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Community Journal

THE PICTURE OF A BLACK EDUCATOR TYREE CURRY HAS GONE HOME TO BE WITH THE LORD... Www.communityjournal.info

VOL. 19 NO. 14

AUGUST 10 2012—NASSAU EDITION

Serving Nassau County’s African American Community


THE NEW COMMUNITY JOURNAL

FRIDAY AUGUST 10, 2012

From the Desk of Mayor Hall An Old School Gentleman Today, I write this column with a feeling of great sadness and yet immense pride. Yesterday we learned that our friend and official village photographer Mr. Tyree Curry has died. The sadness that swept my office and village hall was palpable. Many could not believe that he had died, but even more spoke of the exceptional person that he was and of the sense that we had lost a true gentleman; a man of principle and integrity, who represented so many of the old values.

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We called Tyree Curry ‘Mister Curry’ because everything about him represented class. Mr. Curry was the official village photographer representing the village at hundreds of events each year, sometimes four or five daily. Always he represented himself and the village in top form. He would take photographs of distinguished individuals and ordinary citizens and he treated all with respect and professionalism. All who encountered him were greeted with a smile and a special hello. Though the demands of the job were many, dealing with crowds and often overly assertive politicos, Mr. Curry never lost his composure, and always made the subjects in his photographs feel special. He had a joke and a gentleword for each of them, helping to set them at ease and to get the best photograph possible. Heset up (Continued on page 23)

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THE NEW COMMUNITY JOURNAL

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Community Journal a publication of Emerging Business Group, Inc. Š2006 New York all rights reserved The Community Journal is a weekly publication, based in Baldwin, New York, dedicated to sharing news and information among minority businesses and residents which will enable positive action - economically, socially and politically - for the betterment of us all. From our premiere issue, July 1, 1993, we have grown to be one of the leading African heritage news and information sources on Long Island. As a community - based publication, we intend to expand our presence and to encourage greater participation from all members of the community in forging our shared destiny. We are a "for-profit" business and hope to extend that spirit of economic empowerment to many other businesses in our community. We are published each week unless otherwise indicated and are distributed through newsstands, independent sales agents, and subscriptions.

Publisher: Larry Montgomery Www.communityjournal.info Mailing Address: 456 New York Avenue Baldwin, New York 11510

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PLEASE KEEP THE COMMENTS COMING AND IF YOU LIKE WHAT WE ARE DOING SHOW YOUR SUPPORT FINANCIALLY CHECK OUT OUR NEW WEB-SITE community journal.info

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THE NEW COMMUNITY JOURNAL

FRIDAY AUGUST 10, 2012

COLUMNIST:

This week the Long Island Community lost another veteran educator and all around strong Black man, I speak of Mr. Tyree Curry.

IN THE BLACK

No we are not trying to make up for a lost opportunity in placing his photo so prominently on our front page, we are merely honoring a man who’s honoring is long passed due. Yes he has been honored before and in many other places around the community however, he never received the recognition he surely deserved right here on the front page of the communities oldest weekly newspaper.

Larry Montgomery, Sr. COMMENTARY Dr. Lindamichelle Baron LATINO PERSPECTIVE Stephen Acevedo EDUCATION Lisa Byers ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT: Asha Akins REASONABLE THINKING: Jim Reed HEALTHY LIVING Immacula Oligario RELIGION:

Although his work has been seen here on hundreds of occasions. Among all that Tyree did he was a professional in every definition of the word. Many of our front page photo’s came from his camera. And yes, without cost. Sometimes I had to make Tyree take a few dollars just for gas and CD’s. He was just that nice a man. He knew our struggle better than we knew it sometimes but you could always count on two things when you ran into Tyree at an event. Great photo’s and a smile. God Bless him and his family. We will all miss him dearly.

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MINISTER LARRY MONTGOMERY, SR. PUBLISHER AND CHIEF COMMUNITY JOURNAL, INC.

WATCH AND PRAY God is about to release a 7 FOLD BLESSING. He is doing something new. SO WATCH AND PRAY. God Bless.

From August 9 until November 6 we will be making calls to help re-elect president Obama.

Dr. Karen Deadwyler

The call center is located at 124 Brooklyn Ave, Valley Stream NY, 11581. Crews are making calls Monday – Friday 6pm to 9pm and on Saturdays 12:30pm to 8:30pm.

LOCAL SPORTS:

We have telephone landlines set up, extra work space for people who want to use their personal cell phones, and free Wi-Fi for Google Voice users. All we need is you! It is time for you to take action and join us as we work towards calling 1 million voters before Election Day.

BJ Robinson

Like us on Facebook at:http://www.facebook.com/TOHDC Follow us on Twitter at: https://twitter.com/TOHDC If you would like to make a donation send it to; Town of Hempstead Democratic Committee 29 Central Parkway Merrick, NY 11566 Make checks payable to the Town of Hempstead Democratic Committee NASSAU COUNTY EDITION

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THE NEW COMMUNITY JOURNAL

FRIDAY AUGUST 10, 2012

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Remembering Tyree Curry: The Man I Knew-A Champion For Children! by Khayyam E. Ali

The community lost an icon this week and it is with great sadness, yet with great joy, that I reflect about the man I knew as Mr. Curry. You see, the sadness will eventually diminish while the pleasure of knowing my beloved friend will last forever.

meet Tyree Curry. He greeted us by extending his hand to Maleek and embracing him, then took him off to take a picture. As for me he grimly

mean son-of-a-gun. But his teachers didn't stand in the halls talking to each other, and they came to work regularly and on time. There was order in his school and it

Black Men of Long Island with a friend of mine, Shelby Streeter, presently the Director of Special Services in Uniondale, at a club in West Hempstead. To my surprise I saw Mr. Curry there. Oh yeah, Tyree sure could party as I would later find out. But on this night I would discover that not only was he a school principal but was also a professional photographer as he was walking around taking pictures on behalf of the sponsors of the event.

I first met Mr. Curry in 1997, while I was teaching at the Prospect Elementary School in the Hempstead Public School District. At the time Mr. Curry was the principal of the Rhodes Elementary School located on Washington Avenue, and in charge of the school district's African-American Heritage Celebration. It was my first year teaching in Hempstead and I was selected as the school's African-American Role Model of the Year by the Prospect School principal, Ms. SallyHerb Thompson. I was granted this honor for the most part because of one of my students, Maleek McClough, who was selected as African-American Student Role Model of the year. Maleek had a district wide reputation as being a terror, having been suspended at least a half dozen times the previous year. I just happened to show up the same year he decided to change his life around. The two of us had to go to the Rhodes school to see Mr. Curry for an orientation and Maleek had to get his photo taken for the event. It was the first time I would NASSAU COUNTY EDITION

looked at me and sternly said, "Wait here." That's it! That's all he said, and I felt insulted and ignored. "Some role model of the year I am," I thought. As I waited in the corridor I could see that Mr. Curry was a tough principal. Some of his teachers said to me at that time that he was a

didn't seem to matter whether you liked him or not as long you did your job and the children were engaged and actively learning. As Maleek and I left the Rhodes School, I remembered thinking, "I don't like that son-of-a-gun, either." A few months later, I attended an affair for 100

I remembered that I resented the fact that he had "dissed" me previously. But I decided to approach him in spite of our last encounter. I introduced myself and asked if he remembered me. He said, "Sure do young man, and I'm surprised that you're even speaking to me. Tells me a lot about you." We talked for hours and had a splendid time. I remember leaving him thinking, "He doesn't try to make you like him, he just tries to make you better... Hmmm." By the end of the school year Mr. Curry had been promoted to the position of Special Assistant to the Superintendent. By this time he was becoming my Hempstead Schools mentor. I took him a (Continued on page 33)

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Hillary Clinton visits Nelson Mandela at home QUNU, South Africa (AP) — U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton visited with Nelson Mandela at his home on Monday to pay her respects to the aging South African icon. Clinton and a small group flew to the 94-year-old Mandela’s home village of Qunu, where they reminisced and had a small private lunch. Clinton and Mandela’s wife, Graca Machel, talked as photographers snapped pictures and Mandela looked on smiling from his wingback chair. “That’s a beautiful smile!” Clinton said. “Madiba’s smile is a trademark,” Machel said, affectionately referring to Mandela by his Xhosa clan name. Afterwards, Clinton, Machel and the others went into the main dining room for lunch. Mandela remained in the living room with his medical attendants. The former president of South Africa has homes in Johannesburg and Qunu. In recent years, he has spent more and more time in Qunu and in May, it was announced that he would stay there indefinitely. Mandela, a Nobel peace laureate who spent 27 years in prison for fighting racist white rule, has retired from public life.

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THE NEW COMMUNITY JOURNAL

FRIDAY AUGUST 10, 2012

Jackson camp on NY Post’s Jesse, Jr. seat switch story: ‘false’, ‘absurd’ Family and staffers to Chicago Rep. Jesse Jackson, Jr. strongly refuted a New York Post report, which quoted unnamed sources as saying Rev. Jesse Jackson, Sr. is working behind-the-scenes to place his younger son Jonathan in Jackson, Jr.’s congressional seat. The Post claims that the elder Jackson has essentially taken over his son’s congressional office, at a time when Jackson, Jr. remains hospitalized in the Mayo Clinic in Minnesota, for what his family says are “debilitating” gastrointestinal issues and clinical depression. The Post also asserts that Jackson, Sr. wants his younger son to take over the seat in part because he would wield more influence over the office if his more independent elder son stepped aside. Speaking to theGrio on Wednesday, the Jackson camp put on a full-court defense, calling the story “false,” “absurd” and “a fabrication.” “The story in the Post is false,” the congressman’s chief of staff, Rick Bryant, told theGrio. “Congressman Jackson is running for reelection. He won a primary. He is gearing up to run. All of his supporters are still behind him 100 percent.” Bryant also pushed back against the Post’s sources, who claim Rev. Jackson is essentially running his son’s congressional office. “They’re so off base, I don’t know where to begin,” Bryant said. “Reverend Jackson has not taken over [Jackson, Jr.'s] office, he’s not managing our media. He has nothing whatsoever to do with running our office. The whole thing is totally absurd.” Regarding the Post, he added: “I have no idea who their sources are, but they are totally unreliable [and] misinformed.” Bryant said Jackson, Jr. has no plans to vacate his seat, and that he will be back on the campaign trail “when the doctors feel it’s appropriate. I hope soon.” He last spoke with Jackson, Jr. on Tuesday, and related that the representative has spoken with Democratic congressional leaders in Washington, D.C. to keep them informed about his plans. Both Bryant and Kevin Lampe — a spokesman for the Jackson re-election campaign and for Jackson’s wife, Chicago Alderman Sandi NASSAU COUNTY EDITION

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Jackson — expressed confidence that the congressman will win reelection in November, even given his time off from the campaign trail. Jackson handily won a March primary, and his district is 88 percent Democratic. “The congressman is getting better,” Lampe told theGrio. “The congressman will be returning to work as soon as he’s better. The campaign is moving forward.” Lampe and Bryant also shot down a new rumor that emerged on Wednesday: that Sandi Jackson may be preparing to run for her husband’s seat, if his condition does not improve. Lampe said there has been no talk of Sandi Jackson, who is also her husband’s campaign manager, stepping into the role of candidate. “We had a very successful primary [in March],” Lampe said of Jackson, Jr.’s campaign under his wife’s leadership. “We won with 72 percent of the vote under her direction.” Sources also tell theGrio that it wouldn’t be simple for anyone, whether it was Jackson, Sr. or someone else, to slot a new candidate into Jesse, Jr.’s place. He would have to withdraw his name from the race; then local Democratic Party officials would choose another candidate for the ballot. Jackson, Sr. lashed out at the Post story, which he insisted is “not remotely true.” “It’s unfortunate that they would take a story and run with it without foundation,” Rev. Jackson told theGrio. “I have not been to Jesse’s office… I have no attached relationship with that office. It’s not true.” Jackson said his family has “focused exclusively on the congressman’s health and his recovery, and on his regaining his strength. And people for the most part have been very respectful of that process taking place.” As for his younger son, Jackson, Sr. said: “Jonathan is a businessman, who doesn’t have a remote interest in politics.” The civil rights activist added that the idea that either he or Jonathan would attempt to push Jesse, Jr. out of his congressional seat, or “replace” him with a family member is “a fabrication. It’s unfair, and it’s untrue.” Follow Joy Reid on Twitter at @thereidreport PAGE 7


THE NEW COMMUNITY JOURNAL

FRIDAY AUGUST 10, 2012

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Zimmerman’s lawyer to seek ‘stand your ground’ hearing Lawyers for George Zimmerman, accused of second degree murder in the shooting death of Trayvon Martin, will seek a “stand your ground” hearing. A statement on the website for Zimmerman’s legal defense confirms that Mark O’Mara is preparing for a hearing, which the website describes as a “mini-trial.” There will be no jury, however, and the judge alone will decide whether Zimmerman has proved that he was in reasonable fear for his life when he fatally shot Martin February 26th. “Now that the State has released the majority of their discovery, the defense asserts that there is clear support for a strong claim of self-defense. Consistent with this claim of self-defense, there will be a “Stand Your Ground” hearing,” the statement on the GZLegalCase website read. The statement continued: There are significant differences between a “Stand Your Ground” hearing and a trial. In a “Stand Your Ground” hearing, there is no jury; the decision is made by the judge alone. In a criminal trial, the prosecution must prove the defendant’s guilt beyond a reasonable doubt, but in a “Stand Your Ground” hearing, the burden is on the defense to prove that the evidence fits the conditions of the “Stand Your Ground” law. If the Court rules in favor of the defendant in a “Stand Your Ground” hearing, not only are criminal charges dismissed, the defendant is also immune from civil actions related to the shooting. The primary focus of a “Stand Your Ground” hearing is whether George Zimmerman reasonably believed that his use of his weapon was necessary to prevent great bodily harm to himself at the hands of Trayvon Martin. Zimmerman maintains he shot Martin after the 17-year-old attacked him. Zimmerman spotted the teen inside the gated community where he and his wife rented a townhome, and where Martin was visiting with his father from Miami. O’Mara said preparing for the “stand your ground” hearing will take time. The law has become controversial in the wake of the Martin shooting, and a Florida task force led by the state’s lieutenant governor is reviewing its application. Follow Joy Reid on Twitter at @thereidreport.

NASSAU COUNTY EDITION

Michelle Obama graces the September 2012 cover of Ladies Home Journal, which features an exclusive interview with both the first lady and President Obama. The article focuses on the tight relationship the couple enjoys, their vibrant affection for each other, and how athletics can increase the participation of young women in leadership roles. Regarding encouraging girls to embrace their power, the first lady said, “We have to start with them while they’re young and instill in girls a sense of confidence. That’s why sports are so important. They teach you how to compete — how to fall down and get back up.” Mrs. Obama has certainly been putting her support of the edifying aspects of sports into practice by heartily cheering for America at London’s Olympic Games. President Obama has done his part as well by calling Olympic winners, including gold medalist Gabby Douglas. Yet, not every aspect of their Ladies Home Journal interview was about serious social issues. In keeping with their penchant for PDA, the first couple also got playful. When asked why people take Michelle’s advice so seriously, Obama responded, “Well, she’s very smart. She’s a wonderful speaker. She’s very cute.” Michelle quipped back, stating, “Thanks for this question. I wanted to see what he had to say [laughs].” But President Obama did not rest his point on this moment of levity. “Having said all those things, the quality I love most about her is, she’s honest and genuine. I think that comes across to people,” he said. “They get a sense that they can trust her. You know, the word ‘authenticity’ is overused these days. But I do think it captures what folks are looking for — not just in leaders, but also in friends and in coworkers — and that is, folks who are on the level,” the president continued. “People like that tell you what they think and don’t have a bunch of hidden motives. That’s who Michelle is. She’s also funny. She’s the funniest person in our family.” Enjoy more of the Obama’s perfect mix of flirtation and exposition on positive values on the Ladies Home Journal web site. Will you be picking up a copy of the magazine’s September issue? Follow Alexis Garrett Stodghill on Twitter at @lexisb PAGE 8


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THE NEW COMMUNITY JOURNAL

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Employers from McCarthy Job Fair Still Taking Resumes Congresswoman Releases Contact Info of Employers GARDEN CITY, NY (Aug. 8, 2012) – Numerous employers from Rep. Carolyn McCarthy’s recent job fair are still taking resumes and have made their contact info available for Long Islanders to apply in case they weren’t able to attend the event. “About a thousand people were able to attend our most recent job fair, but having this information will help give even more Long Islanders a shot at local jobs even if they couldn’t make it the other day,” Rep. McCarthy said. “I hope that my constituents looking for work right now take advantage of this opportunity.” About three dozen employers attended Rep. McCarthy’s job fair in July. This week, 11 of them have made their contact information available for the public to continue to apply for possible openings. Four other participants from Rep. McCarthy’s job fair – HempsteadWorks, the NYS Small Business Development Center, The Soldiers Project and Hofstra University – have also made their staff available to continue to help local residents with their job searches. Aflac NY Christine Walsh District Sales Coordinator 516-621-1606, x15 christine_walsh@us.aflac.com Ambit Energy Meier Stein Senior Consultant 646-251-6479 www.realenergydeal.com Avon Lillian Russo Executive Unit Leader 516-314-6477 www.youravon.com/lillianrusso Century 21 Dept. Stores 1085 Old Country Road Westbury, NY 11590 Sameela Chowdhry 516-333-5200, x4104 schowdhry@c21stores.com JHACS Electric 611 Middle Neck Rd. Great Neck, NY 11023 Chris Clark 516-773-8000 Legal Shield NASSAU COUNTY EDITION

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Mark Bonnett 877-474-7828 Light Speed Solutions Stacy Larson Business Development Manager stacy.larson@lightspeedsolutions.com Lord and Taylor (Manhasset) Cassandre Maurice Human resource coordinator 516-627-3000, x214 lt002hr@lordandtaylor.com Miller & Milone, P.C. Dorothy Post dpost@millermilone.com New York Life Insurance 576 Broadhollow Rd. Melville, NY 11747 Sally C. Doukas 631-844-3020 sdoukas@ft.newyorklife.com PL Developments 200 Hicks St. Westbury, NY 11590 Liza Anzola Corporate Recruiter 516- 213-2412 lanzola@pldevelopments.com Town of Hempstead Department of Occupational Resources at HempsteadWorks Sandy Rubin 516-485-5000, x1110 srubin@hempsteadworks.com **Not hiring but will consult Farmingdale Small Business Development Center John Narciso 631-420-2765 **Not hiring but will consult The Soldiers Project Linda Caginalp Chair of Outreach 516-627-3225 longisland@thesoldiersproject.org **Not hiring but will consult Hofstra University Office of Graduate Admissions 105 Memorial Hall Hempstead, NY 11549 516-463-4876 graddean@hofstra.edu **Not hiring but will consult with students “We still have a long way to go in our economic recovery and I’m doing everything I can to make sure that Long Islanders have access to local jobs,” said Rep. McCarthy, who is focusing on measures and events that help small businesses, entrepreneurs, students and workers as the nation continues its path to economic recovery. In December, Rep. McCarthy held a career expo that focused on Long Island’s health care industry, from which over 20 employers participated. Other major economy-related forums she has held in this Congress include ones focusing on tax cuts for small businesses; how small businesses can benefit from the U.S. Export-Import Bank; and what career training opportunities are available at local educational institutions. [PHOTO CAPTION: About 1,000 jobseekers and three dozen employers attended Rep. Carolyn McCarthy’s “Long Island Job Fair” at Nassau Community College on July 23. Eleven employers and four organizations who participated have made their contact information available for Long Islanders through Rep. McCarthy’s office in case they couldn’t make the recent event.] PAGE 10


THE NEW COMMUNITY JOURNAL

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Rep. McCarthy on Wisconsin Shooting: 'Another Sad Moment to Reflect' GARDEN CITY, NY (August 6, 2012) -- Rep. Carolyn McCarthy issued the following statement in response to the mass shooting at a Sikh temple in Wisconsin yesterday: "I mourn with the people of Oak Creek and Sikh communities across the country as we recover from this tragedy, yet another in a line of too many mass shootings in our nation. For the victims, this is a personal tragedy that will be with them forever; I hope they find strength and comfort in this time of great need. "For our nation, it’s another sad moment to reflect and ask ourselves what we can do to fight intolerance and improve public safety for innocent Americans in a nation where guns unfortunately too often fall into the wrong hands.”

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aircraft noise over Nassau County. Topics discussed at these meetings have ranged from runway distribution to potential “Part 150” studies. The attendees are knowledgeable on the issues and steadfast in their pursuit of livable conditions in their communities.” Rep. McCarthy focused her request in the letter on the need – as also called for by TVASNAC Chair Kendall Lampkin and his fellow board members – for a “memorandum of understanding” between the FAA and the PA so that each agency’s respective roles and responsibilities in noise management and mitigation are made more clear and accountable” “It is my understanding that at one TVASNAC meeting representatives from each the FAA and PANYNJ agreed to make public their respective responsibilities in mitigating aircraft noise. In order to address the confusion as to each entity’s jurisdiction with respect to reducing aircraft noise, I am asking that each agency commit to a memorandum of understanding on the issue. Such a memorandum will serve as a bilateral agreement between the FAA and PANYNJ and represent a formal starting point for residents and local elected officials alike to work with both entities in a manner that reduces noise pollution over the skies of Nassau County.” Rep. McCarthy has been fighting through legislative channels to

Rep. McCarthy to FAA & Port Authority: Work Together on Airplane Noise Amplifies Nassau Residents’ and Officials’ Calls As Related in Monthly Community Meetings WASHINGTON, DC (Aug. 3, 2012) – Rep. Carolyn McCarthy (D-NY4) sent a letter yesterday to top officials at the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) and Port Authority of New York and New Jersey (PANYNJ) relating the concerns of some of her constituents about increasing airplane noise over their homes and the need for the agencies to work together on solutions. “As a resident of Mineola, I, myself, can attest that the piercing blare of jet engines of commercial airlines is oppressive,” Rep. McCarthy wrote. “I am determined to seek a solution on behalf of my constituency and I remain committed to attaining the cooperation of both the FAA and the PANYNJ in order to ensure that noise abatement is being given the attention it demands.” Rep. McCarthy noted the grassroots work of local officials and residents in her letter as well: “The Town-Village-Aircraft-Safety and Noise Abatement Committee (TVASNAC), a committee that I applaud for engaging in grass-roots tactics in order to restore peace and quiet to localities on Long Island, has been working tirelessly at meetings with local leaders to determine the best course of action to help solve the issue of NASSAU COUNTY EDITION

try to bring noise relief to the residents of Nassau County near JFK and LaGuardia airports. She voted against the departure flight path redesign that is making westbound flights take off over Nassau County before turning back towards their destinations; successfully sponsored an amendment to last year’s FAA Reauthorization Act that encouraged the Port Authority to conduct a noise study focusing on the areas surrounding JFK and LaGuardia Airports; and she voted against this year’s FAA Reauthorization Act due to its lack of an “environmental impact study” to assess the problem of noise levels in communities near local airports. Rep. McCarthy has also joined TVASNAC members in a call for a joint telephone hotline and database for both the FAA and Port Authority to share information from local residents about airplane noise in their communities. PAGE 11


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Candidate Spotlight: Michaelle Solages

The Right Choice for Assembly District 22 Michaelle Solages is a lifelong resident of Elmont and will fight tirelessly to improve quality of life in all of Nassau County. As a professional and as a private citizen, Michaelle has worked closely with community members to understand and address the issues that affect all Nassau County residents. When elected, Michaelle will be a strong advocate for:  GREATER POLICE PROTECTION OF OUR NEIGHBORHOODS NASSAU COUNTY EDITION

MORE STATE AID TO OUR SCHOOLS  SMART DEVELOPMENT AT BELMONT PARK TO ATTRACT MORE HIGH-PAYING JOBS Michaelle is not going to get caught up in petty political squabbles that distract from her primary goal of ADDRESSING THE NEEDS OF THE COMMUNITY. To volunteer or for more information, visit www.nassaucountydems.com. Don't forget to vote for Michaelle Solages on Primary Day, Thursday, September 13th! 

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LONG ISLAND’S COMMUNITY FOUNDATION GRANTS MORE THAN HALF A MILLION DOLLARS August 7, 2012, Syosset,NY – The Long Island Community Foundation announces $563,000 in recent grants to 23 effective nonprofits that make Long Island a better place to live, work, and play. Showcasing Long Island’s cultural assets… Ø HAMPTONS INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL, East End - $20,000 to expand the Festival’s visiting artists and community outreach initiatives in the Long Island East End villages of Montauk, East Hampton, Southampton, Sag Harbor, Watermill, and Westhampton. Ø LONG ISLAND ARTS ALLIANCE, Woodbury - $25,000 to launch an annual Arts and Culture Festival that encourages collaboration, showcases Long Island's cultural assets, and fosters economic development. Affordable, rental housing on LI: It can be done. Ø REGIONAL PLAN ASSOCIATION, Long Island - $86,000 to collect data and analyze Long Island’s affordable rental housing stock, and creation of a public education campaign. Cleaning and protecting our waterways. Ø CITIZENS CAMPAIGN FUND FOR THE ENVIRONMENT, Farmingdale - $25,000 to improve sewage treatment facilities in three Long Island communities. Ø OPERATION SPLASH, Freeport - $18,000 to involve the community in addressing water pollution in the Western Bays. Ø PECONIC BAYKEEPER, Quogue - $20,000 to advance watershed protection plans for threecritical East End bodies of water. No pesticides, protecting our farmland, and environmental justice for all! Ø NEIGHBORHOOD NETWORK RESEARCH CENTER, Farmingdale - $22,000 to inform the public about the risks of pesticide use and encourage the use of organic alternatives to pest control. Ø PECONIC LAND TRUST, Southampton - $10,000 to involve the public in an update of Suffolk County’s agricultural and farmland protection plan. Ø SUSTAINABLE LONG ISLAND, Farmingdale - $20,000 to develop an environmental justice action agenda on Long Island. Bringing equal access to education, creatively. Ø HOFSTRA UNIVERSITY MUSEUM, Hempstead - $25,000 to bring the Art Travelers program to three additional highneed school districts in Nassau County. Ø NEW YORK COMMUNITIES FOR CHANGE, Hempstead (Continued on page 14)

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- $25,000 to mobilize Village of Hempstead parents and students to advocate for education reforms. Helping Long Islanders put food on the table. Ø LONG ISLAND CARES, Hauppauge - $20,000 continued support for the Long Island Cares Nassau Service Center food pantry in Freeport. Ø LONG ISLAND COMMUNITY AGRICULTURE NETWORK, Huntington - $20,000 to help six congregations develop community gardens to feed hungry Long Islanders. Paying it forward for our returning heroes. Ø MENTAL HEALTH ASSOCIATION OF NASSAU COUNTY, Hempstead - $25,000 to support the Veterans Health Alliance of Long Island in its advocacy and college campus outreach efforts. Ø TOURO COLLEGE JACOB D. FUCHSBERG LAW CENTER, Central Islip - $20,000 to provide legal assistance to military veterans with psychological disorders. Strengthening LI nonprofits for greater impact. Ø CHILD CARE COUNCIL OF NASSAU COUNTY, Franklin Square - $25,000 to improve the quality of out of school time providers in Nassau County. Ø LA FUERZA UNIDA COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION, East Norwich - $20,000 to provide technical assistance to minority and women-owned small businesses. Ø LONG ISLAND VOLUNTEER CENTER, Hempstead - $20,000 to provide services to nonprofit agencies to help them recruit and manage volunteers more effectively. Protecting the Island’s youth by saying NO to bullies, gangs, and drugs. Ø CHILD ABUSE PREVENTION SERVICES, Roslyn - $25,000 to expand a comprehensive bullying prevention/intervention program. Ø CORNELL COOPERATIVE EXTENSION OF SUFFOLK COUNTY, Riverhead - $20,000 to involve parents in the anti-bullying efforts of four schools on Long Island’s East End. Ø FAMILY AND CHILDREN’S ASSOCIATION, Mineola - $22,000 to protect children from gang recruitment and violence as they walk to and from school in the Village of Hempstead. Ø MAKE THE ROAD NEW YORK, Brentwood - $25,000 to mobilize a multi-racial student coalition that will create a youth violence intervention action agenda. Ø PHOENIX HOUSE FOUNDATION, Wyandanch - $25,000 to address adolescent substance abuse in the Wyandanch School District. Through the generosity of our donors, the Long Island Community Foundation invests in groups that create positive change and have a significant impact on the quality of life on Long Island. To learn more about these grants and the Long Island Community Foundation, visit our website at www.licf.org. Like us on Facebook or follow us on Twitter @LICommunityFndt. The Long Island Community Foundation (LICF) is the Island’s community foundation, making grants to improve our region and helping donors with their philanthropy since 1978. We identify current and future community needs, strengthen the Island’s nonprofit sector, encourage philanthropy, and, with our generous donors, build a permanent endowment to address these needs. We have made more than $130 million in grants from hundreds of funds established by individuals, families, and businesses. LICF is a division of The New York Community Trust, one of the country’s oldest and largest community foundations.

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THE NEW COMMUNITY JOURNAL

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Denenberg & Activists Call for Hearings on Sewer Privatization Mangano Continues Effort to Lease the System Behind Closed Doors (Mineola) – Today, Legislator Dave Denenberg joined with the members of the Nassau County Coalition of Civic Associations (NCCCA) and other activists at a rally to call for immediate hearings on County Executive Ed Mangano’s continued effort to privatize Nassau’s sewage treatment plants. United Water has been selected as the operator and the County is now examining 13 responses from investors interested in giving Nassau County $700 million to lease our sewage treatment plants for the next 50 years. This loan will be repaid by Nassau’s sewer taxpayers through a new sewer rate structure based on water usage. An investor could be selected by the end of the summer, yet there has not been one hearing scheduled on this issue. “This deal is a gold mine for investors who are lining up at the door to reap profits that will be paid for by Nassau taxpayers,” said Legislator Dave Denenberg. “Mr. Mangano continues to push forward behind closed doors with the biggest one-shot in our history. This is no more than a county bailout on the backs of Nassau taxpayers. We demand transparency and an immediate hearing on the status of this potential deal.”

Proposals for the new Nassau Coliseum taking shape Four developers have submitted proposals for the development of the 77 acres surrounding Nassau Coliseum, county spokesman Brian Nevin said Tuesday. Patchogue-based Baldassano Architecture, Garden City developer Breslin Realty, Plainview developers Renaissance Downtowns, and Syosset developer Ed Blumenfeld will compete to be master developer. The winning proposal will have to be promising enough to keep the

New York Islanders from relocating. The bid-winner will be asked to negotiate with Islanders owner Charles Wang, who has said he will not stay at the current arena past his lease’s expiration in 2015. Although each developer hopes to inspire Wang, the owner’s plans remain unknown. Monti said he hopes to build a new arena, along with bioscience reNASSAU COUNTY EDITION

The Nassau Interim Finance Authority (NIFA) – a fiscal watchdog that controls county finances – has already rejected a contract with Morgan Stanley put forth by the county executive which would entitle them to up to $5 million for brokering the sewer deal. This should have been a warning sign to Ed Mangano to stop, and re-think this. Yet, he continues to promote a plan that is completely and entirely unfeasible for our county and expensive for our residents. search facilities and a convention center, with eventual links such as bike lanes, shuttles, or light rail connecting the Coliseum project and the village of Hempstead. His submission to the county's request for qualifications, or RFQ, outlined a development team that includes Manhattan real estate firm Jones Lang LaSalle, Spector Group, an architect with offices in Manhattan and Woodbury, and sports facility architect Populous, formerly known as HOK Sport, which designed Yankee Stadium and Citi Field.

Don Monti of Renaissance Downtowns said his plans would emphasize community involvement and financing would include his partners and potentially federal and state funds. "I love when people say it's impossible," he said, adding that he planned to reach out to the Islanders if he wins. "I deliver. We're going to keep them here -no ifs, ands or buts." PAGE 16


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Durso: Time running out on the Coliseum The following Op-ed appeared in Long Island Business News on August 2, 2012 This summer may be the last chance to catch the outgoing tide on the top economic development project for our region – the Coliseum and the surrounding high-value 77 acres of land. If a new arena is not built, the New York Islanders, its anchor tenant, has promised to find a new home when its lease expires in 2015. Understanding that it takes 2 1/2 years to build a new arena, we must act now. There is a lot of talk these days about policies necessary for job creation. Have we forgotten about the 2,000 existing jobs at the Nassau Coliseum? Last week I spent time talking to some of the people who work there, people who are going to be directly impacted if we cannot break the logjam preventing the redevelopment. Paul works part time as a security guard, a position he’s held for 12 years. With two daughters ages 20 and 17, the eldest in college and the other preparing to enroll in September, it is a job he needs to keep. “If they (the Islanders) leave and they don’t fix it up, it will be like a ghost town over there,” he said. Paul is one of 150 security guards at the Coliseum working hockey games, concerts and special events. Similarly, Kerry works nights part time as a parking lot attendant. He has been there for almost 30 years.

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can’t imagine.” He went on to recite a litany of positions that would be lost including related jobs like advertisers, event managers, vendors and suppliers. “It trickles down. People don’t realize how many other businesses are connected to this place,” he said. If the Islanders leave, he added, it’s doubtful the Coliseum would survive. Many other workers like Paul, Kerry and John are facing the same uncertainties. A report commissioned by the Nassau County Industrial Development Agency estimated that if the Coliseum is shuttered, 2,660 jobs and approximately $104 million in annual payroll earnings would be lost. The analysis projects that the county could lose $243 million annually if the New York Islanders were to leave the Nassau Coliseum. The county government would lose sales tax, hotel tax and entertainment tax revenues of $7.8 million. On the other hand, starting work on a new arena could create 1,500 construction jobs right away, something our economy and our members urgently need. Our Long Island labor movement will not give up on this project – a lot of working families are counting on us. We will accelerate the efforts to bring together political, business and community leaders. It is not too late to find the right combination of creativity and leadership that can give our region and Nassau’s hub a brighter future. John Durso is the president of the Long Island Federation of Laborand is the president of Local 338 RWDSU/ UFCW. He also servees on the Vision Long Island Board of Directors.

“It pays the bills. It’s not like we’re living like kings … a lot of the men rely on it,” he said. “And working there is like being with family – it’s a nice place to be.” John works full time at the Coliseum as a painter. He spoke with pride about the work he does, which includes painting the lines on the ice. He has two kids attending Nassau Community College. He worries whether he’ll be able to find another job if the Coliseum closes and doubts if any would offer the same kind of benefits. At age 50, he says he’s a “marked man” understanding how much tougher it is for older workers who lose their jobs. When he was asked what the impact would be if the Coliseum closed, he said, “a place full of tumbleweeds and a higher unemployment rate that people on Long Island NASSAU COUNTY EDITION

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Mangano’s Historic Assessment Reforms Save Millions for Residents Mineola, NY – Nassau County has the only dysfunctional assessment system of its kind in the United States of America. Governed by a unique New York State law and protected by prior politician’s lack of will to tackle the dysfunction, the assessment system has generated $1.6 billion in debt and a $100 million in errors annually for the last decade. Nassau County Executive Edward P. Mangano, with the support of the Republican Majority Caucus in the Legislature, toNASSAU COUNTY EDITION

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day ends the accumulation of residential tax assessment debt to save taxpayers $30 million. For the first time in the history of Nassau County, every residential challenge has been corrected prior to finalizing the assessment roll thanks to reforms implemented by County Executive Mangano. Simply put: · Residents receive their correct home value before paying taxes. · Residents no longer have to pay money they do not owe to the County of Nassau. · Future generations have ZERO future debt liability for the 2012-13 assessment roll. · Nassau County saves over $30 million a year, plus interest savings. · Nassau County saves $4.3 million a year in labor employee processing savings.

County Executive Mangano’s assessment reforms avoid costly and time consuming litigation. The County Executive’s Residential Assessment Reform Team (comprised of Shalom Maidenbaum, Paola Orsini, Bob Orosz and William Wise) established a process to enable the County to conduct meaningful, good-faith settlement negotiations concerning residential assessments at the earliest possible stage. In 2011, the County reduced residential liability from $30 million to $2 million. This year, Nassau County will face zero liability for the first-time in its history. “I would like to commend County Executive Mangano and other members of the Residential Assessment Reform Team for securing a positive outcome for the homeowners,” stated Residential Assessment Review Team member Bob Orosz.

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Residential Assessment Review Team member Paola Orsini stated, “The implementation of the changes recommended by County Executive Mangano's Residential Assessment Reform Team (ART) has led to the prompt review and correction of assessment challenges before a tax refund situation occurs. This welcome change is unprecedented as it has achieved significant savings for taxpayers. I am honored to have been a part of this process.” “The historic reforms implemented by this administration have truly helped homeowners by ensuring they receive a correct home value before paying taxes,” added Residential Assessment Review Team member Shalom Maidenbaum.

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Mortgage Crisis Meeting Held at Town of Hempstead Town of Hempstead Councilwoman Dorothy Goosby hosted a meeting sponsored by NYS Attorney General Schneiderman, titled “Community Information Forum on the National Mortgage Settlement” at Hempstead Town Hall in Hempstead. Photo L-R Najee Simmons, Intern, Michael Wigutow, Nassau/Suffolk Legal Services Committee, Carol Yopp, Long Island Housing Partnership, Councilwoman Goosby, Valerie Singleton, NYS Asst. Attorney General, Jordan Frieson-Alexander, Legal Aide Intern, Myles Bramble, Intern

Call For Peace Concert The Kareem D. Sapp Foundation hosted a Call For Peace concert at the African American Museum in Hempstead. Proceeds from the event will be used to continue the fight against guns and gang violence which robbed the life of Kareem Sapp, a teen from Uniondale. Councilwoman Dorothy Goosby congratulated Thomas Sapp CEO/Founder and presented him with a Certificate of Recognition. photo:Lon Ivey (African American Museum)Detrel Howell & Thomas Sapp (The Kareem D. Sapp Foundation) Bonita Johnson & The Aspiring Young Artist dancers NASSAU COUNTY EDITION

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Reggie and Nancy Lucas Celebrate 50th Wedding Anniversary Reginal & Nancy Lucas of Hempstead celebrated their 50th Wedding Anniversary and Reginal’s 70th Birthday at the Chateau Briand in Carle Place. Town of Hempstead Councilwoman Dorothy Goosby offered her heartfelt congratulations to the couple. L-R Warren Brooks, Reginal Lucas Jr., Councilwoman Goosby, Reginal Lucas Sr. Nancy Lucas, Regina Lucas, Kevin Lucas

DDI Walk and Motorcycle Run for Autism Developmental Disabilities Institute (DDI), the leading service provider for children and adults with autism on Long Island,will be hosting the "DDI Walk and Motorcycle Run for Autism," on September 23, 2012 at the Holtsville Ecology Center. The walk and motorcycle run will help to promote community support for individuals with autism and other developmental disabilities. The scenic 5 K Walk through Suffolk County's Holtsville Ecology Park will feature activities for the entire family along the way, followed by a festival in the park complete with picnic lunch, music, games, a petting zoo and more. This year the event will include a Motorcycle run sponsored by Hansen Home Designs. Registration for the walk begins at 9:00 A.M. and the 5K Walk will start at 10:30 A.M. The family activities will continue throughout the day until 2:30 P.M. Biker registration begins at 9AM at Hansen Home Designs located at 1541 Smithtown Avenue in Bohemia. Kickstands are set to be up by 10AM. A rain date has been set for September 30th. NASSAU COUNTY EDITION

Ground Treatment for West Nile Virus Scheduled for Tonight, August 7th Postponed Uniondale, NY - Nassau County has postponed tonight’s ground treatment for West Nile virus. Weather permitting, ground treatment has been rescheduled as follows: Monday, August 13th, 7 PM through 2 AM – Sections of Cedarhurst, Hewlett Neck, Inwood, Lawrence, Woodmere, and Woodsburgh. Adulticide application by truck will be conducted and bounded by the following geographical area: Areas South of Peninsula Boulevard and West of Woodmere Boulevard Maps of the areas to be treated can be found on the Department of Health web site at: http://www.nassaucountyny.gov/agencies/ Health/index.html For additional information: Please call the West Nile Virus Treatment Hotline at 1-888-844-8657 or visit the Nassau County Department of Health website.

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From the Desk of Mayor Hall (Continued from page 2)

the photographs, took the pictures and was generous enough to take the names of individuals he’d shot and send them individual photographs afterwards. When I think of what we’ve lost today I think of his incomparable dignity, of grace under pressure, of an individual who, in the manner of the old days, could always be counted on, took his responsibilities to the highest degree, and was where he was needed, rain or shine. Mr. Curry would take the photographs, develop and distribute them either on the same day or the day after, with each photograph properly identified and catalogued. The degree of work that went into this cannot be fully appreciated, and perhaps one of the few regrets that we will have is that we did not tell him fully how deeply we appreciated his work and consistency and the pride and dignity with which he represented the village and all that he did. Long before Mr. Curry was the village photographer, a position that he held for many years, he was a teacher and a principal in the Hempstead school system. He taught English at Hempstead Middle School beginning in 1969, and was so moved and committed to the education and improvement of our youth that he became a school principal at Jackson Main Elelmentary, Hempstead High School and the now-closed M.G. Rhodes Elementary School on Washington Street. As principal he helped to herald change in Hempstead, cleaning up several schools, making them significantly better than they were, teaching our young people that ‘yes, you can achieve; yes, you can be great; yes, you stand on the shoulders of a great and mighty people who came before you, who sacrificed and died so that you can live and triumph, and so yes, you can and will triumph.’ Mr. Curry taught Hempstead’s young people to believe in themselves, to carry themselves with dignity, confidence and pride. He taught them that all the dreams they’d had when they were small were possible with hard work and discipline. He taught them that even if they had not yet begun to dream they had the potential to not only dream but to achieve the highest of their possibilities out of that dream. He taught the many adults who he encountered daily, that we have a responsibility to our community and to the young people around us to carry ourselves with a certain grace; to be courteous and considerate to the individuals we encounter daily; to treat all with the respect and compassion that we would like to be treated without regard to position or station.

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Community Development The Incorporated Village of Hempstead Community Development Agency “(CDA)" is a public benefit corporation established in 1964 pursuant to Title 16 Sec 585 to address problems of urban decay. Originally known as the Urban Renewal Agency, the name was changed to Community Development Agency by State Law in 1980. The Agency is led by it's own Board of Directors which is chaired by the Village Mayor. The selection of the Directors is ratified by the Village B o a r d o f T r u s t e e s . The Community Development Agency's function is to plan and implement programs involving the rehabilitation of both the residential and commercial sectors of the village, foster economic growth, provide assistance to public service organizations, eliminate blight and improve opportunities for low & moderate income citizens. The CDA's major programs include:  Special Economic Development  Construction of Affordable Housing  Homeowner's Assistance Program  Small Business Revolving Loan Fund  Commercial Rehabilitation Loan Program  Facade Improvement Program  Public Facilities and Improvement  Micro-Enterprise Incubator Program Claude Gooding, Commissioner (516) 485-5737 50 Clinton Street, Hempstead, N.Y. 11550

On behalf of the Board of Trustees, my inner office staff, the many village employees who knew and worked with him, and indeed the entire village of Hempstead, I send my condolences to his wife Rose and to his children, grandchildren and family and friends. Yesterday my office was bombarded by calls from people who had heard about Mr. Curry’s death. Political leaders across the spectrum called to say they’d heard. Mayor Andrew Hardwick of Freeport offered to send a police escort and anything we needed for Mr. Curry’s funeral. Tyree Curry was a principal, a village photographer and a gentleman, and he will be sorely missed. For more information on his funeral, please contact my office at: 516-4893400, ext. 263, 264, or 324. To stay on top of what’s happening in the Village, please visit the village website at www.villageofhempstead.org and join our electronic mailing list by sending your name and email address to Mayor@villageofhempsteadny.gov. To stay abreast of what’s going on with the Downtown Revitalization Plan, visit www.renewhempstead.com. You may also share your ideas for the redevelopment and/or provide your feedback on the plan on that site.

Sincerely,

Wayne Wayne J. Hall Sr. Mayor of the Incorporated Village of Hempstead

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RE-ELECT MAYOR WAYNE HALL 2013 PAGE 23


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4 half-truths about black-owned businesses — and why you should still buy black Last week, I wrote an article for theGrio entitled theGrio’s guide to buying black online. As I was reading the Facebook comments about the article, I noticed a great sense of frustration on behalf of consumers about black businesses. Many commenters said that they will never shop at a black-owned store until these firms make their prices lower, improve customer service, and start selling things that they like to buy. Although these criticisms are certainly valid for many black-owned businesses, African-Americans are stuck in a chicken or egg scenario. We refuse to spend our money with slightlyto-moderately inferior black businesses, because they are not on-par with the competition, but the only way for them to improve is

tions in my industry was through the support of my AfricanAmerican base. I certainly can’t forget that now, when it’s my turn to choose vendors.

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IN THE BLACK

Now that I have a second company, Ujamaa Deals, I work actively to encourage AfricanAmericans not to make the same mistake I made at the beginning of my small business life. While promoting the products of blackowned businesses to AfricanAmerican consumers online, I have heard many different reasons explaining why blacks do not support their own community’s efforts. All have some ring of truth, but they do not tell the whole story. Below are

the four most popular complaints and my responses to each one. through practice and financial support from their base to keep them in business in the long term. MORE: theGrio’s guide to buying black online, harnessing black buying power to empower our community I fall into this trap just as much as anyone else in our community. My first company, Great Black Speakers, has been in business for over five years now. One thing that helped me keep costs low in the beginning was Elance, a site that brings buyers and sellers of talent together from all across the world. It was perfect because it allowed me to use my process engineering talents to set up a low cost-high value system without ever having to leave my house. Is it blackowned? No. Yet, over time, I started to use the site less and less as I became more in tune with my own story and the need to support the black community more. Like many startups founded by first-time entrepreneurs, the Great Black Speaker service was just average in the beginning and had to use the cheapest resources available. But a major reason that I survived to become one of the premier organizaNASSAU COUNTY EDITION

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(Continued from page 25)

1. “Customer service is terrible with black-owned businesses.” Black businesses have the reputation for having poor customer service. What is often left out is that many white-owned businesses are plagued with poor customer service as well. As I can attest, one of the most challenging things to do with any new business is to set up a culture and process of excellent customer service. Not all black businesses have bad customer service. The poor reputation of black businesses leads to confirmation bias, which is our tendency to favor information that confirms our beliefs. We selectively recall the bad experiences that we have with black businesses while ignoring all of the good ones. Often, we completely ignore the good and bad experiences from businesses outside of the black community and just assume that they were all superior. MORE: Build your personal brand online and off with these easy tips 2. “The prices of black-owned businesses are higher than at other firms.” Prices at many black-owned businesses are higher than large retail chains like Wal-Mart, as well as some other small businesses. What people do not consider is that black businesses neither have the size nor the solidarity that it takes to command low prices from suppliers. Large companies have the ability to buy in large quantities, which lowers the cost per item. There has never been a company started by black people of that size, therefore the prices that suppliers charge us is higher. We have a habit of comparing the attributes of Fortune 500 companies with those of small businesses, even though they are not always competing on an even playing field. Lack of solidarity and our inability to control our own value chain is another reason that black businesses experience higher prices. A great example is the black hair care market. Black hair salons are charged higher rates from suppliers because people from other cultures often own the raw materials and means of production that go into having a nice hair-do. A way around this would be for black businesses to consolidate buying power, but this can be challenging in a fragmented market. The above example plagues black businesses in other industries as well. 3. “Encouraging people to buy black is racist. We need to encourage people to buy American.” I read this statement a lot on blog posts written by people of every race, but it is faulty logic. By this assessment, anyone who wants people to buy American can then be labeled a nationalists. They are implicitly saying that we can overlook nationalism, but advocating for the development of a particular segment within that nation somehow crosses the line. MORE: 5 things I have learned as a black tech entrepreneur Encouraging people to buy American does not ensure that every segment of the population will benefit equally. Trickle down economics does not trickle to everyone. For black people to ensure their piece of the American pie for generations, we have to take a proactive stance and support our own businesses. This still helps the American economy as well, as black Americans are still a part of it and have contributed to it greatly through our excessive consumerism over the years. 4. “There aren’t any black products that I really want to buy.” One of the very first things that we noticed while starting Ujamaa Deals is the tendency for black companies to be in the hair care/ beauty, jewelry, or food markets. These are all industries that have a low cost of entry and can be started out of people’s homes. I would love to see more of a diversity of black businesses, but that takes NASSAU COUNTY EDITION

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time. Because some businesses have a higher cost of entry, and blacks have a harder time acquiring the necessary capital to compete, our community just doesn’t offer a huge array of products and services — for now. If we can develop the independent black economy, I predict that there will be a more diverse pool of black products to choose from. When our entire community has more capital, we can capitalize more businesses. MORE: African-Americans and credit scores — How the mortgage meltdown permanently impacts many blacks’ finances There are many things that black-owned businesses need to do to improve their service offerings, which I will address in a later article. Similar to other emerging markets, we need to have a level of protectionism over the black economy in order for it to reach a critical mass so that it will be self-sustaining. Until then, we have to bear the burden of “the black tax” and sacrifice some short-term individual gains for long term collective economic stability. The assumption that all black-owned businesses are inferior is a false statement. Although they may lag, on average, in many categories, there are still many that are doing extraordinary things. These businesses should not be overlooked. A change in self-perception is needed in order for us to thrive in this global environment. Lawrence Watkins is the founder of Great Black Speakers, Great Pro Speakers, and co-founder ofUjamaa Deals, which is a daily deal site that promotes black-owned businesses. He graduated in 2006 from The University of Louisville with a B.S. in electrical engineering and earned his MBA from Cornell University in 2010. Lawrence currently resides in Atlanta. You can follow him on Twitter@lawrencewatkins.

Village of Hempstead Partners with Island Harvest Organization to Fight Hunger The Village of Hempstead is currently working with the Island Harvest Organization this summer to help eliminate hunger among children in the area. Parents are invited to bring children and young adults (ages 18 and under) to Campbell Park for a free meal on Fridays from 12:00 p.m. to 1:30 p.m. The program began on Friday, July 6th and will run through Friday, August 24th. The event provides kids with a healthy sandwich, snack and beverage. After lunch is served, children and adolescents are invited to enjoy playtime. It is advised that children under the age of 10 come with a parent or guardian.

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Mangano Secures Nearly $1 Million in Grants to Improve Traffic Safety with HOV Patrols on LI Expressway Mineola, NY – Nassau County Executive Edward P. Mangano today announced that the Nassau County Police Department will receive $915,000 in funds from the New York State Department of Transportation for enforcement of patrols of the east and west High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) lanes of the Long Island Expressway (LIE) from the Queens border to the Suffolk County line. The grant will help fund police officer overtime expenses and vehicle usage reimbursement for dedicated patrols to enforce the HOV traffic laws on the LIE in Nassau County. County Executive Mangano stated, “We’ve all dealt with motorists who blatantly disregard the law by entering and exiting HOV lanes in unsafe places. These funds will assist with providing ongoing patrols of the HOV lanes and dissuading motorists from disobeying the

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rules of operation. These additional patrols will help enforce the law while improving traffic safety.” The grant includes funds to plan, schedule, implement and manage the HOV Lane Enforcement Program and provide monthly enforcement schedules and assignments to the department. In addition, in consultation with the Police Department, the funds will assist with instituting special operations support for pavement sweeping, pavement striping and other highway maintenance, and providing reimbursement of operating costs for vehicle usage for the HOV lane enforcement. Monitoring will be ongoing and a review and evaluation of the effectiveness of the patrols and monthly reports will be compiled summarizing the previous month’s enforcement activities, including the actual number of tours, related costs and the number and reason for stops.

Mangano Announces “Wedding for a Veteran” Contest Winner will Receive Complimentary Wedding Package Courtesy of Local Nassau County Businesses

MANGANO TO HOST LATINO AMERICAN DAY Celebrating the “Pride of Colombia” at Eisenhower Park’s Lakeside Theatre Mineola, NY – Nassau County Executive Edward P. Mangano today announced that the Nassau County International Music Nights Concert Series will host Latino American Day - celebrating “Pride of Colombia” - on Sunday, July 15th beginning at 2:00 p.m. at the Harry Chapin Lakeside Theatre in Eisenhower Park. The International Music Nights Concert Series, sponsored by Canon U.S.A., provides residents an opportunity to experience the broad range of cultures that Nassau County has to offer. County Executive Mangano stated, “I invite all Nassau County families to come to Eisenhower Park this summer to experience the cultures, music, folklore, crafts and food of numerous ethnicities from around the world,” said County Executive Mangano. Latino American Day celebrating “Pride of Colombia” will host artists of national and international stature, such as La Sonora Dynamite, Johnny Rivera, Charles Cejares, Troubadours, Rhythmology Dance Group, Teatro Rodante Puerto Riqueño, and folklore dances. Funding for these performers is made available by the generous sponsorship of Affinity Health Plan Coral House and Westbury Toyota.

NASSAU COUNTY EDITION

Mineola, NY – Nassau County Executive Edward P. Mangano and the Nassau County Veterans Service Agency today announced the “Wedding for Veteran” contest to award a complimentary wedding for this Veterans Day, November 11th, at Westbury’s Viana Hotel & Spa to one lucky Nassau County veteran or active-duty member of the military. Co-sponsored by the Village of Westbury, the Westbury-Carle Place Chamber of Commerce, TD Bank, and the Viana Hotel & Spa, the allinclusive wedding package for up to 50 guests includes a full menu and house drinks, a DJ, photo, and videographer services. Also included are flowers, favors, bridal gown and favors. The Viana Hotel will also offer 10 rooms for use by the bridal couple and their guests for the night of November 11, 2012. In addition, arrangements can be made for a wedding ceremony to take place at the Viana Hotel & Spa. “This is a great opportunity for one deserving member of our military to have a dream wedding and there isn’t a better day to celebrate than Veterans Day,” said County Executive

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Mangano. “I am proud to join with our local businesses to give back to our military community and help one lucky couple start their lives together in such a special way.” The “Wedding for a Veteran” contest is open to any Nassau County veteran or active-duty serviceman or woman. To enter the contest, each applicant should provide a written description in 100 words or less describing why they should be chosen. Applications can be picked up at the Nassau County Veterans Service Agency and must be postmarked by September 24th. Veterans must be honorably discharged and must produce a copy of his or her D214 if chosen as the winner. All applications should be mailed to the Veterans Service Agency, Building Q, East Meadow, NY 11554, Attention: Joseph N. Pascarella, Acting Director. The winner of the “Wedding for a Veteran” contest will be announced on October 4th, along with 2nd and 3rd place winners who will receive a monetary prize.

Additionally, the Hispanic Telemundo presenters Luis Alejandro Medina and Andrea Romero, Journalist Ricardo Espinoza and Oscar presenter William Zapata from Spite program, will be broadcasting live from the event. Regional channel Telecafe has also invited others to join in regional channels with this broadcast. The International Music Nights Summer Concert Series is presented by the Nassau County Department of Parks, Recreation and Museums in recognition of Nassau County’s unique ethnic diversity. Through a sponsorship from Canon USA Inc., a total of twenty International Music Nights are presented at the Lakeside Theatre throughout the summer, free of charge.

The remaining summer concert schedule is as follows:

Sunday, July 15th Latino American Night th Scandinavian American Night Sunday, July 29 Irish American Night Sunday, August 5th Sunday, August 12th Chinese American Night th Pakistani American Cultural Night Sunday, August 26 Saturday, September 22nd Korean American Night About Harry Chapin Lakeside Theatre The Harry Chapin Lakeside Theatre is located near parking fields 6 and 6A in Eisenhower Park. Lakeside Theatre is a venue with no formal seating. Concertgoers are urged to bring folding chairs or blankets. Special accommodations are available for disabled patrons, including reserved parking, easily accessible restrooms and a convenient reserved location on the hill. Assistive hearing devices are also available upon request for the hearing impaired. About Eisenhower Park Eisenhower Park is located in East Meadow, with entrances on Hempstead Turnpike and Merrick Avenue. As one of the largest public spaces in the New York metropolitan area, Eisenhower Park offers a full range of athletic and family activities, including one of the finest swimming facilities in the U.S., three worldclass golf courses, dozens of athletic fields and courts, picnic areas, playgrounds, fitness trails and more. For further information, contact the Parks Public Information Office at: (516) 572-0200 or visit the Nassau County Parks, Recreation and Museums website at: www.nassaucountyny.gov/parks PAGE 28


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The Sweetness and Light of Gabby Douglas The 16-year-old gold medalist retains an innocence that most black girls her age don't get to show. By: Helena Andrews | Posted: August 10, 2012 at 12:50 AM Researched by ACommunity Journal Entertainment Editor Asha Akins (The Root) -- There's something about Gabby. Of course, the 16-year-old gold medalist is inspiring millions of little black girls for whom Dominique Dawes is relegated to YouTube clips. It's no big secret she's broken barriers of perception that persist despite evidence to the contrary. But

there's more to this young woman who can fly than just her strength -it's her lightness that gets me. The girl is sweet. There is joy in her eyes. Her smile is a given. Her positivity is downright Pollyanna-esque. She is, in short, a black female athlete not just with heart but with a heart as seemingly gold as the medal adorning it. She is allowed an innocence that so many black girls her age don't get to show, especially as one with an entire nation's expectations on her shoulders. But instead of hardening to the task, Gabby Douglas seems to be lifted by it. In an interview with the New York Times, she sounds like a teenager with declarations like "Holy cow!" and "Oh, snap." When explaining her initial lack of focus, Gabby could be any 16-year-old: "It's very tough for me to focus," she said. "I'm like, 'Look, something shiny! No, focus. Oh, there goes a butterfly!' " Just reading that interview made me smile, made me wonder how this young woman has managed to hold on to a piece of her childhood innocence like a talisman. Her Facebook and Twitter pages are all exclamation points, smiley faces and OMGs. Even the way she handled the overblown coverage of criticism surrounding her hair was more schoolgirl than schooled. "Are you kidding me? I just made history. And you're focusing on my hair? I just want to say, we're all beautiful inside out. I don't think people should be worried about that. Nothing is going to change," she said in an interview with USA Today. What's so smile-inducing about Gabby is that so often, black women aren't allowed access to the innocence that other young women get to experience by right of their youth. In my essay on "Reserve" in Black Cool, I write: "There's something curious that happens to Black girls on their way to puberty: We disappear into an imaginary telephone booth and emerge as miniature superheroes. Hit by a speeding bullet of outside forces -- race-based sexism and society's impossible expectations -- former civilians begin to take cover behind an ancient mask of impenetrability. Our secret identity -sweet, innocent, approachable -- becomes just that, a secret." Scholar Michael Eric Dyson describes something similar in his introduction to TourĂŠ's Who's Afraid of Post Blackness? Dyson writes of the world's most visible black woman, Oprah: "Like most Black folk, Oprah found the batteries of Blackness included at birth, and ripped open NASSAU COUNTY EDITION

the packaging and slid them in and started using the instrument of race before reading the manual." My phone booth and Dyson's battery pack are comparable memes. Both are involuntary responses to racial identity that are passed down without comment or critique. We just do it. Black men and women alike are changed by the "battery pack," but black women go into the telephone booth alone, like a butterfly in a cocoon. But instead of coming out lighter, we more often than not emerge weighted down. And it's that moment of transformation that fascinates me. When do black girls go from being blank slates to the bathroom walls, graffitied with everyone else's slander? Take my goddaughters. At 10 and 7, they are little girls in the most literal sense. They like playing pretend, playing in my hair and playing with my iPad. Last summer on an especially hot day, they noticed a box of hot cocoa on my kitchen counter and begged for some. When I suggested that it wasn't the right time of year for a steaming mug of anything, they protested in perfect unison, "It's always time for hot chocolate!" And I carried the hope in that sentence with me for weeks. I don't want them to change, but I see it happening. At 7 years old, Anna, the youngest, still loves a good secret. She still wants to cut into every conversation I have with her mom, vying for my attention and begging me to look at her "doing stuff." We had tea after the ballet a few weeks ago, and Anna declared it "a girl's night out!" It was three in the afternoon. Nancy, 10, is already sort of over it. She sits up straight without being asked and is content to eavesdrop on an adult conversation, nodding in agreement to punch lines she can't have understood. Her schooled nonchalance is almost unnerving. More than just maturing like any other little girl, Nancy is dumping her naivetĂŠ as if it's nuclear. I look at her and think, when did this happen? That's the question, among others, I plan to ask every woman I interview for a new book I'm working on. When did it happen? When did you disappear into the phone booth? When did you go from just being a girl to being a black girl? Was the transition painless? And do you miss it -- the levity other girls-cumwomen get to slip into that we seem to be barred from? When did you stop being like Gabby Douglas? "I have an advantage because I'm the underdog and I'm black and no one thinks I'd ever win," she told the New York Times last week. "Well, I'm going to inspire so many people. Everybody will be talking about, how did she come up so fast? But I'm ready to shine." The shine part Gabby has down, and that's what I'm hoping rubs off on the rest of us. PAGE 29


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ASK LISA-ANNE Q. School is about to reopen in a few weeks and I’m concerned about my district’s ability to really educate my children. Moving is not an option but do you have any information on what school districts can do to raise their achievement standards and scores? A. This is a great question! It’s one that district superintendents and their administrators meet about and create plans for over numerous hours in the school year. Each district has it’s unique set of needs, challenges, problems, delays and successes. Money is a big issue in school districts today. For example, in a school district where 90% of the students are considered poor, free breakfast and lunch must be offered along with other accommodations necessary to meet their needs. This means that monies from the state must be spent for these accommodations. In a nearby district where the student body is 90% above the poverty line, those monies can be spent on literacy or math programs or NASSAU COUNTY EDITION

FRIDAY AUGUST 10, 2012

other academic ventures. The key to academic success is for school districts to adopt research based and proven to work programs designed to meet their students n e e d s ! The Broad Prize for Urban Education is awarded to large school districts that show the most progress. Heather Zavadsky, who writes for the Los Angeles Times, followed the process of selecting districts over a four year period. Five districts were c h o s e n . Two of the districts are in Southern California — the Long Beach and Garden Grove unified school districts. The others are the Boston Public Schools, Norfolk Public Schools in Virginia and the Aldine Independent School District outside Houston. As different as the five school systems are in location, funding and, to some extent, demographics, all have raised achievement notably using five commonsense steps: 1, Developing a challenging, clear, and specific curriculum. 2. Set no more than six long-term strategic district-wide goals, and used them to drive practices in every

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school. 3. Developing strategies to attract and retain effective teachers, support them, and cultivate a collaborative working environment. 4. Use data to select, pilot, and monitor programs and eliminate those that weren't working. 5. Successfully build relationships with parents, community organizations, area businesses, and others with a stake in student success. As a parent, you can join your district’s PTA, attend board meetings and create a writing campaign to request from your district what their current plans are and urge them to take specific steps to improve the academics for their students. To read this full article visit: http:// articles.latimes.com/2010/ jul/07/opinion/la-oezavadsky-broad20100707

Lisa-Anne Byers is a licensed and certified speech-language pathologist who has worked in education for over two decades. She holds graduate degrees in speechlanguage pathology and multicultural education. She is also holds certification in educational administration. She is the author of the book, They Say I Have ADHD, I Say Life Sucks! Thoughts From Nicholas. You may contact her at speechlrb@yahoo.co m or visit her website at www.AskLisaAnne.co m.

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FRIDAY AUGUST 10, 2012

Freeport Summer Academy Nurtures Creative Arts The Freeport Public Schools Summer Academy of the Arts provided an opportunity to continue artistic development for over 200 district students this summer with a mul-

tifaceted program for grades four through 12. “In 16 days, students who had never touched an instrument before learned how to play,” said Interim Director of the Arts Anne-Marie Hudley Simmons in her opening remarks to parents and guests who attended the culminating presentation in the high school auditorium.

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art exhibit, original theatrical plays and performances from the band, orchestra, chorus and dance groups. The Freeport Summer Academy of the Arts was sponsored by the 21st Century Community Learning

Center’s Literacy Through the Arts Program.

The program, aptly named “A Palette of Creativity,” gave students a forum in which to present the extent of their learning this summer. The two-hour show featured an NASSAU COUNTY EDITION

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book written by 14 of my students. It was the second compilation of poetry books written by students that I edited and published, and was called, "Doing The Write Thing." The concept behind the book was more significant than the book itself. The idea was to begin a literacy program in Hempstead whereby students were taught to write books for other students to read. Each student had a photo of themselves, a profile page, and a chapter of their best poetic works included in the compilation. My plan was to increase the efficacy of the school district's seven figure printing facilities. If we taught our students to write books for each other and published them, our students would be more inclined to read. Seeing a photo of their peers along with their best published literary works in real book form would also encourage other students to write and say, "Hey I know him, if he can do that, so can I!" Remunerations derived from the sale of the books would go to scholarship funds set up for student authors which along with this newly discovered love for reading and writing might also encourage them to actually do the things that are necessary to effectively go to college. The school district could also save hundreds of thousands of dollars by publishing many of its own books written by its own student authors, especially those written for younger students. Reading and writing might become the "in" thing to do. Imagine an educational idea like that catching on, I thought. Needless to say, Mr. Curry loved the idea and diligently tried to sell the concept to the school district. To no avail! He called me to his office and said, "Education Politics 101." I replied, "What does that mean?" He said, "It means that you did not include enough of the right people in the process. You needed to list certain district power brokers in the book's credits that could make this happen.� It never did, though the two of us continued to share that dream for years to come. He would often say to me they're just not ready. And from time to time Mr. Curry and I would discuss the possibilities of what if....? The following September, I took three students onto the radio talk show called "Night Talk" with Bob Law. The segment was called "Young, Gifted, and Black." Two students, Chris Henry and Maleek McCloud were to perform a rap record I wrote called, "Creative Education." Another student Tanisha Green would sing a song I wrote called, "Lord Give Me Strength." One of the school disNASSAU COUNTY EDITION

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trict's assistant superintendents at the time tried to block the on air performances. I went to my mentor, Mr. Curry. He stepped in and said, "Don't be intimidated young man, there may be repercussions, but just ask yourself one questionIs what you're doing in the best interest of children? Then stand strong young man, stand strong." Not only did the students perform on the radio, but Mr. Curry (despite collegial reprisal) saw to it that the students received citations and were honored at a special ceremony. Two years later, I wrote a monologue called, "The Chairman," which was performed by one of my students named Keiron Scott at a tribute for outgoing principal Sally Thompson. Some of you in Hempstead may remember the piece. An administrator named Wilma Tootle advised me to enter the piece in the Martin Luther King Youth on Parade Contest which was annually held at Hofstra University, which I did. The piece, performed by another student named Marquis Chestnut won first prize. But it was Mr. Curry who raised the bar and said, "Take The Chairman to the Apollo." Which we did, and again Marquis won first place at "Amateur Night at the Apollo," while competing against adult competition. Mr. Curry then saw to it that every student in Hempstead got a chance to see a subsequent performance. It didn't matter whether it was I or someone else working with students, if it was in the best interest of students, Mr. Curry did whatever he could to facilitate the efforts. This is a key point in the way I will remember him. There are many, many educators working toward doing exceptional things with students. Yes, right here in Hempstead. But many of them go unnoticed or are being hindered by others who instead of facilitating these efforts are in its place debilitating these efforts. Mr. Curry was not one of them, he was a student facilitator and a student enabler, and what all students and every good teacher needs. And that is the one thing I will miss the most. He was a champion for children! I soon discovered that this great man was also a talented DJ. There was a place called Wondaful's on Franklin Avenue. For a time, once or twice a week, after work parties were held there which many of our educators and staff attended. And the house was rocking and this was definitely the place to be. As I looked over to the DJ box, I couldn't believe my eyes. I walk over and could see Mr. Curry pumping up the volume, rocking the joint, and said, "You got to be kidding! What don't you do?" And he didn't just play old (Continued on page 41)

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Charges Upgraded Against Suffolk Man Who Caused Crash That Severely Injured a Nassau County Police Officer Officer suffered numerous injuries; Blanton faces 10 to 25 years in prison if convicted MINEOLA, NY – Nassau County District Attorney Kathleen Rice announced today that an indictment unsealed in court this morning included upgraded charges against the man who led a Nassau County police officer on a high-speed pursuit and then intentionally caused the officer to crash, causing serious injuries. The indictment charges Louie Blanton, 24, of Amityville, with Aggravated Assault on a Police Officer and Assault in the First Degree, both B felonies. Blanton had already been charged with Assault on a Police Officer, Assault in the Second Degree, Reckless Endangerment in the First Degree, Unlawful Fleeing a Police Officer, Leaving the Scene of an Accident with Serious Physical Injury, and Reckless Driving. Blanton faces 10 to 25 years if convicted because of his status of a prior violent felony offender. He has been incarcerated at the Nassau Correctional Center since his arrest. Rice said that at approximately 12:30 p.m. on Nov. 21, 2011, a police officer responding to reports of a suspicious vehicle attempted to pull Blanton over on Broadway in North Massapequa. In an attempt to evade the officer, Blanton drove into incoming traffic and then entered the Southern State Parkway heading eastbound at a high rate of speed. Near exit 32 in Farmingdale, Blanton slammed on his brakes, forcing the pursuing officer to swerve out the way. The officer lost control of her vehicle and crashed into the guard rail, bounced out into traffic, and was hit by another vehicle. Blanton then fled the scene. Blanton was arrested on Feb. 29, 2012 after an intense investigation by police.

Happy MEMORIAL DAY Weekend!!!!!! Give A $1 Dollar In the Name of Your Father..... Support Male Leadership Empowerment Programs at Urban League of Long Island Campaign for Achievement. Click on the link below: http:// www.urbanleaguelongisland.org /Donate_Now_.html GVE BACK TO MOVE FORWARD NASSAU COUNTY EDITION

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The officer suffered multiple injuries, including a fractured spine, collapsed lung, fractured ribs, and fractures to her sternum, collarbone, shoulder blade, and nasal bone. She remains unable to work. “Police officers risk everything to protect and serve our communities, and this crash shows just how dangerous the job can be,” Rice said. “These upgraded charges carry a far stiffer penalty and truly reflect the danger this defendant poses.” Assistant District Attorney Brendan Ahern of the Vehicular Nassau County District Crimes Bureau is prosecuting the Attorney Kathleen Rice case for the DA’s Office. Blanton is represented by Joseph LoPiccolo, Esq. These charges are merely accusations and the defendant is presumed innocent unless and until proven guilty. CASE UPDATE Jonathan Roth was arraigned today on charges of Insurance Fraud in the Second Degree, Conspiracy in the Fourth Degree, Falsely Reporting an Incident, and Making a Punishable False Written Statement. Bail was set in the amount of $10K bond or $5K cash. He pleaded not guilty, is represented by the Legal Aid Society of Nassau County, and is due back in court on August 9. Corbin, Williams, and Mullings Convicted of Felonies; Judge Declares Mistrial on 17 Remaining Counts “This trial concludes with one undeniable fact: that Roger Corbin, Patrick Williams, and Neville Mullings abused their positions to steal this project from the people of New Cassel for their own personal gain,” Rice said. “Whether that meant bid-rigging, soliciting and receiving bribes, or the outright theft of taxpayer money, these men were not shy about taking what they wanted and their felony convictions were inevitable. My office is committed to rooting out public corruption and I will continue to aggressively investigate, arrest, and prosecute any public official who thinks they can violate the public trust.” The guilty charges for each defendant: Patrick Williams  Count 5: Conspiracy 4th Degree (conspire to steal the project) Guilty  Count 6: Conspiracy 4th Degree (lesser included of Count 5; conspire to steal the project) Guilty Roger Corbin  Count 9: Bribe Receiving 2nd Degree (soliciting and accepting approximately $208,000 from Ranjan Batheja upon a continuing agreement and understanding that if such payments were made, Roger Corbin’s vote, opinion, judgment, action, and exercise of discretion as a public servant would be influenced) (Continued on page 35)

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DA: Son of man feared drowned is arrested Originally published: August 6, 2012 5:28 PM Updated: August 7, 2012 10:26 AM By WILLIAM MURPHY AND ANN GIVENS william.murphy@newsday.com,ann.givens@newsday.com The son of the Massapequa man presumed drowned at Jones Beach who turned up later in South Carolina was arrested and charged Monday with insurance fraud in connection with his father's disappearance, the Nassau County district attorney's office said. Jonathan Roth, 22, was charged with second-degree insurance

fraud, second-degree conspiracy to commit insurance fraud and filing a false report, a misdemeanor, a district attorney spokesman said. He faces up to 15 years in prison if convicted on the charges and is scheduled to be arraigned today in First District Court in Hempstead, the spokesman said. After his arrest Monday afternoon, Jonathan Roth was transferred to the district attorney's office, state park police officials said. The younger Roth told Newsday on Saturday that he was unaware his father, Raymond Roth, 47, was going to disappear as part of what his stepmother Evana Roth said Friday was a suspected plot to collect life insurance money. "I had no idea about this plan, this plot, whatever you want to call it," Roth told Newsday. Raymond Roth's whereabouts were still unknown Monday and authorities have not spoken with him in recent days. Meanwhile, the missing man's wife, Evana Roth, 45, said she was the victim of domestic abuse. She went to Family Court in Nassau County Monday and got an order of protection barring her husband from having any contact with her. Her lawyer, Lenard Leeds of Carle Place, conceded that there was little chance of actually serving a court order on a missing man. "We're trying to have the sheriff look for him" to serve papers, Leeds said. Roth's son told police on July 28 that his father had gone for a swim at Jones Beach that afternoon and did not return. "I was just so mad," the son said Saturday, two days before his arrest by state park police. He said he remembered thinking, "How could you leave me at the beach that day? I thought you were dead." Authorities obtained a search warrant for the Roth house in Massapequa and seized a computer early Friday morning with emails that Evana Roth said were instructions from the father to the son on how to reach him in Florida. Jonathan Roth told Newsday on Saturday that he had never gotten such emails. Leeds said his office was also served with a search warrant for materials related to the case, and that he was cooperating. Raymond Roth, an unemployed telecommunications manager, was presumed drowned until Wednesday, when an officer in Santee, S.C., ticketed him for speeding. Police believe he initially fled to Orlando, Fla., where he has a timeshare. NASSAU COUNTY EDITION

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(Continued from page 34)

Guilty  Count 24: Official Misconduct (using his influence as a Nassau County legislator to intervene with one of Ranjan Batheja’s creditors) Guilty Neville Mullings  Count 5: Conspiracy 4th Degree (conspire to steal the project) Guilty

 Count 6: Conspiracy 4th Degree (lesser included of Count 5; conspire to steal the project) Guilty  Count 18: Official Misconduct (agreed to use his influence with the CDA Board to assure Hal Harris the award of New Cassel sites B, C, D with its attendant development rights) Guilty  Count 20: Official Misconduct (assisted Ramon Batista in preparation of his company’s first response to the New Cassel RFP submitted to the CDA) Guilty

The South Carolina officer let him go because it's not illegal to be a missing person, police said, and investigators in New York said Roth promised state park police here that he'd meet with them upon his return to Long Island. Judge Frank D. Dikranis of Nassau County Family Court signed the order of protection after Leeds argued in court that Evana Roth "was terrified" of her husband. She said later Monday in a news conference with Leeds that she had been physically and verbally abused for much of the 12 years of her marriage. She said she had never filed a police report, "but my nose was broken when I tried to help his son. My nose was broken by Raymond." She said last week that Roth sent her a text message to "be nice" after hearing that she was going to hold a news conference to accuse him of faking his death. " 'Be nice' is Raymond's way of saying, 'Be careful,' " she said, adding that she has not heard from him since. Capt. Bruce Marx of the state park police, which has jurisdiction at Jones Beach, said Monday he did not know where Raymond Roth was. This story has been changed to correct the spelling of Lenard Leeds' name. PAGE 35


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salon, I  discovered  two  masses  on  my  colon,  each  the  size  of  golf  ball.  I  went  from  a  healthy  size  8  to  size  00.    My  doctor  told  me  that  there was no hope. I opted to  go without surgery, chemo or  radiation;  I  trusted  in  God  and  took  massive  action  in  order to overcome the incur‐ able.    I  am  so  happy  to  tell  you  that  those  masses  are  gone  now.  It  took  dedication  and  perseverance  but  I  am  healthy  and  happy,  despite  a 

to share  how  the  human  body  can  use  its  inner  wis‐ dom,  coupled  with  the  right  nutrition  to  overcome  any  dis‐ease,  rebuild  and  restore  itself to better health.    According  to  Center  for  Dis‐ ease  Control,  the  top  two  leading  causes  of  death  are  heart  disease  and  cancer.  In  the Jan. 12, 2011 the Journal  of  National  Cancer  Institute,  projected  2020  costs  in‐ creased  to  $173  billion.  We 

of clients  and  helped  them  create a lifestyle plan for opti‐ mal  health.  Now,  as  I  cele‐ brate my victory over cancer, I  would  like  to  offer  you  a  free  30‐minute phone consultation  to assess your lifestyle.     I  appreciate  the  opportunity  to  service  your  health  and  wellness  needs.  In  the  mean‐ time  you  may  reach  me  at  516.485.1411  /  516.481.1001  or  info@yesicandoit2.com  to  make an appointment.  

doctor’s bleak diagnosis.     My personal hair loss led me  to  become  an  expert  in  that  field  and  in  turn  I  helped  so  many  people.  I  have  trans‐ ferred  the  same  passion  to  health,  wellness  and  nutri‐ tion  and  I  have  been  making  a  difference  in  the  lives  of  many  people  through  health  coaching.  Since  my  recovery,  my life’s mission has become 

all know someone close to us  affected by these top leading  killers.  With  those  estima‐ tions, is it fair to ask, who will  be next? You? A family mem‐ ber?  A  co‐worker?    I  am  de‐ termined  to  help  people em‐ power  themselves  against  dis‐ease  because,  in  many  cases, it is preventable.    During  the  past  2  years,  I  have coached a limited roster 

Passion, Purpose & Grati‐ tude,     Immacula Oligario  President    P.S. – I opened a new business Eau De Vie (water of life) Wellness Center, and would love to see you at the grand opening on December 8, 2012!

From the Desk of Immacula Oligario August 8, 2012 I know  most  of  you  have  got  to be wondering, “What hap‐ pened  to  Immacula?”  Well  I  want  you  to  know  that  I  am  alive,  well  and  as  passionate  as ever about helping people  transform.    Before,  I  was  helping  people  transform  through  hair  styles.  Now,  my  approach is a little different.     I must admit, I never stopped  thinking  about  you  all,  at  times  the  deep  desire  to  reach  out  to  you  was  there,  however  the  feeling  that  I  had  to  explain  why  I  walked  away from the salon kept me  from doing so.    Some  of  you  reached  out  af‐ ter  I  closed  the  salon  to  find  out  how  I  was  doing  and  I  thank  you  for  that.  Most  of  you know also that I am very  private  person  so  I  hope  you  understand  that  I  kept  my  personal  challenges  to  my‐ self.  Just  before  I  closed  the  NASSAU COUNTY EDITION

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How to Identify Hidden Sugars The first step is to identifying hidden sugars is to be aware they are hidden in your food, the second step is to familiarize yourself with food labels and look for hidden sugars under different names.

Often times because you do not know the various names for sugar you fall for marketing labels inscribed with “No sugar added”. Sugar comes under different names; the best known sugars are fructose and sucrose. There is a variety of sugars used in marketing; they are often listed under different names like: maltose, honey, dextrose, cane sugary, fructose, corn syrup, high-fructose corn syrup, molasses, sorbitol, fruit juice concentrate, galactose, lactose, polydextrose, raw sugar, mannitol, sorbitol, xylitol, maltodextrin and turbinado sugar is an indication that sugar has been added to the food.

Even if you don't want to, you might still be eating way more sugar than you think, they are hidden under different names in your favorite foods. How much sugar is too much? When you take a look at the amount of sugar that goes into a 20oz can of soda, once you do the math and realize it is almost one teaspoon of sugar per ounce of water, you will think twice before picking up your next can of soda; especially if you are trying to lose weight. Here is a closer look at the amount sugar calories we consume

During the canning or packaging process manufacturers often add different kinds of ingredients to extend shelf life of their products like: salt and sugar; they can also be used as a preservative. Below you will find some items containing hidden sugars.

1 teaspoon sugar = 5 grams = 15 calories of sugar 12 oz can of soda = 10 teaspoons 39 grams = 140 calories of sugar The National Cancer Institute's analysis of data from the 2001 to 2004 for the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey revealed that the average American consumes 22.2 tsp. of sugar daily, or about 355 calories, according to Rachel K. Johnson, Ph.D., R.D., lead researcher in a study published in the August 2009 issue of "Circulation." Boys ages 14 to 18 years old consumed 34.4 tsp. a day, or 549 calories, the most of any other group. The lowest consumption group was children of both genders between the ages of 1 and 3 years at 12.2 tsp. of sugar a day. It is no wonder why there is an obesity epidemic, causing national health problem. Even young children are at high risk of developing obesity-related diseases. Fruits and vegetable remain the best source of natural sugars. (Continued on page 39)

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Gonorrhea becoming resistant to only treatment left The sexually transmitted disease, gonorrhea, colloquially known as “the clap,” may soon have no drugs left to treat the infection. Lab studies are showing an increasing resistance to the type of drugs that doctors use to treat gonorrhea, called cephalosporins. That leaves only a few options, which are not as effective. “Cephalosporin-resistant gonorrhea could potentially mean untreatable gonorrhea,” says Dr. Gail Bolan, director of the Division of STD Prevention at the CDC. “Untreatable gonorrhea is a real possibility.” Gonorrhea has already become resistant to every other class of drug used to treat it. For that reason, the CDC is urging doctors to immediately change their practice and begin treating with an injectable cephalosporin and adding one of two oral medications — azithromycin or doxycycline. Certain patients will need to return to the doctor in a week for a repeat test to ensure the medications worked. Any partners in the 60 days prior to diagnosis should be treated as soon as possible. Gonorrhea is transmitted through sexual contact with the penis, vagina, mouth or anus of an infected partner, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Ejaculation does not have to occur to (Continued from page 38) pass the disease. It can also spread from a mother to her child during Disclaimer: This article is intended to provide general educational information. childbirth. Information provided should not be construed as medical advice or instruction. No Over 300,000 cases are reported each year, and it’s estimated that action or inaction should be taken based solely on the contents of this information; the number is closer to 700,000, since many people go undiagnosed or instead, you should consult appropriate health professionals on any matter relating to their health and well-being. untreated, and continue to pass it on. Untreated, gonorrhea has major implications for women, causing This article is not an attempt to practice medicine or provide specific medical infertility, ectopic pregnancy — a life-threatening condition where the advice, and should not be used to make a diagnosis or to replace or overrule a qualipregnancy is outside of the uterus — and a deeper infection that spreads fied health care provider's judgment. Nor should readers rely upon my information if they might need emergency medical treatment. I strongly encourage readers to into the uterus, fallopian tubes and the pelvis. Contracting gonorrhea makes it more likely to transmit and become infected with HIV as well, for both men and women. The CDC currently recommends annual gonorrhea testing for women with more than one partner, or in communities where gonorrhea is rampant. While the rates of gonorrhea have been at recent lows, AfricanAmericans are still affected disproportionately. For every one white man or woman with gonorrhea, 20 African-Americans are infected. The rates have more than doubled since 2006 among young black men ages 20 to 24. The CDC says higher rates of resistance are seen in the Western part of the United States and among men who have sex with men. Researchers are actively looking for adequate treatment options for this highly contagious disease, according to Bolan. “There is one promising treatment in the pipeline,” she says, adding that researchers are also looking at new combinations of existing drugs. consult with a qualified health care professional for answers to personal questions. Dr. Tyeese Gaines is a physician-journalist with over 10 years of By writing this article I do not establish a doctor-patient relationship with the readprint and broadcast experience, now serving as health editor for the- ers. Grio.com. Dr. Ty is also a practicing emergency medicine physician in The information and opinions expressed here are believed to be accurate, based New Jersey. Follow her on twitter at @doctorty. on the best judgment available to the author, and readers who fail to consult with appropriate health authorities assume the risk of any injuries.

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What does the bible say about men fellowship? I am glad you asked! The bible say "BEHOLD, HOW GOOD AND HOW PLEASANT IT IS FOR BRETHREN TO DWELL TOGETHER IN UNITY!" PSALM 133:1 WELLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLL! On Friday August 24 at 7:30pm, I will be speaking at a Pre-men day conference at Judea United Baptist Church, 83 Greenwich Street, Hempstead, New York. I will be talking on the subject "Its time for men to wake up and come out of hiding," in preparation of our men day conference on September 9th at 3pm (See attachment). Any one who know me, and the work and ministry of ABBA Leadership Center, know that I do not mince words when it come to men ministry. God is doing a phenomenal job helping and touching the lives of men in the Village of Hempstead. Over the last 18 months ABBA has went out to the street to help men find jobs, reaching out to men in and transitioning out of State and local prisons. I can say without equivocation that we have touched the lives of hundred of men. These are men of valor, in ugly situations, men who have been rejected by society as miscreants, derelicts and worthless. But God is using these same men to rebuild the Village of Hempstead, a community they in times past wrecked havoc. God in these last days, is going behind the wine-press where the Gideon(s) of today are hiding (Judges 6:11), He is calling outcasts in the spirit of Jephthah(Judges 11:35) to save their people, He is calling men in the spirit of David to come out of the wilderness of despair (2-Samuel 2), He is calling Elijah(s) from under the tree of hopelessness (1-King 19-4). All I can say is, God is on the move in the Village of Hempstead! And I, and the men fellowship of Judea United Baptist Church inNASSAU COUNTY EDITION

vite you, our brothers and sisters, in the spirit of the Lord to join us for a great more of God! Remember this, men are coming home, please come out and support them. This is what the bible say "A man that hath friends must show himself friendly: and there is a friend that sticketh closer than a brother." Evangelist Reginald Benjamin Executive Director ABBA Leadership Center 83 Greenwich Street Hempstead, NY 11550 516-398-7484

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school music, he was up on all the new school tunes and rappers too. It was just another way that he stayed in tune with young folks. A few years later, he retired from the Hempstead School District, but continued with his photography and music. By this time he would refer to me as, ‘The Chairman’ and I felt comfortable calling him Tyree. If he heard I was doing an event with children, he would surprise me and show up, "Just here to take pictures of the kids," he'd say. And he never charged me a dime as long as what I was doing was in the best interest of children. I spoke to him via phone early this year, and he sounded fine and said he was doing alright. I can only presume that he has been summoned by a higher calling. As the heavens open its gates for his arrival, I offer my condolences to his family and friends in this most difficult time. He will be missed. In time, may you come to understand that what he has given you is greater than that which you have lost. Life on Earth lasts but so long, but a legacy lasts forever. And Tyree Curry's legacy lives eternally through us. To his educational colleagues and associates, I say in Mr. Tyree Curry's memory, ask yourself, "Are you REALLY doing what's in the best interest of children?" Really? Then stand strong! And to my friend Tyree, truly a champion for children, I say, your work is done here, enjoy the journey! (Khayyam E. Ali has been an educator for the past three decades, is author of a children's book, titled, The Wormhole Kids-Visit President Kennedy, and editor of two compilations of children's books, Ten Girls on the Write way to College, and Doing the Write Thing. He is also a subject of a biographical sketch in Who's Who in the World.)

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Life Changing Words “Reaping What You Sown” (Gal 6:7-8 KJV) “Be not deceived; God is not mocked: for whatsoever a man soweth, that shall he also reap. For he that soweth to his flesh shall of the flesh reap corruption; but he that soweth to the Spirit shall of the Spirit reap life everlasting.” For many years of my life I have heard this saying “You reap what you sow” and I literally thought it was a cliché. Then as I begin to learn the Bible I realized that it wasn’t a cliché. It was a true fact and it was written in the Bible. Now we must go back to our teachings and understand that the Bible is the infallible word of God. That means everything written in it is true, holy, and righteous. Just as God is truth, holiness and righteousness so now when you think about that statement and/or scripture it should raise some questions in your mind. And the questions should be… During my lifetime and even right now what have I sown and what shall I reap? Now according to scripture God is not deceived. Meaning you can fool people but at no time in life can you ever fool God. He knows exactly what you have sown and knows exactly what you will reap. Now if the truth were told all of us are reaping at least one thing that we know we are not deserving of; and that is eternal life. Now the next question is where will you spend it? Now that one is entirely up to you. My suggestion to you is that if you have not already sown your life into Christ hands then now would be a good time.

when it looks dark for He is the Light. Trust not in the flesh (the things of this world) for flesh only reaps flesh but rely on the spirit, which is God. He promises that you will reap the harvest of blessing not only here and now…but throughout eternity…and that is one of Gods greatest gifts to man. Apostle Dr. Karen Deadwyler is a new author inspired by God. Her first book titled “His Miraculous Way” speaks of her victory through Jesus Christ. For Apostle Karen is truly a miracle writing about miracles. She is the Visionary of a women’s ministry called Willing Women of Worship Fellowship and the Co-Pastor of Glory Temple Ministries. To contact her, inquire about her book or to send comments email her at kaynrony@yahoo.com or visit her website: www.godlypleasures.org

For those who are not sure how to do it let me help you. Here are the scriptures that you need to read and just follow Gods instructions (Rom 10:8-10 KJV) “ But what saith it? The word is nigh thee, even in thy mouth, and in thy heart: that is, the word of faith, which we preach; That if thou shalt confess with thy mouth the Lord Jesus, and shalt believe in thine heart that God hath raised him from the dead, thou shalt be saved. For with the heart man believeth unto righteousness; and with the mouth confession is made unto salvation.” Thank God for salvation through Jesus Christ. For in the middle of all these economic uncertainties, wars and rumors of wars we need to know that there is someone we can count on besides man. When we look around at the world’s situations and circumstance it looks pretty dim right now. For at know time in life are we to lean on man and man alone. We must trust completely in God even NASSAU COUNTY EDITION

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Alliance Ministries International Convocation The Alliance Ministries International hosted their 8th Annual Holy Convocation at St. John's Baptist Church in Westbury. Town of Hempstead Councilwoman Dorothy Goosby presented a Certificate of Recognition to Apostle Katherine Williams and congratulated all of those in attendance. Photo L-R Deacon Robinson, Rev. Louboutin Bryant, Rev. Dr. William Watson, Jr. Councilwoman Goosby, Apostle Katherine J. Williams, Pastor Annette Wilder, Rev. Elliott, Pastor Kendall Wilder, Deacon James Brown, Apostle Thelma Johnson.

Eastern Baptist Association Women's Day The Eastern Baptist Association of New York held their 91st Annual Women’s Day at the Bethlehem Baptist Church in Brooklyn. Town of Hempstead Councilwoman Dorothy Goosby attended the conference and presented a Certificate of Recognition to Women’s Auxiliary President Sister Rosalyn Johnson. The Councilwoman expressed her heartfelt appreciation to the Eastern Baptist Association for its important role in providing leadership and serving as a focal point for community life. L-R Host Pastor, Rev. Larry W. Camp Deaconess, Lillian Mack Todd Vice Moderator Rev. Alvin Barnett Councilwoman D o r o t h y G o o s b y Women's auxiliary Pres. Sis. Rosalyn Johnson Former Moderator, Rev. William A. Watson Vice Moderator at Large, Rev. William E. Thomas

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GABBY’S GOLDEN MOMENTS By B.J. Robinson

Cabby Douglas had us all smiling last week when she stole the show at the London Olympics with a golden gold medal for all around performance in gymnastics. She made golden history when she became the first African American to accomplish such a task, but we doubt she will be the last. Millions of little girls of color who watched Gabby in awe are likely dreaming their own golden dreams. Before the start of the Olympics, the emphasis was not on Gabby, it was on her teammate Jordan, considered the golden girl, who everyone predicted would take the all-round gold. I think that’s one reason why what Gabby has done has been so remarkable, because she wasn’t expected or projected to win. She just went in there, dazzled all of us, and took home the biggest prize of all. Gabby had her moment and what a wonderful moment it was. While the world sat mesmerized, she nailed one challenging gymnastic routine after another and she looked focused and confident and happy out there while taking these outsize steps toward making her mark in history. She has an adorable face, a lovely smile and a charming personality…and during her interviews, she wowed us. And what a back ground story she has, taking the monumental step of leaving her home in Virginia to move to Iowa to be near the coach who she knew could take her to the next level…and to the next, and beyond. We know Gabby’s mom had a tough decision to make because no one wants to live 1,000 miles from their daughter who is on the eve of womanhood. What a heart NASSAU COUNTY EDITION

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wrenching decision that had to be, yet one that paid off with a history making gold medal and with moments that are forever etched in our memories. Gabby also helped her team garner the gold. Even when Gabby failed to perform well in the uneven bars and the balance beam, we still cheered for her because she had won our hearts and we understood that golden moments don’t happen every day. Gracious in defeat, Gabby greeted each girl after their performance and made a point of congratulating those who won. More golden moments. Gabby showed us how it’s done …on the map or the beam or the bars….She’s a role model …not only for children but adults can also learn lessons from her. She’ll be on the cover of the next People Magazine and that’s only the beginning of all that lies ahead for her—in endorsement dollars, earnings and other golden perks over the years. And this teenager earned every bit of the riches that lie before her –by working hard, dedicating herself to her sport, practicing all hours miles from her home while living with a host family, and never allowing anyone or anything to hold her back from her goals. She showed us how to be a real champion and holds true to that phrase from the bible, “And a child shall lead us.”…RIP Mr. Tyree Curry, you and your welcome smile will be long remembered by those of us blessed to know you and your photos will live forever on our walls, in our newspapers and media outlets….and in our hearts. B.J. Robinson is an educator, a youth sports enthusiast, and author of LeBron James: King of the Court. She has also written an unpublished coming of age novel. PAGE 44


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Cullen Jones of the United States has earned three medals at the London Games. He won gold in the men’s swimming 4x100meter medley relay. Cullen Jones won a silver medal in the men’s swimming 50meter freestyle Day 7 of the London 2012 Olympic Games at the Aquatics Centre on August 3, 2012 in London, England. Cullen Jones earned a silver medal in the men’s swimming 4x100meter freestyle relay.

AfricanAmerican 2012 Olympic medalists The 2012 Summer Olympic Games in London are coming to a close on Sunday, August 12. So far the United States has earned 30 gold, 16 silver, and 20 bronze medals, bringing our country’s total medal count to 66. theGrio congratulates African-Americans who have competed in the London Games, and recognizes black Americans who have earned medals. The slideshow contains the black stars who won gold, silver or bronze in the 2012 games.

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Sanya Richards-Ross of the United States celebrates after winning the gold medal in the Women’s 400m final on Day 9 of the London 2012 Olympic Games on August 5, 2012.

Lia Neal won a bronze medal for Team USA in the women’s swimming 4x100meter freestyle relay.

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Bronze medalist DeeDee Trotter of the United States poses on the podium during the medal ceremony for the Women’s 400m Final on Day 9 of the London 2012 Olympic Games on August 5, 2012.

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Michael Tinsley of the United States win silver in the Men’s 400meter hurdles at the London 2012 Olympic Games.

Justin Gatlin won the bronze medal in the men’s 100meter final on Day 10 of the London 2012 Olympic Games on August 6, 2012

Carmelita Jeter of the United States celebrates winning the silver in the Women’s 100m Final on Day 8 of the London 2012 Olympic Games on August 4, 2012.

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Will Claye of the United States won bronze in the Men’s Long Jump Final on Day 8 of the London 2012 Olympic Games on August 4, 2012.

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Gabby Douglas won the gold medal in the Artistic Gymnastics Women’s Team final on Day 4 of the London 2012 Olympic Games on July 31, 2012.

Gabrielle Douglas of the United States celebrates on the podium after winning the gold medal in the Artistic Gymnastics Women’s Individual All-Around final on Day 6 of the London 2012 Olympic Games on August 2, 2012.

Gold medalists Serena Williams of the United States and Venus Williams of the United States celebrate on the podium during the medal ceremony for the Women’s Doubles Tennis on Day 9 of the London 2012 Olympic Games on August 5, 2012

Serena Williams of the United States of America beat Maria Sharapova of Russia to win Gold at the Women’s Singles Tennis on Day 8 of the London 2012 Olympic Games on August 4, 2012

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Maya Lawrence of the United States won a bronze medal for Women’s Epee Team Fencing Finals on Day 8 of the London 2012 Olympic Games on August 4, 2012

PLEASE KEEP THE COMMENTS COMING AND IF YOU LIKE WHAT WE ARE DOING SHOW YOUR SUPPORT FINANCIALLY CHECK OUT OUR NEW WEB-SITE TAKE A SUBSCRIPTION communityjournal.info

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GOLF SHOW COMING TO BROOKLYN Medgar Evers College (MEC) in Brooklyn, NY opens its doors to The Darby Foundation for the First Annual Golf Show. September 7, 2012 is the date for The Darby Foundation “MOMENTS OF HISTORY TOUR”, GOLF SHOW, AND EXHIBIT WITH USGAMUSEUM!!! The "Moments of History Tour" consists of distinguished panelists, individuals who have made a significant contribution to the sport of golf and to American History. All the participants will share valuable insights about the challenges they faced; and how they overcame those challenges to pursue their dreams and achieve their goals. The intent of the "Moments of History Tour" is to pave the way for this future generation. Humans all have dreams. We all have been given gifts and often times through challenges we develop the integrity, and character necessary for becoming the person we are destined to be. USGA Museum Honors "American Champions and Barrier Breakers". Some of the world's greatest athletic achievements have been accomplished in the face of untold adversity. Jackie Robinson, Joe Louis and Althea Gibson all excelled in their respective sports, not NASSAU COUNTY EDITION

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only performing competitively at an exceptionally high level, but shattering racial barriers in the process. The exhibit will be on display from Feb. 17, 2012, to Feb. 2014, and celebrates the lives of Robinson, Louis and Gibson, their sports achievements and their important legacies. "American Champions and Barrier Breakers: Jackie Robinson, Joe Louis and Althea Gibson" has been developed through the African-American Golf Archive, which was created in 2010 by the United States Golf Association and The PGA of America and is housed in the USGA Museum. For more information about the USGA Museum, go to www.usgamuseum.com. The Golf Show will feature major manufacturers demonstrating their new club lines for 2012. The Discount Pro Shop will offer bargains galore on clubs, balls, apparel, shoes and accessories. The discounts are real, too. If you see nothing else at the show, visit the shop for substantial savings. The Darby Foundation Demo Stage will feature hourly discussions on the Swing, The Rules, The Mental Game and Putting. Pros will provide free 10 minute lessons on the full swing and the short game. Exhibitors from far and near offer great deals on travel, resorts and local and regional golf. Others will help you get in shape for golf physically and financially. The Darby Foundation returns this year with its popular FUN’ RAISER GOLF OUTING where you will learn how to get involved in reaching Inner City Youth in the area. Women are invited to get their swing analyzed or learn the basics from Golf Professional at the Executive Women’s Golf area. Put it on your calendar and watch for more news on other Darby Programs. www.darbyfoundation.org

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