Page 1


TABLE OF CONTENTS

TAKE A PEEK 8

pg.

“We have so many people who live here for the quality of life and the quality of the schools…"

12

pg.

Summer high 78° Winter high 38° pg.

22

Community and business leaders and residents are anticipating a bright future for Woodland Park

2 Greater Woodland Park Chamber of Commerce


TABLE OF CONTENTS

WHAT’S INSIDE

Greetings

Letter from the Chamber ................................................................................ 6

Welcome

Explore the beauty of this Pikes Peak community. ...................................... 7

Education

This community is committed to a bright future for all. .................................................................................. 8

Government

City and county officials work to maintain an ideal community. ............ 10

At a Glance

Demographics/Important Information.......................................................... 12

Health Care

The health care sector is growing to serve those who have discovered this great community. .................................. 13

Worship

A strong spiritual family reaches out to the community at large. ............. 19

Real Estate

Come home to paradise. ............................................................................... 20

Business & Industry

An exciting climate of growth pervades the economy here. ..................... 22

Arts & Culture

An active arts community draws inspiration from their surroundings. .... 25

Tourism & Recreation

The glories of nature await you.................................................................... 27

Calendar

Greater Woodland Park Chamber of Commerce Calendar of Events — 2007 ......................................................................... 30

Close

You’ve got to see it all for yourself to understand. ..................................... 31

Advertisers

Index of Advertisers ...................................................................................... 32

4 Greater Woodland Park Chamber of Commerce


GREETINGS

CommunityLink.com

A letter from the Chamber.

1 800-455-5600

production production manager director of media & content copywriting copy editor proofreader director of photography photography

creative director director of publication design senior publication designer web site creation & support

O

MATT PRICE DIANA VAUGHN AIRONN BISHOP LAURA WILCOXEN LAURA WILCOXEN CHRISTINA REESE LISA LEHR KATHERINE FORTUNE K MARK KIRKLAND CRAIG WILLIAMS CRAIG WILLIAMS CLINT EILERTS AMANDA WHITE JOSH CHANDLER

n behalf of the Greater Woodland Park Chamber of Commerce, I would like to welcome you and thank you for your interest in our community and region. In these pages you will learn of a place we call home and one that is fast becoming Colorado’s first choice to visit, to locate a business or to live. We have prepared this publication to offer you a glimpse of Teller County and all we have to offer. Our members and our organizational leaders believe in this community and have made a considerable investment in it. Teller County is a region with proximity to major metropolitan areas, a dedicated workforce and a quality of life that is beyond comparison to any other spot in the country. We are the base camp for tourists seeking the best in hospitality amenities of the area as they enjoy the natural splendors of Colorado and the Rocky Mountains. With the Pike National Forest area abundant within the boundaries of Teller County, there is no lack of outdoor activity for family and friends. Woodland Park sits at an elevation of 8,465 feet and is known as the “City Above the Clouds.” Cripple Creek serves as the Teller County seat and is home to many casinos as well. Within the Teller County region we have “Colorado’s first choice to visit, several other pastoral communities, each with its own character and locate a business or to live” history. Although Teller County is just 559 square miles and has a population of approximately 25,000, we host within our borders thriving businesses, proactive governments, modern amenities, excellent schools and an extensive cultural heritage. Indeed, Teller County has much to offer. Whatever your interest, the Greater Woodland Park Chamber of Commerce believes you will find the Teller County region to be a vibrant backdrop for business, education or culture, making it a great place to live, work and raise a family. I invite you to stop in, when you are in the area, and let us help you to make the most of your exploration.

business development director of sales operations director of business development business development manager sales representative customer service director customer service representative mail room technician

DEBBIE MOSS GEORGE PRUDHOMME BONNIE EBERS JIM BARROWS KATHY RISLEY JULIA JOHNSON MELINDA BOWLIN

advertising ad research

ad traffic ad design

senior ad designer

MARY KOPSHEVER MILLY MASON AMY SCHWARTZKOPF KATHY SCOTT CAROL SMITH JOSEPH GOETTING MARIAH SNIDER BECKY TRAIL KACEY WOLTERS

administrative support administrative support account support human resources assistant customer service advocate

KATHY HAGENE CAROL SMITH TERRI AHNER TRICIA CANNEDY TERESA CRAIG JULIE VORDTRIEDE

information technology publishing systems coordinator

CHRISTOPHER MILLER

executive leadership chairman and founder chief financial officer

ABOUT

CRAIG WILLIAMS RHONDA HARSY

This book is published by CommunityLink and

distributed through the Greater Woodland Park Chamber of

Commerce.

For

advertising

information

or

questions or comments about this book contact CommunityLink at 1 800-455-5600 or by e-mail at info@CommunityLink.com FOR

INFORMATION

The

Greater

Woodland

Park Chamber of Commerce, Ute Pass Cultural Center, 210 East Midland, Woodland Park, CO 80866, (719) 687-9885, Fax (719) 687-8216, www.woodlandparkchamber.com © 2007 Craig Williams Creative, Inc., 4742 Holts Prairie Road, Post Office Box 306, Pinckneyville, IL 62274-0306, (618) 357-8653. All rights reserved. No portion of this book may be reproduced without the expressed written consent of the publisher.

6 Greater Woodland Park Chamber of Commerce

Debbie Miller, IOM, ACE President Greater Woodland Park Chamber of Commerce


WELCOME

Explore the beauty of this Pikes Peak community. BY LAURA WILCOXEN

I

magine standing on the north slope of Pikes Peak, surrounded by fragrant spruce and pine and quivering aspen trees. As you look around, majestic views of the Rocky Mountains against a backdrop of clear blue sky delight the eye. The air is fresh and clean; the sounds of birds and the whisper of the wind through the trees calm and refresh. If it is springtime, fresh green and yellow shoots and delicate mountain wildflowers open to the touch of the sun. If it is summer, the air is dry and deliciously mild, and the aspen leaves dance in a gentle breeze. If it is autumn, the aspen leaves have turned a shimmering gold that glistens against the snowy white bark and the surrounding seasonal riot of color. If it is winter, gleaming snow makes a luxurious blanket for the gorgeous landscape, bringing further peace and silence to a spot that’s already a center of calm in a noisy world. You might well decide that you had found paradise. The people of Woodland Park certainly think they have. Nestled amidst this natural splendor, Woodland Park is a historic resort community that is transforming into a recreational and commercial center — all while respectfully preserving the pristine

natural surroundings. Those new to the community often describe an immediate knowledge that they’ve finally come home, from the first moment they set eyes on Woodland Park. That feeling intensifies as they meet their new neighbors and experience a warm welcome and a kindred desire to help their community reach its full potential.

Centrally located amidst Colorado’s many attractions — and very close to Colorado Springs — Woodland Park is the ideal base camp for exploring the region. A full-service city offering all the amenities any traveler could desire, Woodland Park is more than just a tourist’s town. The community is also adding more services for its residents, including a brand-new, state-of-the-art “Woodland Park has all the hospital and the infrastructure benefits of a small town, yet it’s needed to support high-tech, 21st-century businesses. Those who only 20 minutes away from a choose to live in Woodland Park and Teller County but work in nearby major metro area.” – Michael Harper metropolitan areas will enjoy a quick and easy commute. Business and Just 18 miles west of Colorado Springs in leisure travelers looking for the convenience Teller County, Woodland Park was established of air travel will find a major metropolitan as a lovely resort town and business center airport in the Springs. over 100 years ago. Today, Woodland Park Woodland Park must be experienced to is a flourishing community of 7,600 that be fully appreciated. The Greater Woodland offers its residents an unparalleled quality of Park Chamber of Commerce is proud to life. The community is still a thriving tourist introduce you to their community in the center, drawing many visitors who fall in pages of this book, fully expecting that, love and go on to become new residents. once you have learned a little, you will Woodland Park’s leadership is overseeing want to learn a lot more. And that can best steady yet gentle growth, working hard to be done in person. ensure the community maintains its history, Welcome to Woodland Park! its freshness and its beauty. www.woodlandparkchamber.com 7


EDUCATION

This community is committed to a bright future for all. BY AIRONN BISHOP

O

ne of the reasons people choose to live in Woodland Park instead of the larger city of Colorado Springs is education. Residents cite the schools in the area as one of the reasons they chose to make Woodland Park their home. Their support of the school doesn’t end with the compliments the district receives either. Investing in education is something members of the community do willingly, eager to help the future leaders of Woodland Park receive the best education possible. The community’s support for education is evident with a tour of the new Woodland Park Library and the satellite library in Florissant. “The new libraries are absolutely gorgeous!” raves Teller County Commissioner Jim Ignatiuas. The libraries were constructed after a bond was passed by voters in 2002 and today are enjoyed by all residents of Woodland Park, as well as Teller County. The community also demonstrated support for Woodland Park schools by passing a bond for expanding and updating the middle and high schools. With this latest round of renovations and expansions, all schools in the Woodland Park School District RE-2 are either new or have been extensively renovated since 1988. 8 Greater Woodland Park Chamber of Commerce

Woodland Park School District Woodland Park School District is comprised of three elementary schools, one middle school and one high school. The elementary schools serve Woodland Park children in grades K through five. In addition, all three elementary schools have preschool programs for 3- and 4-year-olds. This attention to even the youngest Woodland Park residents provides big dividends later in the educational process. With only 450 to 500 students in each of the elementary schools, the district is able to keep class sizes small. Specialized gifted and talented programs keep children motivated, and extra help is always ready for those struggling to achieve success. An active parent–teacher organization assists schools with other support services they may need, including parent involvement in the classrooms. Acting as a liaison between community and school, the organization’s goal is fostering quality education through close community–school cooperation. After children complete elementary school, they move on to the Woodland Park Middle School, which is home to approximately 800 students in grades six

through eight. Here, students can continue their successful education through a convenient block schedule. Average class sizes are 20 to 30 children. Additional subjects challenge middle school children to explore their talents and abilities. Students can choose to participate in a wide range of interests such as art, band, vocal music and athletics. Once students arrive at Woodland Park High School, even more academic doors open. Students have 105 choices in courses when enrolling in Woodland Park High School, including six honors and five advanced placement courses to prepare them for higher education. Success in education is evident in the district’s yearly test scores. Woodland Park students consistently hold the fourth-highest score position of all districts in the Pikes Peak region on the Colorado Student Assessment Program (CSAP). Terra Nova Multiple Assessment results are above average to well above average. A highly successful educational system is one of many reasons so many families choose to call Woodland Park home, even though they work in a larger city. “We have so many people who live here for the quality of life and the quality of the


EDUCATION

Woodland Park School District offers high school students 105 different courses from which to choose.

schools in Woodland Park that commute to Colorado Springs,” says Debbie Miller of the Greater Woodland Park Chamber of Commerce.

Colorado Springs Christian School The Colorado Springs Christian School (CSCS) of Woodland Park is another option for education in the area. Teaching grades K through seven, CSCS of Woodland Park provides a place for children to grow academically, physically, emotionally and spiritually. CSCS first opened its doors in 1971 and is now the largest Christian school in Colorado, with almost 1,250 students on five different campuses throughout the state. The CSCS educational philosophy is modeled after Ecclesiastes 4:12, which states that “a cord of three strands is not quickly broken.” CSCS seeks to support the input of a child’s family and church, serving as the third strand in ensuring the child’s overall development — spiritually, academically, physically, socially and emotionally. From excellent academics to incredible athletic competition for students of all ages, CSCS of Woodland Park is making its mark on the area as one of the best Christian-based schools available. For more information, call the CSCS Woodland Park office at 719-686-0706. All schools in the Woodland Park school district are either new or extensively renovated.

www.woodlandparkchamber.com 9


GOVERNMENT

City and county officials work to maintain an ideal community. BY AIRONN BISHOP

W

oodland Park and the surrounding communities in Teller County are served by officials who take pride in creating communities that not only have managed growth, but also maintain their hometown feeling. When describing Woodland Park, residents and officials alike comment on the friendly and accepting residents, stunning surroundings, and perfect climate. The secret of the community’s unparalleled quality of life is out. “We have an average growth rate of 2 percent per year, with a projected county population of 35,000 by 2030,” says Teller County Commissioner Jim Ignatiuas. Managing the growth in such an idyllic place is a top priority of elected officials in the area, who are working to make sure the growth is not so rapid that it negatively impacts the environment. For example, since water supply is always an important issue in the West, one initiative of local leaders is placing an annual quota on the number of new taps into city water lines. In this way, the city can better manage when and where new growth occurs, ensuring plentiful supplies for generations to come. 10 Greater Woodland Park Chamber of Commerce

Serving the citizens of Teller County are eight elected officials, including three county commissioners; one county clerk, who also serves as the county recorder; a county treasurer; a county assessor; a county sheriff; and the county coroner. Elections for county offices are held in November, with all but two commissioner seats being elected the same year. The remaining two commissioner seats are up for election two years following the major election. Elected officials serve four-year terms. Voters in the county must register to vote 30 days prior to elections and can do so when renewing or applying for their drivers license or by visiting the Teller County offices at 112 North “A” Street in Cripple Creek, the county seat. The Teller County offices take care of a variety of things for residents, including marriage licenses, drivers licenses, vehicle registration, property tax assessment and voter registration, as well as many others. To contact Teller County for more information, please call 719-689-2988. The City of Woodland Park is also staffed by responsible officials concerned with managing the growth of the area

while maintaining the same hometown feeling that currently exists. Woodland Park operates under a council/manager form of city government. A city manager handles day-to-day business in the city, while six city council members and one mayor are elected to part-time positions. Elections for city offices are held every two years, with three council members and the mayor up for election each time. Elections are held through a mail ballot system; the city mails out election ballots, and citizens need only mark their choices and mail them back in to the city. Residents of Woodland Park enjoy a low crime rate, thanks in large part to the Woodland Park Police Department. “Our crime rates are very, very low for violent crime and also quite low for property and domestic crime,” says Mark Fitzgerald, city manager for Woodland Park. There are 21 sworn officers, including patrol officers, detectives and the police chief, as well as a support staff of nine. Fitzgerald hears many comments from residents and visitors alike about the unique nature of the area and the many services available in Woodland


GOVERNMENT Park. “People are generally surprised that such a full-service community is located at 8,500 feet. Typically, communities at this elevation are much more rural and offer fewer services.” Additional services provided by the City of Woodland Park include water and sewer services. One of the many things that make Teller County unique is the ratio of publicto-private lands. Of the 559 square miles making up the county, half are public land managed by the State of Colorado, the United States Forest Service and the Bureau of Land Management. This partnership between local and county governments and these public entities helps to ensure the safety of the residents of this beautiful mountain hideaway. Living in a mountain community provides not only beautiful surroundings, but can also create unique emergency situations for residents, such as forest fires. Working in partnership, firefighters from city, county, state and federal agencies ensure that citizens can enjoy the beautiful

scenery safely, with outstanding fire protection, especially during the summer forest fire season. Eight fire protection districts respond not only to brush fires, but also to any home or business fires throughout the area. With over 15 engines and several truck companies and brush trucks, area residents know they will be in good hands in case of a fire emergency.

“People are generally surprised that such a full-service community is located at 8,500 feet.” The Woodland Park Police Department is staffed by 21 sworn officers.

The Teller County Courthouse, built in 1904, retains many of its original features.

www.woodlandparkchamber.com 11


AT A GLANCE

Demographics/Important Information Community Profile*

Total Population, 2000 ................................ 6,515 Total Population, 2005 ................................ 7,500

Sex and Age

DRIVING DISTANCES (MILES) Aspen ......................................... 140 Breckenridge ................................. 85 Buena Vista ................................... 75 Canon City..................................... 61 Cascade ........................................ 10 Crags Campground ........................ 12 Crested Butte .............................. 180 Cripple Creek................................. 26 Colorado Springs ........................... 17 Deckers......................................... 23 Denver .......................................... 78 Divide.............................................. 7 Durango ...................................... 329 Eleven Mile Canyon........................ 20 Eleven Mile Reservoir ..................... 27 Estes Park ................................... 160 Florissant ...................................... 15 Florissant Fossil Beds..................... 16 Garden of the Gods ........................ 22

Glenwood Springs ........................ 180 Grand Junction ............................ 269 Hartsel .......................................... 47 Keystone ..................................... 125 Lake George .................................. 19 Leadville ...................................... 100 Manitou Lake .................................. 8 Monarch...................................... 109 Mueller State Park ......................... 11 Pikes Peak Highway ....................... 11 Pueblo .......................................... 60 Rampart Reservoir ........................... 8 Salida............................................ 84 South Platte River .......................... 23 Steamboat Springs ...................... 227 Telluride ...................................... 289 Vail ............................................. 124 Victor ............................................ 31 Wilkerson Pass .............................. 30

Climate

Total Percent Male .......................................3,264 ........... 50.1 Female....................................3,251 ........... 49.9 Under 5 years........................... 407 ............... 6.2 5 to 9 years ............................. 473 ............... 7.3 10 to 14 years ......................... 603 ............... 9.3 15 to 19 years ......................... 544 ............... 8.3 20 to 24 years ......................... 210 ............... 3.2 25 to 34 years ......................... 709 ............. 10.9 35 to 44 years ........................1,435 ........... 22.0 45 to 54 years ........................1,212 ........... 18.6 55 to 59 years ......................... 292 ............... 4.5 60 to 64 years ......................... 284 ............... 4.4 65 to 74 years ......................... 110 ............... 1.7 75 to 84 years .......................... 28 ................ 0.4 Median age (years) ...................37.5 ...............—

Educational Attainment

Number Percent Population 25 years and over ...............................4,574 ............ 100 Less than 9th grade................... 44 ................ 1.0 9th to 12th grade, no diploma .............................. 95 ................ 2.1 High school graduate (including equivalency) ............ 999 ............. 21.8 Some college, no degree ........... 1,344 ............ 29.4 Associate degree ...................... 433 ............... 9.5 Bachelor’s degree ....................1,135 ........... 24.8 Graduate or professional degree ............... 524 ............. 11.5

Elevation .......................................................................................... 8,465 feet above sea level Average summer high temperature ...........................................................................78 degrees Households/Income Average household size ............2.63 Average summer low temperature ............................................................................41 degrees Average family size ...................3.03 Average winter high temperature ..............................................................................38 degrees Median household income .....$52,279 Average winter low temperature .................................................................................5 degrees Median family income ............$59,583 Average rainfall ......................................................................................................... 14 inches

Important Telephone Numbers

Greater Woodland Park Chamber of Commerce ....................................................719-687-9885 City of Woodland Park (water and sewer) ..............................................................719-687-9246 Teller County .......................................................................................................719-689-2988 Woodland Park School District RE-2 .....................................................................719-686-2000 Ute Pass Cultural Center......................................................................................719-687-5284 Utilities Aquila (natural gas) ..........................................................................................800-303-0752 Intermountain Rural Electric Association (IREA) ..................................................719-687-7033 Qwest (telephone) ............................................................................................800-475-7526 US Cable (television) ........................................................................................800-480-7020

12 Greater Woodland Park Chamber of Commerce

Occupation

Number Percent Management, professional, and related occupations ........1,587 ........... 43.5 Service occupations ................. 349 ............... 9.6 Sales and office occupations..... 966 ............. 26.5 Construction, extraction and maintenance occupations....... 432 ............. 11.8 Production, transportation and material moving occupations .. 312 ............... 8.6 *U.S. Census Bureau, Census 2000


HEALTH CARE

The health care sector is growing to serve those who have discovered this great community. BY AIRONN BISHOP

T

he health care industry in Woodland Park is undergoing a major change. Woodland Park is evolving, changing from a community with just a few caring family practice physicians and specialists — with the nearest hospital 20 minutes away — to a thriving community with abundant health care choices, including a brand-new hospital that’s attracting specialists from across the country. As in so many other ways, when it comes to health care, Woodland Park is exceeding the expectations of residents.

Pikes Peak Regional Hospital Pikes Peak Regional Hospital will open its doors to the public in August 2007, and with it comes a new age in health care in Woodland Park. “It was surprising that a community this size did not have a hospital of their own already. The community is really excited about the opening of the hospital,” says Bob Harvey, executive director of the Pikes Peak Regional Medical Center Association. The hospital’s construction is the result of countless hours of planning, fundraising and preparation by many citizens of Teller County. Community support is evident

in the fundraising success: The minimum community goal for fundraising — $3 million — was obtained in just two years. Nestled in the pines of Woodland Park, the main entrance of the hospital will face Pikes Peak. Located just off Highway 24, the hospital will be just 1.5 miles west of Woodland Park and will serve all of Teller County. A primary care facility, Pikes Peak Regional Hospital will have 15 medical/ surgical beds as well as three intensive care beds. The hospital is being built with the future in mind. All rooms will be private rooms; however, five of the rooms will be larger so that they can be transformed into semi-private rooms if the need arises. Three birthing suites and one postpartum room will be ready to meet the needs of the newest members of the Woodland Park community. Patients will no longer need to drive to Colorado Springs for surgery once the new facility is completed. Two surgery rooms, as well as two additional rooms for minor procedures, will give physicians a place to perform surgeries right in Woodland Park. Obstetrics/gynecology, gastroenterology and pediatrics are just a few of the

specialties residents of Woodland Park can expect at the new hospital. A radiology department will have ultrasound, mammography, echocardiography, MRI and CT scanning. A full-service lab, pharmacy, infusion center, and physical and occupational therapy services will also be available. The quality of life in Woodland Park is attracting physicians from many specialties to the area, in addition to primary care physicians. “Every week I have physicians contacting me, wanting to practice here,” says Harvey. “New doctors are moving in and starting up their practice in Woodland Park. They say over and over that they always wanted to practice here but needed to have a hospital. Now they will have a hospital.” Many of these new doctors will have offices in the Medical Office Building, located on the same campus as the new hospital. In addition, Legacy at Pikes Peak, a 24-unit assisted-living facility, will also be on the campus of the hospital, giving those needing special medical care a one-stop place to have all their health needs met.

www.woodlandparkchamber.com 13


HEALTH CARE

Pikes Peak Regional Hospital will open its doors to the public in August 2007.

Peak Vista Community Health Centers Divide Health Clinic 34 Hybrook Road South Divide, Colorado 80814 719-687-4460 In 2006, Peak Vista Community Health Centers celebrated 35 years of service to El Paso and Teller counties ... providing primary medical care and dental services to working families and others without health and dental insurance. With clinics at 10 sites, Peak Vista serves those without a medical or

Peak Vista served more than 46,000 patients in 2005. dental home, focusing on children, pregnant women, families and seniors. In 2005, Peak Vista provided in excess of $6.6 million in charity care. Its mission of “providing exceptional health care for people facing access barriers� directs Peak Vista to serve those experiencing geographic, child care, cultural, transportation, financial, age, language and 14 Greater Woodland Park Chamber of Commerce

other challenges that can prevent access to health care. With more than 46,000 patients served through almost 143,000 visits in 2005, Peak Vista estimates it provides services for only half of those in need living in the Pikes Peak Region. Ancillary services include on-site pharmacy and lab, attended well-child waiting areas, specialty clinics, Second Sight Vision Services, First Visitor new parent education, evening and weekend acute care, and more. Peak Vista has a paid staff of more than 325, in addition to a multitude of volunteer physicians and dentists who support its mission. All Teller County residents are welcome at the Divide Health Center. To schedule an appointment at the Divide Health Clinic for medical or dental services for all ages, call 719-6874460. For more information about Peak Vista Community Health Centers, call 719-228-6606. Peak Vista needs your support: Donate online at www.peakvista.org.

Other Regional Health Care Providers Until the hospital is complete, the residents of Woodland Park can continue to receive excellent health care from many different primary care physicians throughout the area. One such choice is


HEALTH CARE Ideal Family Health Care, which provides the compassion and individualized service of old-fashioned health care — complete with available house calls — while implementing the technology of today. With same-day appointments and low overhead, Ideal Family Health Care is a place where you are more than a patient; you become family. From birth through the end of life, there are health care services tailored to fit your needs in Woodland Park. With the addition of the new Legacy at Pikes Peak, residents will be able to have the independence they want with the help One of 10 Peak Vista facilities, the Divide Health Clinic provides a full range of health services.

www.woodlandparkchamber.com 15


HEALTH CARE they need at their fingertips. For those wishing to stay in their home, Prospect Home Care and Hospice is one option. Providing many home-health services, Prospect Home Care and Hospice works closely with patients’ physicians to provide the care they need within the walls of their own home.

Woodland Park has many other health care services available as well. From hospice to flu clinics to wellness classes, residents have many options when it comes to staying healthy. However, one of the greatest benefits of living in the shadows of the stunning Pikes Peak is the abundance of recreational opportunities available to

keep both body and spirit in top shape. From an evening stroll through the trees to a more strenuous mountain biking trail, there is no need for a gym membership to maintain your health when you live in this beautiful area offering year-round outdoor recreation possibilities.

Woodland Park is home to many health care professionals who provide comprehensive services for patients.

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WORSHIP

A strong spiritual family reaches out to the community at large. BY AIRONN BISHOP

A

diverse community of churches meets not only the spiritual needs of the community, but also reaches out to help with everyday living. Teresa Tucker, administrative assistant for the Woodland Park Christian Church, says, “There are a bunch of different religions in Woodland Park. I think they are all very open-minded and work well together.” The diversity of religious sects in Woodland Park is not commonly found in a town this size. Together, the different churches work to make Woodland Park and the surrounding area an even better place to live. They often come together for a day of joint praise and worship, building on each congregation’s strengths. “Habitat for Humanity, the Help the Needy program and Community Cupboard are some of the programs different congregations work on together in Woodland Park,” says Betty France, senior pastor at Mountain View United Methodist Church. “Help the Needy is a group providing short-term financial help and support, while Community Cupboard is a food source for the people in need throughout the community. With projects such as these, which church you belong

to doesn’t matter at all. It’s all about practicing the religion you’ve been taught and helping those less fortunate.” Youth are very important to all religions in Woodland Park. At Mountain View United Methodist Church, groups such as the boy scouts and girl scouts meet free of charge in the building each week. Youth groups in the Woodland Park Christian Church meet every Sunday for their own study groups, as well as to enjoy games and activities, such as a recent trip to take in a Rockies’ baseball game. They are also building a new facility that will have “a bigger youth center so they can spread out more,” says Tucker. Most churches throughout the community have activities throughout the week for young and old alike to enjoy. Preschool groups, Bible study groups, choir and life groups are just a few of the options. “You don’t need to be a member to join one of our life groups,” says Tucker. “The groups are run by members, but can be attended by anyone with an interest.” There are many different types of worship services in Woodland Park. Congregations include Lutheran, Baptist, Methodist, Catholic, Church of Christ, Episcopal, Fellowship and non-denominational.

A common thread shared by all is growth. In 2006, the Mountain View United Methodist Church has experienced a growth in membership of 10 percent, according to France. The Woodland Park Christian Church is also experiencing a growth in membership and is in the process of constructing a new building to meet the needs. Tucker says, “We’re running out of rooms right now and outgrowing the church.” Even with so many different churches, the Woodland Park religious community is connected in their desire to strengthen the members throughout the area.

www.woodlandparkchamber.com 19


REAL ESTATE

Come home to paradise. BY AIRONN BISHOP

M

any things make Woodland Park and the surrounding area a perfect place to live. There’s the beautiful mountain setting, with an ideal climate featuring mild summer temperatures and plenty of winter snow. Local services, already high-quality, are expanding every day. And as the local real estate market undergoes ongoing growth, many people are realizing the long-term financial benefits of buying a home in Woodland Park. Each year, the area averages a 2 percent growth. City officials are cognizant that they should continue to manage this growth responsibly. Water supply is a hot topic in the West, and in Woodland Park, governing officials are setting limits on growth in order to ensure enough water for the residents of the area. A smart, long-term growth plan has been established by the city. Each year, the city regulates how many new water taps will be allowed. According to real estate professional Shawn Keehn, because of the restriction on construction created by this quota, property values are on the rise, due to supply and demand. “Seventy to 75 homes are allowed to tap the water supply each year in Woodland Park,” notes Keehn. “This is bringing about rising property values, which are attracting 20 Greater Woodland Park Chamber of Commerce

investors. Woodland Park right now is a fantastic place to invest and to live.” Investors aren’t the only ones realizing that Woodland Park is a haven from the busy world of today. Debbie Miller, president of the Greater Woodland Park Chamber of Commerce, sees the growth of the community on a daily basis. “We are experiencing strong real estate growth, unlike other parts of the country,” Miller says. While growth is managed and the location ideal for both work and play, prices in Woodland Park have remained affordable. Starter homes can be easily found for under $200,000. Keehn notes, “The average home prices are between $250,000 and $350,000, but there are homes also selling for $3 to $4 million.” Existing homes are selling quickly as well. “While there is a good selection of homes on the market at any given time, they average just 30 to 60 days on the market,” Keehn says. Homes throughout the county are also selling quickly. While the area has traditional subdivisions, there are also mountain retreats. Even though the area is popular with tourists and second-home buyers, most residents live in Woodland Park/

Teller County year-round. “Only 15 percent of the homes are second or seasonal homes,” says Teller County Commissioner Jim Ignatiuas. Several new developments will make more than 400 home lots available in the next few years in Woodland Park. Among the features making these new developments particularly appealing are the lot sizes and prices. All lots must be a minimum of one-third of an acre, giving residents more room to spread out. The Eagle Pine development will be the site of 30 new homes for those in the “move-up” market. Lots start at just $110,000 and will sell quickly. According to Keehn, the new area will be a showcase of handsome homes, with new home prices averaging around $500,000. Additionally, in 2007, the Stone Ridge development will begin selling lots. Plans for 400 home sites will be developed over several years. The new homes popping up in the region are being specially designed to complement the region’s majestic natural beauty. Million-dollar homes, including luxurious log homes, are designed to grace the surrounding countryside. As the new developments become reality, more and more people will get to


REAL ESTATE

“There is an overwhelming feeling of being home.” experience the feeling Debbie Miller felt when first driving through town several years ago. “It’s a place that when people drive into town, there is an overwhelming feeling of being home.” Whichever area in Woodland Park you choose, you will be surrounded by people who care. “They’ll watch after you,” says new resident Gayle Gross. “They’ve watched after me.” That’s a sentiment shared by many in the area. One of Debbie Pinello’s favorite aspects of living in Woodland Park is the cozy feel of the area. “Living in a small community, you know everyone.” Of course, the region’s most obvious appeal comes from the stunning natural surroundings. “People live up here because it’s cooler and it’s absolutely beautiful,” says Ignatiuas. The residential market isn’t the only thing growing in Woodland Park. The commercial sector is also experiencing tremendous growth, with several new large-scale projects in various stages of completion. One of the most exciting projects for the area is the construction of the first Woodland Park hospital. The $16 million project will open its doors to the public in August 2007, a culmination of eight years’ work. With the new hospital come additional jobs and residents to the area, further boosting the already stable economy in Woodland Park. Another exciting project is a new retail plaza anchored by Wal-Mart. The development will be home to not only the retail giant, but also to several smaller retail spaces. Pad sites are currently available for development. The downtown area is also home to commercial real estate growth. A new theater development area will begin construction in 2007 and will eventually be the premier stop for plays and cultural attractions in the area. The real estate market in Woodland Park and surrounding Teller County is hot. Who could argue that it is a perfect place to call home? With the convenient access to a major metropolis, stunning scenery, friendly residents and the allure of a perfect climate, you can’t go wrong in choosing Woodland Park! www.woodlandparkchamber.com 21


BUSINESS & INDUSTRY

An exciting climate of growth pervades the economy here. BY AIRONN BISHOP

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ebbie Miller, president of the Greater Woodland Park Chamber of Commerce, sums the region’s business climate up best when she says, “We are a service community!” From the tourism industry, to telecommuters, to high-tech concerns, Woodland Park is home to a wide variety of businesses, keeping the unemployment rate well below the national average. “Unemployment has hovered around 3.5 to 4 percent for some time now,” says Teller County Commissioner Jim Ignatiuas. Woodland Park’s location makes it the perfect spot for many tourism-related businesses. As Woodland Park continues to be discovered as the ideal base for exploring the entire region, more and more businesses are calling it home. Ignatiuas realizes the important part tourism plays in the area. “Tourism runs our economy. The food service and accommodations sector account for 24 percent of jobs in the county.” People visiting the area can stay in Woodland Park and enjoy public lands for fishing, hiking, biking and skiing, and then head into Colorado Springs and stroll through the shops or take a short drive to Cripple Creek and try their luck with some 22 Greater Woodland Park Chamber of Commerce

gaming. As the area continues to develop into a destination spot, more and more service-related businesses are opening to meet the demands of the consumer. Mark Fitzgerald, city manager of Woodland Park, says that in addition to the service industry, other major employers are the school district and a high-tech research and development company. The high-tech infrastructure is in place for immediate access to the outside world through the Internet in Woodland Park. Companies no longer need to be in a major metropolitan area to research and market their products. For this reason, Woodland Park is quickly becoming home to high-tech companies and telecommuters. Businesses locating in the region benefit not only from a talented local pool of workers, but also from the ease of recruiting newcomers to this beautiful mountain community. Another new business creating jobs in the Woodland Park area is the new Pikes Peak Regional Hospital, set to open in the late summer of 2007. With the hospital comes a variety of well-paying jobs, beyond just physicians and nurses. Administrative support jobs will also be created, adding to the economy of Woodland Park.

New developments join an already thriving economic sector. The Highway 24 corridor is home to an eclectic mix of office space and retailers and restaurants. This high-visibility locale is attracting new investment on an almost daily basis. With each new job that comes to the area, additional services are needed, creating additional businesses and employment opportunities for area residents. This trickle-down effect is helping strengthen the local economy even further. The retail sector of the economy is expected to experience a surge with the construction of a new Wal-Mart, which will create many jobs with flexible schedules and benefits. Where this retail giant goes, others tend to quickly follow. Pad sites next to the new Wal-Mart will soon be filled with additional shopping and dining choices, including popular national chain restaurants. Woodland Park’s retail sector is also taking advantage of the community’s beauty and charm. The downtown area is currently undergoing a revitalization effort that’s earning rave reviews by residents. According to Fitzgerald, the area is currently being built up as a retail destination. In the spring of 2006, the city


BUSINESS & INDUSTRY announced plans to redevelop a chunk of downtown property into a village of shops, restaurants and a performing arts theater. The City of Woodland Park is taking a proactive approach to business growth in the downtown sector. “Within the downtown area, there are incentives for businesses to locate,” says Fitzgerald. The downtown area has been designated as a TIF (Tax Increment Financing) district. Here, revenue from business development goes into a special fund instead of the

“Woodland Park is quickly becoming home to high-tech companies.” general tax fund. The TIF funds are then used for infrastructure improvements and other incentives. The area is improved without raising the tax rate for the entire community, while the new and existing businesses in the area are enjoying benefits such as frozen property tax rates. Downtown is already home to several unique shops with a down-home feel. From country-western wear to specialty furniture stores featuring the rustic log furniture of the West, shoppers can enjoy an afternoon spent browsing items unique to the Woodland Park area. Shawn Keehn, real estate professional and long-time resident of Woodland Downtown Woodland Park is home to several unique shops.

www.woodlandparkchamber.com 23


BUSINESS & INDUSTRY Park, is amazed at the transformation the downtown area is going through and credits the Downtown Development Authority (DDA). “I like a lot of what the DDA is doing in the downtown area. There are major developments going on downtown.” Community and business leaders and residents are anticipating a bright future for Woodland Park as a tourism, retail and business hub. With continued growth is coming improvement in all sectors of life — education, health care, recreation and more. The tools are in place to make any business successful in Woodland Park — and to make the community a great choice for the families who will continue to come as a result.

Cripple Creek & Victor Gold Mining Company One of Teller County’s strongest and most prominent businesses, the Cripple Creek & Victor Gold Mining Company (CC&V) was formed in 1976. CC&V is a joint venture between Golden Cycle Gold Corporation and AngloGold Ashanti (Colorado) Corp. The company’s mining operation, the Cresson Project, was first issued permits to mine in 1994. Since then, close to 3 million ounces of gold have been produced. The Cripple Creek Mining District of Colorado is the third-largest gold district in the United States, with historic production estimated at 23 million ounces of gold. CC&V is also one of the lowestcost gold mines in the world, with a mining cash cost of approximately $0.74 per ton of material moved. In 2006, CC&V mined approximately 60 million tons of material at a rate of roughly 164,000 tons per day. Surface mining removes the low grade ores that were not economic for historic underground mines. Gold and silver are removed from the ore in the valley

24 Greater Woodland Park Chamber of Commerce

leach facility, using a dilute sodium cyanide solution. Exploration activities continue with the hope that additional gold ore is located and that permits can be modified to further extend the life of the Cresson Project. CC&V employs over 300 people to run the 24-hour, 365-days-a-year operation. CC&V is among the largest private employers in Teller County, with an average annual compensation of $64,000, including wages and benefits. In 2005, CC&V employees achieved two outstanding safety records: 1 million man hours worked without a losttime injury and two years worked without a lost-time injury. These milestones were recognized with awards from the Colorado Mining Association and Colorado Division of Minerals and Geology. Since 1998, CC&V employees have donated over 33,000 volunteer hours to local government, civic organizations and community groups. Over $2.2 million has been donated to local schools, community organizations and local charities since 1994. CC&V provides Teller County with nearly $1.5 million annually in property and net proceeds tax revenue, with an additional $400,000 sent to the state for sales, use and severance tax. To ensure the Cresson Mine project is reclaimed for future generations to enjoy, CC&V has a $44.9 million financial warranty posted to the state of Colorado. CC&V was honored with a Pollution Prevention Award and Reclamation Award in 2005 by the Colorado Mining Association and Division of Minerals and Geology for outstanding work in waste management and voluntary reclamation projects. Clearly, CC&V is an invaluable partner in ensuring a prosperous, healthy future for all the residents of Teller County.


ARTS & CULTURE

An active arts community draws inspiration from their surroundings. BY AIRONN BISHOP

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sually a town the size of Woodland Park must rely on a neighboring community for an active arts and culture district. Whether it’s the majestic Pikes Peak that inspires people, or the perfect climate, Woodland Park is an exception to that rule. Active theater, music and art communities are enhancing the natural beauty surrounding Woodland Park.

Ute Pass Cultural Center 210 E. Midland Avenue 719-687-5284 www.utepassculturalcenter.itgo.com The Ute Pass Cultural Center is a one-stop location for many cultural events throughout the year in Woodland Park. This city-owned building was once the home of Woodland Park’s original high school (from 1937) but has been transformed into a cultural haven for the residents of the Woodland Park area. Facilities Manager Debbie Pinello says, “The center puts on community events like concerts, where patrons are treated to great entertainment in a large main room with a stage and seating for 250 people.” The room can be rearranged to meet the needs of each performance.

So many events take place at the Ute Pass Cultural Center that it is best to call the center for regular updates. “There is something for all ages, including concerts, plays, symphonies and festivals,” says Pinello. “Many of the performances are annual traditions in Woodland Park, and several are free of charge.“ The Woodland Park Wind Symphony is one of the regular performers at Ute Pass Cultural Center. “They have a diverse and large following,” says Pinello, “and their Christmas Concert is phenomenal!” The support for the Woodland Park Wind Symphony comes from many areas of the community. “They have a broad and very good support,” Pinello explains. “All ages perform with the symphony.” Conductor Craig Harms is widely praised for his professional symphony located in a rural setting. Pinello is one of those singing the praises. “The conductor is just terrific, and his hard work pays off. They sound great.” Harms notes, “The symphony is completely volunteer, and we accept anybody. There are no auditions, and yet people are amazed by the quality. It’s a very social thing, with some complete families playing together in the symphony.”

In addition to the regular 50-member symphony, 17 members have created the Swing Factory. Playing Big Band music at summer festivals and dances, the Swing Factory is quickly becoming a local favorite.

Festivals and Events The area is home to several fun family festivals throughout the year. The Mountain Arts Festival has been an annual tradition each August for over 20 years. Held at the Ute Pass Cultural Center, the festival features a wide variety of artists each year, as well as food booths and entertainment. It’s a fun excursion for the whole family! A newcomer on the Woodland Park festival scene is the Christian Arts Festival. Held each summer at the Ute Pass Cultural Center, this family event showcases local talent. Arts and craft booths staffed by local vendors selling a variety of homemade goods, Christian performers from many different local churches, and classes the whole family will enjoy are just some of the events at the Christian Arts Festival. “It started in 2006 and was such a success it will continue on each year in the summer,” says Debbie Pinello of the Ute Pass Cultural Center. www.woodlandparkchamber.com 25


ARTS & CULTURE Please contact the Center for exact dates and events of both the Mountain Arts and Christian Arts festivals by calling 719-687-5284. Another festival livening up the cultural scene in Woodland Park is the Colorado Festival of World Theatre. Held the last two weeks of July, the Colorado Festival of World Theatre features shows from around the world. The shows are presented at the Dickson Auditorium in the local high school; there are also some shows in Colorado Springs. Another fun family event held each summer is the Concert Above the Clouds. Held on July 5, this patriotic event is located at the Woodland Park Middle School athletic fields and is free to the public. “The Colorado Springs Philharmonic Orchestra comes each year for an outdoor performance. During the 1812 Overture, cannons from Fort Carson are fired. The evening also has fireworks,” says local resident Gayle Gross. There are also free concerts presented during the Woodland Music Series. These monthly concerts feature a wide range of musical styles such as rock ’n’ roll, blue grass, big band, and blues and jazz. All of the concerts are held at the Ute Pass Cultural Center. Cultural attractions don’t end when winter arrives, however. Winter is a glorious, glistening season here, and there are many events to enjoy after the weather turns colder. The City of Woodland

Winter is a glorious, glistening season here, and there are many events to enjoy after the weather turns colder. Park Tree Lighting in December each year is a family tradition of many, and the Christmas Concert is a treat many look forward to each year to get them in the holiday spirit.

Local Artists/Performers Youth in Woodland Park have many opportunities to get out and put their creative talents to use. The Junior Woodland Players is an outlet for all their creative energy in the summer. Each year, children from the area present a summer performance that draws a loyal following. The youth are certainly talented in Woodland Park! Not surprisingly, Woodland Park has drawn a group of artists and artisans who draw inspiration from the region’s natural beauty and history. Local craftsmen create original artwork, jewelry, gifts and more. Writers and poets come to the region for enlightenment. There is so much to the cultural side of life in Woodland Park, from banks showcasing local artists’ works through their lobby galleries, to local bands and performers presenting the fruits of their labors to the public through concerts and plays. Woodland Park is truly a small town with big cultural surprises! With its majestic mountains and picturesque beauty, Woodland Park’s landscape has inspired artists throughout the ages.

26 Greater Woodland Park Chamber of Commerce


TOURISM & RECREATION

The glories of nature await you. BY AIRONN BISHOP

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hawn Keehn has lived in Woodland Park almost his entire life, and he never gets bored. “There is always something to do here. If someone says there is nothing going on, they are crazy!” The perfect hub for area attractions, Woodland Park is being discovered by more and more people each year. Their experiences lead them to make it a regular vacation spot. From Pikes Peak, to the Air Force Museum in Colorado Springs, to world-class skiing at Breckenridge, to fishing the plethora of trout streams, there is so much to see and do in Woodland Park that you’ll need to live here to accomplish it all.

Mueller State Park The weather is almost always perfect for outdoor activities around Woodland Park, and Mueller State Park in Divide is a great spot to get started. There is so much to experience at Mueller State Park, and your activities can vary with the season. One thing that doesn’t vary within the park is the splendid view. “The view of Pikes Peak is a view that is unique to the park. You can see the west side of the peak from the park. Along with the hikes, the quiet solitude and view of the park make it

a favorite spot for me,” says Debbie Miller, president of the Greater Woodland Park Chamber of Commerce. In the summer, 132 campsites located in picturesque aspen and conifer settings are ready for your weekend get-away. Only the walk-in tent sites are not equipped with electricity. You won’t be roughing it too much, however, with the Camper Services Building close by. Here you will find restrooms as well as coin-operated showers and laundry facilities to wash off the inevitable dirt of camping. Once camp is set up, head out and explore some of the 50 miles of trails leading into the park’s 4,771 acres of pristine backcountry. The region’s luxurious winters bring new adventures to Mueller State Park. While you can still use one of the 18 electrical sites and the Comfort Station with modern restrooms, a great experience can be had in one of the park’s brand-new log cabins. “Three new log cabins with beautiful views, unique furnishings and amenities are available,” says Susie Yost. “With two, three or four bedrooms, you can experience the exquisite forested setting with views of America’s favorite mountain, Pikes Peak. Sit by the fireplace; create a delicious meal in the fully furnished

kitchen, or grill your favorite steaks. A backcountry trailhead is nearby, so don’t forget your snowshoes.” All the trails in Mueller State Park are open during the winter to backcountry snowshoeing and cross-country skiing. When the snowfall is right, sledding areas are also available.

Florissant Fossil Beds Another great hiking spot for hikers of all skill levels is the Florissant Fossil Beds. The Fossil Beds were created over 35 million years ago when the Guffy Volcano erupted, creating the petrified wood the area is famous for. Four exposed stumps are now covered with interpretive plaques describing what visitors are seeing. Interpretive programs are another way for visitors to truly understand what happened to create the stunning scenery. Tours are offered daily from June through early September and also occasionally in the winter months. “Approximately 14 miles of hiking trails in the easy-to-moderate categories are great for almost anyone. Most trails are handicap-accessible,” says Reginald Tiller. “While enjoying the Fossil Beds, visitors often run across elk, and a lucky www.woodlandparkchamber.com 27


TOURISM & RECREATION

“There are 559 square miles in Teller County, and half of that is public land, giving people excellent access.” few will see a black bear heading off down the trail,” Tiller adds. The northwest slope of Pikes Peak is also visible from the Fossil Beds. Open from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., seven days a week (closed only for the Fourth of July, Thanksgiving and Christmas), the Florissant Fossil Beds are a great stop on your next family vacation or even an afternoon out. For more information, including current pricing, visit the park Web site at www.nps.gov/flfo.

Pikes Peak Woodland Park is “the base camp to the Rockies.” It goes without saying that Pikes Peak is a destination not to be missed when in Woodland Park. Whether your passion is for white-water rafting or the Old West, mountain biking or shopping, narrow gauge railroads or fine dining, the Pikes Peak area has something for everyone. Pikes Peak is the most accessible mountain in Colorado — you can drive, hike, bike or even ride a train to the summit. Located on the north slopes of Pikes Peak, Woodland Park is the perfect place to start your exploration of the famous mountain, which can easily serve as the centerpiece for an entire family vacation. Visit www.pikes-peak.com, the Web site of the Pikes Peak Country Attractions Association, for a comprehensive list of the many attractions and activities taking place on and around the mountain year-round.

The Great Outdoors The “Great Outdoors” is more than just an expression in Woodland Park and Teller County. Nestled in the Rocky Mountains, whispered to by the wind through the aspen trees of the Pike National Forest, Woodland Park’s natural beauty is truly awe-inspiring. But best of all, its unspoiled beauty is open for all to enjoy. 28 Greater Woodland Park Chamber of Commerce

“There are 559 square miles in Teller County, and half of that is public land, giving people excellent access,” says Teller County Commissioner Jim Ignatiuas. “People use them for hiking, biking, fishing — we have terrific trout fishing — dirt biking, ATV riding and much more. “And as an added bonus,” Ignatiuas notes, “there are no bugs!” For water fun, spend an afternoon at Manitou Lake or Rampart Reservoir or just spend a day fishing one of the streams surrounding Woodland Park for a prized trout. Manitou Lake is one of the most beautiful small mountain lakes in the region. Located just a few miles north of Woodland Park on Colorado Highway 67, the lake is perfect for summer picnics, fishing from April through December, water sports, and mountain biking and hiking. With many trails winding around the lake and through the beautiful mountains surrounding it, Manitou Lake has become a destination for many seeking a day in the great outdoors. An eight-mile paved path takes bikers and hikers from town to the lake. Rampart Reservoir was created in 1969 and serves as the domestic water storage facility for Colorado Springs. Today, the 500-surface-acre lake offers prize-winning fish, excellent hiking and biking opportunities, and a great place for watercraft. People of all ages visit Rampart Reservoir throughout the year to enjoy ice fishing, water skiing or just a scenic drive across the dam. If you would like to spend the night or even a few days, set up your tent in one of the two U.S. Forest Service campgrounds located near the reservoir. The City of Woodland Park is another great resource for recreation in the area. An active Parks and Recreation Department is continually growing to meet the needs of the residents of Woodland Park. The department recently built a new soccer and baseball field with artificial turf so it can be used virtually year-round.

Rocky Mountain Dinosaur Resource Center One of the indoor treasures in the Woodland Park area is the Rocky Mountain Dinosaur Resource Center. A dinosaur lover’s dream, the center has many exhibits — some of which are hands-on — a working lab and a fully stocked store.


TOURISM & RECREATION “We do field trips for schools yearround,” says Dave Ehlert, museum director. The Resource Center is not only for school children, however. There are educational displays to interest all ages. With 30 dinosaur skeletons — including an all-time favorite, T-Rex — visitors have plenty to enjoy. A special feature is the Marine Room, where prehistoric marine creatures are on display. “A lot of times people forget what was roaming around in the water at the time of the dinosaur,” notes Ehlert. Located in downtown Woodland Park, the Resource Center opened its doors in 2004 and has been wowing visitors ever since. Whether you are on a school field trip, having your birthday party hosted by the Resource Center, or just enjoying a family outing, there is something to see and do once inside. The Rocky Mountain Dinosaur Resource Center is open seven days a week, 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday through Saturday and 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Sundays. Cost of admission is $9.50 for adults, $8 for seniors, $6.50 for children 6 through 12, and 5 and under free. Visit them online at www.rmdrc.com or call them directly at 719-686-1820.

The Rocky Mountain Dinosaur Resource Center has many exhibits, a working lab and a fully stocked store. www.woodlandparkchamber.com 29


CALENDAR

Woodland Park Calendar of Events CHAMBER’S ANNUAL DINNER

CHAMBER’S GOLF OUTING

CHAMBER’S BUSINESS AFTER HOURS

OLD-FASHIONED FOURTH OF JULY CELEBRATION

FARMERS MARKET

SYMPHONY ABOVE THE CLOUDS

March

3rd Tuesday of Every Month

Every Friday, June–September

CHAMBER’S SMALL BUSINESS EXPO April & November

June or July

July

July

UTE PASS TRAIL STAMPEDE RODEO July

MOUNTAIN ARTS FESTIVAL August

CLASSIC CAR SHOW September

ROCKY MOUNTAIN OKTOBERFEST September

CHAMBER’S MEMBERSHIP BREAKFAST October

LIGHTED CHRISTMAS PARADE December

30 Greater Woodland Park Chamber of Commerce


CLOSE

You’ve got to see it all for yourself to understand. BY AIRONN BISHOP

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oodland Park is more than just a tourist’s town; here, people become more than family — they become kindred spirits. Just take a drive into town and experience the hospitality and service the area is famous for. Once in town, jump out of your car and into stunning natural surroundings. From this “base camp to the Rockies,” you can explore Pikes Peak, several state parks, fossil beds, a world-class dinosaur museum, lakes and rivers, and trails galore. An award-winning school district is waiting to teach your children, and an active arts community is ready to enrich

your cultural awareness. From performing in the local symphony to excelling in math and science, the whole family will enjoy getting involved in the academic and cultural side of things in Woodland Park. The new hospital and other medical personnel in Woodland Park will meet any family’s health care needs with state-of-theart facilities and the caring, compassionate service found in this amazing hometown. Health care facilities aren’t the only places compassion is evident in Woodland Park. The religious community consistently reaches out to help those in need, and

the many different denominations come together to make an even bigger impact. Blessed to be living among some of the most spectacular scenery in the world, the residents of Woodland Park are eager to share their community with visitors and new residents. Woodland Park is all about service. From helping those who call the area home, to making visitors feel at home, Woodland Park is a service-oriented community. Craig Harms, a local resident, puts it best: “I couldn’t ask for a more beautiful place!”

www.woodlandparkchamber.com 31


INDEX OF ADVERTISERS

ADVERTISERS

Advertiser................................................................. Page Number

Advertiser................................................................. Page Number

A Wise Child ............................................................................................. 28 Allstar Landscaping................................................................................... 18 Allstate – Dawn M. Roberts ......................................................................... 9 American Family Insurance – Frank W. Gundy Agency, Inc. ........................... 6 Aspen Custom Homes / Ute Country Property, LLC ....................................... 3 Bad Rock, Inc. Automotive Powertrains....................................................... 16 Bottom Line Results, Inc. .................................................. Outside Back Cover Building Alternatives Inc. ........................................................................... 21 Clarion Mortgage of the Rockies / Eileen Zytka Group, Inc........................... 23 Coldwell Banker 1st Choice Realty ............................................................. 24 Coldwell Banker 1st Choice Realty – Bob Morton, David Martinek, John Marshall ............................................ 21 Colorado Wolf & Wildlife Center ................................................................. 15 Compassion Animal Hospital...................................................................... 11 Country Lodge .......................................................................................... 29 Cruises Inc. .............................................................................................. 11 DMI Builders ............................................................................................. 18 The DiGiglia Law Firm, LLC ......................................................................... 6 Echo Pages .............................................................................................. 30 Ent ............................................................................................................. 9 Factory Direct Carpets................................................................................. 5 G & G Handyman Service, LLC .................................................................. 19 High View Baptist Church .......................................................................... 18 The Insurance Center ................................................................................ 11 Keller Williams Realty – Noma Nel Hayden Group ....................................... 29 Keller Williams Realty – The Woodland Exchange........................................ 29

Kelly’s Office Connection ........................................................................... 14 LandAmerica ............................................................................................ 15 The Lodge at Elk Valley ............................................................................. 30 The Lofthouse Inn ...............................................................Inside Back Cover Mark Kirkland Photography ....................................................................... 26 Mountain Aire Homes ................................................................................ 23 Pikes Peak Insurance .................................................................................. 5 Prudential Colorado Real Estate ................................................................... 1 Prudential Colorado Real Estate – Keli Konczak .......................................... 21 Rampart Library District / Wood Park Public Library .................................... 18 RE/MAX Performance, Inc. ................................................. Inside Front Cover Rocky Mountain Elk Tour 2007 .................................................................. 24 Rocky Mountain Dinosaur Resource Center .................................................. 3 Rocky Mountain Lodge & Cabins ............................................................... 28 Service Funding Inc................................................................................... 14 State Farm Insurance – Bill Clulo ............................................................... 26 Teller County Public Health ........................................................................ 15 Templed Hills ............................................................................................ 28 Timberland Dental Care............................................................................. 18 Town and Country Resort .......................................................................... 17 Triple B Ranch .......................................................................................... 30 United Country Tiberline Realty, Inc. ........................................................... 32 The UPS Store .......................................................................................... 14 Vectra Bank of Colorado ............................................................................ 24 Woodland Hardware & Rental .................................................................... 26 Woodland Park School District Re-2............................................................. 9

32 Greater Woodland Park Chamber of Commerce


GrWoodlandPark0507aw  

“We have so many people who live here for the quality of life and the quality of the schools…"

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