomes, cabins, apartments, and mobile homes. Several builders of new developments in the area specialize in constructing green homes that save energy, harmonize with the natural surroundings, and minimize the impact on the environment.

Teller County real estate agents agree that now is a great time to take advantage of competitive home prices and low interest rates. According to Jim Ignatiuas, Teller County Commissioner, there will be growing demand for homes in Teller County in the years ahead. As a result, property values will likely continue to rise. “The over-65 population is projected to increase by 66 percent by 2015 as the area becomes more appealing as a retirement destination,” he said. Along with an increase in sales to retirees, real estate brokers have noted more demand from first-time home buyers looking for homes in the $150,000–$200,000 range. City and county officials have made inroads in meeting this demand in recent years by increasing the number of affordable apartments, townhomes, and condos in the area. Future plans include more pedestrian and bike-friendly neighborhoods, as well as multi-use developments featuring a blend of retail, residential, and multi-family units.

www.woodlandparkchamber.com

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Worship

Communities of Service “Our message is the timeless Gospel of Jesus Christ as revealed in the Bible, but our methods are constantly changing to most effectively connect with our culture.” – Teaching Pastor Kirk Greenstreet

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The Greater Woodland Park Chamber of Commerce


Worship

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n Woodland Park, when churches talk about their services, they’re talking about much more than Sunday gatherings. Local congregations are committed to strong outreach that takes their message outside their four walls. When he meets someone new to the community, the first thing Worship Pastor Todd Zeller mentions about Woodland Park Community Church is The Storehouse, a seven-ministry program to help those in need. The church utilizes 11 percent of its offerings for its outreach ministries. It recently started a transitional housing program, purchasing a mobile home to help people get back on their feet. In terms of spreading the Gospel message, Woodland Park Community Church strives to meet people where they are. “The message of the Gospel and the teaching of the scriptures must come to people in terms they can understand,” said Teaching Pastor Kirk Greenstreet. “Just as Jesus communicated in terms familiar with a 1st century Hebrew culture, so too we will use the language, technology, and music of our culture to communicate Biblical truth to our generation. Our message is the timeless Gospel of Jesus Christ as revealed in the Bible, but our methods are constantly changing to most effectively connect with our culture.”

So too does the name of Impact Christian Church reflect its mission: impacting its members, guests, community, and world. “Beliefs are not worth much unless they are translated into actions,” says Lead Pastor Barry Park. “In our high-tech world, it’s easy to feel out of touch with other people. At Impact Christian Church, you can relax in our informal services because we are just an ordinary group of people who are continuing to discover the joy of living for Christ. We do our best to share Biblical solutions to contemporary situations.” Impact’s local ministries include adult, children’s, student, women’s, men’s, worship/arts/ drama, visual arts, and Celebrate Recovery. The congregation also supports “In the Lord’s Service,” a communitywide ministry of Christians supporting each other and those in need in Teller County. Volunteers meet needs with skills and training to give support in times of crisis. Several churches are involved to meet physical, emotional, and spiritual needs in the name of Jesus Christ. ITLS uses a database to help people find the specific help they need. A sample of services provided by ITLS volunteers includes: • Outdoor: Lawn care, minor auto repair, snow shoveling, painting, moving furniture • Indoor: House cleaning, providing meals, minor carpentry, handyman repair, house sitting • Personal Care: Home visitation for the sick or shut-ins, transportation, befriending new people, errands • Skills Teaching: Budgeting, basic computer skills, tutoring, pet care, cooking, baking

Chamber-Member Churches Church in the Wildwood, The 10585 Ute Pass Avenue Green Mountain Falls 719-684-9427

High View Baptist Church 1151 Rampart Range Rd Woodland Park 719-687-8585 www.highviewchurch.org

Impact Christian Church 27400 N. Hwy. 67 Woodland Park 719-687-3755 www.impactchristian.net

Little Chapel Food Pantr y 69 County Road 5 Divide 719-322-7610 www.littlechapelfoodpantry.org

Mountain View United Methodist Church 1101 Rampart Range Rd Woodland Park 719-687-3868

Our Lady of the Woods Catholic Church 116 S. West Street Woodland Park 719-687-9345 www.ourladywoods.com

Peak Life Church 201 N. Boundary Street Woodland Park 719-505-2708 www.peaklifechurch.org

Prayer Mountain Colorado 107 W. Henrietta Avenue Woodland Park 719-687-7626

Sacred Hoop Ministr y 1515 County Road 21 Woodland Park 719-687-4335 www.sacredhoopministry.org

St. David of the Hills Episcopal Church 36 Edlowe Rd Woodland Park 719-687-9195

Woodland Park Community Church 800 Valley View Drive Woodland Park 719-687-9444 www.woodlandparkcommunitychurch.com

www.woodlandparkchamber.com

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Arts & Culture

Let Us Entertain You

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The Greater Woodland Park Chamber of Commerce


Arts & Culture

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esidents and visitors enjoy a thriving arts community year-round. For a town its size Woodland Park offers an extensive variety of music, theater and art in addition to annual festivals that draw crowds from all over Colorado and surrounding states.

Ute Pass Cultural Center www.utepassculturalcenter.itgo.com

The Ute Pass Cultural Center hosts dozens of events throughout the year including plays, concerts, and festivals. The city-owned center opened in 1996 as a multi-purpose community center after the site was acquired from the Woodland Park Re-2 School District. The Main Room offers a stage with a theatrical lighting and sound system, a wooden dance floor, and seating for 200–250 people. The Cavalier Room, a multi-use space, is frequently used for classes, while the downstairs Community Room hosts meetings, small parties, and seminars. Midland Pavilion, designed to resemble the trestles of the Midland Railroad, is located adjacent to the Ute Pass Cultural Center. This open-air venue, offering spectacular views of Pikes Peak, is a popular site for picnics, concerts, art exhibits, and festivals. It is a source of pride among residents not only for its striking design and entertainment options, but for the way it brought the community together to help raise funds for its completion.

Events & Festivals Worship Fest Colorado www.worshipfestco.com Formerly known as the Pikes Peak Christian Artist Festival, this annual event was created six years ago by Woodland Park resident Galen Beaver. Currently director at Lift Prayerhaus, he works as a consultant for various ministries and continues to pursue his lifelong interest in music. The festival, held each June, was originally conceived as a way for local Christian musicians to connect with one another and perform for the community. Held at Midland Pavilion and the Ute Pass Cultural Center, it has become so successful it attracts musicians and artists from all over the country. Participants enjoy live Christian music, fine art exhibits, food vendors, and a KidZone with bounce houses, face painting and balloons. The 2011 festival included performances by Jared Anderson, Schlyce Jimenez, and The Sonflowerz.

Woodland Music Series www.woodlandmusicseries.com Held the second Saturday each month from June-September, this annual free concert series features a variety of music, including classical, big band, blues, and bluegrass. Performances are held at the Midland Pavilion adjacent to the Ute Pass Cultural Center. According to Bob Powell, project director, the series began in 2003 as a way to bring greater musical diversity to Woodland Park. Over the years the performances have become more family-oriented, with food and drink vendors and activities for children.

www.woodlandparkchamber.com

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Arts & Culture

Farmers Market www.woodlandparkfarmersmarket.com A favorite gathering place for locals to catch up with friends and enjoy the outdoor ambience, the Woodland Park Farmers Market is a street market held on Fridays from June through September at the intersection of Center and Henrietta. The popular market celebrated its 30th anniversary in 2011. Open from 7 a.m.–1 p.m., it features a variety of vendors selling artisan crafts, fresh vegetables and fruits, plants, flowers, trees, natural meats, baked goods, and gourmet items like salsa, roasted chilies, and barbecue sauce. A Winter Market featuring autumn and winter fruits, vegetables, and gifts is held monthly from October–December at the Ute Pass Cultural Center on select Saturdays.

Old Fashioned Fourth of July www.city-woodlandpark.org Each year more than 5,000 people turn out for the annual Fourth of July celebration at Memorial Park. The all-day event kicks off with a pancake breakfast followed by an old-fashioned festival with a bicycle parade, live music, food, and arts and crafts vendors. Family fun and games include a fishing contest and the chance to plunge city officials into dunk tanks to raise money for local charities. Other popular activities include tractor-pulled hayrides, horse-drawn carriage rides, and rides on the back of a vintage fire truck from the Woodland Park Fire Department.

Symphony Above The Clouds www.symphonyabovetheclouds.org This must-see concert on July 5 has been entertaining local families and visitors for 31 years. Hosted by the Ute Pass Symphony Guild, the annual event is a blend of pop, classical, and show tunes with a grand finale featuring Tchaikovsky’s 1812 Overture, bells, the Fort Carson cannon, and fireworks. Attracting crowds of several thousand people who bring blankets, lawn chairs, and picnic baskets, the concert, held at Woodland Park Middle School’s football field, is free to the public, but organizers work tirelessly each year to fund the celebration with donations from the city, corporate sponsors, and individual donors.

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The Greater Woodland Park Chamber of Commerce


Arts & Culture

Mountain Arts Festival

Rocky Mountain OktoberfestPlus

www.themountainartists.com Held the first weekend of August on the grounds of the Ute Pass Cultural Center, the two-day Mountain Arts Festival includes displays from more than 75 regional and national artists, including paintings, photography, jewelry, leather goods, pottery, basketry, stained glass, and woodwork. The juried event offers a chance to view numerous artists at work and to spend a day enjoying live music and food. The festival has been sponsored for 26 years by Mountain Artists, a nonprofit organization established in 1989 to foster appreciation and awareness of arts in the community and to promote visual art education. In addition to the festival, the group offers workshops and a variety of art exhibits throughout the year.

www.woodlandparkchamber.com Sponsored by the Greater Woodland Park Chamber of Commerce for 14 years, this annual two-day event, held in mid-September, features fun and games for all ages, arts and crafts, and vendors selling authentic German food, beer, and wine along with treats like funnel cakes and kettle corn. Held at the Ute Pass Cultural Center and surrounding area, the popular festival offers a variety of entertainment, including live German music and dancing. “We plan the event each year to provide lots of family fun. It’s an end of summer celebration the community looks forward to, and it is one of our biggest fundraisers of the year,” said Debbie Miller, president of the Greater Woodland Park Chamber. Proceeds help fund Chamber operations as well as training and advocacy programs.

Cruise Above the Clouds www.cruiseabovetheclouds.com Held the third Saturday in September, this annual two-day car show features up to 300 cars competing for cash, door prizes, and trophies. The show originated as a Woodland Park Chamber of Commerce event in 1991 and has been organized by the Cruise Above the Clouds Cruisers Car Club for the last 13 years. Drawing hundreds of spectators, it is held at Memorial Park in Woodland Park on Saturday and in Cripple Creek on Sunday. Oldies music is provided by local DJs, and all proceeds are donated to local charities. The SPEED Channel series My Classic Car filled the 2011 event for airing in 2012. www.woodlandparkchamber.com

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Calendar of Events

WHAT’S GOING ON For further information on these and other events please go to the Community Calendar at www.woodlandparkchamber.com or call 719.687.9885

monthly • Greater Woodland Park Chamber of Commerce Business After Hours • Third Tuesday of every month except December (held the second Tuesday in December)

spring March • Greater Woodland Park Chamber of Commerce Annual Dinner & Silent Auction & Awards

April • Chamber Spring Business Expo • KidsFest • Teller County Public Health Fair

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The Greater Woodland Park Chamber of Commerce


Calendar of Events

fall September • Pow Wow and Indian Market • Victor Celebrates the Arts • Cruise Above the Clouds Car Show • Rocky Mountain OktoberfestPlus • 2 Mile High Aspen Tours • Mt. Pisgah Speaks Cemetery Tour

October • Chamber Membership Breakfast • Spookfest

summer • Woodland Park Farmers Market (every Friday, June – September) • Woodland Music Series (second Saturday of the month, June – September)

November • Chamber Fall Business Expo • Rocky Mountain Christmas Boutique • Annual TCRAS Craft Fair • Christmas in Divide Craft Fair

June • WorshipFest Colorado • Donkey Derby Days

July • Old Fashioned 4th of July in Woodland Park • Fourth of July Fireworks – Woodland Park and Cripple Creek • Symphony Above the Clouds • Pikes Peak International Hill Climb • Greater Woodland Park Chamber of Commerce Golf Tournament • Victor Gold Rush Days • Teller County American Cancer Society’s Relay for Life • Lost Dutchman Resort Music Festival • Florissant Heritage Days

winter

August

December

• Dinosaur Resource Center CritterFest • Mountain Arts Festival • Teller County Fair • Touch A Truck Day • Mayor’s Cup 5K & 10K • Vino and Notes • Pikes Peak Ascent and Marathon

• Prospect Home Care & Hospice Lights of Love • Breakfast with Santa • Lighter Side of Christmas Parade • Woodland Park City Tree Lighting • Holiday Home Tour • Cripple Creek’s Gold Camp Christmas www.woodlandparkchamber.com

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Close

The Wonders of Woodland Park and Teller County Come home to Woodland Park/Teller County — come home to it all.

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The Greater Woodland Park Chamber of Commerce

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hen choosing a region to call home, many people struggle with alternatives. Scenic country living or urban amenities? Quiet calm or quality choices? Traditional living or forward progress? Well, when choosing Woodland Park and Teller County, there’s no need to compromise; you choose all of this, and more. Nestled in the stunning Pikes Peak region of Colorado, Woodland Park’s natural beauty is second-to-none, and the community has striven to grow and build in a manner that complements, rather than conquers, that beauty. From single professionals, to young families, to active retirees, the splendor and opportunities of this region are beckoning more and more people to Teller County. Businesses will find a highly educated workforce, while residents enjoy a high standard of living at a remarkably affordable cost, including a variety of housing for newcomers or vacationers. State-of-the-art health care services continue to expand, offering residents top-notch medical services in their own backyard. Innovative schools educate and inspire, graduating students who are ready for the challenges of higher education, national service, and the workforce. Community families of faith work to improve the lives of all those around them. Vast areas of public land are preserved, allowing visitors and residents to get up close to the majesty of nature, while conservation efforts preserve and protect vulnerable wildlife and an invaluable social and natural history. The culture of the region offers much to explore, from music, to art, to enjoying the fresh fruits of the land. Come home to Woodland Park/Teller County — come home to it all.


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Directory of Display Advertisers

Please Support These Valued Members Alpine Towing & Recovery.....................................27 American Family Insurance – Frank W. Gundy......8 Armentrout Construction LLC..................................1 Banana Belt Liquors...............................................19 Benchmark Mortgage – Diane Beaumont............11 Black Mountain Pump Service Inc..........................1 Bristlecone Lodge..................................................16 Carter Realty, Inc. – Ken Rudy / Tina Alibillar.......21 Coldwell Banker 1st Choice Realty.......................17 Compassion Animal Hospital.................................17 Cripple Creek Rehab & Wellness Center................7 El Tesoro de los Angelos Retreat Center...............15 Electric Service of Colorado LLC.............................8 Ent Federal Credit Union........................................32

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Factory Direct Carpet Warehouse & Design Center........................................................5 Horse Feathers Boutique & Hair Shoppe..............19 IREA...........................................................................1 The Law Office of Julie D. Myers, LLC..................11 Lenore Hotchkiss Real Estate...............................27 The Lost Dutchman Resort & Events Center........15 Michael Harper Real Estate...................................21 William H. Moller, Attorney at Law........................23 MountainView Care Center......................................8 Napa Auto Parts.......................................................8 Nuts ‘n Bolts...........................................................19 Paradise Condominiums........................................21 Penrose Mountain Urgent Care...............................8

The Greater Woodland Park Chamber of Commerce

Pikes Peak Regional Hospital and Surgery Center......................................................7 Pikes Peak Workforce Center..................................5 Pizza Hut.................................................................15 Rapid Lube................................................................8 RE/MAX Performance, Inc......................................33 Teller County Regional Animal Shelter..................17 Windows of Heaven...............................................33 Woodland Hardware & Rental...............................11 Woodland Park Partners – Western Centers, Inc...5 Woodland Park School District Re-2...........................Outside Back Cover


Preferred Business Listings

Preferred Business Listings Thank You For Your Support C.W’s Plumbing 119 Circle Drive Avenue Woodland Park, CO 80863 (719) 687-4122 cw6871120@yahoo.com C.W’s Plumbing is a locally owned and operated business with 37 years of experience. We can tackle new and old, install and repair. All jobs are FREE ESTIMATES. No job is too small for our expert attention.

City of Woodland Park 220 W. South Avenue P.O. Box 9007 Woodland Park, CO 80866 (719) 687-9246 www.city-woodlandpark.org The employees & volunteers of the City of Woodland Park value: Customer Service Integrity Stewardship Team Building Respect Loyalty Trust

Garden of the Gods Care Center 104 Lois Lane Colorado Springs, CO 80904 (719) 635-2569 fax (512) 635-2530 jlusk@solterraseniorliving.com www.solterraseniorliving.com

M Lazy C Ranch (Mule Creek Outfitters) 801 County Rd 453 Lake George, CO 80827 (719) 748-3398 or (800) 289-4868 www.mlazyc.com

Garden of the Gods Care Center is located near Old Colorado City, with majestic views of Pikes Peak. Our small home like setting is perfect for short-term guests needing post-surgical and posthospital care.

We offer a taste of the real old west at our famous guest ranch and homestead. Come for the day or relax and stay awhile. Enjoy our Cowboy U vacation package, Cavalry training, or dude ranch vacation.

Horse Feathers Boutique & Hair Shoppe 763 Gold Hill Square South Woodland Park, CO 80863 (719) 687-2665 www.horsefeatherswp.com This delightful boutique/hair shoppe brings you the latest in fashion with an eclectic affordable selection of new and nearly new clothing, jewelry, shoes, gifts, handbags, hats, greeting cards and accessories.

Mid-States Senior Living, LLC 400 W. Midland Avenue Woodland Park, CO 80863 (719) 686-8140 bob.harveyassoc@yahoo.com The mission is to provide compassionate residential care and comfort for residents from a four-county area. The new Forest Ridge Senior Living center will provide all levels of assistance, including memory care. Opening late in 2012.

Park State Bank & Trust 710 W. Highway 24 Woodland Park, CO 80866 (719) 687-9234 rmbpromarket@gmail.com www.mypsb.com One neighbor helping another since 1965, Park State Bank & Trust is your community bank. We provide a full line of quality financial services, blended with excellent personal service. Equal Housing Lender. Member FDIC.

Wal Mart Super Center #3805 19600 E. Hwy 24 Woodland Park, CO 80866 (719) 687-1065

State Farm Erica Stevens Agency 208 E. US Highway 24 Woodland Park, CO 80863 (719) 686-0046 fax (719) 686-0036 Erica@SFWoodlandPark.com www.SFWoodlandPark.com We nurture personal relationships with our clients and provide exceptional service to deliver solutions to our clients’ insurance and financial services needs. We honor our clients with compassion, commitment, & integrity.

Walmart always features a great selection of high-quality merchandise, friendly service and, of course, Every Day Low Prices. Walmart’s #1 goal remains providing the best shopping experience possible for our customers. Walmart. Save money. Live better.

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Woodland Park, CO 2012 Community Profile  

Woodland Park, CO 2012 Community Profile

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