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CommunityLink.com

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production vp of production operations Amanda White

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managing editor Laura Wilcoxen

photography The Chamber of Commerce of Southwest Indiana Chris Berneking Photography

copy consultant Jay Nehrkorn proofreader Christina Reese

lead design Joe Goetting web site creation & support Josh Chandler director of media purchasing Diana Vaughn

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account support Terri Ahner Tricia Cannedy

ad traffic Carol Smith ad design Josh Mueller human resources assistant Teresa Craig mailroom technician Melinda Bowlin

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Old Gallery Renovation at Evansville Museum a Major Step in Capital Project

Arena Is the Jewel of Downtown’s Crown

Significant Growth, Specialized Service

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19

Re-Imagined

Leaders in Southwestern Indiana

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22

Report Card: K–12 Schools

Family Fun in Evansville

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04 05

A Unified Local Government Improving Efficiency and Accessibility

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information technology

Regional Focus, Longer Reach

publishing systems specialist Christopher Miller

executive leadership chairman and founder Craig Williams

08

Reaching for the Stars

Road to Tomorrow

administrative support administrative support Kathy Hagene Carol Smith

02

I-69 Update

advertising ad research Mary Kopshever Amy SchwartzkoPf

table of contents

chief financial officer Rhonda Harsy

Chamber Has Joined Other Economic Leaders at Innovation Pointe

ABOUT   This book is published by CommunityLink

and distributed through The Chamber of Commerce of Southwest Indiana. For advertising information or questions or comments about this book, contact CommunityLink at 800-455-5600 or by e-mail at info@CommunityLink.com.

The Chamber of Commerce of Southwest Indiana 318 Main Street, Suite 401, Evansville, IN 47708 Telephone 812-425-8147 Fax 812-421-5883 www.ccswin.com © 2011 Craig Williams Creative, Inc., 4742 Holts Prairie Road, Post Office Box 306, Pinckneyville, IL 62274-0306, 618-357-8653. All rights reserved. No portion of this book may be reproduced without the expressed written consent of the publisher.

View this magazine at: www.communitylink.com/evansville-indiana/

2 The Chamber of Commerce of Southwest Indiana

07

Manufacturing Matters Sharing Best Practices to Spur Growth

Downtown Dynamism

New Life fueled by whirlpool

Education

Deaconess Health System

We the People

Recreation Destinations

Higher Education Highlights

Arts in Evansville See, Hear, Experience

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27

Youth Power Great Programs for Southwest Indiana’s Most Valuable Resource

2011 Chamber Calendar of Events Please Join Us

17

Health Care

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St. Mary’s: Committed to Excellence, Hope, and a Spiritual Center

Numbers to Know

index of advertisers 4C of Southern Indiana, Inc................................. 26 BKD LLP..................................................................... 10 BMG, Inc......................................................................6 Crossroads Christian Church............................... 23 Dunn Hospitality Group......................................... 24 EconoLodge.................................................................9 Economic Development Coalition of Southwest Indiana.............................................1 ERA First Advantage Realty, Inc......................... 17 Evansville Christian School.................................. 12 Evansville Vanderburgh Public Library............. 15

Get Connected

Evansville Vanderburgh School Corporation....12 F. C. Tucker Emge REALTORS.................................9 Fairfield Inn Evansville West................................ 21 Fifth Third Bank..........................................................3 Heritage Federal Credit Union............................Inside Back Cover Holiday Inn Express Evansville West................ 23 John Friend & Company, P.C...................................6 Kenny Kent Toyota.................................................. 21 New Harmony Inn......................................................5 Schulz Realtors........................................................ 15 T.R.U. Event Rental, Inc.............................................5 University of Southern Indiana........................... 13 Vectren...................................................................... 18


economic development coalition of sw in

IFFC (FP)

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Reaching for the Stars Old Gallery Renovation at Evansville Museum a Major Step in Capital Project

It will “bring the museum into the 21st century and beyond.”

By The Chamber of Commerce Staff

T

hat’s how Evansville Museum officials have described “Reaching for the Stars,” the most ambitious expansion/ renovation project in the institution’s 104-year history. According to museum officials, the $15 million capital project “not only addresses key existing infrastructure needs, but will also dynamically reconfigure our architectural profile. Through this project we shall be able, in our exhibitions and programming, to enlighten and inspire our visitors in the areas of arts, history, and science in a way never before possible.” Early in 2010, the board of trustees of the Evansville Museum moved forward with a key aspect of the “Reaching for the Stars” project with the total renovation of the 5,000-square-foot Old Gallery, the institution’s largest changing exhibition space. Dedicated in 1985 as part of an extensive Southeast Wing addition, the gallery was created with funding support from Old National Bank to honor Dorothea Schlechte, who opened the original Old Gallery in 1964 at the Old National Bank branch in Washington Square Mall as a showcase for the work of area artists. Old National Bank provided major funding for a facelift that includes all-new walls and wall coverings, floor coverings, and lighting for this multi­purpose area, in which so much of the life of the museum is focused. An important new feature in the space was the construction of The Richardt Room, located adjacent to the present kitchen facilities. An area that can be closed off from the larger gallery for smaller meetings and activities, the room is dedicated to the memory of Charlotte Minden Richardt, longtime museum friend and benefactor. At present, $13.2 million has been raised for “Reaching for the Stars,” which will ultimately see the addition of a 2.5-story glass pavilion that will not only serve as the museum’s new main entrance, with direct access from the parking area, but will also house a state-of-the-art theater employing the latest in planetarium technology, affording a 360-degree immersive

2 The Chamber of Commerce of Southwest Indiana

viewing experience for its audience. Plans also include the creation of new exhibition spaces for history and science; a new FamilyPlace Gallery for hands-on learning opportunities in science; a permanent exhibition recalling Evansville’s substantial involvement in the World War II home front effort, with special emphasis on the LST shipyards; two new Learning Centers for classes and workshops; The Begley Art Source, the museum’s art consultation service; the Museum Shop; and needed facility infrastructure improvements. Most of the monies raised thus far have been secured during the campaign’s “quiet period” from major benefactors, area corporations, and foundations. Museum Trustee Jeffery Berger, whose efforts are being importantly supported by Christine Keck, Jennifer Roll, and their fellow board members, is chairing the Public Campaign, which gives the opportunity


Most of the monies raised thus far have been secured during the campaign’s “quiet period” from major benefactors, area corporations, and foundations.

for wider community support. The new, adjusted goal is estimated at $17.5 million, with $14.5 million designated for construction and $3 million for endowment. The museum’s expansion and current projects were designed by Evansville’s VPS Architecture and Ratio Architects Inc. of Indianapolis. Contractors for projects that have been completed to date include Deig Brothers Lumber & Construction Company, Danco Construction Inc., Tri-State Painting Company, Mel-Kay Electric Company, Tri-State Lighting & Supply Company, Industrial Contractors Inc., and Bartley & Perigo Masonry Contractors Inc.

www.ccswin.com 3


I-69 Update Road to Tomorrow

By Mark Allen

S

outhwestern Indiana’s push for a direct and fast path to Indianapolis via Interstate 69 is a decades-long effort that has recently developed great momentum. By the summer of 2011, the I-69 extension is expected to be the largest current transportation construction project in the country, with about 5,000 people working to build a road to tomorrow, says Steve Schaefer, executive director of Hoosier Voices for I-69. “The significant progress on the Interstate 69 project is a direct result of the years of hard work by business and community leaders that have advocated for this economic development tool. This highway is becoming a reality and is truly about jobs and creating a better quality of life. It is an important economic development tool that will benefit generations of Hoosiers.” At a May 2010 event, Governor Mitch Daniels described the progress as “startling” and announced a goal of extending the interstate to the Crane Naval Surface Warfare Center by the

4 The Chamber of Commerce of Southwest Indiana

end of 2012 and Bloomington in 2014, years ahead of schedule. “I’ve said it many times before, if it were just about getting from Evansville to Indianapolis, it wouldn’t be worth  $2 billion  to  $3 billion,” Daniels said. “It’s so much bigger than that.” Sections 1–3 got officially under way in the last year with groundbreakings on highway and bridge structures. The buildi69.com site charts the recent past and exciting future. “It has been a long-standing effort on the part of leaders in Southwest Indiana,” says Matt Meadors, president and CEO of The Chamber of Commerce of Southwest Indiana. “We have started to make very strong headway in recent years.” This project will complete three of the highway’s six sections of independent utility between Evansville and Indianapolis. Construction has been progressing northeast, starting at the intersection of Interstate 64 and State Road 57. “We’re excited about the accelerated timetable for Sections 1–4 of the I-69 extension, but must remain vigilant in our support and advocacy to fully complete the highway from Evansville to

“We have started to make very strong headway in recent years.”

Indianapolis,” Schaefer notes. The potential economic development benefits for the region are significant. Project supporters and economic development leaders expect it to attract advanced distribution and logistics companies to the region. Meadors says that eventually Evansville will have interstate access, within a day’s drive, to 70 percent of both the U.S. and Canadian populations. “The extension of Interstate 69 will mean Southwest Indiana enjoys full and unfettered interstate access north, south, east, and west. That’s huge.” The highway construction will necessitate other infrastructure improvements as well. Interstate 69 is a U.S. Department of Transportation-designated Corridor of the Future, which will connect Texas, Louisiana, Arkansas, Mississippi, Tennessee, Kentucky, Indiana, and Michigan. As a result, a new bridge over the Ohio River is necessary to ensure that traffic does not become bottlenecked between Southwest Indiana and Northwest Kentucky.


A Unified Local Government Improving Efficiency and Accessibility

By Carol Cummings

A

plan is currently under review to consider the consolidation of Evansville and Vanderburgh County governments. In 2009, the League of Women Voters of Southwestern Indiana  exercised a provision of state law to call for preparation of a plan that would merge Evansville and Vanderburgh County governments into a single, unified government. As a result, the Evansville-Vanderburgh Government Reorganization Committee was appointed by the city and the county to study the options, feasibility, and efficiencies of merging city and county government. According to the proponents of unifying into a single, countywide government, this would: • Create new efficiencies and expand the efficiencies already achieved in combined government services, such as Central Dispatch and 911. • Make local government more easily accessible and accountable to its citizens. • Create an integrated leadership structure that can have a unified vision for advancing our community.

The committee is conducting much of its work in subcommittees, which explored and made recommendations on governance, infrastructure, planning and zoning, public safety, tax and finance, and parks and recreation. The plan for government unification was finalized by the Evansville-Vanderburgh Government Reorganization Committee in late 2010 after a series of public forums were held, and the plan was evaluated in light of the opinions expressed in those forums. The plan must still gain the approval of the Vanderburgh County Commissioners and the Evansville City Council, who will review and act on the plan in 2011. According to Steve Schaefer, vice president of public policy for The Chamber of Commerce of Southwest Indiana, it is anticipated that the reorganization plan will go to the voters via a public referendum in 2012. “Benefits of unification are increased transparency, streamlined government operations, unified leadership and vision, enhanced economic development, and long-term cost savings,” Schaefer explains. “Louisville, Lexington, and Nashville are all communities that have

experienced tremendous growth and good fortune due to unified city–county government.” Rebecca Kasha, development director for Mesker Park Zoo and Botanic Garden, is chair of the Evansville-Vanderburgh Government Reorganization Committee. She sees many potential improvements to be gained in consolidation. “My research has convinced me that government consolidation leads to improved economic development, more efficient and uniform provision of government services, lower transaction costs for consumers of government services, and, most important to me, increased transparency and accountability among local officials.”

By Appointment only

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1519 N. Fulton Ave. Evansville, IN 47710 www.ccswin.com 5


Regional Focus, Longer Reach The Chamber Has Joined Other Economic Leaders at Innovation Pointe

By Carol Cummings

S

erving more than 1,500 members, The Chamber of Commerce of Southwest Indiana is one of the largest regional chambers of commerce in Indiana. The Chamber is widely viewed as a high-impact, visionary organization, serving its members and leading Southwest Indiana by fostering an innovative business, educational, cultural, and governmental environment that excels in a global marketplace.

Strategic partnerships with other regional economic development organizations are key to successfully pursuing The Chamber’s mission. To help foster such cooperation, in 2009 The Chamber chose to move its offices to Innovation Pointe, a high-tech business incubator and Indiana certified technology park in Downtown Evansville. Here, The Chamber co-located with the Economic Development Coalition of Southwest Indiana, joining a

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6 The Chamber of Commerce of Southwest Indiana

group of some of the most active workers in the regional economic scene, including Grow Southwest Indiana Workforce, SCORE, the Small Business Development Center, and the Growth Alliance for Greater Evansville. The University of Southern Indiana and the Indiana Economic Development Corporation also have a presence in the building. “The vision was to bring mission-similar organizations together into one location in order to encourage collaboration, create synergies, and enhance economic efficiencies, while becoming more customer-centric and maximizing our region’s economic development potential,” says Matt Meadors, Chamber president & CEO. The co-location of The Chamber and Coalition with other economic development organizations was a long-standing vision shared by many of Southwest Indiana’s leaders, and with good reason. In a competitive national marketplace, communities need every edge. Having a single location that’s home to a wealth of economic development experts and facilitators means corporate site selectors can come to one place to meet with all of the region’s leading economic players. Southwest Indiana is presented with a united front and a business-friendly stance. Furthering that great first impression is the building itself, replete with high-tech tools and amenities in a contemporary, attractively designed setting. The setting is also of great service to present as well as potential businesses. With the second and third floors dedicated to incubating high-tech startups, entrepreneurs need only step upstairs to access the expertise of a variety of business experts. The first floor features a regional art gallery that is home to the Southwest Indiana Arts Council. The Chamber and Coalition have renovated the fourth floor of Innovation Pointe to best serve their missions and functions. The result is a beautiful new home that will serve both organizations well into the future and solidify their role in bringing new business and prosperity to Southwest Indiana. “Though it didn’t happen overnight, I believe that regionalism has moved beyond an abstract concept into an everyday way of operating in our community,” Evansville Mayor Jonathan Weinzapfel commented in a September 2010 speech to the Indiana Economic Development Association.


Manufacturing Matters Sharing Best Practices to Spur Growth

“For a small company, this cost savings can be a real benefit.”

By David Ballard

A

n initiative of The Chamber of Commerce of Southwest Indiana, the Tri-State Manufacturers’ Alliance (TSMA) is taking on the challenges of a difficult economy and a struggling industry through collected — and collective — wisdom, with the goal of making manufacturing in the Tri-State area more competitive. Comprised of local manufacturers and their support network, TSMA operates with one simple idea: Manufacturing executives cannot go it alone anymore. “Typically, manufacturers hold information close to their chest and don’t share best practices,” says Herb Rawlings, operations manager at QTR, Inc. and chairman of TSMA. “TSMA’s core belief is to share best practices to help each other grow.” TSMA’s mission says it all: The group strives “to create a vibrant and attractive manufacturing environment that results in improved revenue and profitability as well as an increase in employment for local manufacturers.” In that vein, TSMA focuses on providing resources and the latest information about manufacturing practices to its members. For $225 in annual dues, corporate membership in TSMA includes quarterly events, local peer groups, plant tours, and a hot topics speaker series, while associate membership for non-manufacturing organizations includes quarterly events, plant tours, and the hot topics speaker series. Dave Conner, CFO at Anchor Industries and past chairman of TSMA, says that engaging local manufacturers in topical discussions, sharing knowledge and best practices, and providing these services in the local community allows executive members to maximize their time and increase their exposure to other leaders and business practices. For example, TSMA’s targeted networking allows members to meet

other manufacturers who share many of the same challenges and issues facing them in daily operations. The effectiveness of the peer groups alone is worth the price of admission. “The companies in the LEAN peer group have been able to reduce their inventory substantially, therefore reducing their costs and scrap rates,” says Rawlings. Additionally, Rawlings explained how the reliability and maintenance peer group resolved a challenge they were having getting their maintenance technicians specialized training — a very costly venture since each company had to send one or more technicians away for weeklong training. The solution was simple: By jointly discussing this cost concern, the group decided they could get all their training technicians together and bring a trainer to the area, eliminating all travel expenses.

“For a small company, this cost savings can be a real benefit,” says Rawlings. “For larger companies with five or six people that need training, this can be an even greater savings.” Still, some companies have concerns about sharing trade secrets. However, TSMA automatically places companies with competing interests in separate peer groups. With all these benefits of joining, it’s hard to “manufacture” a reason not to.

To Learn More Tri-State Manufacturers’ Alliance (TSMA) Julie Ko, manager of business services 812-425-8147 :: jko@ccswin.com www.ccswin.com/busndev/tsmaindex.asp

www.ccswin.com 7


Downtown Dynamism Arena Is the Jewel of Downtown’s Crown

By Mark Allen

N

ot so long ago, a dramatically exciting vision for Evansville’s downtown seemed just a vision. Now, it’s amazingly concrete and rising before our eyes. For years, the city wrestled with the destiny of venerable but tired Roberts Stadium. Evansville cast its lot with a new, architecturally significant arena in the heart of downtown, a multimilliondollar jewel that can host 11,000 happy patrons for sporting events, concerts, and conventions. Scheduled to open in November 2011, the arena features a bold, curved design that evokes

8 The Chamber of Commerce of Southwest Indiana

The city focused on downtown for the new arena because locating there allowed the city to repay bonds sold to finance construction via tax increment financing and receipts from food, beverages, and gaming. No property tax revenue will be utilized for repayment, so there will be no tax increases for residents. To accompany the arena, some new downtown developments are starting to open, while others are eagerly anticipated. The project includes demolishing part of the Executive Inn and building a new 220room hotel that will link with the current convention center and the new arena. The city issued a request for qualifications and proposals for the project in September 2010. Additionally, the city is exploring options for establishing the arena as home ice for a professional hockey team, with interest expressed by the Evansville IceMen and other Midwest leagues. The city is also planning to feature public art displays in the arena’s plaza. Weinzapfel says the projects in the works are positively transformative for the city. “It’s really going to enhance the downtown, which is the heart of our community. If downtown is

“This is a project that transforms our community and creates jobs.”

Evansville’s locale on a graceful horseshoe bend of the Ohio River, with a sweeping façade of Indiana limestone and glass. “Given the public’s overwhelmingly positive reaction to the design, there is no doubt that the arena will not only be the anchor of downtown but the ‘must-have’ venue for concerts, tournaments, and conferences throughout the region,” Evansville Mayor Jonathan Weinzapfel commented in an October 2009 speech.


thriving, people’s perception is that the whole community is thriving.” The benefits will go beyond raising Evansville’s reputation, though. As early as February 2010, area realtors were reporting a rise of as much as 20 percent in property values around the downtown arena site, with markedly increased investor interest in the area. Experts predict that businesses within a nine-block radius of the arena will all see a value increase. Further, to date, the lion’s share of construction work has gone to Evansville-area firms. “This is a project that transforms our community and creates jobs,” Weinzapfel says. “I think it will dramatically improve people’s perception of what Evansville’s about. This is a great place to live, work, and raise a family.”

The extent of downtown’s dynamism radiates and ripples far and wide. Among the many examples of progress are: • A new design for the Lloyd Expressway/ Fulton Avenue interchange that makes it easier for drivers to access Downtown Evansville. • Don’s Clayton’s DCI Fine DryCleaning’s new fully automated drop-off and pickup facility at Main and Third streets. • Main Gate, a new sports bar and restaurant in the 500 block of Main. • The Refuge Coffee House and Cafe at Main and Second. • Eclipse Spanish Tapas Bar & Restaurant at 113 Fourth Street.

• A Subway location at Third and Main streets in a historic downtown building that is returning to life via extensive renovation. • An extensive revitalization of Audubon Apartments. “These are very exciting times for Evansville and Southwest Indiana as a whole,” says Matt Meadors, president and CEO of The Chamber of Commerce of Southwest Indiana.

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www.ccswin.com 9


New Life FUELED BY Whirlpool Re-Imagined

By Mark Allen & Chamber of Commerce Staff

W

hen a community learns an iconic factory will close, it must react or respond. Evansville responded in a big way to the shutdown of production of Whirlpool’s refrigerator plant north of town. “Most people considered it not very good news,” says Greg Wathen, president and CEO of the Economic Development Coalition of Southwest Indiana. “There is something of a psychological blow from the company shutting down manufacturing.” However, Evansville is working to turn a potential negative into a big positive. Though initial plans called for a technology park to take shape on the site, further evaluation has shifted the planning focus. The direction will

10 The Chamber of Commerce of Southwest Indiana

“I think Evansville will always have a very strong manufacturing core.”

now be to leverage the engineering and technical talent currently contained at the Whirlpool site into growing an emerging design technology sector within our region, rather than having a specific site development focus. “As people say, the phoenix does rise out of the fire, out of the ashes,” Wathen says. Although the area is losing the production jobs, Whirlpool intends to continue a vital piece of their operation at the present site. The manufacturing powerhouse plans to retain their 300-plus employee Product Development Center (PDC), which is located on the existing manufacturing site. The engineering operation previously worked in the shadow of the manufacturing arm of the plant. “Most people are probably not aware the PDC was there,” Wathen says. Whirlpool was clear on wanting to remain a part of Evansville. “We are committed to making things work in Evansville. While we are looking at a variety of options, each of the paths we are pursuing is intended to enable Evansville to be home to a Whirlpool Corporation technical center,” says Jill M. Saletta, Whirlpool’s director of external communications. Wathen acknowledges that while the end of manufacturing at the Whirlpool plant was a loss, much has been gained, as more than $1 billion has been invested in the Evansville metropolitan area in the last year. Additionally, Evansville’s unemployment is lower than state and national averages. “It may be a case of not being able to see the forest for the trees,” Wathen says. “We’re probably weathering the storm better than other regions.” Area leaders hope to build on Evansville’s present strength to create an equally solid future, starting with the design technology strategy. “Over time, this strategy will help us focus on more technically skilled jobs and create an environment here to let them thrive. It can also help give us a more clear focus on new strategies for the long term,” says Wathen. But welcoming the new doesn’t mean the city’s leaders are turning their backs on the old — they’re just working to build a diversified economy. “I think Evansville will always have a very strong manufacturing core,” Wathen asserts. “The design technology strategy is a natural extension of what we do on the manufacturing side. A lot of research and development work goes on in the area but is generally performed inside the factories. If we can focus on those kinds of things, we can extend that out.” In early 2011, the Coalition will hire an internationally recognized consulting firm to help the community draft the new strategy and to provide analysis of what other sector opportunities might exist based on the region’s significant economic assets. Wathen notes that the region has a sizeable plastics industry, and research on advanced materials such as plastics and aluminum, as well as advanced coal and other forms of green energy production, could occur throughout the region. “We have an opportunity to build something here that is unique.”


Education Report Card: K–12 Schools

By David Ballard

Warrick County School Corporation www.warrick.k12.in.us

The 2010–2011 school year is Warrick County School Corporation’s 49th. Since its inception, the Warrick County School Corporation has provided world-class educational experiences to Warrick County students, with the staff committed to the principle that “Every child can achieve and counts!” High Academic Standards

• Proven instructional practices are integrated to maximize student learning and achievement. • Differentiated instruction is provided in every classroom. • Parental involvement and strong community support is encouraged.

Evansville Vanderburgh School Corporation www.evscschools.com

The Evansville Vanderburgh School Corporation began the 2010–2011 school year with a host of innovative school options at all levels for parents and students. These options allow the EVSC to best serve personalized educational needs for student success. And, with the announcement by the Indiana Department of Education that school district boundaries have been abolished, waiving tuition transfer fees, students from other counties can now take advantage of the versatility of academic choices the EVSC offers.

Since its inception, the Warrick County School Corporation has provided world-class educational experiences to Warrick County students.

Successes

• Excelled on statewide testing in 2009–2010, setting an all-time high for students passing English/Language and Mathematics. • Continued to add rigor to an already challenging curriculum, with additional advancedplacement courses and dual-credit offerings. • Provides dual-credit agreements with the University of Evansville, the University of Southern Indiana, Oakland City University, and Ivy Tech. Students earned 759 college credits in 2009–2010. Improvements

• To meet the needs of a growing student population, facility additions and improvements continue in Warrick County schools. Renovations to Castle High School and classroom technology enhancements were completed in all Warrick schools in summer 2010. • The Technology Department designed and launched a new user-friendly website, providing relevant information about the corporation and all 17 schools.

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Outstanding Academic Options

As a pillar of the EVSC’s Strategic Plan, innovative school models allow students to select the way they want to learn, with an eye to their futures. Options this year include:

• • Early College High School: Students earn a high school diploma and work toward an associate degree or up to two years of credit toward a bachelor’s degree. • New Tech Institute: Academy for Innovation and Entrepreneurial Leadership: Without traditional classroom boundaries, students work in groups on projects that encompass multiple areas of learning. • EVSC Virtual Academy: Students earn credits for credit recovery or advancement through

online learning and the support of a licensed teacher. Academy for Innovative Studies: For students in grades six through 12 who want or need a non-traditional learning environment. Helfrich Park STEM Academy: Focused academy for science, technology, engineering, and math. Randall Shepard Academy for Law and Social Justice: Junior and senior high school students study law, social justice, American policy, and social values while earning college credit. Equity Schools: Howard Roosa and Delaware elementary schools and McGary Middle School have been given the authority to ­exercise increased control over school

operations without clearance from the Central Office. • Elementary schools offering Project CHILD: A research-based, three-dimensional system, emphasis is placed on reading, writing, and mathematics. Science and social studies topics are incorporated throughout. • Middle and high schools offering Project Based Learning: Students focus on solving a complex problem through a collaborative process of investigation over an extended period. • Elementary schools offering No Excuses University (www.evscschools.com/fairlawn): These schools actively promote a comprehensive model of college readiness to all students the moment they begin elementary school. Top Technology

• All high school students are now in the second year of access to 1-to-1 computing, providing each student with a netbook or other laptop computer for their use at school and at home. • The Equity Schools — Howard Roosa and Delaware elementary schools and McGary Middle School — are also being infused with technological tools for teachers and students. • Glenwood Leadership Academy, a K–8 school, was recently the recipient of a large federal grant, and a portion of the funding will be used for 1-to-1 computing.

12 The Chamber of Commerce of Southwest Indiana


university of southern indiana

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Higher Education Highlights By David Ballard

among the top 10 comprehensive universities in the United States for study abroad programs.

University of Southern Indiana www.usi.edu

Global Reach

The University of Southern Indiana is an engaged learning community, advancing education and knowledge, enhancing civic and cultural awareness, and fostering partnerships through comprehensive outreach programs. In the fall of 2010, the $31.9 million Business and Engineering Center opened. An $18.4 million expansion to the University Center opened in January 2011, and a planned, second-phase expansion of the center, a $16.5 million teaching theater, will have seating for 350 people.

• A campus at Harlaxton College in Grantham, England. • Offering studies in Italy, England, New Zealand, France, Mexico, Spain, Russia, Israel, the Netherlands, and Australia. • Opportunities for UE students to explore the interconnectedness of our global society and to become empowered by technology that brings the world close to them.

Ivy Tech USI Has:

• More than 70 undergraduate majors, 10 graduate degrees, and a doctorate in Nursing Practice. • A new graduate degree program in communications and a new undergraduate degree in biochemistry. • An enrollment of over 10,000, including over 700 graduate students. Noncredit classes and workshops serving over 15,000 students. In Addition, USI:

• Is a leader in STEM (science, technology, engineering, mathematics) outreach in Southwestern Indiana. • Is among the top 10 percent in the nation in pass rates for national nursing licensing. • Has the only accredited baccalaureate sonography program in the state. • Was named “Radio School of the Year” by the Indiana Association of School Broadcasters. • Has captured first place in the Indiana CPA student competition for five consecutive years. • Captured the 2010 national championship in baseball.

14 The Chamber of Commerce of Southwest Indiana

www.ivytech.edu/evansville

University of Evansville www.evansville.edu

Established in 1854, the University of Evansville has a rich history that spans more than 150 years. Since its inception, the university has enjoyed a strong relationship with the United Methodist Church, sharing its commitment to inclusiveness. Students savor a sense of belonging on campus and appreciate the significance of their personal and professional behavior. Faculty members are passionate about teaching and prepare students for success! UE Accomplishments

• 2,799 students, from 44 states and 50 countries. • Distinctive curriculum built on great ideas, timeless themes, significant questions, and multiple perspectives, preparing students not only for their first jobs, but for their very best jobs. • Received national recognition for dedication to international education and is ranked

Ivy Tech Community College is the state’s largest public postsecondary institution and the nation’s largest singly accredited statewide community college system, serving nearly 200,000 students annually. About Ivy Tech - Southwest

• Founded in 1968, Ivy Tech Community College’s Southwest region serves Daviess, Dubois, Gibson, Knox, Perry, Pike, Posey, Spencer, Vanderburgh, and Warrick counties.  • Renovated in 2005, the region’s main campus, located in Evansville, enrolls more than 8,000 students annually. • Ivy Tech Community College - Southwest has locations in Evansville, Princeton, and Tell City. Ivy Tech Community College – Southwest also offers classes at locations in Mt. Vernon and throughout the tri-state. • Degrees and certificates offered through Ivy Tech - Southwest include some of Indiana’s most popular career fields, including: nursing, medical assisting, business administration,


computer information technology, criminal justice, education, energy, advanced manufacturing, and more. • Ivy Tech Community College - Southwest also offers a variety of non-credit continuing-education options, including workforce training and personal enrichment classes. The Corporate Services Department at Ivy Tech helps companies meet their individual training needs and offers customized training on-campus or on-site. The Workforce Certification Center provides pre-employment testing, job analysis, certification testing, and human resources consulting.

Harrison College – Evansville Campus www.harrison.edu

Harrison College – Evansville Campus began training students for business and health sciences careers in 1994. Since then, its program has expanded and the school has placed thousands of well-trained graduates into the workforce. Approximately 320 students currently attend evening and day classes at the Evansville campus.

Harrison College of Indiana is a nationally accredited college with more than 75,000 graduates, offering a unique learning environment for students who want to pursue a career-focused, quality education and to complete their degree in a student-centered atmosphere.

Oakland City University www.oak.edu

Oakland City University in Oakland City, Ind., stands for academic excellence in a warm, Christian environment. A private, liberal arts university nestled among 34 acres of oak trees, founded by General Baptists in 1885, OCU places an emphasis on nurturing students’ faith and preparing them for servant leadership. While OCU is the only General Baptist institution of higher education and maintains strong ties to the denomination, students of all faiths are welcome. OCU offers associate, bachelor’s, master’s, and doctorate degrees. Total enrollment at all five OCU centers is over 2,000, with 600 students on the main campus. Oakland City University’s student body represents 18 countries.

ITT Technical Institute www.itt-tech.edu

ITT Technical Institute is a leading private college system offering technology-oriented programs. The six schools at the ITT Technical Institutes [School of Information Technology, School of Drafting and Design, School of Electronics Technology, School of Business, School of Criminal Justice, and School of Health Sciences] teach skills and knowledge that can be used to begin careers in our global technologydriven culture. The Evansville area location offers career-focused degree programs.

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Youth Power Great Programs for Southwest Indiana’s Most Valuable Resource

Every opportunity in Girl Scouting encourages girls to become courageous, self-confident people of character who take action to make a difference in the world. By Jay Nehrkorn

Girl Scouts of Southwest Indiana 812-421-4970 :: www.girlscouts-gssi.org

The premier leadership development program for girls in grades K–12, Girl Scouts provides activities that are girl-led and feature learning by doing and cooperative learning. Every opportunity in Girl Scouting encourages girls to become courageous, self-confident people of character who take action to make a difference in the world. Five Pathways allow girls to participate in ways that suit them best ... and girls have fun, too!

Junior Achievement of Southwestern Indiana 812-425-8152 :: www.swindiana.ja.org

Junior Achievement of Southwestern Indiana is a nonprofit financial literacy organization that serves over 18,000 students in a 13-county

16 The Chamber of Commerce of Southwest Indiana

area. Each year, their programs bring hundreds of experienced business professionals from the community into the classrooms, where they can present JA curricula and their own experiences in a way that provides practical and realistic learning opportunities for students. The programs give students positive role models, business skills, and real-world experiences and strategies for development and success.

YMCA of Southwestern Indiana 812-423-9622 :: www.ymca.evansville.net

The YMCA of Southwestern Indiana offers a variety of youth and adult programs at their Downtown and Dunigan family centers in Evansville, including aquatics, health and wellness, sports, and educational programs. Based at their downtown location, they also operate a Community Outreach Branch that provides self-esteem and character-building programs to

help at-risk youth reach their full potential. North of Evansville, the YMCA’s Camp Carson in Princeton offers safe, activity-packed summer camps for youth.

Youth First Inc. 812-421-8336 :: www.youthfirstinc.org

Based in Evansville, Youth First Inc. is a notfor-profit agency that collaborates with schools, churches, and other community agencies to strengthen youth and families. Youth First provides school-based social workers and evidencebased prevention programs serving over 30,000 individuals a year in Vanderburgh, Warrick, Posey, and Gibson counties. The agency’s primary goals are to prevent substance abuse, promote healthy behaviors, and maximize student success.


Health Care St. Mary’s: Committed to Excellence, Hope, and a Spiritual Center

www.stmarys.org

By St. Mary’s Staff

S

t. Mary’s has an extensive history of service to Evansville and the surrounding communities and has grown into a health system encompassing numerous health facilities throughout the Tri-State. A member of Ascension Health, the nation’s largest Catholicsponsored, not-for-profit health system, St. Mary’s is one of the largest employers in Southern Indiana.

Commitment to Excellence • St. Mary’s Physician-Driven Quality Initiatives include performanceimprovement projects and teams that are led by physicians. • St. Mary’s Journey to Nursing Excellence focuses on a goal of earning “Magnet” certification from the American Nurses Association, the highest level of nursing quality. Fewer than 300 hospitals (of 5,500 nationwide) have achieved this recognition. • St. Mary’s Relationship-Based Model of Care, related to the Journey to Nursing Excellence, is excellent health care achieved through collaborative relationships. Relationship-Based Care takes place in a caring, competent, and healing environment organized around the needs and priorities of the patients and their families, who are at the center of the care team.

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Heart Services In partnership with Ohio Valley HeartCare, St. Mary’s provides comprehensive cardiology and cardiovascular surgery services for the TriState area. St. Mary’s Heart Institute is proud to offer a full array of cutting-edge diagnostic and interventional cardiac services and is a recognized leader in community education and screenings that form the front line against heart disease. Along with exemplary cardiac care, St. Mary’s Heart Institute is ranked in the top 10 percent in the nation for fastest heart attack care. Patients consistently rate St. Mary’s in the top 1 percent compared to other hospitals in the country. St. Mary’s Cardiac and Pulmonary Rehabilitation program is nationally certified by the American Association of Cardiovascular and Pulmonary Rehabilitation and is one of the largest cardiac rehab programs in the state of Indiana. Patients are able to exercise in a stateof-the-art facility with immediate emergency care available.

Trauma Services St. Mary’s Trauma Services provides efficient and rapid responses to all trauma patients,

18 The Chamber of Commerce of Southwest Indiana

St. Mary’s Heart Institute is ranked in the top 10 percent in the nation for fastest heart attack care. around the clock. For the most seriously ill or injured patients — including children, infants, and newborns — St. Mary’s LifeFlight provides helicopter transport. In 2009, St. Mary’s earned the first and only Level II Pediatric Trauma verification by the American College of Surgeons – Committee on Trauma (ACS-COT) in the tri-state region, making it the most comprehensive trauma program in the area. The ACS-COT verification is the gold standard for trauma programs across the nation. This verification makes St. Mary’s the only combined Level II Pediatric and Adult Trauma Centers in the region.

St. Mary’s is committed to the health and well-being of all of its patients — pediatric, adult, and seniors. St. Mary’s employs two fulltime pediatric intensivists and two full-time pediatric hospitalists. The hospital has both a pediatric transport team and a newborn intensive care unit transport team, the area’s most advanced NICU, a Center for Children that specializes in children with unique medical needs, and a No Pain Campaign, which is a numbing cream applied to kids before they have a painful IV stick or a lab draw. St. Mary’s also features the tri-state’s only Pediatric Rehabilitation Center accredited by CARF (Commission on Accreditation of Rehabilitation Facilities). The physicians and nurses of St. Mary’s Trauma Services have to fulfill continuous medical-education requirements in order to ensure the highest possible standards for trauma, emergency, and intensive care patients.

Spirituality in the Workplace Spirituality in the Workplace is an ongoing variety of education, activities, and renewal of St. Mary’s spiritually based mission, vision, and values. It includes Daily Reflections, the Mission Representative Program, and prayers as the opening for all meetings/surgeries.


Deaconess Health System Significant Growth, Specialized Service

By Deaconess Staff

D

eaconess Health System is a premier provider of health care services in Southwestern Indiana, Western Kentucky, and Southeastern Illinois. The system includes six hospitals in southern Indiana: • Deaconess Hospital, an acute-care facility. • The Women’s Hospital, serving the needs of women and infants. • Deaconess Gateway Hospital, an acute-care facility. • Deaconess Cross Pointe, a behavioral-health hospital.

• The Heart Hospital at Deaconess Gateway, focusing solely on providing leading-edge inpatient and outpatient heart care services. • HealthSouth Deaconess Rehabilitation Hospital, specializing in comprehensive medical rehabilitation. Also included in the system are a freestanding cancer center, a health system and physician-owned managed-care network of preferred hospitals and doctors, two ambulatory-surgery centers, 19 ambulatory-care sites (including the largest physician group in the area), two

Since opening in January 2006, demand has been strong at Deaconess Gateway. urgent-care facilities, and multiple partnerships with other health care providers.

Gateway Growth Deaconess has built a second tower at Deaconess Gateway Hospital that will mirror the existing patient tower. The second tower, opened in November 2010, added 60 beds initially and will eventually add a total of 110 beds. Since opening in January 2006, demand has been strong at Deaconess Gateway. The number of inpatient days has increased tremendously, and many times the hospital has been at capacity. This trend will continue as the Baby Boomer generation ages, and more hospital beds will be needed to provide quality health care. Another factor fueling growth at Gateway is that Deaconess Hospital is planning to move to all-private rooms at its downtown campus. Building another tower at Deaconess Gateway Hospital will allow the main campus to move more quickly to all-private rooms.

Deaconess Level II Trauma Center

www.deaconess.com

A mainstay of Deaconess Hospital’s main campus is the Level II Trauma Center. More than 65,000 patients visit Deaconess Hospital’s Emergency Department each year, and having the department certified as a Level II trauma center ensures patients receive quality emergency services at a moment’s notice. Expansion of the emergency department will be complete in January 2011 and will add eight treatment rooms.

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We the People Leaders in Southwestern Indiana

By Jay Nehrkorn

Dr. Thomas Kazee President, University of Evansville Dr. Thomas Kazee became the president of UE in April 2010, building on a successful teaching and administrative career that included serving as provost and executive vice president at Furman University, chair of the Department of Political Science at Davidson College, and dean of the college at the University of the South (Sewanee). He is also a published author on the topic of politics, which has been a subject of interest for him since his teenage years delivering newspapers in Ohio. “I grew up with a deep interest in current affairs,” Dr. Kazee recalls. “I can remember days delivering The Cleveland Press that I probably spent as much time reading the papers while walking my route as I did actually delivering them. More than once I almost walked into mailboxes or signs because I was so engrossed in what I was reading.” This interest led him to pursue a B.A. in political science at Baldwin-Wallace College, an experience that also kindled a love for liberal arts and the small college environment. “I remember thinking in my junior year that this wouldn’t be a bad way to spend one’s life, in this kind of community, so I went on to Ohio State with the goal of getting a Ph.D. and writing about politics, as well as teaching,” he says. “Always in the back of my mind, I was thinking that the ideal position would be at a small college or university where there is a blend of teaching, scholarship, and writing.” As a professor, Dr. Kazee had a passion for cultivating intellectual curiosity in students so that they would become lifelong learners, and he brings that enthusiasm with him to UE. He also sees potential to build on UE’s strength by improving the way they communicate their

20 The Chamber of Commerce of Southwest Indiana

ability to graduate students that are extremely well-rounded and adaptable — important qualities for getting a return on educational investment in tough economic times. In his spare time, Dr. Kazee enjoys golf and traveling with his wife, Sharon. He is also a jogger, although he admits that one of his other passions is his real motivation for running. “I love to eat, and if I didn’t exercise I’d have a problem,” he laughs. “On many days when I’m not sure I want to break a sweat, I realize what I had for lunch and that gets the running shoes on and gets me out the door.”

Carl Chapman President & CEO, Vectren Corporation “I’m a born Hoosier, and obviously still a Hoosier,” says Vectren executive Carl Chapman. “In fact, the only major move that I’ve made was from Carmel to Evansville.” A Ball State graduate, Chapman began his career in 1977 as an auditor at Arthur Andersen, and his experience managing client accounts in the utilities and energy industries led to an opportunity to become the director of corporate development at Indiana Gas Company in 1985. His decision then to transition into the energy industry has proven to be a good one. Over the past 25 years, his career has grown with the company as he provided leadership at Indiana Energy, affiliate ProLiance Energy, and during the Vectren merger. Today, he is president and CEO of Vectren, although he says that wasn’t the type of title he aspired to early on. “My philosophy was more along the lines that if I work hard and do a good job, then I’ll be rewarded for that,” he explains. “In terms of my career, I didn’t set out to become a president and CEO. Certainly I always had the desire to progress and be recognized for my efforts, but I’m

very much a team-oriented person, so being part of a successful team was and still is my goal.” Chapman and his wife, Kay, made their move to Evansville in 2000 when their sons were both still in high school. While the opportunity in Evansville was an executive position, the couple didn’t make an executive decision when it came to relocating — they involved their sons as well. “We actually gave them each veto rights, and we all decided as a family,” he recalls. “So Evansville was an area that was appealing enough to get two high school boys to say, ‘Lets make this move,’ even though they were very well adjusted there in Carmel at the time.” Chapman enjoys working with a variety of local not-for-profit organizations and is very active in his local church. And while his schedule is extremely tight, he still hopes to find time to pursue his hobby again in the near future. “I actually like to sing, and I sing bass in Southern gospel music groups,” he says. “I used to do a lot of it and I just haven’t had much time recently, but it’s something that I’ll definitely get back into.”

Reverend Gerald Arnold President, NAACP Evansville Chapter Gerald Arnold grew up in Monroe, Louisiana, and from those early years he has memories of inspiration drawn from Jet magazine articles about the contributions of African Americans and also of experiencing firsthand the segregation practices that were prevalent in the 1950s. After graduating high school and a brief stay at Grambling State


“Those are gratifying moments — when I can sit down with people and be a peacemaker and a broker of peace.” University, he left Louisiana for Syracuse, New York. His experiences in Louisiana, however, would continue to shape his future. In New York, Arnold took a job with Bristol Laboratories and was transferred to Mead Johnson in Evansville in the 1980s. Meanwhile, he also attended classes at a number of Baptist colleges, completing both a business degree and religious coursework. Ordained as a minister, he was asked to become pastor of the Little Zion Baptist Church in Newburgh, which had only two members at the time. During his 12 years there, membership grew to over 60. He now preaches at Independence Baptist Church. A pivotal moment for Reverend Arnold came in 1996, when Bristol-Myers gave him the choice of transferring to New Jersey or losing the job he had held for over 25 years. “After constant prayer about the situation, I decided I was going to stay in Evansville, and if I was going to stay I had to get involved in civic affairs, so I got involved with a few minority groups, and that eventually led to my involvement in the NAACP,” he says. “I was asked if I would consider running for the office of president and won the election. I got involved for one two-year term, and I’ve been there now for 12 years.” Giving up a good paycheck and benefits made life a struggle, and Arnold laughs about how his friends out east thought he must have lost his brain to have given up so much. Still, he feels passionate about being part of the development of Evansville and says that the satisfaction of helping individuals in the community when they need someone to intervene for them makes it all worthwhile. “Those are gratifying moments — when I can sit down with people and be a peacemaker and a broker of peace.”

Monica Landaeta Executive Director, HOLA Having recently left her career as an attorney in Caracas, Venezuela, to become the executive director of hospitality and outreach for Latin Americans of HOLA in Evansville, Monica Landaeta has experienced Midwestern hospitality firsthand. Monica’s husband, Jorge, became acquainted with the community years ago while attending UE, and that experience, coupled with the opportunity at HOLA, brought this couple and their 2-year old son to Evansville to stay. “My husband and I decided that we needed to provide a better future for our family, and Evansville fulfilled all the needs we had for growing a family. It’s a great community, the people are very open, and there’s a ‘family sense’ within the whole city,” Monica explains. “Then I found out about the opening for the executive director position at the association, so I applied and was given the job.” While Monica liked the idea of spending more time with her family and less time in Caracas traffic, it was her enthusiasm for HOLA that sealed their decision. “During my college years I worked with some organizations in social programs, and I have always tried to be involved in working with the community. Once I heard about HOLA and about all the programs they offered, I thought it was great because it was an opportunity to work full-time with the community, which is something I love,” she says. Monica’s goals at HOLA include continuing projects such as health fairs and outreach services, but she also wants to further develop their educational programs with more formal language and cultural awareness classes. Her strategy places a strong emphasis on helping young Latinos adjust to become more engaged as citizens, which will impact the entire community in years to come. Meanwhile, she says her own acclimation has been very fulfilling. “The biggest surprise was how easy it was for me to adjust to living here,” she remarked. “I thought that it would be very hard to get to know everyone and where everything is here, and I was amazed to see how everyone I met offered help for both my personal issues and work issues. I’m very grateful for that.”

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Recreation Destinations

All area codes are 812 unless otherwise noted.

Family Fun in Evansville

By Carol Cummings

Boonville Spray Park

Ellis Park Racing

Boonville, Ind. www.cityofboonvilleindiana.com

3300 U.S. Highway 41 North, Henderson, Ky. 425-1456 :: www.ellisparkracing.com

Located in Boonville City Lake Park, the spray park opened in 2006. It is open June–August for children 11 and under. Admission is free.

Ellis Park Race Course features “family fun that lasts a lifetime.” With a tradition dating to the 1920s, Ellis Park runs a live thoroughbred horse racing summer meet, accommodating visitors of all ages and everyone from novice to expert horse players. Live races are held every Friday, Saturday, and Sunday from midJuly through early-September, with simulcasting available from April through September.

Burdette Park and Aquatic Center 5301 Nurrenbern Road, Evansville 435-5602 :: www.vanderburghgov.org

This 170-acre park offers swimming, BMX racing, hiking trails, miniature golf, batting cages, fishing, tennis courts, and athletic fields. Shelters, cabins, chalets, and camping sites for primitive or RV hook-up are available to rent. The centerpiece, Burdette Park Aquatic Center, is one of the Midwest’s largest aquatic centers, featuring waterslides and a children’s spray park.

The District at Casino Aztar Northwest Riverside Drive, Evansville 800-342-5386 :: www.casinoaztar.com

The Downtown Waterfront Entertainment District, located across from Casino Aztar, is a hot spot for fun and entertainment. Restaurant choices include Ri Ra’s Irish Pub & Restaurant and the trendy Blush Ultralounge. Other options include the famous Corky’s Ribs and BBQ, Temptations Buffet, Cavanaugh’s for steak and seafood, and Max & Erma’s all-American fare. Le Merigot Hotel — a luxury, waterfront, boutique hotel — opened in 2006. Stoney’s Rockin’ Country Night Club is a country-themed club with dance floor, full-service bars, pool tables, beer pong, cowboy arcade, a full-service restaurant, and a mechanical bull.

22 The Chamber of Commerce of Southwest Indiana

Opened in 1946, Holiday World was America’s first themed amusement park, preceding Disneyland by nine years.

Evansville IceMen Professional Hockey League Swonder Ice Arena: 209 N. Boeke Road, Evansville 435-8971 :: www.evansvilleicemen.com

Evansville’s first professional hockey team plays home games at Swonder Ice Arena from October through March. The IceMen were the 2010 All-American Hockey Association Davidson Cup Champions and are proud members of the International Hockey League.

Evansville Otters Professional Baseball

Goebel Soccer Complex

Bosse Field: 1900 Stringtown Road, Evansville 435-8686 :: www.evansvilleotters.com

6800 N. Green River Road, Evansville 435-6141 :: www.evansvillegov.org

The locally owned Evansville Otters professional baseball team offers exciting play combined with fun promotions throughout the game. Games are played at historic Bosse Field, the third-oldest ballpark in the country, built in 1915 as the first municipally owned athletic facility in the country. A member of the West Division of the Frontier League, the Otters’ season runs from May through September.

The state-of-the-art Goebel Soccer Complex, which opened in 2004, features nine full-size grass fields and one AstroPlay turf field. The main field and five of the grass fields have lights. In addition to soccer, the complex hosts football and lacrosse events.


holiday world & splashin’ safari 452 E. Christmas Blvd., Santa Claus, Ind. 877-463-2645 :: www.holidayworld.com

Holiday World & Splashin’ Safari has been voted “Nation’s Friendliest Park” and the “Nation’s Cleanest Park” (11 years straight). Opened in 1946, Holiday World was America’s first themed amusement park, preceding Disneyland by nine years. Holiday World is home to four roller coasters — including the Voyage, voted the “No. 1 Wooden Rollercoaster in the World” — exciting rides, and live entertainment. The adjacent Splashin’ Safari is home to numerous water slides and rides, including the Wildebeast, voted the “No. 1 Waterpark Ride in the Nation.”

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Holiday Drive-In

the seasons many hundreds of plant varieties create an ever-changing tapestry of beauty for guests and make the animals feel at home. See monkeys, cheetahs, jaguars, otters, camels, zebras, hippos, llamas, and much more. The zoo is open 365 days a year.

646 N. State Road 161, Rockport 649-2857 :: www.holidaydrivein.com

Offering a fun taste of Americana, the Holiday Drive-In is located three miles west of Rockport. It features five screens of double features — 10 movies a night—and offers great concessions. Open Friday, Saturday, and Sunday nights in season.

Mesker Park Zoo & Botanic Garden 1545 Mesker Park Drive, Evansville 435-6143 :: www.meskerparkzoo.com

Situated on 50 scenic acres of rolling hills on Evansville’s northwest side, the Mesker Park

Pigeon Creek Greenway Passage Zoo & Botanic Garden is home to more than 700 animals from around the globe. While visiting, you will navigate the zoo’s geographically grouped and realistically themed regions, including South America, North America, Africa, Asia, and Australia. The South American exhibit “Amazonia: Forest of Riches” is the zoo’s newest. Thousands of exotic and regional botanic species adorn hillsides and animal exhibits. Throughout

8102-435-6141 :: www.pcgreenway.org

The Pigeon Creek Greenway Passage is a planned 42-mile trail encircling the city of Evansville. Nearly six miles are complete or under construction. The Middle Levee Corridor was completed in 1997, and the Riverfront Corridor was completed in 2004. Once the final phases of the Industrial Corridor are completed in 2011, the Greenway Passage will feature 6.75 continuous miles of  trail from Sunrise Park to the Heidelbach Canoe Launch. Plans are being developed to extend the Greenway Passage even further and create a 14-mile inner loop.

Swonder Ice Arena & SK8 Park 209 N. Boeke Road, Evansville 479-0989 :: www.swonder.evansville.net

Swonder Ice Arena & SK8 Park features two regulation-size rinks for hockey and figure skating. In-line skaters and skateboarders can enjoy  indoor and outdoor skate parks. Skating lessons and rink rentals are available.

Wesselman Woods Nature Preserve & Park 551 North Boeke Road, Evansville 479-0771 :: www.wesselmannaturesociety.org

Wesselman Woods Nature Preserve, located just minutes from Downtown Evansville, has more than 190 acres of bottomland hardwood forest, as well as 50 acres of younger forest, fields, ponds, and nature trails. This old-growth lowland forest has one of the region’s most dense tree and plant populations and is a crucial habitat for native mammals, reptiles, amphibians, and birds. A Nature Center on the western edge of the property offers hands-on educational exhibits and a wildlife observation area. Howell Wetlands is a 35-acre urban wetland showcasing a diversity of wetland habitats, including a marsh, a cypress slough, and an oxbow channel, as well as the surrounding prairie and bottomland hardwood forest. Howell provides habitat for beaver, waterfowl, and the rare green tree frog, among many others. Canoe Evansville, offering guided canoe trips on Pigeon Creek and other area waterways, is also managed by the Wesselman Nature Society. 24 The Chamber of Commerce of Southwest Indiana


Arts in Evansville See, Hear, Experience

Features include historical documents and a wide variety of showcases of area painters, sculptors, and other artisans.

By Mark Allen

Arts Council of Southwest Indiana 318 Main Street, Suite 101, Evansville 812-422-2111 :: www.artswin.evansville.net

The Arts Council of Southwestern Indiana serves communities in Gibson, Knox, Pike, Posey, Spencer, Vanderburgh, and Warrick counties through artistic and cultural endeavors, serving as an umbrella organization for more than 50 cultural groups. Through grants, workshops and seminars, an information and referral service, publications, art exhibits, online information, public events, and more, the council works to bring a variety of arts and cultural experiences to the people of Southwest Indiana.

Evansville African American Museum 579 S. Garvin Street, Evansville 812-423-5188 www.evansvilleaamuseum.org

Dedicated to preserving and educating the public on the history and traditions of African Americans in the region, the museum is located in the last remaining building of Lincoln Gardens (the second federal housing project constructed under the New Deal). Features include historical documents and a wide variety of showcases of area painters, sculptors, and other artisans.

Evansville Museum of Arts, History & Science Cherry Street/SE Riverside Drive, Evansville 812-425-2406 :: www.emuseum.org

With its own origins going back more than 100 years, the Evansville Museum of Arts, History and Science is one of Southwest Indiana’s most venerable cultural institutions and a fitting home for comprehensive collections in art, history, anthropology, and science. The Science Center offers exhibitions and programs to inspire and instruct students of all ages. Koch Planetarium provides explorations of the solar system, while the Anthropology Gallery offers a fascinating look at cultures from 13,000 B.C. to the present.

Artworks from the 16th century to the present are in the permanent galleries. Stroll down the street of a 19th-century American rivertown to see ornately decorated homes and shops, or tour the Evansville Museum Transportation Center. Special events and classes round out the museum’s offerings. The museum is engaged in an ambitious $17.5 million expansion and renovation, “Reaching for the Stars,” Features include a new planetarium, a 2.5-story glass entrance pavilion, and new history and science centers.

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Evansville Philharmonic Main Office: 530 Main Street, Evansville Victory Theater: 600 Main Street, Evansville 812-425-5050 :: www.evansvillephilharmonic.org

Founded in 1934, Evansville Philharmonic Orchestra features 80 professional musicians led by Music Director Alfred Savia. Each year, it presents a sevenconcert Classics Series, four double-pops performances, special-event concerts, and educational and outreach performances. The Evansville Philharmonic Chorus, an auditioned group of singers who perform with the orchestra, was founded in 1977.

Haynie’s Corner Art Festival/ Funk in the City 812-575-9138 :: http://funkinthecity.com

Held annually the last Saturday of September at historic Haynie’s Corner (the Goosetown, Wheeler, and Culver neighborhoods in Downtown Evansville), the Art Festival features music, food, an array of art activities, and more than 100 artists from around the country. In April 2010, for the first time, a similar spring arts event, Funk in the City was held.

Koch Family Children’s Museum of Evansville (cMoe) 22 SE Fifth Street, Evansville 812-464-2663 :: www.cmoekids.org

A young museum geared to young children (4 to 10 years old), cMoe celebrated its fourth birthday in October 2010. Opened in 2006 in the art deco Central Library, cMoe offers interactive adventures that include Live Big, featuring giant displays showing the workings of the human body; a multimedia Freedom Gallery; Work Smart, where kids can take things apart and put them together to see how they work; a Mark Twain talking head; a playable laser harp; and the two-story duck, Moe, who “supervises” Quack Factory, a water-play area. cMoe welcomes more than 100,000 visitors a year to 18,000 square feet of educational exhibits.

New Harmony www.newharmony.biz

Named a “Top Insider Spot” by Travelocity.com, New Harmony is a historic town on the Wabash River with many old Harmonist buildings. The colony, founded almost 200 years ago as a spiritual sanctuary by the Harmony Society, now features a variety of galleries, specialty shops, restaurants, inns, historic attractions, and parks.

Historic Newburgh 812-853-2815 :: www.historicnewburgh.org

Charming, historic Newburgh hosts a variety of events, including downtown farmers markets, Fiddler Fest, Halloween ghost walks, Christmas in Olde Newburgh, the Newburgh Country Store Annual Herb Fest, and the annual Wine, Art & Jazz Festival. Both guided and independent historic walking tours are available through Historic Newburgh Incorporated.

26 The Chamber of Commerce of Southwest Indiana


July

2011 Chamber Calendar of Events

July 7: Chamber Night with the Otters

Please Join Us

September

January January 13: Chamber Night with the USI Screaming Eagles Spend an evening with your fellow Chamber members enjoying a VIP reception and men’s basketball game at Chamber Night with the University of Southern Indiana Screaming Eagles! The VIP Reception begins at 6:00 p.m. and the game begins at 7:30 p.m. at PAC Arena at USI. The VIP Reception includes appetizers and refreshments, special seating, and a pre-game “pep talk” from USI Men’s Basketball Head Coach.

February February 3: Business Exchange at Black Buggy Business exchanges are after-hours events that allow Chamber members the opportunity to network with hundreds of the area’s top business professionals while enjoying delicious, complimentary appetizers and a cash bar at a different Chamber business each month. Business exchanges take place on the first Thursday of each month from 4:30 p.m. – 6:30 p.m., and are free of charge to Chamber members!

February 8: Chamber Night with the University of Evansville Purple Aces Spend an evening with your fellow Chamber members enjoying a VIP reception and men’s basketball game at Chamber Night with the University of Evansville Purple Aces! The VIP Reception begins at 5:30 p.m. and the game begins at 7:05 p.m. at Roberts Stadium (VIP Reception will be in the “tunnel” leading out to the court). The VIP reception includes appetizers and refreshments, special seating, and a pre-game “pep talk” from UE Men’s Basketball Head Coach.

March March 3: Business Exchange at Cheeseburger in Paradise March 10: Chamber Small Business Awards The 3rd annual Chamber Small Business Awards will take place at The Centre at 10:00 a.m. The Chamber Small Business Awards celebrate small businesses and the contributions they make to our communities and economy. Awards will be given in the following four categories: - The Give Back Award - The Entrepreneur of the Year Award - Non-Profit Business of the Year Award - The Small Business of the Year Award

Award-winning companies will be honored at a brunch attended by an average of over 500 people. The brunch not only serves as an opportunity to shine the spotlight on a Chamber member company who is excelling, but it is also the kickoff brunch for the Tri-State Business EXPO. Each winning company will receive a beautiful, engraved glass award that it can proudly display at its office.

The Chamber’s 7th Annual Night with the Otters will take place at Bosse Field.  Attendees will enjoy premium seats in the outfield pavilion, as well as hamburgers, hot dogs, chips, popcorn, and sodas!

August August 4: Business Exchange at Kirby’s

September 1: Business Exchange at Just Rennie’s September 22: The Chamber of Commerce of Southwest Indiana’s Annual Meeting & Dinner

March 10: Tri-State Business EXPO

The Chamber of Commerce of Southwest Indiana hosts its Annual Meeting & Dinner in order to communicate the issues and initiatives that The Chamber has undertaken or supported over the past year. It is a way to show The Chamber’s impact, while previewing the organization’s program of work for the next year.

Highlighting the economic power of the Tri-State’s business community, The Chamber of Commerce of Southwest Indiana will host its 6th annual Tri-State Business EXPO at The Centre in Downtown Evansville. Last year’s EXPO featured 1,000 attendees and 115 exhibitors!

The dinner also provides an opportunity to elect The Chamber’s new officers and directors and recognize Chamber members for their valuable service and leadership. Each year awards are presented in three categories:

The exhibit hall will be open from 11:30 a.m. to 6:00 p.m., with an EXPO party from 4:00 p.m. to 6:00 p.m.

- Norman P. Wagner Business of the Year - Richard A. Schlottman Business Person of the Year - Volunteer of the Year

If you are looking for the opportunity to: - Build strong relationships with the region’s top decision makers - Generate qualified business leads - Enjoy delicious food from EIGHT of the top restaurants in the area - Take a chance to win thousands of dollars in prizes

The evening will begin at 5:30 p.m. with a cocktail reception. Dinner will be served at 6:30 p.m. The Keynote Presentation, as well as The Chamber’s annual report and annual awards ceremony will follow.

October

Don’t miss the opportunity to grow your business by attending the region’s most well-attended business expo!

October 6: Business Exchange at Boston’s

April

November

April 7: Business Exchange at Old Chicago

November 3: Business Exchange at Western Hills Country Club

May May 2: Chamber Golf Outing The 9th Annual Chamber Golf Outing to will include two golf flights, with the morning flight teeing off at 7:30 a.m. and the afternoon flight teeing off at 1:00 p.m. Golfers will enjoy a continental breakfast, a luncheon, and an afternoon cocktail reception. Prizes will be awarded for first, second, and third place; longest drive; closest to the pin; and hole-in-one. This is one of Southwest Indiana’s largest golf outings! Last year’s outing featured over 265 golfers! You don’t want to miss this opportunity to meet and golf with the area’s business professionals.

May 5: Business Exchange at New Harmony Inn

December December 1: Business Exchange at Blush UltraLounge December 2: Holiday CNN The 2010 Holiday CNN will be held at Aztar Executive Conference Center from 7:30 a.m.–9:30 a.m. This is the largest SPEED networking event of the year – CHAMBER NETWORKING NEWS (CNN). This event allows you to sit and network, one-on-one with over 100 area business professionals! There will also be some very nice door prizes! Bring plenty of business cards and be ready to meet new business contacts!

December 9: Chamber Holiday Open House

June June 2: Business Exchange at Ri Ra

The 2011 Chamber Holiday Open House will be held at 11:30 a.m. at The Chamber office in Downtown Evansville. The Chamber’s Holiday Open House is held so that The Chamber can thank its members for a great year. It also gives members an opportunity to network with over 300 fellow Chamber members while enjoying delicious food in a beautiful atmosphere. The event is free-of-charge to all Chamber members.

www.ccswin.com 27


Get Connected Numbers to Know

P.O. Box 745 Mount Vernon, IN 47620-0745 www.southwestindiana.org/rr_posey_county

Poseyville Gas.........................................................874-2212 Poseyville Water Department..............................874-2211 Sprint/Nextel............................................................467-0335 TDS Telecom............................................................874-2255 Vectren Energy Delivery.......................................491-4000 WIN Energy REMC.........................................800-882-5140 WOW Internet/Cable............................................ 437-0345

Government Offices

Schools

Area Plan Commission..........................................838-1323 Building Commissioner..........................................838-1324 County Auditor.........................................................838-1300 County Clerk.............................................................838-1306 County Sheriff..........................................................838-1321 County Surveyor......................................................838-1309 Health Department.................................................838-1328 Black Township Assessor..............................................................838-1342 Cynthiana Fire Department.................................................845-2584 Police...................................................................845-3385 Town Hall.............................................................845-2924 Griffin City Clerk.............................................................851-7500 Fire........................................................................924-3151 Police...................................................................924-3141 Public Works......................................................924-3840 Town Hall.............................................................924-3141 Mt. Vernon City Clerk.............................................................838-5576 City Hall Annex...................................................838-5576 Fire Department.................................................838-3447 Mayor...................................................................838-5576 Police...................................................................838-8705 Street Department ...........................................838-2352 Water Department............................................838-2136 New Harmony City Clerk.............................................................682-4846 Police...................................................................682-4840 Poseyville Clerk.....................................................................874-1401 Fire........................................................................874-2212 Police...................................................................874-3518 Town Hall.............................................................874-2211

MSD Mt. Vernon.....................................................838-4471 MSD North Posey County.....................................874-2243 New Harmony Town and Township Schools...682-4401

Utilities

Assessor...................................................................649-6012 Auditor of Spencer County...................................649-4376 Circuit Court.............................................................649-6025 Fire Department (Rockport)..................................649-4654 Health Department.................................................649-4441 Highway Department.............................................362-8331 Planning Commission............................................649-6010 Sheriff........................................................................649-2286 Solid Waste Management....................................362-7401

Posey County Posey County Courthouse

AT&T..................................................................800-288-2747 Duke Energy.....................................................800-521-2232 Evansville Water & Sewer....................................436-7846 German Township Water......................................963-6403 Henderson Water...........................................270-826-2421 Insight....................................................................... 422-1167 Mt. Vernon Wastewater Department.................838-3396 Mt. Vernon Water Works......................................838-2136

28 The Chamber of Commerce of Southwest Indiana

Surveyor....................................................................649-6016 Trustee/Assessor (Luce Township)....................359-4910 Veterans Services..................................................649-6031 Wilderness Search and Rescue.........................649-6020

Utilities Cinergy Communications......................................456-4708 Community Natural Gas........................................937-2376 Gentryville Water Utility........................................937-2407 Lin Gas, Inc...............................................................937-2137 Ohio Valley Gas.......................................................547-2397 Perry Spencer Communications.................800-511-4899 Perry-Spencer Rural Telephone ................800-511-4899 Reo Water, Inc.........................................................649-4901 Saint Meinrad Utilities...........................................357-5080 Santa Claus Wastewater Treatment..................544-2106

Schools

All area codes are 812 unless otherwise noted.

North Spencer School Corporation....................937-2400 South Spencer School Corporation...................649-2591

Vanderburgh County & City of Evansville Civic Center Complex One N.W. Martin Luther King Jr. Blvd. Evansville, IN 47708-1833 www.vanderburghgov.org :: www.evansvillegov.org Switchboard.....................................................812-435-5000 TDD Hearing Impaired...................................812-436-4925

Government Offices

Spencer County Spencer County Courthouse 200 Main Street Rockport, IN 47635 http://spencercounty.in.gov

Government Offices

Area Plan Commission..........................................435-5226 Burdette Park..........................................................435-5602 City-County Building Commission.......................436-7881 City-County Human Relations Commission.....436-4927 City-County Joint Central Dispatch....................426-7325 City-County Levee Authority.................................435-6137 City-County Purchasing Department.................436-4961 City-County Weights & Measures......................435-5745 Emergency Management Agency (EMA).........435-6020 Evansville Animal Control.....................................435-6015 Evansville City Cemeteries Oak Hill.................................................................435-6045 Locust Hill............................................................435-6040 Evansville City Clerk...............................................436-4992 Evansville City Controller/ Finance Department.........................................436-4919 Evansville City Council...........................................436-4995 Evansville City Engineer........................................436-4990


Evansville Department of Administrative Services...................................436-4934 Evansville Department of Metropolitan Development (DMD)................436-7823 Evansville Department of Parks & Recreation...........................................435-6141 Evansville Department of Transportation and Services..........................436-4988 Evansville Environmental Protection Agency (EPA).................................435-6145 Evansville Fire Department...................................435-6235 Evansville Mayor’s Office......................................436-4962 Evansville Metropolitan Planning Organization......................................436-7833 Evansville Police Department..............................436-7956 Evansville Street Maintenance Department....435-6000 Evansville Traffic Engineering Department......435-6003 Evansville Water & Sewer Utility........................436-7846 Legal Aid Society....................................................435-5173 Mesker Park Zoo & Botanic Garden..................435-6143 Metropolitan Evansville Transit Systems (METS)...................................435-6166 METS TDD Hearing Impaired.........................435-6172 Public Safety, Board of..........................................436-7897 Sustainability, Energy and Environmental Quality, Department of..........435-6145 Vanderburgh County Assessor............................435-5267 Vanderburgh County Auditor...............................435-5293 Vanderburgh County Clerk...................................435-5160 Vanderburgh County Commissioners................435-5241 Vanderburgh County Coroner..............................435-5730 Vanderburgh County Council...............................435-5791 Vanderburgh County Engineer............................435-5773 Vanderburgh County Health Department..........436-4925 Vanderburgh County Highway Department.....435-5777 Vanderburgh County Prosecutor’s Office Child Support Division......................................435-5326 Criminal Division................................................435-5150 Vanderburgh County Public Defender Agency.................................435-5900 Vanderburgh County Recorder............................435-5215 Vanderburgh County Sheriff’s Office..................421-6203 Vanderburgh County Soil & Water Conservation District (SWCD).......867-0729 Vanderburgh County Solid Waste Management..............................436-7800 Vanderburgh County Superior Court..................435-5469 Vanderburgh County Surveyor............................435-5210 Vanderburgh County Treasurer...........................435-5248 Vanderburgh County Veterans Services...........435-5239 Vanderburgh County Voters Registration.........435-5222

Warrick County Warrick County Administrative Offices One County Square Booneville, IN 47601 www.warrickcounty.gov

Government Offices Animal Control.........................................................897-6107 Area Plan Commission..........................................897-6190 Assessor...................................................................897-6125 Auditor.......................................................................897-6110 Building Commission..............................................897-6188 Circuit Court.............................................................897-6130 Clerk...........................................................................897-6160 Commissioners........................................................897-6120 County Council........................................................897-6202 Disposal Center.......................................................897-6155 Economic Development........................................858-3555 Emergency Management.....................................897-6178 Health Department.................................................897-6105

Parks and Recreation............................................897-6200 Recorder...................................................................897-6165 Sheriff........................................................................897-6180 Treasurer..................................................................897-6166 Veterans Affairs......................................................897-6177

Utilities AT&T..................................................................800-288-2747 Indiana American Water.............................. 800-492-8373 Insight........................................................................422-1167 Solid Waste Management....................................897-6210 Sprint/Nextel............................................................467-0335 TDS Telecom............................................................874-2255 Vectren Energy Delivery...............................800-491-4000 WOW Internet/Cable.............................................437-0345

Schools Warrick County School Corporation..................897-0400

Utilities Darmstadt Sewer Utility........................................963-6760 DirectTV............................................................888-777-2454 Evansville Water & Sewer....................................436-7846 Insight........................................................................422-1167 Midwest Telecom...................................................421-0111 SIT-CO................................................................877-805-7409 Sprint/Nextel............................................................467-0335 TDS Telecom............................................................874-2255 Trash..........................................................................436-7800 Vectren Energy Delivery...............................800-227-1376 Verizon...............................................................800-922-0204 WOW Internet/Cable.............................................437-0345

Schools Evansville Vanderburgh School Corporation...........................................435-8453

www.ccswin.com 29


THE Chamber of Commerce of Southwest Indiana Main Office: 318 Main Street, Suite 401 Evansville, IN 47708 812-425-8147 Posey County Office: 915 E. Fourth Street, Suite 100 Mt. Vernon, IN 47620 812-838-3639 www.ccswin.com


Southwest, IN 2011 Community Profile and Resource Guide  

Southwest, IN 2011 Community Profile and Resource Guide

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