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Community Journal

Www.communityjournal.info

VOL. 19 NO. 44

FEBRUARY 22, 2013—NASSAU EDITION

Serving Nassau County’s African American Community


THE NEW COMMUNITY JOURNAL

FRIDAY FEBRUARY 22, 2013

Man fired after being charged with slapping toddler, using n-word on flight MINNEAPOLIS (AP) — A man charged with slapping a toddler on a Minneapolis-to-Atlanta flight is out of a job, his former employer said Sunday. Joe Rickey Hundley, 60, of Hayden, Idaho, is no longer an employee of AGC Aerospace and Defense, Composites Group, Daniel Keeney of DPK Public Relations confirmed Sunday night. Al Haase, president and CEO of AGC, issued a statement early Sunday that, while not referring to Hundley by name, called reports of behavior by one of its executives on recent personal travel “offensive and disturbing” and said he “is no longer employed with the company.” Keeney would not say whether Hundley was fired or resigned. Hundley was president of AGC’s Unitech Composites and Structures unit. Hundley was charged last week in federal court in Atlanta with simple assault for allegedly slapping the 2-yearold boy during the Feb. 8 flight. His attorney, Marcia Shein, of Decatur, Ga., said Saturday that Hundley will plead not guilty. The charge carries a maximum penalty of a year in jail.

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old son started to cry due to the altitude change. Hundley “told her to shut that (N-word) baby up,” FBI special agent Daron Cheney said in a sworn statement. She said Hundley then slapped him in the face, scratching the boy below his right eye and causing him to scream even louder. Bennett told Twin Cities television stations on Saturday that the incident has caused her family a great deal of trauma and that her son, Jonah, had been outgoing but had turned apprehensive of strangers. Hundley became increasingly obnoxious and appeared intoxicated during the flight and complained that her son was too big to sit on her lap, she said. “He reeked of alcohol,” Bennett told KARE-TV. “He was belligerent, and I was uncomfortable.” Bennett said she was shocked by the racial slur she says Hundley used when Jonah started crying. “And I said, ‘What did you say?’ because I couldn’t believe that he would say that,” she told WCCO-TV. “He fell onto my face and his mouth was in my ear and he said it again but even more hateful. And he’s on my face, so I pushed him away.” Bennett and her husband are white, while Jonah, whom they adopted, is black. “We wish to emphasize that the behavior that has been described is contradictory to our values, embarrassing and does not in any way reflect the patriotic character of the men and women of diverse backgrounds who work tirelessly in our business,” Haase said in his statement.

Shein did not immediately returned messages seeking comment left Sunday evening by The Associated Press. Hundley does not have a listed phone number. The boy’s mother, Jessica Bennett, 33, told the FBI their flight was on final descent into Atlanta when her 19-monthNASSAU COUNTY EDITION

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Community Journal a publication of Emerging Business Group, Inc. Š2006 New York all rights reserved The Community Journal is a weekly publication, based in Baldwin, New York, dedicated to sharing news and information among minority businesses and residents which will enable positive action - economically, socially and politically - for the betterment of us all. From our premiere issue, July 1, 1993, we have grown to be one of the leading African heritage news and information sources on Long Island. As a community - based publication, we intend to expand our presence and to encourage greater participation from all members of the community in forging our shared destiny. We are a "for-profit" business and hope to extend that spirit of economic empowerment to many other businesses in our community. We are published each week unless otherwise indicated and are distributed through newsstands, independent sales agents, and subscriptions.

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COLUMNIST: IN THE BLACK Larry Montgomery, Sr. INSPIRATION PERSPECTIVE EDUCATION Lisa Byers ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT: “VILLAGE LIFE Magazine” REASONABLE THINKING: Jim Reed HEALTHY LIVING RELIGION: Dr. Karen Deadwyler Bishop Dr. Andy Lewter LOCAL SPORTS: BJ Robinson

NASSAU COUNTY EDITION

FRIDAY FEBRUARY 22, 2013

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THE LORD CAN STRENGHTEN OUR FAMILY’S WHILE WE ARE IN CRISIS… Fortunately at my age I’m had the opportunity and sometimes the pleasure of living through much of what may be considered modern day history. Back in the 1960’s when the Civil Rights era was becoming a nightly news staple I had the opportunity to watch and hear about the good things the Rev. Jesse Jackson was doing for Black people. Over the years since then I like many others have also seen many of the things, encouraged by the media probably; that were not so good. So life happened for the Jackson family, who like most of us were MINISTER never immune to it in the first place. Never the less when things go good no one comLARRY MONTGOMERY, SR. plains but when the floor falls out from under you PUBLISHER AND CHIEF what do you do? Where do you turn? Who do you look to, to make it all better? COMMUNITY JOURNAL, INC. Well certainly not the media. The question posed on this weeks cover, “Where does the Rev. Jesse JackWATCH AND son’s family go from here?”; is rhetorical in a sense since troubles don’t last always as we Christian proPRAY claim it. I pray that God has not finished with the Rev. God is about to release a Jackson or his family and that they come through this 7 FOLD BLESSING. He is trial stronger and better than they were when it began. For those who my have a different opinion please bear doing something new. SO in mind that trials and tribulations have a habit of com- WATCH AND PRAY. ing to a theater near you when you least expect it, just God Bless. like the Jackson family. God Bless...

Democrats Demand Transparency in Redistricting Process Town of Hempstead Moves Forward on Hiring Private Firm On February 19, 2013 Residents, Democratic and community leaders went to Town Hall to demand that the Town of Hempstead (TOH) hold a transparent redistricting process. Instead the town decided to hire Schenectady-based Skyline Demographic Consultants Inc to handle the Towns redistricting. Skyline, a private company with deep ties to the Republican Party was given the contract without a request for proposal (RFP). Outraged Democratic leaders and local residents spoke out against this action. "Not only should Republicans, Democrats and all the political parties have access to the process, but groups concerned with fairness and good government should all be included and participate, a nonpartisan commission must be formed and must hold public hearings in each district about the proposed map," said Bob Young , first deputy leader of the Town of Hempstead Democratic Committee (ToHDC). In a 4 to 0 vote the TOH, which is controlled by the Republican Party, moved forward with the process while Council Woman Goosby, the only elected Democratic Council Member was away on other legislative business. "The TOH is the nation's largest township, with a population nearing 1 million residents that has a changing demographic which includes more African American and Hispanic families. These families have moved into the TOH at a greater rate than anywhere else in Nassau County. The redistricting process must respect the changing communities and invite residents of Elmont, Valley Stream, North Valley Stream, Hempstead, Uniondale, Freeport and Roosevelt into the process," stated Young. The next town board meeting is scheduled for Tuesday, March 5 at 10:30am. Meetings are held in the Nathan L.H. Bennet Pavilion. One Washington S PAGE 4


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FRIDAY FEBRUARY 22, 2013

An activist fights breast ironing, a ritual mutilation practice of girls in Cameroon In Cameroon, the breast, one of the most conspicuous signs of a woman’s femininity, is a target for ritual mutilation. Breast ironing, a practice that involves flattening a young girl’s breasts with highlyheated stones, pestles, spatulas or coconut shells among other objects, is often carried out by an older female relative on a victim. It is considered a human rights violation by the Friends of the United Nations Population Fund (UNPFA). According to UNPFA, one out of every four girls in Cameroon has been affected by breast ironing, equating to nearly 4 million young women. Breast ironing is primarily practiced in the Christian and Animist south of Cameroon, and less frequently in the Muslim north, where only 10 percent of women are affected. It is also practiced in Guinea-Bissau, Chad, Togo, Benin, and Guinea among African countries. As a 14-year-old girl, Chi Yvonne Leina, now 32, became a witness to this custom, which is practiced by all 200 ethnic tribes in Cameroon. She often went to her grandmother’s hut after school, which is located in the Northwest region of Cameroon, and usually heard the sounds of her cousins playing. But one particular day, the hut was eerily quiet. “[W]hen I approached the hut I heard my cousin crying inside,” Leina told theGrio. “I was curious, so I peeped through a small crack in the door.”

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What Leina saw next would change her life forever. “I heard my cousin groaning and I saw my grandmother warming a small grinding stone. [G]randma was using that small stone, which she warmed on the fire, to press my cousin’s breast, and was pressing hard on the breast, and she was crying.” That was Leina ’s first encounter with breast ironing. Although this practice can result in physical damage in addition to retarding developing breasts, many elders condone it. Mothers or close relatives of young girls who perform the practice believe breast ironing will deter sexual predators. Those who carry out breast ironing hope to minimize young girls’ sexual activity, so they get an education and become financially independent. Teen pregnancy out of wedlock is on the rise in the region. Such a life event curtails any hope a young woman has of pursuing a lucrative career. In its 2011 human rights report on Cameroon, the U.S. State Department explained the cultural motivation for stunting breast growth among adolescent girls. “The procedure was considered a way to delay a girl’s physical development, thus limiting the risk of sexual assault and teenage pregnancy,” the report states. “Girls as young as nine were subjected to the practice, which resulted in burns, deformities, and psychological problems.” Yet, there is strong evidence that breast ironing does not achieve the desired goals. “Statistics confirm that in addition to being a human rights violation, the practice is ineffective in deterring pre-marital pregnancy,” according to a Friends of the UNPFA press release. “One-third of unwanted pregnancies occur between the ages of 13 and 25, with more than half falling pregnant after their first sexual encounter.” For many women, including Leina’s cousin, the negative effects can be deep, long-lasting, and counterproductive to personal growth. “All I know is she became suddenly a shy person, which she wasn’t before,” Leina said. “And she fell out of school and got pregnant some years after.” In 2007, the German Agency for Technical Cooperation (GTZ) be(Continued on page 6)

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came one of the first agencies in the west to report on the practice. Dr. Flavien Ndonko of GTZ, in research he shared with theGrio, listed among breast ironing’s many dangerous consequences: high fever, breast cancer, severe chest pain, infection as a result of scarification, cysts, breast deformities and complete disappearance of the breasts. “Saying that breasts are destroyed is an understatement,” Dr. Ndonko said in previously published reports. “Adolescents are traumatized, mutilated. This is a serious damage not only on their physical integrity, but also on their psychological well-being.” Despite the suffering called by breast ironing, it persists in both rural areas and cities. Older women, often in secret and unbeknownst to men, undertake the torturous operation with faith that it will prevent the difficulties suffered by young women who experience sexual assault, or sex without preparation. Authorities have tried to stress the need for education and contraception as humane, effective substitutes, yet this tradition, which some says dates back to the 1800s, continues. Several months after Leina witnessed her cousin’s agony, her grandmother attempted to iron her breasts as well. Leina resisted and threatened to alert the entire neighborhood, so she was spared. “From that day it came to my mind that when you use your voice you can actually free yourself from some things,” she said of the incident. This experience influenced the young woman’s decision to study journalism and women’s studies as a university student. During the years since, Leina, has worked as a journalist for magazines and in television, reporting extensively on breast ironing. Several years ago she also founded Gender Danger, a non-profit that helps spread awareness about breast ironing in the hopes of ending the practice. Mrs. Agwetang is one of the 35 volunteers working for Gender Danger in Cameroon who go into communities at least once a month to lecture girls and women about the dangers of breast ironing. “We have women that we have trained on this very issue who can go out and also support other women,” Agwetang said. Leina’s organization has already reached over 15,000 women. In the near future it hopes to reach many more girls and women in Cameroon who are affected by breast ironing daily. Because the custom is clothed in secrecy, taking place behind closed doors between women, Agwetang believes many girls don’t know how to process the pain. “Sometimes there are certain things that happen to a girl at an age, and [at] that time she doesn’t understand,” she told theGrio. “She just goes through the things and she bares the pain and she just prays about it.” For Leina what is most troubling about breast ironing is the resulting the emotional scars. “Your mom is doing that to you. What is the message she’s passing to you as a little girl?” Leina said. “That you’re having breasts: It’s wrong, it’s shameful. You don’t like your body.” As the practice is taboo, victims often suffer in silence. But thanks to Leina and other activists fighting to end it, more victims and even perpetrators have been speaking out against it. “I think it’s the culture,” Agwetang said. “They don’t want to talk about certain things. But now that we are going out… they open up and they tell you their experiences. And even some parents, they tell you what they did to their children and they really regret it.” Follow Nia Hamm on Twitter at @niaahamm

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Where does Jesse Jackson’s family go from here? Are we witnessing the end of the Jackson dynasty? Where does this once beloved political family go from here? With former U.S. Rep. Jesse Jackson Jr. pleading guilty to spending $750,000 in campaign funds on a personal spending spree—and his wife Sandra Stevens Jackson pleading guilty to knowingly filing false joint federal income tax returns—the couple is facing years of prison time. Mrs. Jackson, who resigned as a Chicago alderman last month, failed to declare $600,000 to the feds. For a man who was once considered a contender for mayor of Chicago, the fall from grace was swift and sudden. But even more dramatic than the fraud and conspiracy charges against the son of the veteran civil rights leader is how so much was thrown away on so little, it seems. Is one’s career and reputation worth a $43,000 Rolex watch, nearly $9,600 in children’s furniture, over $14,500 in dry cleaning, $5,800 in drinks and $5,150 in furs? An even better question: Is the legacy of the civil rights movement worth a man benefiting from his father’s name and enjoying a lavish lifestyle in the process? “Over the course of my life I have come to realize that none of us are immune from our share of shortcomings and human frailties,” the former congressman said in a statement. “Still I offer no excuses for my conduct and I fully accept my responsibility for the improper decisions and mistakes I have made.” “The guilty plea today is so tragic because it represents such wasted potential,” said U.S. Attorney Ronald C. Machen Jr. at a news conference. “Jesse Jackson Jr. had drive, the ability and the talent to be the voice of a new generation, but he squandered that talent. He exchanged that instead to satisfy his personal whims and extravagant lifestyle.” Meanwhile, in light of his brother’s political woes, Jonathan Jackson, a professor at Chicago State University, was viewed as a possible replacement for Jesse Jr. in Congress, but declined to run for the seat due to a lack of interest in politics. So, now what? As for Rev. Jesse Jackson, Sr., who may have had hopes of building a political dynasty that once knocked on the White House door, just as another prominent black Chicago family moved into the White House, it would appear that dynasty has ended. And maybe that’s not such a bad thing. Empires and dynasties decline and crumble for a variety of reasons, including corruption, greed and excess, mission creep, and mediocre successors to the throne. Old dynasties are replaced, and time goes on. The senior Jackson, known for his role in the civil rights movement working with Martin Luther King, became a power broker with his 1984 and 1988 presidential runs. He has a long track record of fighting for economic and social justice for the poor and disenfranchised, and for his international activism, including aiding in the release of Americans captured in foreign countries. His accomplishments are to be honored and appreciated, personal foibles, stumbles and all. After all, no one is perfect, and we are all human beings with imperfections. But that otherwise great legacy does not translate into a right to cash in the chips of past civil rights struggles for personal fame and perpetual power. Certainly, Jesse Jackson Jr. is not the first politician to use campaign cash for personal aggrandizement, nor will he be the last. Other lawmakers, including African-Americans, have been caught with their hand in the cookie jar while trying to keep up with the Joneses. Public service is a privilege that is desecrated by far too many, which is why there is so little faith in political leadership today. Further, when people invoke the movement as their source of legitimacy, (Continued on page 7)

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the stakes are higher and more is expected of them. They voluntarily place themselves on a higher pedestal, allowing for a much harder fall on the way down. And in the end, people suspect they were only in it

Jesse Jackson Jr.’s downfall tied to objects, not power CHICAGO (AP) — For all the talk of Jesse Jackson Jr. aspiring to be a U.S. senator or mayor of the nation’s third-largest city, his career wasn’t ended by attempts to amass political power.

for the money in the first place. Jesse Jackson Jr. has shown contrition and has apologized to his family, friends and supporters for the mistakes he has made. The former congressman said that “while my journey is not yet complete, it is

Instead, it was the former congressman’s desire for flashy items — a gold-plated Rolex watch, furs and collectibles, such as Eddie Van Halen’s guitar. In a state where stop-at-nothing political ambition has been well documented — and often rewarded — the seemingly frivolous cause of Jackson’s undoing is seen by political observers and former colleagues as both nonsensical and sad. “When you have a magic name like that, he was in position, waiting for the gun to go off, for mayor, the Senate … he was playing with the big guys,” said Paul Green, a longtime political scientist at Roosevelt University in Chicago who moderated Jackson’s first congressional campaign debate. “To go down for this, you just feel sad.” Federal prosecutors on Friday charged Jackson Jr. with one count of conspiracy for allegedly spending $750,000 in campaign money on personal expenses. The Chicago Democrat’s wife, former alderman Sandra Jackson, was charged with one count of filing false joint federal income tax returns. Authorities say the returns, for the years 2006 through 2011, knowingly understated the income the couple received. Both agreed to plead guilty in deals with federal prosecutors. Their sentencing dates have not been set, but the charges both carry possible sentences of several years in prison. Jackson Jr. also could be ordered to repay thousands of dollars in fines and forfeitures. While former Illinois Gov. Rod Blagojevich went to prison because he tried to trade President Barack Obama’s U.S. Senate seat for a more prestigious job or millions in campaign donations, Jackson could go to prison for, in part, buying memorabilia tied to martial arts movie star Bruce Lee. The son of a civil rights icon, Jackson represented Illinois’ 2nd District, which includes part of Chicago’s South Side and south suburbs, for 17 years. He was wildly popular in his heavily Democratic district, consistently winning elections with more than 80 percent of the vote.

my hope that I am remembered for the things that I did right.” Humility and adversity, which Jackson is apparently experiencing now, are among the traits of an effective leader. And while he let many people down and is facing jail, his story is not yet completed. Everyone deserves second chances, and is worthy of redemption. If Rep. Jackson Jr. is guilty, then so too are the many in the black community who traded in “we shall overcome” for the empty materialism of “I’ve got mine, better get yours.” Meanwhile, never mind the played-out talk of political dynasties. Power for power’s sake, to be inherited by future generations who may not deserve it because they did not have to earn it, is not a useful pursuit. Rather, true power lies in helping others rather than serving inflated egos or lining pockets, and the rest falls into place. Perhaps this is the future of the Jackson family legacy, should they choose to pursue it.

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Jackson served as national co-chair of Obama’s presidential campaign in 2008 and had his eyes on becoming mayor or a senator. But those hopes were dashed when his name surfaced as part of the Blagojevich corruption investigation and with revelations that Jackson had been involved in an extramarital affair. Jackson denied any wrongdoing in the Blagojevich matter, which involved unproven allegations that he was involved in discussions to raise campaign funds in exchange for being appointed to Obama’s vacated U.S. Senate seat. Suddenly last summer, Jackson disappeared from public view for several weeks. His staff eventually revealed he was being treated for bipolar disorder and other medical issues. When Jackson resigned from office in November, he cited his bipolar disorder and acknowledged he also was under federal investigation. Sandi Jackson resigned from her Chicago alderman seat in January. U.S. Rep. Danny Davis, who represents a neighboring district and visited Jackson Jr. shortly after his release from treatment at the Mayo Clinic, said the charges against the Jacksons “couldn’t be more unfortunate.” “I think things probably just got out of hand for them and they got involved in making decisions that just didn’t make a lot of good sense,” Davis said. Davis wondered whether the long list of luxury purchases mentioned in the federal criminal complaint were “an indication that his bipolar condition kind of was manifesting itself even then.” If so, he said, it’s unfair to compare this situation to other Illinois corruption. “It’s hard to rationalize it,” Davis said. “Not all elected officials in Illinois are corrupt or building any kind of political dynasty or trying to develop political power. Most individuals elected to public office are citizens who want to make the most effective use of themselves and make this world a better place in which to live.” Delmarie Cobb, a Chicago political consultant who worked on Jackson Jr.’s first campaign and was an aide to his father when he ran for president in 1988, said Saturday she was “absolutely astonished” by the news. She, too, believes Jackson Jr.’s actions were triggered by his bipolar disorder. “It is just not the Jesse Jr. I knew,” said Cobb, who’s known Jackson Jr. since he was a senior in college and was present when he met Sandi. “It’s a very sad ending for everybody.”

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Comptroller DiNapoli and A.G. Schneiderman Announce Felony Plea of Former Senator Shirley Huntley Covered up $30K In Taxpayer-Funded Services Never Performed Sen. Huntley Devised Fake Letter To Falsely Show That They Were Comptroller Thomas P. DiNapoli and Attorney General Eric T. Schneiderman today announced that former New York Senator Shirley L. Huntley has pleaded guilty to Tampering with Physical Evidence, an E Felony, for falsifying evidence in an effort to obstruct the investigation into the theft of a grant she sponsored for a sham non-profit entity, the Parent Workshop. As part of their Joint Task Force on Public Integrity, the Offices of the Attorney General and State Comptroller previously indicted then-Senator Huntley and three individuals associated with the Parent Workshop, Inc., a nonprofit set up by former Senator Huntley that funneled member item funds intended to benefit the public to the senator’s aide and to the senator's niece. According to the state’s indictment, the president and treasurer of the Parent Workshop submitted fraudulent documents to New York State to obtain public money from a legislative member item sponsored by Senator Huntley. Instead of providing the promised programs, the two defendants pocketed approximately $29,950. Senator Huntley, who created the sham nonprofit and earmarked a member item grant to the entity, was charged with falsifying evidence in an attempt to obstruct the investigation into this theft. An ongoing investigation into the theft revealed that, after learning of the probe into her grant to the Parent Workshop, then-Senator Huntley created a handwritten template for a false, backdated letter designed to fool investigators into believing that the Parent Workshop had conducted workshops, when in fact no such workshops were ever conducted. This letter was submitted to the Attorney General Schneiderman's Office in response to a subpoena issued to the Parent Workshop. As part of her plea, Huntley admitted to her role in this cover-up. “Former Senator Huntley betrayed the trust of her constituents and her public duty,” Comptroller DiNapoli said. “State officials must be held to the highest standards. My office will continue to work with the Attorney General to investigate wrongdoing and protect taxpayer funds.” “It is unconscionable that an elected official would deliberately tamper with a law enforcement investigation into the theft of taxpayer dollars," Attorney General Schneiderman said. “Former Senator Huntley’s felony plea sends a strong message that those who abuse their positions to rip off taxpayers and tamper with investigations will be prosecuted. My office’s partnership with the Comptroller is designed to combat such corruption, and we will continue to work tirelessly to protect every penny of taxpayer money during these challenging economic times.” In cooperation with federal partners, and in light of the fact that Huntley faces an 18-24 month prison sentence, prosecutors recommended a sentence of five years probation in exchange for her felony guilty plea. Theft and obstruction charges are still pending against Huntley’s co-defendants. The indictment charges Patricia Savage, president of Parent Workshop and Senator Huntley’s aide, and Lynn Smith, the treasurer of Parent Workshop and Senator Huntley's niece, of engaging in a fraudulent scheme to steal member item funds. The defendants falsely claimed that Parent Workshop would use member item funds secured by Senator Huntley to hold workshops for and conduct NASSAU COUNTY EDITION

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outreach to parents on the workings of the New York City public school system. Instead, the indictment charges that Savage and Smith never intended to hold any such events and that they falsely asserted in multiple submissions to the New York State Department of State that, from April 2008 through March 2009, the Parent Workshop had held workshops and conducted outreach, when no such workshops were ever held and no such outreach was ever conducted. Based on these submissions, the Department of State paid Parent Workshop $29,950 – the sum the two defendants are charged with stealing. Savage and Smith are each charged with multiple felony counts of Grand Larceny in the Third Degree and Offering a False Instrument for Filing in the First Degree. The maximum sentence for one count of Grand Larceny in the Third Degree is 2 1/3 to 7 years in prison. The indictment also charges that Savage and defendant David R. Gantt conspired with Huntley to create and submit false evidence, in response to a subpoena issued to Parent Workshop by the Attorney General's Office. One piece of that false evidence was the handwritten letter drafted by Senator Huntley that was falsified to make it appear as if Parent Workshop had conducted workshops when, in fact, it did not. The superseding indictment also charges that defendant Gantt falsified records to claim that he was paid in cash for conducting workshops as a consultant. The indictment further charges that he, in fact, never conducted any workshops. Gantt is charged with four counts of Tampering with Physical Evidence, four counts of Falsifying Business Records in the First Degree and one count of Conspiracy in the Fifth Degree. The joint investigation began after contact with the New York State Department of State. Since 1999, the New York State Legislature has distributed more than $900 million through legislative member items to more than 20,000 nonprofit entities. Investigator Gerard Matheson and Investigative Analyst Brian Selfon of the Investigations Bureau assisted in this case, under the supervision of Supervising Investigator Michael Ward and Chief Dominick Zarrella. Prosecuting the case are Public Integrity Bureau Senior Counsel Emily Bradford, Public Integrity Bureau Assistant Attorney General Jerrold Steigman, and Criminal Prosecutions Bureau Assistant Attorney General Thomas Schellhammer. The investigation was supervised by Public Integrity Bureau Deputy Chief Stacy Aronowitz and Chief William E. Schaeffer, under the supervision of Executive Deputy Attorney General for Criminal Justice Kelly Donovan. The joint investigation was conducted the Comptroller’s Bureau of State Expenditures and Legal Services Division’s Investigations Unit. The charges are merely accusations and all remaining defendants are presumed innocent unless and until proven guilty in a court of law. Anyone with additional information on this matter or any other public corruption is encouraged to contact the Attorney General’s Office at 1-800-996-4630 or the Comptroller’s office by dialing the tollfree fraud hotline at 1-888-672-4555; filing a complaint online at investigations@osc.state.ny.us; or mailing a complaint to: Office of the State Comptroller Investigations Unit, 110 State Street, 14th floor, Albany, NY 12236. PAGE 9


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Sources: Bellone was often absent, unreachable in his 1st year Originally published: February 20, 2013 9:30 PM Updated: February 20, 2013 10:25 PM By PAUL LAROCCO paul.larocco@newsday.com Suffolk County Executive Steve Bellone was absent from the office for days at a time or longer during his first year on the job and often was difficult to reach, said four high-level sources with direct knowledge of his schedule. Bellone, 43, a Democrat and former Babylon Town supervisor who took office in January 2012, would spend hours at a time during workdays at restaurants, and aides who were searching for him even monitored Twitter users for reported sightings, two of the sources said. Also, for more than a month last summer, as Suffolk wrestled with a projected three-year budget deficit of as much as $530 million, Bellone met only infrequently with staff at the H. Lee Dennison Building in Hauppauge, said all of the sources. "He would not return phone calls, sometimes, for five days; it was very challenging," said one person, who like the others declined to be identified. In an interview Wednesday, Bellone said he "was in the Dennison Building a significant amount of time" last year. "But I also took a lot of meetings outside of the office, which I like to do, because particularly here it's very isolated and the public doesn't come in." He continued, "I reject the notion that I wasn't in the building. It's absurd." He called the people who spoke about his management style "anonymous political insiders who either have an ax to grind or are upset that I didn't spend more time with them." Supporters, including some of the sources who spoke about his management style, noted accomplishments, including an eight-year contract with Suffolk police officers that set lower pay for new hires, as evidence that Bellone's time out of the office didn't impact his performance. But the executive varied from "laser focus" on issues such as the police contract and the midyear layoffs of 263 employees to little dayto-day involvement in preparing the county's $2.7 billion budget for 2013, three sources said. Bellone's management style sits in contrast with former County Executive Steve Levy, a Republican, who used to monitor legislative debates from his office and feed his aides responses via text message. Beginning late last year with the response to superstorm Sandy, and continuing this year, Bellone has been far more engaged in daily operations, sources said. He was active in responding to the recent blizzard, and made personal appeals to many county legislators to secure emergency approval for a plan to intensely monitor convicted sex offenders. The measure passed unanimously earlier this month. Bellone said he is "not doing anything differently than what I did when I negotiated the [police] contract . . . or reducing the layoffs by 100 people," last year, and that he's always been a hands-on manager. ". . . There's nothing going on that is of any significance that I am not aware of." Last year, however, Bellone spent hours at a time during the week at restaurants, primarily Panera Bread in North Babylon, not far from his home, all of the sources said. At least four social media users reported sightings of him at the chain, with one saying she "always" saw NASSAU COUNTY EDITION

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Bellone there. "He'd meet people there," one source said of Panera. "It was just unusual." Bellone said that, "if people have seen me working at a diner or a Panera, they've seen me there late at night, seen me there on weekends, working, having meetings. Have I had meetings during the week at places? Sure. But people have seen me at night, on weekends, because I am working seven days a week, literally." The county executive's frequent absences from the office last spring and summer came as his administration was developing the 2013 budget, which Bellone said closed nearly all of the deficit. But aides didn't regularly discuss budget particulars with Bellone, the sources said. "You'd have to take risks, and hope that they were the right ones," said a source. However, Bellone was involved heavily in the post-Sandy response last fall, particularly in pressuring the Long Island Power Authority to restore power faster. One source also said Bellone's style didn't hurt the county because he knew the right times to get involved: "He'd focus incessantly on a project, and when he focuses on a project, he drops off a lot of the extraneous stuff." The legislature's Deputy Presiding Officer, Wayne Horsley (D-Babylon), said Bellone "shouldn't be judged by how often he's in a building; his office is across the county." Horsley acknowledged that he also met Bellone at Panera, saying, "He has a definite management style, where he's focused heavily on one thing and lets the other issues go to the staff. It's no different from when he was supervisor. He's still doing a lot of work." Legislative Minority Leader John M. Kennedy Jr. (R-Nesconset) said that with his style, Bellone needs seasoned aides, but that most of them had little previous county government experience. "These are complex issues, and if you're not going to be around, you need depth around you," Kennedy said. Bellone's calendar for 2012, obtained through Freedom of Information Law requests, shows his staff set aside four to five hours each week for "private" appointments. Numerous times, he met lawmakers and officials at the Palace Diner in Hauppauge or the South Bay Diner in Lindenhurst. On May 11, he scheduled an appointment with former Nassau County Executive Thomas Suozzi and others at the South Bay Diner to discuss a proposal to seize and resell underwater home mortgages, the schedule shows. And twice in May and June, according to the calendar, Bellone's office set meetings with top aides at Panera locations. A record of Bellone's security card entries into the Dennison Building, also obtained through a FOIL request, shows that Bellone's card logged only seven entries in 2012 -- four in January and three in December. However, the county noted in its FOIL response that Bellone "would rarely be required to show or use his access card." Public policy experts said elected leaders who are often out of the office must rely more on their staffs, and while they can be more effective than micromanagers, they are also at greater risk of not catching mistakes before they happen. "They tend to act more like a CEO or chairman of the board -- their real work gets done on strategic issues," said Angie McGuire, an assistant professor of public administration at Rutgers University and director of the school's Center for Executive Leadership in Government. "You might be much further removed if you have a strong team . . . but if you don't [have competent aides], morale could suffer." Douglas Muzzio, a professor of political science and public affairs at Baruch College, said voters want a leader who is hands-on and effective, but that they'll accept "hands-off and effective." He said Bellone's "style certainly opens him up to attack. You can see an opponent pointing out, 'Where was he?' or ads about 'the disappearing county executive.' He may have done the big stuff, but what about the little stuff?" Those who are familiar with Bellone's schedule emphasized that he has become far more involved in day-to-day matters this year. He has spent significantly more time in the office, said two of the sources, since the January departure of chief deputy Regina Calcaterra, an intense, hands-on manager who now is executive director of the state's Moreland Commission investigating utilities' storm responses. Calcaterra was replaced by Dennis Cohen, Bellone's childhood friend, who was Babylon and Suffolk County attorney. "I have to tell you, it's such a dramatic change, it's mind-boggling," the source said of Bellone's presence at the office. PAGE 10


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Democratic Leaders Endorse Tom Suozzi Jacobs: United party needed to defeat Mangano (Mineola, NY) – Today Democratic leaders and elected officials from across Nassau County announced their support for former County Executive Tom Suozzi, who stated on Tuesday that he will seek the Democratic nomination. Earlier this week, Nassau County Democratic Chairman Jay Jacobs said that he would unite the Democratic organization around the strongest candidate and the party would back Suozzi. “This continues to be an ongoing process, but it is my firm belief that over the next few weeks our party will unite behind Tom Suozzi. With a strong and unified organization we will be able to focus our energy on defeating Mangano and the GOP Machine this fall,” said Jacobs. “I am extremely grateful for the support of so many Democratic leaders and elected officials and I look forward to working with them throughout this campaign to create our shared vision for the future of Nassau,” said Suozzi. Suozzi received endorsements from: William Biamonte – Town of Hempstead Leader David Gugerty – Town of Oyster Bay Leader Ann Famigliette – City of Glen Cove Leader Michael Zapson – City of Long Beach Leader Minority Leader Kevan Abrahams (LD 1) Legislator Carrie Solages (LD 3) Legislator Joseph Scannell (LD 5) Legislator Judy Jacobs (LD 16) Legislator Delia DeRiggi-Whitton (LD 18) Legislator Dave Denenberg (LD 19) NASSAU COUNTY EDITION

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Can the Republicans Be Saved From Obsolescence? One afternoon last month, I paid a visit to two young Republicans named Bret Jacobson and Ian Spencer, who work in a small office in Arlington, Va., situated above an antique store and adjacent to a Japanese auto shop. Their five-man company, Red Edge, is a digitaladvocacy group for conservative causes, and their days are typically spent designing software applications for groups like the Heritage Foundation, the Republican Governors Association and the U.S. Chamber of Commerce. Lately, however, Jacobson and Spencer have taken up evangelizing — and the sermon, delivered day after day to fellow conservatives in the form of a 61-point presentation, is a pitiless we-told-you-so elucidation of the ways in which Democrats have overwhelmed Republicans with their technological superiority. They walked me through a series of slides showing the wide discrepancies between the two campaigns. “And just to make them feel really bad,” Jacobson said as he punched another image onto the overhead screen. “We say, ‘Just wait — this is the most important slide.’ And this is what kills them, because conservatives always look at young voters like the hot girl they could never date.” He read aloud from the text: “1.25 million more young people supported Obama in 2012 over 2008.” In the light of his Apple monitor, Jacobson’s grin took on a Luciferian glow. He is 33, wiry and well dressed and has the twitchy manner of a highly caffeinated techie. “And then we continue with the cavalcade of pain,” he said. The next chart showed that while the Romney campaign raised slightly more money from its online ads than it spent on them, Obama’s team more than doubled the return on its online-ad investment. Spencer chimed in: “That’s when one of our clients moaned, ‘It’s even worse than I thought.’ ” Spencer, who is 29, possesses the insectlike eyes of a committed programmer. He and Jacobson are alumni of the University of Oregon, where they both worked on the Commentator, a conservative alternative paper whose slogan was, “Free Minds, Free Markets, Free Booze.” “Then, once people think we’ve gotten them through the worst,” Jacobson said, “we pile on more — just the way Obama did.” He put up Slide 26, titled, “Running Up the Score.” “Obama was the very first candidate to appear on Reddit. We ask our clients, ‘Do you know what Reddit is?’ And only one of them did. Then we show them this photo of Obama hugging his wife with the caption ‘Four more years’ — an image no conservative likes. And we tell them, ‘Because of the way the Obama campaign used things like Reddit, that photo is the single-most popular image ever seen on Twitter or Facebook.’ Just to make sure there’s plenty of salt in the wound.” Back in August 2011, Jacobson wrote an op-ed in Forbes alerting Republicans to Obama’s lead on the digital front. His warnings were disregarded. Then last summer, he and Spencer approached the conservative super PAC American Crossroads with their digital-toolbuilding strategies and, they say, were politely ignored. It’s understandable, then, that a touch of schadenfreude is evident when Jacobson and Spencer receive the policy-group gurus and trade-association lobbyists who file into Red Edges’s office to receive a comeuppance. “Business is booming for us,” Jacobson said. “We’ll double or triple our bottom line this year, easily. But this isn’t about getting new business. We need the entire right side of the aisle to get smart fast. And the only way they can do that is to appreciate how big the chasm was.” Exhibit A is the performance of the Romney brain trust, which has suffered an unusually vigorous postelection thrashing for badly losing a winnable race. Criticism begins with the candidate — a selfdescribed data-driven chief executive who put his trust in alarmingly off-the-mark internal polls and apparently did not think to ask his subordinates why, for example, they were operating on the assumption that fewer black voters would turn out for Obama than in 2008. NASSAU COUNTY EDITION

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Romney’s senior strategist, Stuart Stevens, may well be remembered by historians, as one House Republican senior staff member put it to me, “as the last guy to run a presidential campaign who never tweeted.” (“It was raised many times with him,” a senior Romney official told me, “and he was very categorical about not wanting to and not thinking it was worth it.”) Under the stewardship of Zac Moffatt, whose firm, Targeted Victory, commandeered the 2012 digital operations of the Romney campaign, American Crossroads and the Republican National Committee, Team Romney managed to connect with 12 million Facebook friends, triple that of Obama’s operation in 2008; but Obama in 2012 accrued 33 million friends and deployed them as online ambassadors who in turn contacted their Facebook friends, thereby demonstrably increasing the campaign’s get-out-the-vote efforts in a way that dwarfed the Republicans’. While Romney’s much-hyped get-out-the-vote digital tool, Orca, famously crashed on Election Day, Obama’s digital team unveiled Narwhal, a state-of-the-art data platform that gave every member of the campaign instant access to continuously updated information on voters, volunteer availability and phone-bank activity. And despite spending hundreds of millions of dollars, the Romney television-admaking apparatus proved to be no match for the Obama operation, which enlisted Rentrak, the data corporation for satellite and cable companies, through which it accrued an entirely new layer of information about each and every consumer, giving the campaign the ability to customize cable TV ads. “They were playing chess while we were playing checkers,” a senior member of the campaign’s digital team somberly told another top Romney aide shortly after the election. Later, the top aide would participate in a postelection forum with Obama’s campaign manager. He told me (albeit, like a few people I spoke to, under the condition that he not be identified criticizing his party), “I remember thinking, when Jim Messina was going over the specifics of how they broke down and targeted the electorate: ‘I can’t play this game. I have to play a different game, so that I don’t look like an idiot in front of all these people.’ ” But the problem for the G.O.P. extends well beyond its flawed candidate and his flawed operation. The unnerving truth, which the Red Edge team and other younger conservatives worry that their leaders have yet to appreciate, is that the Republican Party’s technological deficiencies barely begin to explain why the G.O.P. has lost the popular vote in five of the last six presidential elections. The party brand — which is to say, its message and its messengers — has become practically abhorrent to emerging demographic groups like Latinos and African-Americans, not to mention an entire generation of young voters. As one of the party’s most highly respected strategists told me: “It ought to concern people that the most Republican part of the electorate under Ronald Reagan were 18-to-29-year-olds. And today, people I know who are under 40 are embarrassed to say they’re Republicans. They’re embarrassed! They get harassed for it, the same way we used to give liberals a hard time.” It was not long after the election that elder statesmen of the G.O.P. began offering assurances that all would soon be right. But younger Republicans were not buying it. On Dec. 6, Moffatt addressed an audience of party digital specialists at the R.N.C.’s Capitol Hill Club. Moffatt spoke confidently about how, among other things, the Romney digital team had pretty much all the same tools the Obama campaign possessed. Bret Jacobson was shocked when he read about Moffatt’s claim the next day. “That’s like saying, ‘This Potemkin village will bring us all prosperity!’ ” Jacobson told me. “There’s something to be said for putting on a happy face — except when it makes you sound like Baghdad Bob.” A few days after the Moffatt gathering, the R.N.C.’s chairman, Reince Priebus, announced that the committee would conduct a wideranging investigation — called the Growth and Opportunity Project — into the ways the party was going astray. To guide the investigation were familiar names, like the former Bush White House press secretary Ari Fleischer, the longtime Florida operative Sally Bradshaw and the R.N.C. veteran Henry Barbour. Erik Telford, the 28-year-old founder of the RightOnline bloggers’ convention, told me that he found himself wondering aloud: “Do you want an aggressive investigation from people who’ve built their careers on asking skeptical questions? Or do you PAGE 14


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Nassau County Bar Assoc. Hosts Program to Ease Path to Green Card (MINEOLA, NY) – Nassau County Legislator Kevan Abrahams, D-Freeport, would like to notify residents of a free upcoming community program at the Nassau County Bar Association (NCBA) on Tuesday, Feb. 26, from 2-4 p.m. to help ease the path to a Green Card. If you are undocumented, this program will provide you with helpful information on obtaining a Green Card. Specialists will be on hand to answer questions such as: What is the new I-601A waiver rule that goes into effect March 4, 2013? What is the benefit of the new waiver rule? What steps must be taken before filing? Featured speakers include Howard R. Brill, Esq. and Linda G. Nanos, Esq., both of Hempstead, NY, and David M. Sperling, Esq. of Central Islip, NY. Reservations are required. To claim a spot, please call (516) 747-4070. WHEN Tuesday, Feb. 26, 2013 from 2 p.m. – 4 p.m. WHERE:

Nassau County Bar Association 15th & West Streets Mineola, NY 11501

ROOSEVELT’S OWN, CHRIS ARCENEAUX IS HONORED Hempstead Town Supervisor Kate Murray (2nd left), Councilwoman Dorothy L. Goosby (right), and Councilman James Darcy (left) present the official Town of Hempstead Rosa Parks Award to Darby Foundation Founder and CEO Chris Arceneaux of Roosevelt (2nd right) at the Town of Hempstead’s Annual AfricanAmerican History Celebration held at Town Hall in Hempstead. Mr. Arceneaux is recognized nationwide for teaching the youth about golf, developing discipline, and staying out of trouble. The theme of the event was “ Rebuilding Together.” Rev. Dr. Floyd Flake, former U.S. Congressman and Pastor of the Allen A.M.E. Cathedral in Jamaica, Queens, was the keynote speaker.

Ya Es Hora Campaign Seeks Volunteers for Citizenship Application Event Nassau County Legislator Kevan Abrahams (D-Freeport) would like to advise residents of a volunteer opportunity for Ya Es Hora campaign, which promotes Latino civic engagement and participation through citizenship, voter engagement and census enumeration. The campaign will be hosting their first citizenship application assistance event of 2013 in Washington Heights, New York on Saturday, March 16 at the Hermanas Mirabal Intermediate School. Their goal is to help over 125 people complete their applications for U.S. Citizenship. However, this effort is only advanced through the hard work and dedication of volunteers. For all those interested in volunteering, please email: lmedrano@naleo.org. For more information about Ya Es Hora campaign, visit: www.yaeshora.info. NASSAU COUNTY EDITION

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February Babies The February Babies, a group of women who where born in the month of February, gathered at LL Dent in Carle Place for their annual birthday party. Town of Hempstead Councilwoman Dorothy Goosby, who is a February baby, congratulated all of the women in the group and offered heartfelt happy birthday wishes. Photo: Catherine Moore, Betty Watts, Betty Bedford, Lillian Dent, LaVerne Harris, Councilwoman Dorothy Goosby

100 Black Men Black History Month Reception 100 Black Men of Long Island hosted a Black History Month Reception at TD Bank in East Meadow. Town of Hempstead Councilwoman Dorothy Goosby presented Certificates of Recognition to honorees Khayyam Ali (Hempstead Schools), Amun Handa (Health Plus), and Dr. Teresa Taylor Williams (Publisher of New York Trends). The Councilwoman congratulated President Phil Andrews and members of 100 Black Men. Pictured (L to R): Amun Raheem Handa, John Nedd, Dr. Teresa Taylor Williams, Khayyam Ali, Councilwoman Dorothy Goosby, Pres. Phil Andrews, Councilwoman Viviana Russell, Henry Holley, Jon Cooper, Walt Sony, Pernon Dunston NASSAU COUNTY EDITION

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From the Desk of Mayor Hall As the Village inches closer to achieving the aims of the redevelopment plan, I remain committed to providing the Hempstead community with beneficial services to improve the overall quality of life for each resident. By the time March has begun, the Village will have already implemented the new Hempstat Call Center service and the Shotspotter sensors, which will make for a more convenient and safe Hempstead. The Village Police Department piloted Shotspotter sensors throughout Hempstead in February to ensure resident safety. A new measure to protect and defend residents, the Shotspotter tool was purchased with part of my administration’s budget surplus. This gunshot locator system will provide wide-area acoustic surveillance for gunshots, as well as other large explosive occurrences. These sensors will provide police officers with immediate information and intelligence to respond quickly and safely to gunfire incidents. In addition to increasing safety measures Villagewide, Hempstead will launch its first-ever information hotline on March 1. Created to improve communication throughout Hempstead, the Hempstat Call Center service will be open from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. each day of the week. The hotline will improve customer service efforts, answer inquiries and keep residents informed about Village happenings. Implementing this system will provide my administration with detailed performance metrics to ensure that all concerns are handled and questions are answered. This fast and efficient tool is an added convenience for Village residents. The Hempstat Call Center service and Shotspotter sensors are examples of the many improvements our Village will experience in 2013. Providing residents with tools that enhance communication and safety is a vital aspect of my initiative for a better and brighter Hempstead; I intend to incorporate similar measures moving forward. Since I began my term as Mayor, my administration has continually improved the state of our Village. This year will be no exception. To learn more about what is going on in the Village of Hempstead, including information about local organizations that serve youth and families, visit www.villageofhempstead.org. You may also join our electronic mailing list by sending your name and email address to: Mayor@villageofhempsteadny.gov. To keep abreast of the downtown revitalization, visit www.renewhempstead.com. On that site, you may share your ideas for the redevelopment and/or provide your feedback on the plan. Sincerely,

Wayne Mayor Wayne J. Hall

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Donations for Hempstead Fire Victims Needed (HEMPSTEAD, NY) – Nassau County Legislator Kevan Abrahams would like to notify residents of an opportunity to donate much-needed items to victims of a recent, fatal Hempstead fire. Earlier this month, a fire raged through a Hempstead building complex killing two, injuring several and leaving over 400 residents homeless (see: Newsday Feb. 9, Feb. 10). Some of those affected are staying with relatives, but most are currently at Kennedy Park sleeping in cots set up by the American Red Cross. Through the generosity of local leaders and restaurant owners, they are being fed. Personnel from the local school district have made arrangements for the children to be transported to their schools. Arrangements are being made through the Nassau County Department of Social Services for assistance in relocating those left homeless. The Hempstead Hispanic Civic Association has been designated as the drop-off site for needed clothing and other essential items. The following items are in the greatest demand: Warm clothing, coats, gloves, scarves, sweaters, etc.; financial contributions. Funds are needed to ensure those affected can purchase other personal items (undergarments, toiletries, etc). One-hundred percent of all contributions will go to the people left homeless. Checks can be made out to: Hempstead Hispanic Civic Association, Inc., 236 Main Street, Hempstead, NY 11550 (please put 17 St. Paul on the Memo side of check). Donations in the form of clothing, food and other items may also be brought to this location. For more information about donating, please call the Hempstead Hispanic Civic Association at (516) 292-0007.

HEMPSTEAD PUBLIC LIBRARY ADULT WORKSHOP JOB SEARCH SECRETS Wednesday, March 27, 2013 6:30pm – 8:30pm FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE* * * * * * * * * * * * ADVANCE REGISTRATION NEEDED * * * * * * * CONTACT: REFERENCE* * * * * * * * *481-6990 Job Search Secrets is a positive interactive workshop, focusing on a set of specific actions job seekers can take to significantly improve the effectiveness of their job search strategy. A variety of valuable resources will be shared and discussed throughout the workshop. This is an informative PowerPoint presentation and handouts will be made available to all who attend. This free program will be held in the Community Room of the library. Registration is required.

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Hardwick Team Campaign Headquarters Grand Opening!

Saturday, February 23, 2013 4pm-8pm 9 Sunrise Highway on the corner of church Vote Tuesday March 19, 2013

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Why black athletes need to use their riches to found tech start-ups From BlackEnterprise.com: The privilege of lifting the Lombardi trophy has always been reserved for a small group of men each year, and the Super Bowl proved to be no different. The same goes for the ranks of investors that fund a majority of today’s tech startups. However, the latter is changing and we’d like to see more AfricanAmerican National Football League players, and minority athletes, get off the sideline and into the investing game. Both rapper-turned-actor Will Smith and music mogul Jay-Z are leveraging their capital and celebrity to back BlackJet, which enables clients to book seats on luxury jets via a mobile app. Black Eyed Peas frontman Will.i.am is not only a serial investor, but he’s learning to write code so he can develop his own websites. Athletes can follow the example of Ronnie Lott, a four-time Super Bowl champion with the San Francisco 49ers; Lott recently raised a fund, with other African Americans, and has already invested is several successful startups. His son (who is one of the article’s authors) cofounded StraightCast Media after retiring from the NFL. Diversifying your portfolio can also save you money. All of these investors benefit from what is known as the carried interest loophole. We’ll break it down: while you likely pay 39.6% on income derived from salary towards taxes, your investments face a maximum of 15-20% in capital gains taxes. This is why billionaire investor Warren Buffett reportedly still pays a lower tax rate than his secretary. As one notable angel investor recently explained, “income is a sucker’s game. Carried interest rocks.” Recent initiatives aimed at encouraging a more diverse pool of startup investors have already increased the number of women who are empowered to be more visible and vocal. Websites like FundersClub, with only a few clicks, enables its members, who are accredited investors (with a net worth of over $1 million or yearly earnings more than $200,000), to invest as little as $1,000 in venture funds that go on to finance some of the world’s top startups in exchange for equity. The process of connecting founders with funding is becoming more efficient and transparent than ever before, making it easier for those outside Silicon Valley to get involved. Investors should continue backing the technologies and teams that excite them. However, an increase in the diversity of investors could influence investing habits overall. At present, just one percent of all venture-backed startups in Silicon Valley have an African-American founder. First hand, we’re seeing the situation improve. A handful of African-American investors contributed over 25% of the $2 million dollar seed round closed by one of our startups, SendHub, in April 2012. Kenneth Chenault, CEO and Chairman of American Express, is backing a startup called Urban Compass, which is led by an African- American founder and months ago announced an NASSAU COUNTY EDITION

$8 million seed round. We are convinced that the best strategy for positioning minority communities to benefit from the wealth and jobs created by the innovation economy is to bring more diverse investors to the table. This is exactly what FundersClub and others are doing. To date, the website has funded six companies two of which are led by African-American CEOs. This is an encouraging trend which suggests that a rising tide of investors may lift more startup

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boats, including those led by minority founders. Professional athletes who want to learn more about the startup game, within a controlled and low-pressure environment, might consider attending an upcoming Demo Day put on by YCombinator or 500 Startups in Mountain View, California. Ashton Kutcher and MC Hammer are regulars. Demo Day is almost equivalent to the NFL Scouting Combine except, the room is filled with less anatomically impressive people and everyone is talking about user traction, instead of forty yard dash times. Ronnie Lott, who has demonstrated a remarkable level of deft throughout his career—on and off the field—captures our sentiments best. He noted, “Just like Jackie Robinson explored the possibilities of playing in the big leagues, we also need to explore the possibilities of playing where innovation and economics collide to transform the future. We cannot afford to miss this game!”

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want a report from people who are symptomatic of what’s gone wrong?” Equally galling to younger Republicans was the op-ed Stuart Stevens wrote in The Washington Post on Nov. 28. In it, Romney’s top strategist struck an unrepentant tone, proudly noting that the candidate “carried the majority of middle-class voters” and that the party therefore “must be doing something right.” From her office near the Capitol, Kristen Soltis Anderson, a 28-year-old G.O.P. pollster, tried not to come unglued. “But you didn’t win the election,” she told me she thought at the time. “I’m really glad you scored that touchdown in the third quarter, I am — but you lost the game!” Anderson is a fantasy-football fanatic, with the rat-a-tat argumentative cadence that gives her away as a former high-school debater. Upon graduating from college, she became the lead singer of the Frustrations, a rock-ska group that folded, as only a D.C.-based band could, when one member decided to attend law school and another needed more time to study for the bar exam. Anderson, for her part, is now a pollster and vice president of the Winston Group. Like the Red Edge partners and virtually every other young Republican with whom I spoke, she regards herself as a socially tolerant, limited-government fiscal conservative. (Today Republicans of all age groups strenuously avoid describing themselves as “moderate,” a term that the far right has made radioactive.) Camera-ready and compulsively perky — she has twice appeared on Bill Maher’s ”Real Time” panel as a token conservative — she nonetheless lapses into despondency when talking about her party’s current state of denial. During one of the postelection panels, Anderson heard a journalist talk about his interviews with Romney staff members who had hoped to build a winning coalition of white voters. “That just stunned me,” she told me one afternoon over coffee. “I thought: Did you not see the census? Because there was one! And it had some pretty big news — like that America’s biggest growing population is the Latino community! Surprise, surprise! How have we not grasped that this is going to be really important?” One afternoon last month, I flew with Anderson to Columbus, Ohio, to watch her conduct two focus groups. The first consisted of 10 single, middle-class women in their 20s; the second, of 10 20something men who were either jobless or employed but seeking better work. All of them voted for Obama but did not identify themselves as committed Democrats and were sufficiently ambivalent about the president’s performance that Anderson deemed them within reach of the Republicans. Each group sat around a large conference table with the pollster, while I viewed the proceedings from behind a panel of one-way glass. The all-female focus group began with a sobering assessment of the Obama economy. All of the women spoke gloomily about the prospect of paying off student loans, about what they believed to be Social Security’s likely insolvency and about their children’s schooling. A few of them bitterly opined that the Democrats care little about the working class but lavish the poor with federal aid. “You get more off welfare than you would at a minimum-wage job,” observed one of them. Another added, “And if you have a kid, you’re set up for life!” About an hour into the session, Anderson walked up to a whiteboard and took out a magic marker. “I’m going to write down a word, and you guys free-associate with whatever comes to mind,” she said. The first word she wrote was “Democrat.” “Young people,” one woman called out. “Liberal,” another said. Followed by: “Diverse.” “Bill Clint o n . ” “ C h a n g e . ” “ O p e n minded.”“Spending.”“Handouts.”“Green.”“More science-based.” When Anderson then wrote “Republican,” the outburst was immediate and vehement: “Corporate greed.”“Old.”“Middle-aged white men.” “Rich.” “Religious.” “Conservative.” “Hypocritical.” “Military retirees.” “Narrow-minded.” “Rigid.” “Not progressive.” “Polarizing.” “Stuck in their ways.” “Farmers.” Anderson concluded the group on a somewhat beseeching note. “Let’s talk about Republicans,” she said. “What if anything could they do to earn your vote?” NASSAU COUNTY EDITION

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A self-identified anti-abortion, “very conservative” 27-year-old Obama voter named Gretchen replied: “Don’t be so right wing! You know, on abortion, they’re so out there. That all-or-nothing type of thing, that’s the way Romney came across. And you know, come up with ways to compromise.” “What would be the sign to you that the Republican Party is moving in the right direction?” Anderson asked them. “Maybe actually pass something?” suggested a 28-year-old schoolteacher named Courtney, who also identified herself as conservative. The session with the young men was equally jarring. None of them expressed great enthusiasm for Obama. But their depiction of Republicans was even more lacerating than the women’s had been. “Racist,” “out of touch” and “hateful” made the list — “and put ‘1950s’ on there too!” one called out. Showing a reverence for understatement, Anderson said: “A lot of those words you used to describe Republicans are negative. What could they say or do to make you feel more positive about the Republican Party?” “Be more pro-science,” said a 22-year-old moderate named Jack. “Embrace technology and change.” “Stick to your strong suit,” advised Nick, a 23-year-old AfricanAmerican. “Clearly social issues aren’t your strong suit. Stop trying to fight the battle that’s already been fought and trying to bring back a movement. Get over it — you lost.” Later that evening at a hotel bar, Anderson pored over her notes. She seemed morbidly entranced, like a homicide detective gazing into a pool of freshly spilled blood. In the previous few days, the pollster interviewed Latino voters in San Diego and young entrepreneurs in Orlando. The findings were virtually unanimous. No one could understand the G.O.P.’s hot-blooded opposition to gay marriage or its perceived affinity for invading foreign countries. Every group believed that the first place to cut spending was the defense budget. During the whiteboard drill, every focus group described Democrats as “open-minded” and Republicans as “rigid.” “There is a brand,” the 28-year-old pollster concluded of her party with clinical finality. “And it’s that we’re not in the 21st century.” Of course, many conservatives like their brand just the way it is, regardless of what century it seems to belong to. Anderson did not relish a tug of war over the party’s identity between them and more open-minded Republicans. She talked to me about Jon Huntsman, the presidential candidate whose positions on climate change and social issues she admired, and the unseemly spectacle of his denigrating the far right. To prosper, the party should not have to eat its own, she maintained. Still, to hear her focus-group subjects tell it, the voice of today’s G.O.P. is repellent to young voters. Can that voice, belonging to the party’s most fevered members, still be accommodated even as young Republicans seek to bring their party into the modern era? This conundrum has been a frequent postelection topic as youthful conservative dissidents huddle in taverns and homes and — among friends, in the manner of early-20th-century Bolsheviks — proceed to speak the unspeakable about the ruling elite. I sat in on one such gathering on a Saturday evening in early February — convened at a Russian bar in Midtown Manhattan, over Baltika beers. The group of a half-dozen or so conservative pundits and consultants calls itself Proximus, which is Latin for “next,” and they seem to revel in their internal disagreements. One of them argued, “Not all regulation is bad,” while another countered, “I hate all regulations, every single one of them” — including, he cheerfully admitted, minimum-wage and child-labor laws. Nonetheless, the focal point of Proximus’s mission is not policy formulation but salesmanship: how

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100 Black Men of Long Island, Inc.’s President, Phil Andrews set to speak at Uniondale Chamber of Commerce March 5, 2013 General Meeting Uniondale, New York - On March 5, 2012 the Uniondale Chamber of Commerce will be presenting its monthly general membership meeting. The guest speaker will be Phil Andrews, President – 100 Black Men of Long Island, Inc. Mr. Andrews is a Master Networker in the Long Island region and will be highlighting ways to increase business sales and increase your networking capacity. Mr. Andrews is the owner of the Power Networking Business Seminar Series and has conducted business events in the NYC/Long Island Region for well over 20 years. About: Phil Andrews - Phil Andrews is President of the 100 Black Men of Long Island. Founded in 1974, "The 100" serves as an international coalition focused on creating educational opportunities, promoting economic empowerment, addressing health disparities and creating positive mentoring relationships. As founder of P.A. Public Relations Company, Phil has been afforded the privilege to serve as Public Relations Director for a myriad of companies, community initiatives and professional organizations. Andrews' business acumen is often sought after by organizations that host major events, benefits and fundraisers. In 1995 and 1998, Mr. Andrews' excellence in his field garnered the Small Business Person of the Year award by two branches of the Nassau Council of Chambers of Commerce (Roosevelt and West Indian Chambers, respectively). He has also received a number of proclamations and citations from notable political officials including former Nassau County Executive Thomas S. Gullotta, former Town of Hempstead Supervisor Richard Guardino and Assembly-woman Earlene Hooper Hill, 18th Assembly District of Long Island NY. Phil's work has been featured in multi-platform publications including Black Star News, The New York Beacon, Amsterdam News, Minority Business Review, The Network Journal and more. He is also featured in "15 Years of Minority Business Development" a book published by Mr. Robert Adams. Mr. Andrews is listed in Who's Who in Black America and International Who's Who. Tuesday, March 5, 2013 8:00 am Location: Uniondale High School 933 Goodrich Street, Uniondale, NY 11553 RSVP by emailing uniondalechamber@gmail.com or calling 516.229.1348 Why Join Uniondale Chamber 0f Commerce, New Business Contacts - One major reason to consider active participation with the Chamber is to meet and network new businesses. Representation - The Chamber works as a voice for its members in local and state government.

NASSAU COUNTY EDITION

Association of Towns State of NY Meets in NYC The Association of Towns of the State of New York held their 2013, 80th Training School and Annual Meeting Program at the Hilton in New York City. Councilwoman Dorothy Goosby represented the Town of Hempstead during the event which hosts nearly 2000 town officials from all over New York State. 150 classes are offered in ethics, fiscal management, health insurance, grants, property tax, energy conservation and many more.

During the opening session, NYS Comptroller Thomas DiNapoli addressed the group and discussed issues pertaining to the New York State budget, economy and pension fund. Councilwoman Goosby will be sworn in as the 1st Vice President at the conclusion of the 4 day event and is the first African American to serve on the executive committee. Pictured (L to R): Timothy Whitesell, President AOT, Elizabeth Neville, 5th VP, Gerry Geist, Executive Director, Leslie Gross, Town Clerk Town of North Hempstead, Councilwoman Dorothy Goosby, Thomas DiNapoli, NYS Comptroller, Robert Taylor, 4th Vice President

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ASK LISA-ANNE Q. As a classroom kindergarten teacher, I’m in close contact with my students. They often hug me, lean on me, sneeze on me and cry on me. I’m concerned about contracting a serious ailment like HIV/AIDS. How can I protect myself without being dismissive and cruel to my students? Shouldn’t teachers be told who has AIDS in their classroom? What is the incidence of children who have HIV/ AIDS? A. It’s a heartbreaking thing to see children suffering from the symptoms of AIDS. This is information that should be reviewed in the beginning of every school year to staff in public schools as a reminder of the precautions a teacher should take on a daily basis and to weed out myths about HIV/AIDS as well. Let’s explore this topic! What is HIV/AIDS? According to the Centers For Disease Control and Preventionwww.CDC.gov, HIV stands for human immunodeficiency virus. HIV is the virus that can lead to acquired immune deficiency syndrome, or AIDS. The CDC estimates that about 56,000 people in the United States contracted HIV in 2006. HIV damages a person’s body by destroying specific blood cells, called CD4+ T cells, which are crucial to helping the body fight diseases. HIV is primarily spread via unprotected sex, sharing of needles, syringes, rinse water, or other equipment used to prepare illicit drugs for injection and being born to an infected mother—HIV can be passed from mother to child during pregnancy, birth, or breast-feeding. How Many Children Have HIV/AIDS in America? According to AVERT, an international AIDS charity, an estimated 3,792 children aged under 13 were living with AIDS at the end of 2007. Most contracted it from their mothers. Visit www.avert.org. The numbers outside of the USA are astounding! Are African-Americans More Likely to Contract HIV/AIDS? Of all racial and ethnic groups in the United States, HIV and AIDS have hit African Americans the hardest. The reasons are not directly related to race or ethnicity, but rather to some of the barriers faced by many African Americans. These barriers can include poverty (being poor), sexually transmitted diseases, and stigma (negative attitudes, beliefs, and actions directed at people living with HIV/ AIDS or directed at people who do things that might put them at risk for HIV). When you look at HIV/AIDS by race and ethnicity, you see that African Americans have  More illness. Even though blacks (including African Americans) account for about 13% of the US population, they account for about half (49%) of the people who get HIV and AIDS.  Shorter survival times. Blacks with AIDS often don’t live as long as people of other races and ethnic groups with AIDS. This is due to the barriers mentioned above.  More deaths. For African Americans and other blacks, HIV/ AIDS is a leading cause of death. www.CDC.gov There are several challenges facing the African American community that impact HIV prevention efforts and how well African Americans with HIV/AIDS cope with the disease. Some of these challenges are: poverty, denial, STDs and drug use. Having sexually transmitted diseases increases one’s chances of contracting HIV/ AIDS. This also means that more African-American children will have HIV/AIDS because more African-American mothers have it as compared to other races. Do parents or guardians have to disclose to the school that their child has HIV/AIDS? Parents have to disclose to healthcare professionals, (doctors, nurses, physician assistants, dentists) that their child has HIV/AIDS so they can treat the child accordingly. The law does not require parents and guardians to share HIV-related information with a child's school. However, it may be in the child's best interest for some school NASSAU COUNTY EDITION

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employees to know about the child's HIV infection (for example, if the child needs help taking medicines). Parents and guardians of children with HIV should also think about whether to share their child's HIV status with people directly involved in the child's life, such as babysitters, friends, and relatives. They do not have to tell anyone. However, it may be overwhelming to care for a young person with HIV/AIDS without telling others and getting support. Visit www.health.state.ny.us/ diseases/aids/facts/questions/ child_adolescents.htm Can I get HIV from casual contact? No. HIV is not transmitted by day to day contact in the home, the workplace, schools, or social settings. HIV is not transmitted through shaking hands, hugging or a casual kiss. You cannot become infected from a toilet seat, a drinking fountain, a doorknob, dishes, drinking glasses, food, or pets. HIV is a fragile virus that does not live long outside the body. HIV is not an airborne or food borne virus. HIV is present in the blood, semen or vaginal secretions of an infected person and can be transmitted through unprotected vaginal, oral or anal sex or through sharing injection drug needles. Children who bite will not transmit HIV. Although the virus sometimes can be detected in the saliva of an infected person, experts say the concentration is too weak to cause infection in others.www.Aids.org Can the Department of Education bar students infected with HIV from attending classes? Can HIV-infected employees be removed from their jobs? No. Section 504 of the federal Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 protect the right of persons with HIV/AIDS (which are considered disabling conditions under these laws) to continue working as long as they are able to perform the essential functions of their jobs. Under the same laws, students with HIV/AIDS have the right to attend school and cannot be denied access to any educational opportunity for which they would otherwise be qualified. As we have seen, there is no reason to exclude students or personnel with HIV/AIDS because they do not pose a danger to others in a school setting. How can teachers protect themselves? First, you have probably hugged and held the hand of a child who has AIDS already in your career. You should practice the same precautions you would use to avoid catching pink eye and the swine flu. Most parents don’t disclose this information because they do not want their children isolated, rejected and mistreated. The United Federation of Teachers-www.UFT.org, which is the teachers’ union across America, offers the following information when teaching children who have HIV/AIDS: Some school employees, such as school nurses and health aides, have job duties that involve routine exposure to blood. Just like health care personnel working in hospitals, these school employees face some risk of contracting the HIV virus if they sustain direct contact with infected blood. Examples of direct contact include being pierced with a needle or other sharp object contaminated with the virus or being splashed with infected blood on the eyes, nose, mouth or an open wound. Other school employees with some risk of exposure to HIV may include any physical education teachers and school safety officers who frequently deal with injured students and custo(Continued on page 26)

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The 100 Black Men of Long Island, Inc. set to present its 39th Annual Scholarship Gala Benefit Saturday, March 9th, 2013 at the Crest Hollow Country Club Hempstead, NY (March 9, 2013)—A day that neither anyone in the counties of Nassau or Suffolk will never forget is quickly emerging around the corner and you do not want to miss it. It’s a day of appreciation, it’s a day of high emotions, it’s a day to reunite, it’s a day just for people to see “Real Men serving Real” Time, it’s the 100 Black Men of Long Island, Inc. 39th Annual Scholarship Gala happening on Saturday, March 9th, 2013 from 8pmuntil 1:00 am at the Crest Hollow Country Club, Woodbury, NY. The 100 Black Men of Long Island, Inc., Annual Scholarship Gala celebrated annually in the spring is a premier benefit event. Donations and sponsorship from this affair fund and support scholarships awarded to high school and college students, African American History Academic Challenge (History Bowl), mentoring programs, Dollars & $ense Financial Literacy Program, and various other programs of the 100 Black Men of Long Island, Inc. The festivity includes an elegant evening of a sumptuous cocktail hour, dinning, live music by Long Island greatest Sauce Band, a silent auction, promotional giveaways, photos, and dancing. Mr. Michael Stevens (Anchor for Verizon’s Fios 1 News) will serve as this year’s Master of Ceremony. For the previous years, this event has been a huge hit -as it has sold out in advance for years, it is expected to do the same this year. Some 550 people are expected to fill the grand ballroom at the Crest Hollow Country Club. This year’s Gala Honorees are Mr. Thomas P. Dinaploi- N.Y. State Comptroller, Mr. Jon CooperCo-Chair, Tri-State Region, Obama Victory Trustees -Obama for America, Dr. Kenneth K. Saunders-Officer in Charge of Nassau Community College, Ms. Lorraine Aycock- Market Manager of Bank of America, Mr. Timothy M. Williams- Chairmen of the Board Nassau County Industrial Development Agency, Mr. Anthony Woods- V.P. of Marketing & Sales Health Plus an Amerigroup Co., Mrs. Sharise E. Beatong-Hall- Financial Services Professional Agent, New York Life Insurance Co., Mr. William SuggsNational Regional Director for American Association of Blacks in Energy. For more information about this event, contact Lenore Pringle, Event Consultant for Sponsorship Packages lenorepringle@100blackmenofli.org or purchase tickets at www.39thannualscholarshipbenefitgala.eventbrite.com Visit our website @ www.100blackmenofli.org CONTACT: Communications Chairman, Elseah Chea., info@100blackmenofli.org NASSAU COUNTY EDITION

dial staff who are responsible for cleaning up blood spills. Every school employee should follow the safety procedures called “universal precautions” by avoiding contact with the blood of others. What steps should the Department of Education take to protect school employees against exposure to HIV? The Bloodborne Pathogen Standard adopted by the federal Occupational Safety and Health Administration in December 1991, requires that every employer develop a plan to prevent or reduce workers’ exposure to bloodborne pathogens (germs) including HIV and the hepatitis B and C viruses. For Department of Education employees, the Bloodborne Pathogen Standard is enforced by the New York State Department of Labor through PESH, the Public Employee Safety and Health Program. The OSHA/PESH Bloodborne Pathogen Standard was adopted after strong pressure by the UFT, the American Federation of Teachers and many other unions throughout the country. Shouldn’t teachers who do NOT have HIV/AIDS, be told if other teachers have it? Such a disclosure policy would be illegal. It also is unnecessary. It would be illegal because the New York State Public Health Law explicitly bars the disclosure of such confidential medical information in most circumstances. Department of Education policy reinforces the legal mandate by explicitly prohibiting school employees from disclosing information about a student’s HIV status without the consent of the student or his/her parents/legal guardians. In some cases information about HIV status may not even be disclosed to the student’s parents. (See Chancellor’ Special Circular #37 of May 19, 1993.) For more information about ‘universal precautions,’ visit www.UFT.org. Lisa-Anne Ray-Byers is a licensed and certified speech-language pathologist who has worked in education for over two decades. She holds graduate degrees in speech-language pathology and multicultural education. She also holds certification in educational administration. She is the author of the books, They Say I Have ADHD, I Say Life Sucks! Thoughts From Nicholas, They S S Say I’m a St St Stutterer, But I S S Say Nothing! Meet Kelly and co-author of the book 365 Ways to Succeed With ADHD available by contacting her. She is a member of the National Education Writers Association and the Education Editor of the Community Journal newspaper in Long Island, New York. You may contact her at speechlrb@yahoo.com or by visiting her website at www.AskLisaAnne.com.

HEMPSTEAD PUBLIC LIBRARY ADULT WORKSHOP RESUME WRITING AND E-MAIL Hands On Workshop – Part II Wednesday, February 27th, 2013 6:30P.M. –8:30P.M. For immediate release* * * * * * * * ** * * * * * * * * * * * * * advance Registration needed * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * Contact: Reference* * * * * * * * * * * * *481-6990 We provide the computers! In this hands-on class, you will learn how to use your computer to create, style, format and e-mail a powerful resume. In addition, you will also learn how to use Microsoft Word to create your resume as well as how to attach a file to an e-mail. Writing a cover e-mail and various letter styles will also be covered. This is the second part of a two part workshop. A basic knowledge of computer usage as well as a current e-mail address is required to attend this workshop. The program will be held in the Community Room. Registration is required for this free program. PAGE 26


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Ex-Deputy NCPD Commissioner Convicted of Official Misconduct and Conspiracy for Preventing Arrest of Police Benefactor’s Son William Flanagan faces up to one year in jail; Co-defendants Sharpe and Hunter are awaiting trial MINEOLA, N.Y. – Nassau County District Attorney Kathleen Rice announced today that a former Nassau County Police Department Deputy Commissioner has been convicted by a jury of official misconduct and conspiracy for his role preventing the arrest of a teenager whose father was a personal friend and financial benefactor of the police. The jury began deliberations on Friday, Feb. 8 and returned a partial verdict on Feb. 14, convicting William Flanagan, 55, of Islip, of two

ATTENTION STUDENTS, PARENTS, AUNTS, UNCLES, GRANDPARENTS AND TEACHERS! IN AN EFFORT TO PRAISE AND ENCOURAGE OUR CHILDREN IN THEIR EDUCATIONAL ENDEAVORS, WE WOULD LIKE TO SPOTLIGHT A STUDENT A WEEK WHO HAS ACCOMPLISHED SOMETHING SPECIAL IN SCHOOL!

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counts of Official Misconduct. The jury convicted Flanagan of one count Conspiracy in the Sixth Degree and found him not guilty of Receiving a Reward for Official Misconduct in a verdict returned at 7:45 PM on Feb. 15. Flanagan faces up to one year in jail at sentencing. “This case has always been about making sure that there isn’t one set of rules for the wealthy and connected, and another set for everyone else,” said

Nassau County District Attorney Kathleen Rice Rice. “I’m pleased the jury validated our belief in that important principle. This is a huge win for the public, but it's also a sad day for an awful lot of incredibly hard-working Nassau cops who do their brave jobs honestly every day. This case is a reminder that to safeguard the public's trust and the integrity of our honest officers, we must be vigilant in our fight against corruption and misconduct. We are looking forward to continuing this effort in the two related upcoming trials.” Rice said that on May 19, 2009, a (Continued on page 30)

graduated, won a certificate, passed an exam, written a poem, created or invented something, has significantly improved his/her grades, wrote a fantastic essay, joined the track team, sang a solo, has a part in a play or painted a beautiful picture, let us know and we’ll show him/her off in the paper! Contact Lisa-Anne Byers at speechlrb@yahoo.com

If you know a student from kindergarten - college who has NASSAU COUNTY EDITION

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school administrator from John F. Kennedy High School in Bellmore called police to report the theft of more than $10,000 in electronics equipment from the school. The administrator identified Zachary Parker, a student at the school and part-time employee of the NCPD’s Emergency Ambulance Bureau, as the suspected thief and, in a sworn statement to police, expressed her desire that the perpetrator be arrested. Parker’s job with the NCPD caused the case to be referred to the department Internal Affairs Unit. Deputy Chief of Patrol John Hunter, who was not in this unit’s direct chain of command, directed that the case remain assigned to the Seventh Precinct. Hunter had been instrumental in creating the job for Zachary Parker in the NCPD, and he and Flanagan were frequent guests at expensive lunches and dinners hosted by Gary Parker for high-ranking members of the NCPD and other law enforcement agencies. Gary Parker also donated large sums of money to the Nassau County Police Department Foundation. On May 23, 2009, Hunter asked the school administrator’s nephew, a NCPD officer, to lobby her not to press charges. He refused. In a May 30, 2009 email exchange, Gary Parker requested that Hunter get the NCPD to “lay low” on the investigation into his son. Hunter responded that he would make sure that was done. On June 15, 2009, Hunter directed Detective Sergeant Alan Sharpe to have the property returned to the school. Sharpe dispatched a Seventh Squad detective to do that the following day, but the administrator refused to sign a withdrawal of prosecution form and the property was returned to the precinct. On June 18, 2009, Gary Parker reached out to Flanagan to ask for his assistance. Through July and August, Flanagan worked with Sharpe to coordinate the return of the stolen property to the school administrator and to prevent Parker's arrest, with Flanagan assuring Gary Parker in an email that he had “no doubt about the outcome”. On September 1, 2009, Sharpe directed one of his detectives to return the stolen property to the school administrator and to obtain her signature on a withdrawal of prosecution form. She accepted the property, but again refused to sign the withdrawal form. Despite her refusal, however, Sharpe instructed a subordinate to enter a “close out” memo in the NCPD computer system on September 19, 2010, falsely claiming that the school administrator did not want Zachary Parker arrested. On September 10, 2009, Flanagan accepted gift cards to Morton’s Steakhouse worth hundreds of dollars from Gary Parker and his wife. He thanked Gary Parker by email, calling the gift cards “over the top.” While never arrested by the NCPD, Zachary Parker was prosecuted by the Nassau County District Attorney’s office and is serving time in an upstate prison after violating the probation to which he was originally sentenced. The cases against Sharpe and Hunter are pending. The charges against all three men stem from an investigation that began in the wake of a Long Island Press story documenting allegations of preferential treatment for those with personal connections to the police department and its private foundation. The DA’s investigation would later find no criminality on the part of the Nassau County Police Department Foundation itself. Flanagan’s annual salary as of December 31, 2011 was $224,929. He submitted his resignation on February 29, 2012 and received termination pay of $449,858.01 from the county. Assistant District Attorneys Bernadette Ford (Bureau Chief) and Christiana McSloy (Deputy Bureau Chief) of the DA’s Public Corruption Bureau are prosecuting the cases. Flanagan is represented by Bruce Barket, Esq.

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Freeport Man Pleads Guilty to Robbery and Assaulting a Police Officer; Will Serve 14 Years in Prison Menjivar stole car and intentionally crashed into police after being cornered in elementary school parking lot

MINEOLA, N.Y. – Nassau County District Attorney Kathleen Rice announced today that a Freeport man has pleaded guilty to stealing a Hicksville resident’s vehicle at gunpoint and then intentionally crashing into a police vehicle after officers had trapped him in an elementary school parking lot. Remick Menjivar, 19, pleaded guilty this morning to Robbery in the First Degree and Assault in the Second Degree in exchange for a promised prison sentence of 14 years from Judge William Donnino. The DA’s Office advocated for a 20-year prison sentence. He will be sentenced on March 15. Rice said that just before noon on March 20, 2012, Menjivar and another man, Edwin Flores, 21, of Hicksville, approached a male victim standing in the driveway of his Ohio Street home in Hicksville. Menjivar pulled out a black 9mm Republic Arms semi-automatic handgun and demanded the victim’s keys, wallet, and cell phone. Menjivar then got into the victim’s 2006 Infiniti G35 and fled the scene, followed by Flores in a black 2011 Toyota Corolla. Responding police officers from the Nassau County Police Department’s Second Precinct and Bureau of Special Operations soon located the stolen Infiniti and attempted to pull Menjivar over. Menjivar attempted to evade officers and pulled into the parking lot of the Fayette Elementary School on Merrick Avenue in North Merrick. Menjivar, trapped in a parking lot with only one exit, accelerated at an approaching police car and crashed head-on into it and then into the school building. Menjivar tried to flee after the crash but was immediately apprehended. Several officers were injured, one of whom suffered a serious head injury. Flores was located and arrested in Freeport. The Corolla he was driving had been stolen during a March 16, 2012 carjacking in Bellerose. Flores pleaded guilty to Robbery in the First Degree last month and is awaiting sentencing. “A violent criminal with his back against the wall is a very dangerous thing, especially one armed with a firearm and a stolen vehicle,” Rice said. “These dedicated officers, however, thought not of their own wellbeing but of the safety of the community, and stood their ground.” Assistant District Attorney Everett Witherell of the DA’s Major Offense Bureau is prosecuting the case. Menjivar is represented by Michael Albert, Esq.

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In 2005, I chose to run for public office for the first time in my life because I felt I had the energy and ideas to make a difference in a county I care so much about. Nearly two terms later, I’m proud to have kept my promises and to have helped the district attorney’s office become one of the most professional, independent and innovative prosecutor's offices in the nation. While our strides have been bold and our progress steady, I believe I have more to contribute to an office that we all rely upon to protect our families and to ensure the integrity of the criminal justice system. That’s why I’m so excited to announce my candidacy for a third term as Nassau County’s district attorney. Our work over the last two terms is something we can be proud of. our office has become a national leader in the fight against drunk and drugged-driving. We’ve cut plea-bargaining and toughened prosecutions of violent criminals and cyber predators. We’ve gone after corrupt officials who abuse the public’s trust and we've recovered millions of dollars of misused taxpayer money. Our community and school education programs have received widespread praise and our efforts to help rehabilitate non-violent offenders and reduce recidivism have put our office on the forefront of the criminal justice reform movement. We’ve done all this as non-political, independent prosecutors not guided by fear or favor, but instead by what’s right and what’s wrong. If you give me the opportunity to continue my public service as your district attorney, I can promise that you will get more of the same independence that has become the hallmark of our time in office. And you will always know where I stand on the issues. My top priorities for a third term are clear: I will to continue to crack down on violent and cyber crime. I will redouble investigative efforts targeting those who steal from taxpayers or abuse the public’s trust. I will help lead local and state reform of the juvenile justice system so that we can reduce recidivism and redirect nonviolent teen offenders to paths of prosperity. I will fight to get illegal guns off our streets and I will lobby Albany and Washington for sensible gun-control laws. I will continue to push for reforms that better safeguard the integrity of our criminal justice system. I need your help to make sure that the progress that has improved the safety of Nassau County families continues. If you share my belief in the importance of keeping the office in the hands of prosecutors who are committed to innovation and independence, then please take a moment to contribute to our campaign (link below), forward this email to your circle of contacts, or visit our website, Facebook or Twitter accounts using the links below. Additionally, our first event of 2013 is next Thursday, January 10 at the Cradle of Aviation Museum in Garden City. As a homicide prosecutor, as an assistant U.S. attorney, and as Nassau County’s district attorney, I have spent my entire life advocating for victims of crime and for reforms that make our criminal justice system more effective. I ask for your support so that we can build on our successes and continue to make Nassau County a safer, more prosperous place for us all. Sincerely, Kathleen Rice NASSAU COUNTY EDITION

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CLAVIN SPEAKS AT TAXPAYER’S FORUM: Hempstead Town Receiver of Taxes Donald Clavin (center) discusses important tax issues with Wantagh, Oceanside, Roosevelt, and Freeport residents at a recent Taxpayer’s Forum held at the Freeport Library located on West Merrick Road in Freeport. Receiver of Taxes Clavin discussed tax payment collection periods, payment methods, tax exemptions, challenging assessments, Hempstead tax office extended hours and satellite office payment dates. Pictured (left to right) are Kurt Faraczek of Wantagh, Claire Johnson of Oceanside, Receiver of Taxes Clavin, Cartez Johnson of Roosevelt, Regina Sumpter of Roosevelt, and Frances Tarantino of Freeport.

Maragos: County Maintains A+ Credit Rating Cost-reductions, lower borrowing and reasonable sales tax forecasts Mineola, NY: Nassau County government’s ability to reduce costs, reduce borrowing and conservative estimates on sales tax led Fitch Ratings to maintain its A+ credit rating on County borrowings, Nassau County Comptroller George Maragos announced today. The A+ rating saves taxpayers money by securing a favorable interest rate for any borrowing. “Fitch has acknowledged the County’s financial progress made through cost cutting, labor savings and restructuring of operations in affirming the County’s A+ bond rating,” Comptroller Maragos said. “This is the fifth consecutive A+ rating for the Mangano Administration restoring the County rating back to 2005.” Fitch recognized the fiscal progress achieved and maintained by the County, by noting; $20 million in savings from police precinct closures and $33 million from the privatization of the bus system; Reduction of County workforce by nearly 20% since 2009 to 7,359 at the end of 2012; Legislation eliminating responsibility for making property tax refund payments . . . effective in 2014 . . . would significantly reduce the County’s liability up to $100 million a year; Debt ratios are moderate despite the county’s practice of bonding out tax refund payments. Management’s ability to continue to reduce costs, especially labor, is essential to near-term budget balance and rating stability; and “Reasonable” 2013 Sales tax growth forecasts for 3.7%. The major ongoing concerns expressed include the impact of Hurricane Sandy, the “hurdles” from NIFA oversight and cost pressures from unfunded mandates and long term labor agreements.

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THE NEW COMMUNITY JOURNAL

FRIDAY FEBRUARY 22, 2013

70 percent increase in ADHD among black children, study finds Many parents lament over their children not following directions, lack of focus or inability to sit still. These actions are often seen “out of control” and “bad” behavior. However, it may be a sign of ADHD. According to a recent study by Getahun and colleagues published in JAMA Pediatrics, ADHD diagnoses are increasing among youth. What is ADHD? Attention-deficit/hyperactivity-disorder is the most common child disorder, which affects about 4.6 million American (eight percent) school aged children. ADHD is ‘a persistent pattern of inattention and/or hyperactivity-impulsivity.” These symptoms should have begun before age seven, must be present for at least six months and cause problems in everyday functioning in at least two settings (e.g., school vs. home). A recent study by Getahun and colleagues found a 70 percent increase in the number of ADHD diagnoses among African-American children, with a 90 percent increase among African-American girls. This is compared to smaller increases in other groups — 60 percent among Hispanic youth and 30 percent among white youth. Dr. Richard Gallagher of the Institute for Attention Deficit Hyperactivity and Behavior Disorders at NYU Child Study Center cautions to not be alarmed that there has been a huge jump in the use of the diagnosis of ADHD. In fact, several studies show youth of color have previously been under-diagnosed for ADHD. How does ADHD affect children? Children with untreated ADHD are more likely to have problems in school because they are easily distracted and have difficulty learning. Untreated ADHD also impacts social relationships because children with ADHD often don’t get along well with others. An additional consequence of untreated ADHD is an increase in physical in-

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juries due to hyperactivity and disruptive outbursts. The Getahun study was conducted using medical records from almost 850,000 children ages 5 to 11 years. It was the first of its kind to sample such a large number of children using very strict criteria. But the study wasn’t able to examine why the increase in ADHD diagnoses are occurring. There are several possible explanations for the increase. Gallagher finds that “African-American parents are obtaining more knowledge of the symptoms of ADHD and are encountering practitioners that are being more careful in discussing the symptoms and the treatments with them.” This encourages more parents to get ADHD evaluations for their children. Gallagher also mentions that the tools used to test for ADHD have become better at identifying different types of ADHD, which might explain the increase. However, some experts, like Dr. Elissa Brown, Executive Director of the Child HELP Partnership, have noticed that many children who have experienced trauma — violence, physical abuse and the like — are initially misdiagnosed as having ADHD. In these cases, PTSD symptoms can be misperceived as ADHD symptoms, Brown says. Unfortunately there is much debate but very little is known about the reasons for the increase in ADHD diagnoses. What is known is that increases in ADHD diagnoses among African-American youth without treatment could have consequences for those communities. Consequences of untreated ADHD among African American children Youth with untreated ADHD are more likely to drop out of school, abuse drugs and become engaged in delinquent activity, which may lead to incarceration. African-American youth are already at higher risk for these problems, thus those with ADHD are at an increased risk for the negative consequences of those behaviors. ADHD is usually more prevalent among boys compared to girls, 11 percent compared to 5 percent. However, the Getahun study shows that this gender gap is closing for African-American children. Researchers that have looked at gender differences found that (Continued on page 34)

NASSAU COUNTY EDITION

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THE NEW COMMUNITY JOURNAL

FRIDAY FEBRUARY 22, 2013

Leukemia patient aims to score 1,000 new bone marrow donors Bay Area journalist Kevin Weston, 44, says he has no recollection of marrying the love of his life, Lateefah Simon. That was because his wedding ceremony took place inside the intensive care unit at the Kaiser Santa Clara hospital in California, where Weston laid helplessly in his hospital bed attached to tubes and monitors. Weston was diagnosed with a rare form of blood leukemia just a month before their lastminute nuptials. “At the time, I was in very bad shape and the doctors didn’t think I was going to make it. My wife made the decision to get [married] before something really bad happens,” Weston told theGrio in a phone interview. “I have no idea what [my wedding] was like. I was on all these drugs, but I was awake enough to say “I do.” But I don’t even remember that. I don’t remember anything about that day.” Four months later, Weston and Simon, who also have a two-year-old daughter, Lelah, had the chance to say ‘I do’ again in a renewal ceremony at San Francisco City Hall two weeks ago. Weston and his wife Lateefah also decided to make their renewal ceremony part of another national mission — to garner 1,000 more AfricanAmerican donors in the bone marrow registry. “It seemed to be the right thing to do, to build awareness around this issue,” says Weston. “We thought it was a good opportunity to do something public and also personally to celebrate with our community and acknowledge their contribution.” Weston and Simon’s renewal ceremony was officiated by State Attorney General Kamala Harris. Weston, who is a John S. Knight journalism fellow at Stanford University, hoped this event will bring awareness of this issue to local and state officials. “We really took our cues from Robin Roberts who did so much to get people registered. She used her position to create awareness, and we felt we can do something similar in the Bay Area to help save people’s lives,” Weston says. Robin Roberts, a co-host on ABC’s Good Morning America, was diagnosed last year with a similar condition called MDS, or myelodysplastic syndrome, and successfully received a bone-marrow transplant from her sister. Roberts’ has rallied both on- and off-screen to encourage more people, especially minorities, to register in the bone marrow registry. She plans on returning to her post on GMA today. Both Weston and Roberts are just two of the many minority patients who are in dire need of bone marrow transplants. According to Be The Match Registry spokesperson Nadya Dutchin, African-American donors only consist of seven percent of the nation’s 10 million registered bone marrow donors, with black patients only having an estimated 66 percent likelihood of finding a willing and able donor in the registry. Dutchin, who happens to be black, understands why the African-American community has a general mistrust of the medical community; however, she contends that people need to weigh their fears of donating to saving another person’s life. “One single African-American person can alleviate the pain and suffering for another, just by really and truly educating themselves, being brave and stepping forward and coming through with the donation,” Dutchin says. “Robin was so grateful and so generous and shared her story with the public and we saw our online registrations triple within days. She brought that awareness and we [still] need for more people to join the registry.” “It seems like this big daunting thing, but really it’s a very simple process,” says Weston. “It’s not painful and [you] usually just go there one day and they take care of you.” And it’s true, Dutchin says, the process is relatively simple and painless. More than 70 percent of the time, donors are given an injection that will release bone marrow into the bloodstream. For one day, the donor will get blood drawn out from one arm; a machine will extract the marrow from the bloodstream and then the blood will be returned into the donor’s other arm. “We’re not actually taking something from you. We’re making your body make something extra, leaving you with what you started with,” Dutchin explains. Weston’s mission to gain more African-American bone marrow donors is something he says he can accomplish for others waiting for a match. “Basically this drive is to give back,” he says. “There’s small chance that someone that will match me at this point. Statistically it’s probably not likely. [But if] you get a thousand more people – that’s a thousand more people that have been educated and hopefully they’ll be people who will take the NASSAU COUNTY EDITION

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next step [and donate]. It’s a snowball effect.” Weston actually did find a match in the registry, but the donor was unable to go through with the donation. The 44year old Oakland native is now turning to his halfbrother for a haplo transplant which he says works almost as well as a full match non-relative donor. “It’s a waiting game for me. My prognosis isn’t dire, but it is urgent. We’re trying to get [the haplo transplant] done as soon as possible,” he says. Weston currently has registered over 800 African-Americans in the registry so far and are holding more drives in the following months. A Be the Match spokesperson told theGrio that hundreds of people have registered to be donors at Weston’s renewal ceremony, but they have not determined how many of them are African-American.

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girls with untreated ADHD are often more likely than boys to have low self-esteem, forget things easily, be disorganized and become involved with promiscuity or acting out sexually. Many youth with untreated ADHD continue to have symptoms as adults where they are less likely to manage jobs and household responsibilities, have challenges parenting and experience high levels of stress that may place them at risk for physical health problems. These concerns taken together highlight the severe consequences of not properly identifying and treating ADHD for individuals and within the African-American community at large. What needs to be done about ADHD among African-American children? Experts are not certain of the cause of ADHD in general. So what can be done? Screening children for ADHD is an important step in addressing the problem. Dr. Deidre Anglin, licensed clinical psychologist recommends: “get a comprehensive psychological evaluation if ADHD is suspected to rule out other competing explanations for your child’s behavior such as anxiety, or other learning disorders.” If the child is diagnosed, there are very effective treatments to help parents and children deal with the challenges they experience from ADHD. These treatments include: teaching behavior strategies to help deal with symptoms of ADHD, providing approaches for parents and children to structure the home and school environment, as well as prescribing medication. It’s important for parents, school personnel and community leaders not to dismiss a child’s behavior as simply “troublesome” or “something they will grow out of.” Here are some steps for getting help if you are concerned a child has ADHD: Begin taking notes about the behaviors of concern. Identify when you noticed the behaviors starting and how long they have been occurring. Talk to a trusted health provider about your concerns about the child’s behavior. Utilize the web for available resources, like the Children and Adults with Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder organization, to learn more about the symptoms and treatment options for ADHD. Dealing with a child who has ADHD can be stressful. It’s important to get support from others, including other families with children who have ADHD. Dr. Scyatta A. Wallace is an award winning Psychologist/Teen Expert, Associate Professor of Psychology and Founder of Janisaw Company. Dr. Wallace’s work focuses on health issues impacting youth and families. PAGE 34


THE NEW COMMUNITY JOURNAL

FRIDAY FEBRUARY 22, 2013

Over $1 Billion in SBA Disaster Loans Approved in NY; Just Over One Week Left to Apply ATLANTA – The U. S. Small Business Administration has approved over $1 billion in low interest Disaster Assistance Loans for residents and businesses in New York affected by Hurricane Sandy and is continuing to do more. The deadline to apply for physical damage disaster assistance is Feb. 27. “Currently 15,216 disaster loans have been approved in the amount of $1,030,456, 300 for affected survivors,” said Frank Skaggs, director of SBA’s Field Operations Center East in Atlanta. “We are pleased to reach this significant milestone in New York. However, there are many who have yet to apply. For some people, the combination of grant assistance and insurance proceeds will not be enough to rebuild and recover. We strongly encourage those affected by Sandy to return their completed disaster loan application before the deadline so the SBA can provide as much help as possible,” added Skaggs. NASSAU COUNTY EDITION

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The sooner one returns a completed loan application, the sooner he or she can potentially receive financial assistance from the SBA. Those who are approved for a disaster loan can choose whether or not to use the loan. Homeowners and renters not approved for a disaster loan may be referred back to FEMA for additional grant consideration. Furthermore, if a survivor does not know how much of their loss will be covered by insurance or other sources, SBA will consider making a loan for the total loss up to its loan limits, provided the borrower agrees to use insurance proceeds to reduce or repay their SBA loan. Applicants may apply online using the Electronic Loan Application (ELA) via SBA’s secure website at https:// disasterloan.sba.gov/ela or visit one of the local recovery centers for one-on-one assistance. For more information, contact the SBA Customer Service Center at 800-659-2955 (800-877-8339 for the deaf and hard-of-hearing) or by visiting www.sba.gov. The filing deadline to return applications for physical property damage is February 27, 2013. The deadline to return economic injury applications is July 31, 2013. PAGE 35


THE NEW COMMUNITY JOURNAL

NASSAU COUNTY EDITION

FRIDAY FEBRUARY 22, 2013

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THE NEW COMMUNITY JOURNAL

FRIDAY FEBRUARY 22, 2013

Question: "What is the meaning of Lent?" Answer: Lent is a period of fasting, moderation, and selfdenial traditionally observed by Catholics and some Protestant denominations. It begins with Ash Wednesday and ends with Easter Sunday. The length of the Lenten fast was established in the 4th century as 46 days (40 days, not counting Sundays). During Lent, participants eat sparingly or give up a particular food or habit. It’s not uncommon for people to give up smoking during Lent, or to swear off watching television or eating candy or telling lies. It’s six weeks of self-discipline. Lent began as a way for Catholics to remind themselves of the value of repentance. The austerity of the Lenten season was seen as similar to how people in the Old Testament fasted and repented in sackcloth and ashes (Esther 4:1-3; Jeremiah 6:26; Daniel 9:3). However, over the centuries Lenten observances have developed a much more "sacramental" value. Many Catholics believe that giving something up for Lent is a way to attain God’s blessing. But the Bible teaches that grace cannot be earned; grace is “the gift of righteousness” (Romans 5:17). Also, Jesus taught that fasting should be done discreetly: “When you fast, do not look somber as the hypocrites do, for they disfigure their faces to show men they are fasting. I tell you the truth, they have received their reward in full. But when you fast, put oil on your head and wash your face, so that it will not be obvious to men that you are fasting, but only to your Father, who is unseen” (Matthew 6:16-18). Jesus’ command to “wash your face” seems to conflict with the practice of rubbing ashes on one’s face on Ash Wednesday. Fasting can be a good thing, and God is pleased when we repent of sinful habits. There’s absolutely nothing wrong with setting aside some time to focus on Jesus' death and resurrection. However, repenting of sin is something we should be doing every day of the year, not just for the 46 days of Lent. If a Christian wishes to observe Lent, he is free to do so. The key is to focus on repenting of sin and consecrating oneself to God. Lent should not be a time of boasting of one’s sacrifice or trying to earn God's favor or increasing His love. God’s love for us could not be any greater than it already is. Question: "What is the power of the Holy Spirit?" Answer: The power of the Holy Spirit is the power of God. The Spirit, the third Person of the Trinity, has appeared throughout Scripture as a Being through and by whom great works of power are made manifest. His power was first seen in the act of creation, for it was by His power the world came into being (Genesis 1:1–2; Job 26:13). The Holy Spirit also empowered men in the Old Testament to bring about God’s will: “So Samuel took the horn of oil and anointed him in the presence of his brothers, and from that day on the Spirit of the Lord came upon David in power” (1 Samuel 16:13; see also Exodus 31:2–5; Numbers 27:18). Although the NASSAU COUNTY EDITION

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Spirit did not permanently indwell God’s people in the Old Testament, He worked through them and gave them power to achieve things they would not have been able to accomplish on their own. All of Samson’s feats of strength are directly attributed to the Spirit coming upon him (Judges 14:6, 19; 15:14). After His resurrection and before His ascension to heaven, Jesus promised the Spirit as a permanent guide, teacher, seal of salvation, and comforter for believers (John 14:16-18). He also promised that the Holy Spirit’s power would help them to spread the message of the gospel around the world: “But you will receive power when the Holy Spirit comes on you; and you will be my witnesses in Jerusalem, and in all Judea and Samaria, and to the ends of the earth” (Acts 1:8). The salvation of souls is a supernatural work only made possible by the Holy Spirit’s power at work in the world. When the Holy Spirit descended upon believers at Pentecost, it was not a quiet event, but a powerful one. “When the day of Pentecost came, they were all together in one place. Suddenly a sound like the blowing of a violent wind came from heaven and filled the whole house where they were sitting. They saw what seemed to be tongues of fire that separated and came to rest on each of them. All of them were filled with the Holy Spirit and began to speak in other tongues as the Spirit enabled them” (Acts 2:1–4). Immediately afterward, the disciples spoke to the crowds gathered in Jerusalem for the Feast of Pentecost. These people hailed from a variety of nations, and therefore spoke many different languages. Imagine their surprise and wonder when the disciples spoke to them in their own tongues (verses 5–12)! Clearly, this was not something the disciples could have accomplished on their own without many months—or even years—of study. The Holy Spirit’s power was made manifest to a great number of people that day, resulting in the conversion of about 3,000 (verse 41). During His earthly ministry, Jesus was filled with the Holy Spirit (Luke 1:15), led by the Spirit (Luke 4:1, 14), and empowered by the Spirit to perform miracles (Matthew 12:28). After Jesus had ascended to heaven, the Spirit also equipped the apostles to perform miracles (2 Corinthians 2:12; Acts 2:43; 3:1–7; 9:39– 41). The power of the Holy Spirit was manifest among all the believers of the early church through the dispensation of spiritual gifts such as speaking in tongues, prophesying, teaching, wisdom, and more. All those who put their faith in Jesus Christ are immediately and permanently indwelt by the Holy Spirit (Romans 8:11). And, although some of the spiritual gifts have ceased (e.g., speaking in tongues and prophecy), the Holy Spirit still works in and through believers to accomplish His will. His power leads us, convicts us, teaches us, and equips us to do His work and spread the gospel. The Holy Spirit’s powerful indwelling is an amazing gift we should never take lightly.

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THE NEW COMMUNITY JOURNAL

FRIDAY FEBRUARY 22, 2013

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HONORING OUR HISTORY AND CELEBRATING OUR YOUTH During Black History Month (and every month, actually), we celebrate the fine accomplishments of many of our legendary heroes. We invoke names such as Langston Hughes, Jackie Robinson, President Barack Obama, Harriet Tubman, Frederick Douglas, Sydney Poitier, Oprah Winfrey, Martin Luther King, Jr. and many, many others. However, we also want to be mindful of celebrating when our young, future heroes step up to make us proud. Such was the case with two ABGS Middle School students – eighth grader Travis Nelson and 7th grader Andrew Culbreath. Travis and Andrew participate in the Adelphi STEP program on Saturdays. This is Travis’s second year in the program. Last Saturday, February 16th these talented youngsters competed in the STEP program’s “I Have A Dream” oratorical contest. The judges were so wowed by both Travis and Andrew’s performances that they decided to pick co-winners. These boys represented ABGS MS, and by extension, the Hempstead School Difference with much pride. It’s no coincidence that both boys are also academic heavy weights and have wonderful support at home, a requisite for success in school. They made us all proud and reminded us of how far Martin Luther King, Jr.’s dream has propelled us. These students are on a positive pathway and they deserve recognition, but it’s likely this accolade is only one of many to come for these young men….local boys basketball playoffs have gotten underway. Hempstead did not make the playoffs this year and finished with a 7-10 overall and 5-7 conference record. In the last game of the year v. Syosset, the Tigers lead player Tidell Pierre scored 49 points to make a statement as his high school year came to an end. Top seeded Baldwin defeated Freeport and will take on Hicksville in the semifinals Tuesday, February 26 at 7:30 at SUNY Old Westbury. That game will be preceded by the other semifinal between Uniondale and Farmingdale. Uniondale defeated Elmont in a close game to reach the semis. –B.J. Robinson (photo: Travis Nelson, left, and Andre Culbreath)

NASSAU COUNTY EDITION

Teen making history as 4th black driver in NASCAR DAYTONA BEACH, Fla. (AP) — With his Canon 60D in hand, Darrell Wallace Jr. is a fixture at the track, eagerly snapping photos with an insider’s view of auto racing. His Instagram account is littered with day-in-the-life snapshots of cars and crews, all carrying the tag, “My crazy life captured in pictures.” Wallace, though, isn’t a typical 19-year-old NASCAR prospect trying to climb the ladder, and he’s less interested in a budding photography career. He is a pioneer of sorts as only the fourth black driver with a full-time ride in a NASCAR series. When Wallace takes the wheel for the Truck Series race Friday at Daytona International Speedway, he’ll become a slice of NASCAR history in a race that ignites his goal of serving as a role model for a generation of potential future black drivers. “It’s kind of up to me,” Wallace said. “It’s kind of a huge weight.” Busting down racial barriers in a sport long reserved for whites is pretty heavy stuff for a teenager and all eyes are on him. Yet Wallace, the son of a white father and black mother, openly talks of becoming the Tiger Woods of NASCAR — the great black star who can transcend the sport and prove people of all colors can race. “You don’t have a role model. That’s why you don’t see anybody in it,” Wallace said. “They can’t look up and be like, ‘I want to be like him because he’s the same color as me.’ There’s no one there to do that. I’m the top one right now and I’m only 19.” Wallace joins Wendell Scott, Willy T. Ribbs and Bill Lester as the only full-time black drivers in the 65-year history of NASCAR. Scott is the only black driver to win a race, way back in 1964. Wallace is signed with Joe Gibbs Racing and will drive the No. 54 Toyota for Kyle Busch Motorsports on Friday. Gibbs knows as well as anyone what it’s like to work with black athletes under the microscope. He coached the Washington Redskins when Doug Williams became the first black quarterback to win a Super Bowl in 1988. Gibbs said Wallace has the talent and the mental toughness to break through in NASCAR. “I think he’s the right kid,” Gibbs said. Wallace, raised in Concord, N.C., has the full support of the black drivers before him. Lester has sent him encouraging tweets. Wallace met some of Scott’s children at a race in Virginia. “They’re just happy to see someone following in their dad’s footsteps,” he said. “I’m hoping that I can carry that torch a little farther.” He’s in a better position to succeed than many other minorities over the years. He has sponsorship, a top-flight team in JGR and is a graduate of NASCAR’s diversity program. Even in NASCAR, the climate has changed where drivers of all sexes and colors are openly accepted, in the garage, and hopefully in the stands. Wallace, who goes by Bubba, spent the last three seasons driving in a low-level NASCAR developmental series and said racism in all forms was nonexistent. At lower levels of racing, though, Wallace would hear racial insults or encounter ignorant views. “We used to take it from fans,” his father, Darrell, said. “We’ve had it from other drivers. We’ve had it from officials. We’ve had it PAGE 38


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from promoters. We’ve had it from track owners. We’ve pretty much had it from everybody.” Wallace said the heckles and hurtful words from his formative years in the sport have been left on the side of the road and he can continue to focus on racing — just this time on his biggest stage so far. “I’d show up the next week and wear ‘em out again,” he said, smiling. “I really didn’t understand it. My dad got more fired up than anything.” His father sparked a love of the sport when he was 9, putting him in go-karts, and always scouting out the next series. Darrell Wallace even bought a Legends car from Mark Martin. He attends every race and will be in the stands Friday night. His mother, Desiree, ran track at Tennessee and stays home to watch on TV (“She likes hearing what they say about me.”). Mom did offer a piece of advice that has stuck with Wallace. Avoid confrontations with other drivers who used slurs. Just go win. Wallace’s love and talent for the sport will mean nothing if he can’t find the right sponsor willing to fund his career. Sponsorship cash is the lifeblood of the sport. His father has owned an industrial cleaning business since 1999 and pumped at least $1 million into his son’s fledgling career. He spent as much $250,000 in 2008. The elder Wallace paid bills late and borrowed money to keep his son’s career alive. “He tried to do everything he could to keep me racing,” Wallace said. It’s a path he expects to land him in the Sprint Cup series. “I’m not ready for it next year. I’m not ready for it in two years,” he said. “It’s all about the timing. It’s all about how well I do this year.” NASCAR has initiated several pushes toward boosting the number of minorities in the sport. There’s a Drive for Diversity program that may pay some dividends with Wallace and Kyle Larson after struggling to find racers for the top series. The program is 10 years old and was designed to attract minorities and women to the sport in all fields, from the track to the front office. Wallace participated in a short-lived reality show in 2010 called “Changing Lanes,” that featured 10 young female and minority racers competing for a spot on a developmental team. Not even showbiz helped Wallace land the big-bucks sponsor needed to race in the second-tier series. Wallace ideally would have run in the Nationwide Series this season, but was unable to land enough sponsorship. He had three top-10 finishes and a pole in four Nationwide races in 2012. Gibbs said Wallace is still slated for some Nationwide races. “We’ve had a lot of other African-American drivers get in the sport, but they got in late,” Gibbs said. “It’s hard to get in late. You’ve got to start when you’re young and race your way up. I thinkDarrell’s got it.” Wallace was busy balancing Daytona duties with media requests this week and was set to hold a press conference with Gibbs on Wednesday at the track. “Darrell’s equipped to handle the attention,” said Marcus Jadotte, NASCAR’s vice president for public affairs and multicultural development. “Most importantly, he’s equipped to handle the competition on the race track.” He can win. But can he lead? The next generation of black golfers never followed Woods for much of the same reasons it’s hard to crack NASCAR. The sport is expensive and opportunities are few. And, it’s unfair to place the burden of a revolution on one athlete. But it’s time for a change. “It’s not about the color of your skin or your gender, it’s about your abilities,” four-time Cup champ Jeff Gordon said after Danica Patrick won the Daytona 500 pole. For now, at least he has the name for a NASCAR star. Darrell, Wallace, Junior. That’s a tripleheader of iconic NASCAR names that have deep roots in the sport. His team came up with a slogan: “Darrellnot Waltrip. Wallace not Rusty. Junior not Dale.” Funny stuff for an easygoing teen who just wants to race while the hype of his achievement swirls around him. “If you think about it much, you’ll end up messing up,” he said. He thought about it for a second, then added: “I won’t mess up.” NASSAU COUNTY EDITION

Tiger Woods joins vacationing Obama for golf round PORT ST. LUCIE, Florida (AP) — Tiger Woods joined President Barack Obama’s golfing group on Sunday at the Floridian, a secluded yacht and golf club on Florida’s Treasure Coast. The White House says the group also included Jim Crane, the Houston businessman who owns the resort and Major League Baseball’s Houston Astros, and the outgoing U.S. Trade Representative Ron Kirk. Obama is spending the long President’s Day holiday weekend at the Floridian and is expected to return to Washington on Monday. First lady Michelle Obama and daughters Malia and Sasha are on an annual ski vacation out West. On Saturday, Obama got some instruction and played a few holes with Butch Harmon, Woods’ former swing coach.

Floyd Mayweather Jr. to fight Guerrero on Showtime Floyd Mayweather Jr. will fight Robert Guerrero on May 4, and he’s changing television networks to do it. The biggest star in boxing dropped a surprise Tuesday while announcing his long-rumored next bout: After several years on HBO, Mayweather is moving to Showtime with a lucrative multi-fight deal. Mayweather’s move is a coup for Showtime, the CBS-owned network that has always trailed behind HBO in boxing prominence. Mayweather (43-0, 26 KOs) is the sport’s biggest moneymaker, and his new revenue-sharing deal with Showtime could include up to six fights over 30 months. Mayweather’s first bout is against Guerrero (31-1-1, 18 KOs), the WBC’s interim welterweight champion. The fight likely will be at the MGM Grand Garden in Las Vegas.

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THE NEW COMMUNITY JOURNAL

NASSAU COUNTY EDITION

FRIDAY FEBRUARY 22, 2013

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THE NEW COMMUNITY JOURNAL

NASSAU COUNTY EDITION

FRIDAY FEBRUARY 22, 2013

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Volume 1 Number 44

Arts, Culture and Entertainment Magazine


VILLAGE LIFE MAGAZINE

ONLINE EDITION

FRIDAY FEBRUARY 22, 2013

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VILLAGE LIFE MAGAZINE

FRIDAY FEBRUARY 22, 2013

‘Free Angela’ revels in Angela Davis’ political rise and liberation Many words describe Angela Davis – radical, intellectual, Communist, feminist, rebel, scholar, revolutionary– but the story of her life can be defined by one: justice. As a civil rights activist and prison abolitionist, Davis has spent decades fighting for a fair society, and in the process, circumventing the systematic prejudices she so fervently denounces. In the new documentary Free Angela and All Political Prisoners, filmmaker Shola Lynch explores the moment 41 years ago that Davis became an international political icon, a woman both exalted and vilified as she fought for the right to assert her beliefs, her speech and consequently her liberty. “In the landscape of that period, when you think about political figures, when you think about mass media figures, there are very few examples, if any, of strong women,” Lynch tells theGrio. “Let alone strong black women.” The movie centers on Davis’ implication in a courthouse murder, kidnapping, and conspiracy effort on August 7, 1970 in Marin County, California, the trial that ensued thereafter and Davis’ eventual acquittal. Though only 26 years old at the time, it was the culmination of a riotous period in Davis’ life, where she had already been labeled a terrorist by the government, and fired from her job as a professor at UCLA. “Angela Davis is associated with [the Black Panthers] and she stands up for her rights and her beliefs,” Lynch explains. “It starts with UCLA and standing up for her job. It went against the school policy and the law, I’m pretty sure, for the school to try and fire her for being a Communist…That’s what democracy is all about, that we have freedom of speech, and academic freedom, within the context of the university, to discuss ideas that may or may not be popular. So, the idea that she was standing up for her rights unequivocally is very attractive.” ONLINE EDITION

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After receiving death threats for her socialist ties, Davis was linked to George Jackson, a Panther and member of the Soledad Brothers trio, when a gun she’d purchased for defense was used during his courthouse ambush. Several people were killed, and Davis was indicted for her connection to the crime. She went into hiding following the incident, becoming the third woman ever to appear on the FBI’s Ten Most Wanted List, and was eventually captured and detained without bail as she went on trial. Lynch spent eight years researching Davis’ story and bringing the film project to fruition. It serves as a recounting of a significant moment in Davis’ life that would influence her future work, and inspire a faction of constituents backing her cause. “When I started [making the film], it was post 9-11, and there was all this talk about what was a terrorist, and who was a terrorist,” the filmmakers recalls. “What attracted me about this story was that this was a way of discussing it without having the raw emotion of discussing 9-11…It also resonates in the present with prisoners’ rights…In the 70’s, [Davis] was starting to articulate a prisoners’ rights kind of activism that was very new at the time. Talking about prisoners – young men, primarily black and Latino – that had been caught up in petty crimes and now been in prison for extended periods of time.” “She wanted to call them political prisoners,” Lynch continues. “There were a lot of people on the political side of protesting, and revolution and anti-war that had real discomfort with that because it’s like, ‘Well these people are criminals.’ And so the whole George Jackson story really relates to the situation with prisoners’ rights today, and the increasing prisoner industrial complex.” As the film shows, Davis became aware of what she felt were discriminatory and inhumane practices infiltrating the criminal justice system during her own detainment. These experiences would provide a framework for her later theories on abolition democracy, camouflaged racism, penal servitude and the extension of slavery through incarceration. Furthermore, it was this period in Davis’ life that would inspire her (Continued on page 4)

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VILLAGE LIFE MAGAZINE

FRIDAY FEBRUARY 22, 2013

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organization, Critical Resistance, a crusade to replace prisons with social institutions that remedy conditions dooming many men and women to a life behind bars. “Her relationship with George Jackson and the Soledad brothers is what started it, and then her own incarceration – those two experiences are pivotal to the direction that her life takes after that,” Lynch observes. “She’s about justice issues, and for her they’re all intertwined. You can’t talk about one justice issue without another… Free Angela is a way to narrow that, and to give Angela a fair trial. That really was the point of the movement.” The film pulls together images, letters and video clips from Davis’ supporters around the world at the time of her trial, all of whom rallied together for her liberation. Those advocates included Nina Simone, who visited Davis in prison; Aretha Franklin, who offered to pay her bond; John Lennon and Yoko Ono, who wrote a song in her honor; and the countless men, women and children of all ages and races who organized a movement demanding her release. Lynch additionally interviews Davis and her family, her lawyers and old friends, as well as those countering her struggle to fill in details of the historical outline. Not surprisingly, Davis’ involvement took convincing. “Her attitude was skeptical,” Lynch remembers. “She doesn’t seem like the kind of person that revisits the past. She’s not living in the past, believe it or not. People have ideas of her from the past, but she lives in the present. She’s a retired professor now; she’s an activist speaking all over the world about, ironically, the same kinds of issues that ‘got her in trouble’ in the 70’s. So, it just took a moment to get her attention.” Lynch also points to the fact that, from Davis’ point of view, the story was limited. Thus, the documentary was a way for the activist to revisit her narrative from several vantages. Lynch adds, “There was all this stuff going on around her, whether it’s the government, whether it’s her old lawyers, whether it’s the protests and the Free Angela movement – she never experienced it. She was the beneficiary.” Free Angela and All Political Prisoners premiered at the Toronto International Film Festival in 2012 to critical praise, and opens at select theaters in the U.S. on April 5. It was executiveproduced by Overbrook Entertainment partners Will Smith, James Lassiter, Jada Pinkett Smith, and Roc Nation, and is being distributed by Codeblack Films and Lionsgate. In addition to its focus on Davis’ exoneration, the production also touches on issues of American civil liberties, gun violence, and the dynamism of a cause célèbre. Though decades past, many of the concerns addressed in the movie still resonate in today’s sociopolitical climate, particularly relating to the national debate on gun control. “What I couldn’t have anticipated is the amount of gun violence that’s happened in the last few years with lone gun people walking into certain situations, either for political reasons or personal reasons, and initiating a similar kind of gun battle or massacre that happened on August 7,” Lynch admits. “I don’t think there’s any correlation in the sense that this was such a political period…People were motivated by the idea that the revolution was right around the corner, and so it’s not so individualistic. It’s not about crazy, deranged people, but there is a question of guns and how to control them, and how law enforcement responds.” Nevertheless, the movie, as Lynch notes, is not about the Second Amendment, but primarily the First, and Davis’ momentous, ongoing journey in defending it. “She doesn’t hesitate,” Lynch remarks. “Just seeing her set that example, seeing her make those choices – to stand up – they are really powerful.” Follow Courtney Garcia on Twitter at @CourtGarcia. ONLINE EDITION

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VILLAGE LIFE MAGAZINE

FRIDAY FEBRUARY 22, 2013

Lou Myers, Mr. Gaines on ‘A Different World,’ dies CHARLESTON, W.Va. (AP) — Actor Lou Myers, best known for his role as ornery restaurant owner Mr. Gaines on the television series “A Different World,” has died. Tonia McDonald of Myers’ nonprofit, Global Business Incubation Inc., said Myers died Tuesday night at Charleston Area Medical Center in West Virginia. She said he was 76. McDonald said Wednesday that Myers had been in and out of the hospital since before Christmas and collapsed recently. An autopsy was planned.

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He began singing jazz and blues with the touring company of “Negro Music in Vogue,” according to a biography provided by McDonald. His Cabaret show has been acclaimed in Berlin, Paris, Hong Kong, Tokyo, and New York, as well as Los Angeles at the Roosevelt Hotel. Myers was chairman of Global Business Incubation that helps urban small businesses and chairman of the Lou Myers Scenario Motion Picture Institute/Theatre. He won a NAACP “Best Actor” award for playing the Stool Pigeon in “King Hedley II,” a play by August Wilson.

A native of Chesapeake, W.Va., Myers had returned to the state and lived in the Charleston area. His TV credits included “NYPD Blue,” ”E.R.,” ”The Cosby Show,” ”Touched by an Angel,” and more. He also appeared in a number of films, including “Tin Cup,” ”How Stella Got Her Groove Back,” ”Wedding Planner” and more. “A Different World” ran from 1987-93 and originally starred Lisa Bonet from “Cosby” fame. Myerssaid he owed his introduction to Hollywood to Bill Cosby. Myers also appeared on Broadway including “Cat on a Hot Tin Roof” African American Style and “Oprah Winfrey’s The Color Purple.” In 2005, the Appalachian Education Initiative listed Myers as one of 50 “Outstanding Creative Artists” from the state of West Virginia and featured him in their coffee table book Art & Soul. ONLINE EDITION

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VILLAGE LIFE MAGAZINE

FRIDAY FEBRUARY 22, 2013

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Village Life Is a publication of Emerging Business Group, Inc. ©2012 New York all rights reserved Village Life Magazine is a weekly publication, based in Baldwin, New York, dedicated to sharing business, cultural, entertainment and religious information among minority residents which will enable positive action - economically, socially and politically - for the betterment of all. Village Life is a footprint of the Community Journal newspaper which premiered on July 1, 1993, since then we have grown to be the leading African heritage news and information sources on Long Island. As a community - based publication, we intend to expand our presence and to encourage greater participation from all members of the community in forging our shared destiny. We are a "for-profit" business and hope to extend that spirit of economic empowerment to many other businesses in our community. We are published each week unless otherwise indicated and are distributed through newsstands, independent sales agents, and subscriptions.

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT, MOVIES, MUSIC, LITERATURE, MUSEUM, RADIO, CABLE TELEVISION, RELIGION, CULTURE, HOME AND GARDEN, DINING

Publisher: Www.communityjournal.info

Larry Montgomery Mailing Address: 456 New York Avenue Baldwin, New York 11510

MAIN ADVERTISING SALES NUMBER:

(516) 384-0961

CHRIS TUCKER Friday, March 29th at 8:00PM

ADVERTISING AND SALES COMPANY: Make all checks out to: EMERGING BUSINESS GROUP, INC. E-mail: montgomerybusiness@hotmail.com

NEWS NUMBER: (516) 384-0961

NEW DATE THE TEMPTATIONS & THE FOUR TOPS AT THE NYCB THEATRE AT WESTBURY – FRIDAY, MARCH 15

Privacy Policy We do not accept anonymous comments. If you do not want your comments or your name or address published tell us. Thank you from the Mgmt. ONLINE EDITION

www.communityjournal.info PAGE 6


VILLAGE LIFE MAGAZINE

FRIDAY FEBRUARY 22, 2013

THE TEMPTATIONS & THE FOUR TOPS AT THE NYCB THEATRE AT WESTBURY –

FRIDAY, MARCH 15 Westbury, NY – Live Nation is pleased to present The Temptations and The Four Tops at the NYCB Theatre at Westbury on Saturday, February 9 at 7 p.m. Tickets are $69.50 and $49.50 plus applicable service charges and are available online at www.ticketmaster.com, charge by phone at 800-745-3000 or at the Westbury box office. Event, date and time are subject to change. For more information visit www.thetheatreatwestbury.com. For nearly fifty years, The Temptations have prospered, propelling popular music with a series of smash hits, and sold-out performances throughout the world. The history of The Temptations is the history of contemporary American pop. An essential component of the original Motown machine, that amazing engine invented by Berry Gordy, The Temps began their musical life in Detroit in the early sixties. It wasn’t until 1964 however, that the Smokey Robinson writtenand-produced “The Way You Do the things You Do” turned the guys into stars. An avalanche of hits followed, many of which...”My Girl,” for instance...attained immortality. With “Get Ready,” “Ain’t Too Proud to Beg,” “Beauty Is Only Skin Deep,” and “I Wish It Would Rain”...the hits kept coming. When the sixties and seventies turned political, The Temps got serious. They changed their tone, dress and music. The Temptations sound burned with intensity on songs like “Cloud Nine,” “I Can’t Get Next to You,” “Papa Was a Rolling Stone”, and “Psychedelic Shack.” Today, the current lineup consists of founder Otis Williams along with Ron Tyson, Terry Weeks, Joe Herndon, and Bruce Williamson. There current CD is the aptly titled "Still Here." The Four Tops are four powerful voices led by original member and founder Abdul “Duke” Fakir. Their first hit was “Baby I Need Your Loving” in 1964. Their songs, soulful and bittersweet, were across-the-board successes. “I Can’t Help Myself (Sugar Pie, Honey Bunch),” a no. 1 R&B and Pop smash in 1965, is one of Motown’s longest-running chart toppers; it was quickly followed by a longtime favorite, “It’s The Same Old Song” (no. 2 R&B/no. 5 pop). Their commercial peak was highlighted by a romantic trilogy: the no. 1 “Reach Out I’ll Be There,” “Standing In The Shadows Of Love” (no. 2 R&B/no. 6 pop) and “Bernadette” (no. 3 R&B/no. 4 pop)—an extraordinary run of instant classics. Their hit making streak continued well into the eighties making them one of the few groups to have hits in three consecutive decades. In 1990, with 24 Top 40 pop hits to their credit, the Four Tops were inducted into the Rock & Roll Hall Of Fame. Though they would no longer have hits on record, the group continued to be a hit in concert, touring incessantly, a towering testament to the enduring legacy of the Motown Sound they helped shape and define.

ONLINE EDITION

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THE FOUR TOPS FRIDAY, MARCH 15th at 7:00pm Four Tops are an American vocal quartet, whose repertoire has included doo-wop, jazz, soul music, R&B, disco, adult contemporary, hard rock, and showtunes. Founded in Detroit, Michigan as The Four Aims, lead singer Levi Stubbs (born Levi Stubbles, a cousin of Jackie Wilson and brother of The Falcons' Joe Stubbs), and groupmates Abdul "Duke" Fakir, Renaldo "Obie" Benson and Lawrence Payton remained together for over four decades, having gone from 1953 until 1997 without a single change in personnel. Among a number of groups who helped define the Motown Sound of the 1960s, including The Miracles, The Marvelettes, Martha and the Vandellas, The Temptations, and The Supremes, the Four Tops were notable for having Stubbs, a baritone, as their lead singer; most groups of the time were fronted by a tenor. The group was the main male vocal group for the songwriting and production team of Holland-Dozier-Holland, who crafted a stream of hit singles, including two Billboard Hot 100 number-one hits: "I Can't Help Myself (Sugar Pie Honey Bunch)" and "Reach Out I'll Be There". After Holland-Dozier-Holland left Motown in 1967, the Four Tops were assigned to a number of producers, primarily Frank Wilson. When Motown left Detroit in 1972 to move to Los Angeles, California, the Tops stayed in Detroit and moved over to ABC Records' Dunhill imprint, where they continued to have charting singles into the late1970s. Since the 1980s, the Four Tops have recorded for, at various times, Motown, Casablanca Records and Arista Records. Today, save for Indestructible (owned by Sony Music Entertainment), Universal Music Group controls the rights to their entire post-1963 catalog (through various mergers and acquisitions), as well as their 1956 single, "Could It Be You". A change of line-up was finally forced upon the group when Lawrence Payton died on June 20, 1997. The band initially continued as a three-piece under the name The Tops,[1] before Theo Peoples (formerly of The Temptations) was recruited as the new fourth member. Peoples eventually took over the role of lead singer when Stubbs suffered a stroke in 2000 with his position assumed by Ronnie McNeir. On July 1, 2005, Benson died of lung cancer with Payton's son Roquel Payton replacing him. Levi Stubbs died on October 17, 2008. Fakir, McNeir, Payton, and Harold "Spike" Bonhart, who replaced Peoples in 2011, are still performing together as the Four Tops. Fakir is now the only surviving founding member of the original group.

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VILLAGE LIFE MAGAZINE

FRIDAY FEBRUARY 22, 2013

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SUPERSTAR COMEDIAN CHRIS TUCKER RETURNS TO THE NYCB THEATRE AT WESTBURY ON MARCH 29 Westbury, NY – Chris Tucker brings his triumphant return to stand up comedy to the NYCB Theatre at Westbury on Friday, March 29 at 8 p.m. Tickets are $75.50 and $55.50 and are available at www.ticketmaster.com, charge by phone at 800-745-3000 or at the Westbury box office. Event, date and time are subject to change. For more information, visit www.thetheatreatwestbury.com. Chris Tucker is an American actor and comedian. He is best known for playing the role of Detective James Carter in the Rush Hour film series. Tucker became a frequent stand up performer on Def Comedy Jam in the 1990s. He came to prominence in 1995 film Friday alongside Ice Cube, and then appeared in Luc Besson’s The Fifth Element before beginning work on the highly commercially successful Rush Hour films. In 2006 he negotiated an unprecedented $25 million salary to appear in Rush Hour 3, which at the time made him the highest paid actor in Hollywood. Tucker is also a humanitarian and spends much of his spare time traveling and working with his foundation. He can currently be seen in the highly acclaimed film, “Silver Linings Playbook” with Robert DeNiro and Bradley Cooper. About Live Nation Entertainment: Live Nation Entertainment is the world’s leading live entertainment and eCommerce company, comprised of four market leaders: Ticketmaster.com, Live Nation Concerts, Front Line Management Group and Live Nation Network. Ticketmaster.com is the global event ticketing leader and one of the world’s top five eCommerce sites, with over 26 million monthly unique visitors. Live Nation Concerts produces over 20,000 shows annually for more than 2,000 artists globally. Front Line is the world’s top artist management company, representing over 250 artists. These businesses power Live Nation Network, the leading provider of entertainment marketing solutions, enabling over 800 advertisers to tap into the 200 million consumers Live Nation delivers annually through its live event and digital platforms. For additional information, visit www.livenation.com/investors.

ONLINE EDITION

Radio Show host Don Durant of Living, Caring, and Sharing Hosts Live Show in New York Link http://www.prlog.org/11933857 PAGE 8


VILLAGE LIFE MAGAZINE

FRIDAY FEBRUARY 22, 2013

Page 9

“REASONABLE THINKING” By Jim Reed James W. Reed and two other distinguished recipients will be honored, February 28th, 6pm, at Antun's in Queens Village by the National Association of Medical and Business Leaders. Among the distinguished recipients of the awards are the following: 1. Hon. James W. Reed Deputy Commissioner for Consumer Affairs (Ret.) Nassau County, NY, USA. 2. Dr. Henry Reyna Outstanding Physician of the Year 2012 Cumberland Hospital and Diagnostic Center (HHC) Brooklyn, NY, USA 3. Karin AndersonPonzer, Esq - Community Law Practice Pace University, NY, USA -- James W. Reed is a master communicator and a friend to hun-

dreds of organizations from local community groups to the United Nations. For more than 25 years, Mr. Reed has used his extraordinary network of connections to help others. Through both his role as Deputy Commissioner of the Nassau County Office of Consumer Affairs and his work with civic and charitable organizations, it is easy to see that education, combined with a happy and healthy life, is his priority. Professionally, Mr. Reed is the Former Deputy Commissioner of the Office of Consumer Affairs for Nassau County. He was also a Founding Member of the Nassau County Police Explorers Board of Directors which helps youth, ages 14 to 20, succeed and ex-

cel in career opportunities, life skills, character development and leadership roles. Additionally, Mr. Reed has served as a Super-Distinguished Lieutenant Governor of Kiwanis, a member of the Freeport Salvation Army Corps Advisory Board, a (Continued on page 15)

Robin Roberts returns to ‘Good Morning America’

ONLINE EDITION

NEW YORK (AP) — Five months after undergoing a bone marrow transplant, Robin Roberts is back on television in the morning. Roberts said Wednesday she’d been waiting 174 days “to say this, good morning America.” The morning-show host is recovering from MDS, a blood and bone marrow disease. She looked thin with close-cropped hair but was smiling broadly, back at work on “Good Morning America” at ABC’s studio in New York City. ABC announced Roberts will interview first lady Michelle Obama later this week, to be shown next Tuesday. PAGE 9


VILLAGE LIFE MAGAZINE

FRIDAY FEBRUARY 22, 2013

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Mike Tyson sues Live Nation over alleged embezzlement LOS ANGELES (AP) — Mike Tyson sued a financial services firm owned by Live Nation Entertainment on Wednesday, claiming one of its advisers embezzled more than $300,000 from the former heavyweight champ and cost him millions more in lost earnings. The lawsuit claims that Live Nation and its company SFX Financial Advisory Management Enterprises haven’t given the boxer and his wife, Lakiha, a full accounting of their losses. The company returned some of the embezzled money but wanted the Tysons to sign a nondisclosure agreement, which they refused, the suit states. The lawsuit seeks more than $5 million in damages for breach of fiduciary duty, negligent hiring, unjust enrichment and other claims. A spokeswoman for Live Nation Entertainment Inc. said the company had not been served with the lawsuit and could not comment on it. The lawsuit claims the embezzlement prevented the Tysons from emerging from bankruptcy, and forced them to hire new advisers and turn down lucrative contracts. The couple trusted Brian Ourand, their adviser at SFX, so much that he attended their wedding, the case states. Ourand, who could not be reached for comment, has since left SFX, according to the lawsuit. The filings claim his conduct has not been reported to regulators. “Defendants did not secure, protect, safeguard and appropriately apply the Tysons’ finances for their intended purposes,” the case states, “but instead misappropriated said funds for the benefit and enrichment of SFX/Live Nation. The former boxer has broadened his career in recent years, including appearing in “The Hangover” and leading a one-man autobiographical show, “Undisputed Truth.”

ONLINE EDITION

Kevin Hart to host ‘Saturday Night Live’ March 2 Comedian Kevin Hart is set to host Saturday Night Live on March 2ng. The announcement came during the February 16 live episode hosted by Django Unchained star Christoph Waltz. Next month’s episode of the legendary sketch comedy show will be Hart’s first time hosting. Hart has had roles in several hit comedy films, including Think Like a Man, and he is currently starring in the BET satire Real Husbands of Hollywood. Musical guests Macklemore and Ryan Lewis will also be performing. The hip-hop artists’ hit single “Thrift Shop” has sold over 3 million copies and has been at #1 on Billboard Hot 100 for weeks.

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VILLAGE LIFE MAGAZINE

FRIDAY FEBRUARY 22, 2013

NYCB THEATRE AT WESTBURY SCHEDULE OF EVENTS

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THE TEMPTATIONS & THE FOUR TOPS FRIDAY, MARCH 15 at 7 PM Tickets are $69.50 and $49.50

Save the date for these exciting new shows:

RON WHITE: A LITTLE UNPROFESSIONAL

ALABAMA

SATURDAY, MARCH 16 at 8 PM

WEDNESDAY, MAY 1 at 8 PM

Tickets are $52.75

Tickets are $99.50, $59.50, and $49.50

DAVID CASSIDY Presents

Tickets on Sale Friday at 10 AM

The World’s Greatest TEEN IDOLS

ZZ TOP

Starring DAVID CASSIDY,

WEDNESDAY, MAY 15 at 8 PM

PETER NOONE of Herman’s Hermits

Tickets are $89.50, $39.50, and $49.50

And MICKY DOLENZ of The Monkees

Tickets on sale Friday at 10 am

Friday, March 22 at 8 PM

KEVIN JAMES

Tickets are $69.50, $49.50 and $29.50

THURSDAY, MAY 30 at 7 PM

Dick Fox’s DOO WOP EXTRAVAGANZA

Tickets are $66.50, and $56.50

Starring BOBBY RYDELL, LOU CHRISTIE,

Tickets on sale Sunday at 10 am

Willie Winfield & THE HARPTONES,

NYCB THEATRE AT WESTBURY

Vito Picone & THE ELEGANTS,

SCHEDULE OF EVENTS

THE KNOCKOUTS, THE TOYS,

THE SPINNERS

and THE BROOKLYN REUNION

LITTLE ANTHONY and THE IMPERIALS

(The Mystics - The Passions – The Classics)

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 16 at 8 PM

SATURDAY, MARCH 23 at 7 PM

Tickets are $69.50 and $49.50

Tickets are $59.50, $49.50 and $39.50

CHRIS YOUNG

RODNEY ATKINS

SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 17 at 8 PM

Special Guest JOSH THOMPSON

Tickets are $29.50

SUNDAY, MARCH 24 at 8 PM

ARTIE LANGE LIVE!

Tickets are $49.50, $34.50, and $29.50

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 23 at 8 PM

CHRIS TUCKER

Tickets are $61.50 and $51.50

FRIDAY, MARCH 29 at 8 PM

HOW I BECAME A PIRATE

Tickets are $75.50, and $55.50

SATURDAY, MARCH 2 at 1 PM

PETER RABBIT

Tickets are $39.50 and $29.50

SATURDAY, MARCH 30 at 11AM

Family Four Pack Tickets available at $19.50 each.

Tickets are $16.50 and $11.50

FITINGO MUSIC presents

LONG ISLAND APRIL FOOL'S COMEDY JAM

An Evening of Sophisticated Soul

SUNDAY, MARCH 31 at 8 PM

EN VOGUE, LILLO THOMAS & FRIENDS

Tickets are $110, $90, $70, $50, and $35

SATURDAY, MARCH 2 at 8 PM Tickets are $69.50, $49.50, and $39.50 DEMETRI MARTIN FRIDAY, MARCH 8 at 8 PM Tickets are $49.75 and $39.75 MARTIN SHORT SATURDAY, MARCH 9 at 8 PM Tickets are $79.50, $49.50 and $39.50 STRAWBERRY SHORTCAKE & DOODLEBOPS LIVE SUNDAY, MARCH 10 at 1 PM Tickets are $49.50, $39.50 and $19.50 ONLINE EDITION

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FRIDAY FEBRUARY 22, 2013

KEYSHIA COLE ANNOUNCES WOMAN TO WOMAN TOUR MARCH 28 NYCB THEATRE AT WESTBURY APRIL 4 BEACON THEATRE TICKETS GO ON SALE FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 22 AT 10AM! ONLINE EDITION

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NEW YORK, NY (February 19, 2013)—Multiplatinumselling songstress Keyshia Cole (Geffen) is gearing up for an 18 city headlining tour, she announced today. Set to kick off this March, the Woman to Woman tour—named after her November 2012 album—will serve as a thank you to fans; all five of Cole’s albums have reached the Billboard Top 200’s top 10. The month-long tour includes two area performances at the NYCB Theatre at Westbury on March 28 and at the Beacon Theatre on April 4. Tickets for both area performances go on sale Friday, February 22 at 10AM at www.livenation.com. The tour announcement continues an exciting run for the R&B diva. First, the Grammy-nominated artist bared her soul on Woman to Woman; an effort which earned her the #2 position on the R&B/Hip Hop Albums chart. The record was host to singles “Enough of No Love” and “Trust and Believe”; the first, a passionately belted up tempo track, with the latter serving as a confessional, yet catchy tale of broken trust. In addition to the release of her fifth studio album, Cole also starred alongside husband Daniel Gibson in BET’s hit reality series “Keyshia & Daniel: Family First.” She’s slated to hit the Essence Festival stage for the fourth time this July. Concert goers will also be treated to the sultry sounds of fellow crooner and special guest, Chrisette Michele. Presale for the Woman to Woman tour begins on Wednesday, February 20. For more information, please visit: http://smarturl.it/KeyshiaColeTour PAGE 12


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member of the Board of Directors at the Nassau County Salvation Army, and a Government Liaison Chair for the Long Island Chapter of ASIS International. He believes strongly in public education and information, giving as many as 300 speeches a year. His assistance to diverse communities has been recognized and appreciated by those groups that have benefited from Mr. Reed’s life-long commitment to make life better for all. Much of Mr. Reed's service to underserved communities has been in Long Beach, Westbury/Carle Place, Freeport, Uniondale, Roosevelt, Hempstead, Roslyn, Great Neck, and to international communities, such as the Philippines and Russia. Mr. Reed has received the Community Leadership and Everyday Hero awards from Newsday, the Liberty Bell Award from the Nassau Bar Association, the School-to-Business Award from BOCES, the Long Island Latino Award from La Fiesta Radio, the Martin Luther King, Jr. Humanitarian Award from Nassau County, among 100s of other prestigious awards for his efforts on behalf of others. Mr. Reed has solicited, obtained and distributed over $52 millions in in-kind donations to not-for-profit agencies locally, nationally and across the world. James W. Reed is responsible for the permanent Kiwanis International “Young Children: Priority One” program and for their Iodine Deficiency Disorder international program to virtually eliminate IDD, the major cause of severe mental retardation in the world. Mr. Reed has an extensive writing history, dating to writing newsletters and press releases for many of the organizations he belongs to, writing for his College (CCNY) newspaper (an advice column for the lovelorn using a female pen name), a writer for LATIN LONG ISLAND Magazine, and preparing press releases for the Nassau County Office of Consumer Affairs, where he affectionately earned the title of "MEDIA MOGUL" and he assisted other County agencies and organizations with their media exposure. He is well-known to television networks and cable stations, print media outlets and to numerous radio groups. Mr. Reed resides in Oceanside, Long Island and has three accomplished daughters. From what he has learned from the daily challenges as a single parent, he is better prepared for even greater issues in his public and private life. His exceptional job experience, vast volunteer efforts and unprecedented dedication to helping others has resulted in Mr. Reed being known in the community as “The Everyday Hero”. The Community Journal joins in recognizing Jim’s tireless community and humanitarian work while acknowledging his support of this publication.

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TIME MAGAZINE’s #1 Musical of the Year "Porgy and Bess is a glowing tribute to a phenomenal stage production that transcends time and race: polished, respectful and packed with the creme de la creme of Broadway talent." -BET The Gershwins' Porgy and Bess has triumphantly returned to Broadway, in an electrifying new staging as timeless as ever presenting themes that reflect the cultural landscape of America, featuring such legendary songs as "Summertime," "It Ain't Necessarily So" and "I Got Plenty of Nothing," plus a remarkable cast led by four-time Tony Award winner Audra McDonald, Drama Desk nominee Norm Lewis, and twotime Tony nominee David Alan Grier. Experience the show TIME Magazine declares, "Exquisite, intimate and musically ravishing. A don't-miss theater event!" and The Associated Press calls,“A gorgeous version of The Gershwin Masterpiece!” “AN INDISPENSABLE TICKET! It’s hard to imagine any hurricane matching the tempest that is the extraordinary Audra McDonald.” -The New York Times “AS RAPTUROUS AS EVER! Norm Lewis is a revelation.” -USA Today “A luscious piece of musical Theatre! David Alan Grier is terrific!” -Newsday GET YOUR TICKETS NOW AND SAVE! Sunday through Friday performances: Orchestra & Front Mezz - $89(Reg. $139) Rear Mezz, Rows A to F - $69 (Reg. $87) Rear Mezz, Rows G & H $49 (Reg. $67) Saturday performances: Orchestra & Front Mezz - $99Reg. $139) Rear Mezz, Rows A to F - $69 (Reg. $87) Rear Mezz, Rows G & H $49 (Reg. $67) Three easy ways to get your discounted tickets: CALL 877-250-2929 and mention code: PBDWK Visit Ticketmaster.com and enter code: PBDWK Bring this e-mail to the Richard Rodgers Theater Box Office, (226 West 46th Street, between 8th Avenue and Broadway). Valid for performances through 7/8/12. Offer subject to availability and prior sale. Limit 12 tickets per order. Offer valid on select seat locations. All sales are final. No refunds or exchanges. Offer may be modified or revoked at any time without notice. All phone and internet offers subject to standard Ticketmaster.com service fees. All above prices include a $2 facility fee. Not valid on previously purchased tickets and may not be combined with other offers. For group sales please call 718-703-2260 For more information, visit PorgyandBessonBroadway.com

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I hope you will consider my first Christian Fiction effort about the after life. Available for only $4.99 for a limited time. Just click and enjoy... http://www.amazon.com/THE-WAY-STATIONebook/dp/B00AVECUM6/ref=la_B00AVKMARA_1_1? ie=UTF8&qid=1357229984&sr=1-1

ABOUT THIS BOOK: “THE WAY STATION” (Genre: Christian fiction) By Minister Larry Montgomery, Sr. Author of the ‘U.S. Marshal Harry Bailey Parables of Life Series’ The Way Station is a fictional account of what could happen immediately following a person’s death. This book is about the moments’ right before the souls of six strangers transitions to either the other side of life, better known as the ‘hereafter’ or to the next phase of life, known as the second chance to get it right. This book was written on the theory that either you learn the lesson you were sent into this world to learn, or you can be recycled, given another chance to get it right before it is finally too late. Seven people take an elevator ride together, each from a different walk of life, but unbeknownst to them; they are each riding into either their next destiny or a second chance. In their minds, they are all going to the top floor of an office building owned by a world renowned charitable organization, to receive a cash reward for doing something good but none of them really remembers exactly what. None of the six awardees are known to one another but during the elevator ride to the top-floor office they each have a chance to talk about that part of his or her life, they believe earned them this recognition. As they tell their story, they recollect the trials and tribulations they went through which they believe made them worthy of this honor. Each person’s story is of no consequence to any of the other recipients, but the seventh person on the elevator seems to know a lot more about their lives then even they realize. Once each of the awardees reaches their individual destination they are ushered off the elevator to confront life’s ultimate choice; to choose their soul’s next destination. Each awardee is left to choose between two doors. Each door holds a different destiny behind it. So, don’t be fooled by the majesty or outward appearance of either, the one selected is the one each recipient is most worthy of. One door is made of solid OAK1 and the other solid Birch2 wood. Ride with these six people to their final destination and read how each of them chose their soul’s next resting place based on the trials and tribulations that made up their lives. Then think how your life compares to theirs; if at all, and you just may find out more about what really awaits you at the ‘Way Station.’ ONLINE EDITION

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LISTEN TO: www.blogtalkradio.com/usmarshalharrybaileycom Friday afternoon’s at 2:30 PM for live readings or visit www.usmarshalharrybailey.com for archived readings and purchases. ONLINE EDITION

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AVAILABLE NOW AMAZON.COM eBOOKS ONLINE EDITION

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The ADHD Awareness Book Project:

365+1 new ways to succeed with ADHD

WE DID IT AGAIN! IF YOU REMEMBER LAST YEAR THIS TIME OVER 80 ADHD EXPERTS AND COACHES, INCLUDING ME, COMPILED THEIR BEST ADHD STRATEGIES INTO A BOOK TITLED 365 WAYS TO SUCCEED WITH ADHD! WELL, WE DID IT AGAIN WITH THIS FASCINATING BOOK CONTAINING 365+1 IDEAS ON HOW TO SURVIVE WITH ADHD. IF YOU’RE INTERESTED IN PURCHASING EITHER BOOK JUST LET ME KNOW! Lisa Byers speechlrb@yahoo.com

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SISTAS ON FIRE New Talk Show: Station: Cablevision Channel 20 Day: Tuesdays Time: 10:30 AM Plus, we're still on Saturdays at 3 AM

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ORDER YOUR BLACK YOUR BLACK EXPRESSION HOLIDAY DAY GIFTS FROM US GET A FREE SIX MONTH SUBSCRIPTION TO THE COMMUNITY JOURNAL. INBOX US AT montgomerybusiness@hotmail.com FOR DETAILS ONLINE EDITION

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Museum Mission Statement The mission of the African American Museum of Nassau County [AAM] is to provide programming and events that foster the intellectual development of community members and visitors with an interest in African-American art, history and culture. A primary goal is to disseminate the history of African-Americans on Long Island and the AfricanAmerican contribution to the social and cultural development of American society through material and visual culture. The AAM, located in

Hempstead, New York, opened in 1970, at the height of the black power movement, as the Black History Exhibit Center. It is the only African American history museum on Long Island, and is located to serve Nassau County’s largest African-American population. The museum is a multi-disciplinary cultural institution that provides art installations, historical exhibitions, film programs, community service events, and educational programming. This 6,000-square-foot facility, offers a rotating series of exhibits showcasing local and national African American artists. The African American Museum also houses the African Atlantic Genealogy Society. This organization provides workshops and individual research instruction in family genealogy. The museum has installed a new E-Learning Program that offers an innovative pedagogical approach, using subject headings relative to Americans of African descent, for conducting research on the internet. The AAM is currently working on methods to expand the community’s understanding of knowledge organization methods, literary warrant, and information retrieval and how these relate to African-American social history.

African American Museum and Center of Education and Applied Arts 110 North Franklin Street Hempstead, New York 11550 516-572-0730 fax: 516-572-032 Mr. David Byer-Tyre, Museum Director/Curator

ONLY ON CABLEVISION CHANNEL 18 Roots & Culture The Minority Report The Nassau Channel

Sunday at 7:00 am Monday at 5:00 pm Tuesday at 9:00 pm

The Brain Child /Diaspora Wednesday 5 & 8 pm L.D. 1 Report About the Town What’s Going On Reporters Roundtable

Thursday at 9:00 pm Thursday at 6:00 pm Friday 6:00 pm Saturday 8:00 pm

Email: aamnc@yahoo.com Website: www.theaam.org Hours of Operation Monday: by appointment, Tuesday-Friday: 12-8, Saturday: 10-5, Sunday: Closed ONLINE EDITION

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Traditions, New & Old, Celebrated at Children’s Museum The circus is in town and we’re ready to celebrate! LICM is opening the doors at 6 p.m. on Monday, March 11 for three hours of circus fun as we await the annual arrival of the Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey Circus Animal parade. Their march from the circus train to the Nassau Coliseum will take them right past our front doors – an exciting ending to a fun-filled night at Long Island Children’s Museum. Later that week, LICM will explore Irish traditions and lore around the Blarney Stone in preparation for St. Patrick’s Day. Program Schedule- March 1117, 2013 Circus Animal Walk Monday, March 11 from 6- 9 p.m. Come join the Long Island Children’s Museum as the Ringling Bros. & Barnum and Bailey Circus world-famous elephants make their march to their temporary home at Nassau Coliseum. Get your face painted, make fun circus arts and crafts, juggle, stomp and play all over the museum. At the end of the evening, the elephants (and maybe some other fun circus animals!) will walk right past the museum. Tickets can be purchased at the LICM Box Office (Tuesday–Sunday 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.) or by phone (516) 224-5802. Advanced ticketing recommended. (Limited capacity.) All ages. Tickets: $10 ($8 LICM members) Korean Language Immersion at LICM Tuesdays and Thursdays from March 5- March 21 from 11:30 a.m. to noon , Children’s language skills develop rapidly, absorbing everything they hear. Why not introduce another language to your child while they are young and receptive to new things? Join us while we explore basic themes in Korean in a fun and relaxed atmosphere. Workshops are drop in and do not require advance sign up. ONLINE EDITION

FRIDAY FEBRUARY 22, 2013

Continue with us during this five week series that explores a different theme each week (numbers, fruits, animals, etc). A class project and song will be used each week to reinforce learning. Ages: 3-5. Fee: $3 with museum admission ($2 LICM mem-

lery and enjoy the mixed media artwork created by students from North Babylon Schools. Students were inspired by lighthouses on Long Island and the world All ages. Free with museum admission KaleidoZone Gallery- Don’t Play with Your Food! Through Sunday, April 28 Don’t play with your food! We’ve all heard that phrase at the dinner table as we grew up. Artist and Art Educator Julianne Zegers challenges that notion by making

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them out of your system! Attack of the Bloodsuckers! offer visitors the chance to: Look a real leech in the mouth; • Pull off your socks and test your bug-appealing foot odor; • Receive a big hug from a giant, inflating tick; • Get itchy and knotty with the life-size game of "Twitcher" — a buggy variation on Twister™! Attack of the Bloodsuckers! is produced by EEC! -- the Environmental Exhibit Collaborative (ECHO Lake Aquarium and Science Center, Burlington, Vermont; EcoTarium, Worcester, Massachusetts; and the Children’s Museum of Maine, Portland, Maine) -- and made possible by grants from Jane's Trust, Cabot Family Charitable Trust, and the Institute for Museum and Library Services. All ages. Free with museum admission. Early Childhood Programs* Language Immersion Class: Tuesday and Thursday March 521 from 11:30 a.m. - 12 p.m. † stART (Story + Art): Tuesday to Friday from 12:30-1 p.m. †

bers) Van Gogh’s “Sunflowers” Every Tuesday through Friday (March 5 - March 22) from 2:30-4 p.m. Come join us in the Inner Lobby as we celebrate the birthday (March 30th) of the famous artist, Vincent Van Gogh. Use assorted materials to create your own unique sunflower arrangement. All ages. Free with museum admission Blarney Stone Saturday, March 16 from 2 to 4 p.m. The Blarney Stone is a famous stone in Ireland that is thought to have a special power. Legend has it that if you kiss the Blarney Stone you will be given the gift of gab, also referred to as “Blarney Talk,” and that you will become a very persuasive speaker. Come decorate your own Blarney Stone and test the legend out for yourself! All ages. Free with museum admission. Community Gallery Tuesday, March 5 through Sunday, March 31 Stop by the Community Gal-

sculpture out of her food. She arranges food sculptures to look like landscapes and portraits. She then makes oil paintings and monotypes of her sculptures. Julianne Zegers’ playful narrative paintings and prints are appealing to children of all ages who have tried to resist playing with their food. All ages. Free with Museum admission. Traveling Exhibit – Attack of the Bloodsuckers! Through May 5, 2013 Explore the science of what’s eating you in this skin-crawling exhibition! Examine the what, why, when and how of mosquitoes, fleas, ticks, leeches and other parasites known as sanguinivores (creatures that eat blood). Learn why bloodsuckers are important to the ecosystem -- and how to keep

Music and Movement: Wednesday and Friday from 11:30 a.m. -12 p.m. † Messy Afternoons: SaturdaySunday, from 3:30-5 p.m. †Fee: $3 with museum admission ($2 LICM members). All activities will be held at the Long Island Children’s Museum, 11 Davis Avenue, Garden City, NY. Children must be accompanied by an adult. Museum admission: $11 for adults and children over 1 year old, $10 seniors, FREE to museum members and children under 1 year old. Additional fees for theater and special programs may apply. For additional information, contact 516224-5800.

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VILLAGE LIFE MAGAZINE

FRIDAY FEBRUARY 22, 2013

Odds for a bright future are slim for kid Oscar nominees TODAY – If 9-year-old Quvenzhane Wallis wins an Oscar for “Beasts of the Southern Wild,” she’ll be the youngest performer ever to capture an adult version of Hollywood’s most coveted prize. Unfortunately for Wallis, her chances of taking home the gold-plated statuette for best actress are slim, and if history is a predictor, being bestowed with an Oscar at such a young age won’t do much for her career anyway. Wallis, who was only 6 when she made “Beasts of the Southern Wild,”’ is the 22nd actor or actress to get an Oscar nomination before turning 18. Only three have won, however, and all for supporting roles: Tatum O’Neal, Anna Paquin and Patty Duke. That’s not counting the honorary juvenile award first given to 6-yearold Shirley Temple in 1935 and last handed out to 14-year-old Hayley Mills in 1961. The youngest winner was O’Neal, just 10 when she was honored for her precocious performance as the sidekick of a Depression-era con man (played by her father Ryan) in 1973’s “Paper Moon.” She went on to star in “The Bad News Bears” and “International Velvet,” but drug problems — the result, according to her autobiography “A Paper Life,” of growing up with an alcoholic mother and abusive father living in Hollywood’s fast lane — derailed her career and marriage to tennis great John McEnroe. Paquin, who was 11 when she won for 1993’s “The Piano,” is the anomaly. She stars in HBO’s “True Blood,” had a recurring role in the “X-Men” series and has scored great film roles in “Almost Famous” and “The Squid and the Whale.” Duke’s career trajectory was much different. Winning the the supporting-actress award for playing Helen Keller in “The Miracle Worker” (1962) when she was 16 did not “open any doors for me,” she told TODAY.com. Sure, she parlayed her Oscar into a TV series, “The Patty Duke Show,” but her feature-film career fizzled as an adult and she mostly appeared in made-for-TV movies.”It’s a kick when people refer to me as an Oscar winner,” she said. “But part of me says, ‘Hey, I’m 66 years old. When are you going to give me another part for which I could be nominated?’ “ While Wallis is the youngest best actress nominee, she's not the youngest nominee ever -- that goes to Justin Henry, only 8 when he played the child of divorcing parents in "Kramer vs. Kramer’’ (1979). He’s never given up acting, but he hasn’t achieved the same kind of recognition again, and now works as a sales director for an Internet ad company. " 'Kramer vs. Kramer' spoiled me," he told TODAY.com. "When you have such a magical ONLINE EDITION

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experience with your first movie, it’s hard to match after that." Haley Joel Osment, who was 11 when he was nominated as the boy who sees dead people in "The Sixth Sense" (1999), later starred in Steven Spielberg’s "A.I." and recently finished filming the sci-fi thriller "I’ll Follow You Down.’’ But like many young Oscar nominees, he’s had a hard time duplicating his early success. "When you’re young, it seems like a blur," Osment said. "You don’t realize what a unique situation you’re in." The list of young Oscar nominees includes one-hit wonders (Mary Badham of "To Kill a Mockingbird" and Quinn Cummings of "The Goodbye Girl"); actors who who died prematurely (Sal Mineo of "Rebel Without a Cause" and Brandon deWilde of "Shane"); and casualties of drug or alcohol abuse (Jack Wild of "Oliver!" and Linda Blair of "The Exorcist"). Is there a reluctance to give Oscars to very young actors? Do Academy voters prefer to vote for veterans who may not get another chance for glory? "I do think voters are partial to people who have paid their dues, which works against young actors who don’t yet have long histories,’’ Robert Osborne, a host for Turner Classic Movies and author of many books about the Oscars, told TODAY.com. "The demands put on an adult and a child are entirely different, and it’s foolish to try to compare them," he said. Jodie Foster and Abigail Breslin are among the exceptions, child actors who continued to have steady, successful careers after losing their first bids for Oscars. Foster was 14 when she was nominated for her supporting role as a child prostitute in "Taxi Driver" (1976). Though she lost to Beatrice Straight ("Network"), Foster went on to win best-actress Oscars for "The Accused" (1988) and "The Silence of the Lambs" (1991), and recently received a lifetime achievement award at the Golden Globes. Breslin, a best supporting-actress nominee for "Little Miss Sunshine" (2006) at age 10, filmed five movies last year, including an adaptation of the Pulitzer Prize-winning play "August: Osage County." Breslin said her parents made sure celebrity didn’t go to her head. "I still had to come home, take out the trash and feed the dogs," she told TODAY.com in an interview from her New York home, where she still lives with her mom and dad. So what does the experience of past juvenile nominees mean for Wallis? Would an Oscar victory be a good or bad omen? Would losing actually be better than winning? Regardless of what happens at the Oscars on Feb. 24, history indicates that Wallis faces an uphill battle to achieve adult stardom. But as Foster and Paquin prove, it can be done. "Winning an Oscar when you’re young is wonderful,’’ Duke said, "but it’s what you do with the rest of your life that really matters.’’ PAGE 30


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Beyoncé’s HBO documentary breaks HBO ratings records Beyoncé’s HBO documentary Life Is But A Dream may have garnered mixed reviews, but it pulled in record ratings for HBO. The superstar’s documentary had the “largest audience for a HBO doc since Nielsen revised its method of measuring viewership in 2004,” according to The Hollywood Reporter. Beyoncé’s documentary premiere drew 1.8 million viewers, breaking the previous record of 1.7 million set by Spike Lee’s Hurricane Katrina opus When the Levees Broke: A Requiem in Four Acts in 2006.

Beyoncé documentary premiering on HBO in February HBO announced Monday that a documentary about the Grammywinning singer will debut Feb. 16, 2013. Beyonce is directing the film, which will include footage she shot herself with her laptop. The network said the documentary will include “video that provides raw, unprecedented access to the private entertainment icon and high-voltage performances.” It will also feature home videos of her family and of the singer as a new mother and owner of her company, Parkwood Entertainment. Beyonce said in a statement the untitled project was “personal” to her. She is married to Jay-Z. They had their first child, daughter Blue Ivy Carter, in January. The 31-year-old will perform at the 2013 Super Bowl halftime show on Feb. 3, 13 days before the documentary airs.

In ‘Life Is But A Dream’ Beyoncé looks flawless, reveals little On Saturday night, Beyoncé dominated cable airwaves. She appeared in a last-minute, hour-long sit down with Oprah Winfrey at 8PM, then immediately after she debuted Life is But a Dream, a 90minute documentary about her life. I watched, curious about the sudden about-face from the notoriously guarded entertainer. After two and half consecutive hours of all Beyoncé everything, I was impressed by her latest media campaign—Oprah and HBO on the same ONLINE EDITION

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night?!—but not fooled. In each of the prior “B-seasons,” the anticipated time of year when she blitzes every news, entertainment and lifestyle publication and site to promote her new projects, the reigning Queen of Pop has posed for breathtaking photo shoots, and her energetic performances—always in high heels—have created an allure that leave her beauty and work ethic are rarely, if ever, questioned. Where Beyoncé has always fallen short is in interviews. She’s always seemed careful and rehearsed, giving the “nice” answer that wouldn’t make waves instead of what she we all thought she had to be thinking, if anything. That wouldn’t have been so bad, if there weren’t so many unanswered questions about her top-secret marriage to Jay-Z, the unconventional name for her child and the blanket she insisted on keeping over her head in a very Michael Jackson-esque way. In her attempts to maintain privacy, Beyoncé was beginning to come off as impersonal, unrelatable and frankly, weird. It’s why the rumors that she wore a fake-bump for six months and had a surrogate carry her baby were able to persist in the minds of otherwise logical people. This all matters because it explains how Life is But a Dream, billed as a “revealing” portrait of Beyoncé came to be. And Beyoncé indirectly says as much right upfront in a staged interview where she sits on a white couch, sans makeup looking casual and actually seeming comfortable in an interview for the first time ever. (And why shouldn’t she be? She’s controlling the camera, the questions, and the editing.) “When Nina Simone put out music, you loved her voice,” Beyoncé explains. “That’s what she wanted you to love. That’s what — that was her instrument… You didn’t get brainwashed by her day-today life and what her child is wearing and who she’s dating and, you know, all the things that really — it’s not your business, you know? And it shouldn’t influence the way you listen to the voice and the art. But it does.” Sales were undoubtedly impressive for Beyoncé’s last album, 4, but lower than the two preceding releases, despite the quality of the music. It would be ignorant to overlook the affects of the enduring recession, but when you’re a global superstar sales are supposed to go up, not down. It’s no coincidence that in the aftermath of 4 and the crazier by the day rumors, the very private artist was now up for sharing via personal photos on Tumblr, and later, Instagram and now, a sit down with Oprah and a carefully constructed documentary about her life. PAGE 31


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The New Community Journal  

Long Islands oldest online African American newspaper and cultural magazine.

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