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DEPARTMENT OF SURGERY 2017 ANNUAL REPORT DEPARTMENT OF SURGERY 5841 South Maryland Avenue Chicago, IL 60637 Email: info@surgery.bsd.uchicago.edu Website: surgery.uchicago.edu Facebook: facebook.com/uchicagosurgery Twitter: twitter.com/uchicagosurgery

TRAUMA

GENERAL SURGERY

UROLOGY

Dr. Selwyn Rogers leads UChicago Medicine’s adult trauma center

Gaining hope and healing after a cancer diagnosis

Surgeons provide life-saving care for child with rare urologic condition


table of contents Letter From The Chair . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3

Select Publications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32

Trauma & Acute Care Surgery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4

Pediatric Surgery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34

Cardiac & Thoracic Surgery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6

Plastic & Reconstructive Surgery . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38

Research . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10

Education . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42

Colon & Rectal Surgery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12

Graduates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44

Surgery By The Numbers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16

Residents & Fellows . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46

General Surgery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18

Transplant Surgery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48

Development . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22

Sponsored Research . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52

Neurosurgery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24

Urology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56

Otolaryngology - Head & Neck Surgery . . . . . . . 28

Vascular Surgery & Endovascular Therapy . . . . . 60

Editor and Writer: Heather Linder Design: Reputation Partners


Constantly providing world-class care. Constantly seeking new knowledge. Constantly pursuing excellence in clinical care, research and education. For the last 90 years, the University of Chicago Medicine has been a constant source of hope and health for its surrounding community, and unto the far reaches of the globe. The Department of Surgery’s legacy dates back even further. For more than a century, our surgeon-scientists have been providing life-saving care for the most complex conditions. Our faculty are constantly pushing the bounds of possibility forward, simultaneously developing new care protocols and treating the untreatable, while training up the next generation of surgeons.

letter from the chair

This past year alone, our faculty provided incredible options for patients — including a heated chemotherapy option for patients with previously untreatable abdominal cancers. Our skilled surgeons completed our 500th cardiac robotic procedure, using minimally invasive technology to get patients back on their feet faster. Our researchers got closer to harnessing the power of the human microbiome to fight disease, and our resident training program used data to provide an effective, evidence-based approach to education. We are also thrilled to announce the arrival of Selwyn O. Rogers, Jr., MD, MPH, who joined the department as chief of the Section of Trauma and Acute Care Surgery. Dr. Rogers and his team will help launch the UChicago Medicine adult level-1 trauma center in May 2018, fulfilling a great need for the community. Our new trauma surgeons will work to not only treat victims of trauma but also to prevent systemic violence from occurring. You can read about these accomplishments and more in this year’s edition of the annual report, The Constant, where we highlight our exceptional legacy and our ongoing pursuit of better surgical care. Jeffrey B. Matthews, MD, FACS Dallas B. Phemister Professor of Surgery Chairman, Department of Surgery Surgeon-in-Chief, University of Chicago Medicine

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trauma & acute care SURGERY

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Dr. Selwyn Rogers Leads UCHICAGO MEDICINE’S ADULT TRAUMA CENTER

us address social factors that affect victims of violence and underserved populations,” said Derek Douglas, vice president for civic engagement.

Dr. Selwyn O. Rogers Jr., a top surgeon and public health expert, will lead the University of Chicago Medicine’s development of the South Side’s only Level 1 adult trauma center, scheduled to open in 2018. As chief of the Section of Trauma & Acute Care Surgery and founding director of the UChicago Medicine Trauma Center, Rogers will build an interdisciplinary team of specialists who will work to expand trauma care on the South Side.

“Dr. Rogers’ most important priority in the coming months is the preparation and successful launch of the adult trauma program,” said Dr. Jeffrey Matthews, chairman of the Department of Surgery, who led the national search.

“Dr. Rogers is highly qualified for this role,” said Kenneth S. Polonsky, MD, executive vice president for medical affairs at the University of Chicago. “He will provide leadership that will ensure both clinical excellence and operational leadership.” Rogers will also oversee the Urban Health Initiative, which will complement efforts in UChicago Urban, the university’s commitment to understand urban issues and create a positive impact for Chicago and other cities worldwide.

Rogers holds degrees from Harvard College and Harvard Medical School, as well as a master’s degree in public health from Vanderbilt University School of Medicine. “Joining UChicago Medicine is truly an opportunity of a lifetime,” Rogers said. “I look forward to working in Chicago’s South Side to help meet the clinical needs of patients while working to understand and help address the broader challenges that go beyond our hospital walls.”

“In this position, Dr. Rogers will collaborate with faculty across the university and members of the community to help

Left to right: Gary An, MD, FACS; Kenneth Wilson, MD, FACS; David Hampton, MD, MEng; Priya Prakash, MD; Selwyn Rogers, MD, MPH; Jennifer Cone, MD; and Peter Bendix, MD, MPH

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cardiac & thoracic SURGERY

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UChicago Medicine Surgery Team Achieves Goal OF 500 CARDIAC ROBOTIC PROCEDURES

Using the da Vinci surgical robot system, Dr. Balkhy and his team performed the complex valve repair and ablation procedure through small holes in the right side of Scott’s chest (the largest being only 20 mm). Without the robotic surgery option, surgeons would have had to saw through Scott’s sternum in an open-chest procedure. The minimally invasive approach shortened Scott’s hospital stay and decreased her recovery time at home significantly.

The University of Chicago Medicine’s robotic surgery team, led by cardiac surgeon Husam H. Balkhy, MD, hit a milestone in May 2017 when they treated their 500th patient to repair a heart valve and an irregular heartbeat using a robotic totally endoscopic approach. This milestone comes just over three and a half years after Dr. Balkhy was recruited to join the faculty at UChicago Medicine.

“I’m not even 48 hours out of surgery, and I feel remarkably good,” Scott said, the day after the procedure. “My biggest relief was when I woke up and they said they were able to repair it, and I wasn’t going to be on a blood thinner the rest of my life. I can’t even tell you the amount of relief that’s involved in that.”

“ This approach

avoids many of the complications of openchest heart surgery. An experienced team can have positive results with this technology in the sickest of patients.

Dr. Balkhy has been averaging about 125 robot-assisted heart surgeries per year since he joined UChicago Medicine in July 2013, and in 2016 he and his team completed 165 robotic heart surgeries on patients with a multitude of cardiac problems, including coronary artery disease and valve problems. As one of the world’s leading robotic heart surgeons, Dr. Balkhy has, by his estimation, completed roughly 1,100 of these robotic procedures since he began using the robot in 2007.

“This approach avoids many of the complications of open-chest heart surgery,” Dr. Balkhy said. “An experienced team can have positive results with this technology in the sickest of patients.”

Dr. Husam H. Balkhy

Jennifer Scott, 51, of Rogers Park, was discharged on April 26, two days after Dr. Balkhy repaired her mitral valve, which was causing a severe leak and was associated with atrial fibrillation. Scott quickly returned to work and full health; she was even able to take a previously-planned trip to Africa this past fall that her heart condition appeared to threaten.

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FACULTY HONORS Mark Ferguson, MD, a professor and program director for residents in cardiothoracic surgery, was named as one of Chicago’s Top Cancer Doctors by Chicago magazine this year. He also serves as the editor-in-chief of CTSNet, which is the most comprehensive, heavily trafficked, and reliable online source of information about cardiothoracic surgery available worldwide.

Chicago magazine recognized several cardiac and thoracic surgery physicians on the Top Doctors list. They include: • Husam H. Balkhy, MD – Top Doctor • Mark K. Ferguson, MD – Top Doctor and Top Cancer Doctor • Gerhard Ziemer, MD, PhD – Top Doctor

Research was a primary focus for associate professor Takeyoshi Ota, MD, PhD, this year. Dr. Ota, who is the co-director of the University of Chicago Center for Aortic Diseases, began a first-in-human study of the use of NuPulse iVas balloon pump in bridge-to-transplant patients. He also worked on a study of XVIVO’s EVLP system for assessing donor lungs for transplant.

Valluvan Jeevanandam, MD Professor of Surgery Chief, Section of Cardiac & Thoracic Surgery Surgical Director, Heart and Vascular Center

FACULTY LISTING PROFESSORS OF SURGERY Husam H. Balkhy, MD Mark K. Ferguson, MD Mahesh P. Gupta, PhD Valluvan Jeevanandam, MD Gerhard Ziemer, MD, PhD

ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR OF SURGERY Takeyoshi Ota, MD, PhD ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF SURGERY Tae Song, MD CLINICAL ASSOCIATE David Onsager, MD

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research with patients in a seemingly benign way. It shows us how microorganisms enter and colonize a hospital environment.”

The Department of Surgery’s decades-long dedication to basic, clinical and translational research is an essential part of the University of Chicago Medicine mission. The bench-tobedside breakthroughs and developments that happen every day at UChicago Medicine improve of the quality of care for patients at the hospital. This year a study was published featuring a once-in-a-lifetime look at a brand new, unpopulated hospital environment.

The study, “Bacterial colonization and succession in a newly opened hospital,” began two months before UChicago Medicine opened its new hospital, the Center for Care and Discovery, on Feb. 23, 2013, and continued for 10 months afterward. The researchers, led by graduate student and study first author Simon Lax, collected more than 10,000 samples, and detected microbial DNA in 6,523 of them. These samples came from 10 patient care rooms and two adjoining nursing stations, one caring for surgical patients and the other, on a different floor, for cancer patients.

A 12-month study mapping bacterial diversity within a hospital — with a focus on the flow of microbes between patients, staff and surfaces — should help hospitals worldwide better understand how to encourage beneficial microbial interactions and decrease potentially harmful contact.

The investigators swabbed each patient’s hand, nostril and armpit, as well as the surfaces patients may have touched, such as bedrails or faucet handles. They collected additional room samples from multiple surfaces, including the floor and the air filter. Each room was cleaned daily, with a more extensive cleaning after each patient’s discharge. The researchers also gathered samples from each unit’s nursing staff, swabbing their hands, gloves, shoes, nursing station countertops, pagers, shirts, chairs, computers, land lines and cell phones. The most obvious change came when the hospital opened after extensive cleaning efforts. Bacterial organisms such as Acinetobacter and Pseudomonas, abundant during construction and pre-opening preparations, were quickly replaced by human skin-associated microbes such as Corynebacterium, Staphylococcus and Streptococcus, brought in by patients. “Before it opened, the hospital had a low diversity of bacteria,” Dr. Gilbert said. “But as soon as it was populated with patients, doctors and nurses, the bacteria from their skin took over.”

“The Hospital Microbiome Project is the single biggest microbiome analysis of a hospital performed, and one of the largest microbiome studies ever,” said study senior author Jack Gilbert, PhD, director of the Microbiome Center, professor of surgery at UChicago Medicine and group leader in microbial ecology at Argonne National Laboratory.

A second set of changes followed each patient’s hospital admission. On a patient’s first day in the hospital, microbes tended to move from surfaces in the patient’s room — bedrails, countertops, faucet handles — to the patient. But by the next and every subsequent day, the preponderance of microbes moved from the patient to the room, steadily adding to the microbial diversity of the surfaces in the room.

“We’ve created a detailed map, highly relevant to clinical practice, of microbial exchange and interaction in a large hospital environment,” he said. “It describes the ecology of a building, a thriving microbial ecosystem that regularly interacts

“By the second day of their stay,” Dr. Gilbert said, “the route of microbial transmission was reversed. Within 24 hours, the

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patient’s microbiome takes over the hospital space.” There were two unanticipated findings.

pressure, managed to acquire genes that could boost antibiotic resistance and promote host infection.

First, when the heat and humidity increased during the summer, staff members shared more bacteria with each other. Second, when they measured the impact of treatments — such as antibiotics prior to or during admission, chemotherapy during admission, surgery, or admission to the hospital though the emergency department — the impact was minimal.

“This finding requires further study,” Dr. Gilbert said, “but if it proves to be true then these genetic changes could affect the bacteria’s ability to invade tissue or to escape standard treatments.” The study, published May 24 in Science Translational Medicine, “demonstrates the extent to which the microbial ecology of patient skin and of hospital surfaces are intertwined, and may provide context to future studies of the transmission of hospitalacquired infections,” the authors conclude.

“We consistently found that antibiotics given intravenously or by mouth had almost no impact on the skin microbiome,” Dr. Gilbert said. “But when a patient received a topical antibiotic, then, as expected, it wiped out the skin microbes.” Samples from the rooms of 92 patients who had longer hospital stays, measured in months, revealed a trend. Some potentially harmful bacteria, such as Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis, faced with continual selective

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colon & rectal SURGERY

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Innovative Simulation Training HELPS SURGICAL RESIDENTS PERFECT SKILLS

faculty, including Dr. Andolfi and Lisa Cannon, MD, assistant professor in the Section of Colon and Rectal Surgery.

Practice makes perfect, and Konstantin Umanskiy, MD, associate professor of surgery, is helping to ensure that residents have fully perfected their surgical skills upon graduation. Dr. Umanskiy, a surgeon in the Section of Colon and Rectal Surgery, co-directs the Center for Surgical Simulation, Training and Research (S-STAR), a program that gives residents handson practice of technical skills in a simulated operating room setting. The realistic venue mimics the environment a real-life surgery, but no patients are at risk while future surgeons perfect their technique.

“ Simulation offers an

immersive, realistic way of learning technical skills. Simulation allows trainees to make mistakes, to ask the ‘what if?’ questions, and to learn and reflect on such situations without risking patient safety.

Dr. Umanskiy is the surgical lead for the University of Chicago’s Comprehensive Educational Institute, a center accredited by the American College of Surgeons with the mission of enterprisewide improvement of simulation-related training, quality, patient safety and associated innovation and scholarship. Dr. Stephen Small directs the University of Chicago Simulation Center, and has had a close working relationship with Dr. Umanskiy, both in the center and in the care of patients perioperatively.

“Training using a virtual reality simulator is an option to supplement standard training,” said Ciro Andolfi, MD, who works with Dr. Umanskiy to administer S-STAR sessions and is supported by UC Simulation. “It has been proven that virtual reality training improves the technical skills of surgical trainees, such as decreased time for suturing and improved accuracy.”

Dr. Ciro Andolfi

Specific tasks tackled in these courses include tying knots, suturing wounds, and handling surgical instruments; performing actual laparoscopic procedures with the LabMentor virtual simulator; and getting hands-on experience and certification using da Vinci robots for robotic procedures. All residents are expected to complete Surgical Simulation Training, and any fellows interested in sharpening their skills are welcome to attend.

Along with Dr. Andolfi, UC Simulation staff, and Dr. Small, Dr. Umanskiy has developed and implemented a comprehensive surgical skills curriculum specifically designed for residents that includes basic surgical skills, minimally invasive surgery and robotics. “In the public eye, technical mastery is one of the most important attributes of a surgeon,” Dr. Umanskiy said. “The program aims to safely educate technically proficient surgeons.”

“Simulation offers an immersive, realistic way of learning technical skills,” said Dr. Andolfi. “Simulation allows trainees to make mistakes, to ask the ‘what if?’ questions, and to learn and reflect on such situations without risking patient safety.”

Five courses are offered through the S-STAR program: Skills Club, Fundamentals of Laparoscopic Surgery, Fundamentals of Endoscopic Surgery, Advanced Laparoscopic Skills and Robotic Surgical Training. Through each course, interns, residents and fellows are guided through hands-on coursework by experienced

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FACULTY HONORS Assistant professor of surgery Lisa Cannon, MD, spoke this year to the CME Symposium on topics ranging from advances in transanal surgery for rectal cancer to robotic total mesorectal excision. She also presented at the University of Chicago Women in Surgery Conference. Dr. Cannon continued to focus on her research projects, which included a Bucksbaum Institute for Clinical Excellence Pilot Grant Program where she explored promoting the skill set for compassionate patient care during invasive outpatient procedures in colon and rectal surgery. Other research areas Dr. Cannon is pursuing include the use of MR imaging following colorectal resection, and optimizing ileostomy outcomes through pathways and protocols.

UChicago Medicine professor and chief of Colon and Rectal Surgery Neil Hyman, MD, received the Robert Baker Golden Apple Award for Excellence in Teaching and was selected to be master clinician at the Bucksbaum Institute for Clinical Excellence. As a key leader at UChicago Medicine, Dr. Hyman sits on committees that manage ambulatory operations, surgery quality and patient safety improvement, and cancer prevention and control, among others. Dr. Hyman also is a leader on the national stage. He is chair of the Advisory Councils of the American College of Surgeons, director of the American Board of Colon and Rectal Surgeons, and treasurer of the American Society of Colon and Rectal Surgeons and its Research Foundation. He also co-chairs the Surgery Research Network of the Crohn’s and Colitis Foundation, and serves as associate editor of the Journal of Gastrointestinal Surgery

Roger Hurst, MD, was recognized by Chicago magazine as both a Top Doctor and a Top Cancer Doctor.

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This year, associate professor Konstantin Umanskiy, MD, was the co-director for the Best of Annual Conferences in Digestive Diseases in Chicago. In addition to this role, Dr. Umanskiy is the program director for Colon and Rectal Surgical Residency, and the associate program director for General Surgical Residency at UChicago Medicine. He also serves as the Secretary for the Illinois Surgical Society and on the leadership and member committees for the Society of American Gastrointestinal and Endoscopic Surgeons and as Chair of the Young Researchers Committee of ASCRS.

and on the editorial board of the Annals of Surgery. In addition, he was named as a Best Doctor in America®, America’s Top Doctor for Cancer®, and a Chicago magazine Top Doctor. While Dr. Hyman presented many lectures at the University of Chicago in the past year, he also spoke at the American College of Surgeons Clinical Congress, the Colorectal Residents Seventh Annual Career Course, the Crohn’s and Colitis Foundation Annual Clinical and Research Meeting, the Fifth Annual Chicago Colorectal Symposium, the Adrian J. Greenstein Inflammatory Bowel Disease Memorial Lectureship at Mount Sinai Medical Center in New York, and the 2017 Oriental Inflammatory Bowel Disease Forum in Shanghai, China. Clinical associate Radhika Smith, MD, worked to optimize patient outcomes at UChicago Medicine through her research project titled, “Optimizing our Ileostomy Outcomes through Pathways and Protocols.” She also assisted in research papers for Clinical Colon Rectal Surgery, Annals of Surgery and Seminars in Colon and Rectal Surgery. Dr. Smith also became board-eligible for the 2017 American Board of Colon and Rectal Surgery.

Neil Hyman, MD Professor of Surgery Chief, Section of Colon & Rectal Surgery Co-Director, Digestive Diseases Center

FACULTY LISTING PROFESSORS OF SURGERY Roger Hurst, MD Neil Hyman, MD

CLINICAL ASSOCIATE Radhika Smith, MD* *Denotes new faculty

ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR OF SURGERY Konstantin Umanskiy, MD ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF SURGERY Lisa Cannon, MD

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surgery by the numbers RESEARCH ACTIVITY Total new grant funding:

Active grants and contracts:

$4.8 million

123

Total new federal funding:

Active clinical trials:

$1.8 million

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EDUCATIONAL ACTIVITY Section Residents Fellows Totals Cardiac & Thoracic Surgery

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4

Colon & Rectal Surgery 1 1 Complex General Surgical Oncology 2 2 Endocrine Surgery 1 1 General Surgery 46 46 Neurosurgery 10 10 Otolaryngology-Head & Neck Surgery

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10

Pediatric Surgery 1 1 Plastic & Reconstructive Surgery

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1

13

Transplant Surgery 1 1 Urology 18 2 20 Vascular Surgery & Endovascular Therapy 2 2 Total 96 15 111

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CLINICAL ACTIVITY Section Cases Visits RVUs Cardiac & Thoracic Surgery 1,089 4,578 70,683 Colon & Rectal Surgery 860 3,459 22,364 General Surgery 2,427 11,590 64,431 Neurosurgery 1,029 7,036 36,584 Otolaryngology-Head & Neck Surgery

2,282

18,670

57,979

Pediatric Surgery 805 2,748 15,643 Plastic & Reconstructive Surgery

1,556

8,588

46,616

Transplant Surgery 378 1,903 20,088 Trauma Urology 2,602 13,863 68,267 Vascular Surgery & Endovascular Therapy

894

4,673

27,508

Total 13,922 77,108 430,163 Ostomy 1,281 1,256 Grand Total 13,922 78,389 431,419

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general

SURGERY

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Gaining Hope and Healing AFTER A CANCER DIAGNOSIS

Oncologist Hedy Lee Kindler, MD, the founder and director of UChicago Medicine’s mesothelioma program, led the team. “Dr. Kindler was the first doctor I spoke to who had extensive knowledge of the disease,” Blackford-Cleeton said. “She really helped with my anxiety about being newly diagnosed.”

Throughout her busy career, Jessica Blackford-Cleeton has provided training on public education, emergency management and reporting systems to fire departments, but nothing could prepare the 32-year-old for her own crisis. In 2015, following recurring fatigue and abdominal pain, Blackford-Cleeton was diagnosed with mesothelioma, a rare and aggressive cancer.

Blackford-Cleeton was concerned about how the extensive surgery might affect her ability to have children. She understood that tumors were in many of her organs and they would have to be removed. Prior to surgery, she gave Turaga a wish list of what she hoped could be spared: at least one ovary and her navel.

Only about 3,000 people are diagnosed with mesothelioma in the United States each year; peritoneal mesothelioma is even rarer, with just 500 to 800 cases a year. Blackford-Cleeton turned to the University of Chicago Medicine, which has a comprehensive program and team of experts devoted to mesothelioma diagnosis, treatment and research.

“Dr. Turaga came through — he saved my ovary and even the belly button,” she said. “Everyone was extremely supportive with my goal to start a family.”

With the support and guidance of her care team at UChicago Medicine, she was able to understand and successfully navigate her treatment options. Her treatment included surgery to remove the cancer, followed by a procedure called HIPEC (hyperthermic — or heated — intraperitoneal chemoperfusion), which targets and kills cancer cells that remain after surgery.

One year after surgery, she was cleared to begin in vitro fertilization. In August 2017, Jessica and her husband, Brandon Cleeton, were thrilled to welcome their son, Avery. “Mesothelioma is not a one-size-fits-all disease. You don’t just look up the cookbook and the recipe,” Kindler said. “We tailor our treatment to the patient, because we are the experts, who live, eat, and breathe this disease 24 hours a day, and who really are focused on trying to develop a cure.”

UChicago Medicine cancer surgeon Kiran Turaga, MD, MPH, is an expert in the specialized procedure. Immediately following surgery, the patient’s abdomen is treated with a powerful dose of heated chemotherapy, which circulates for 90 minutes, destroying remaining cancer cells, before it is washed out.

Kiran Turaga, MD, MPH

Added Turaga, “From our research to the treatment plans, our team thinks about each and every patient. We bring every single discovery that we make in the lab right to our patients.”

HIPEC has fewer side effects than traditional chemotherapy because the medicine targets specific areas rather than circulating throughout the whole body. Also, the heated medicine causes blood vessels to expand, allowing the chemotherapy to penetrate deeper and more effectively.

Blackford-Cleeton is grateful for what she has gained as a result of the successful surgery: her son, Avery, and her improved health. “Everything is a new normal, but my new normal is good,” she said. FACULTY HONORS Gary An, MD, co-director of the Surgical Intensive Care Unit, proudly accepted the Best Submitted Paper for Computational Approaches Award at the Cancer Workshop of Supercomputing 2016 Conference.

“I remember having a LOT of questions,” Blackford-Cleeton said. “Dr. Turaga very patiently answered everything and put my mind at ease with his knowledge and experience.”

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“ I remember having a lot

of questions. Dr. Turaga very patiently answered everything and put my mind at ease with his knowledge and experience.

Jessica Blackford-Cleeton

Peter Angelos, MD, has been officially installed as the 2016-2017 president of the American Association of Endocrine Surgeons. His swearing-in took place at the AAES 37th annual meeting in Baltimore, MD.

Associate professor Kiran Turaga, MD, has several leadership roles at UChicago Medicine that include vice chief of general surgery and surgical oncology, director of the Surgical GI Cancer Program, and director of the Regional Therapeutics Program.

Jean Bao, MD, assistant professor, assumed the role of Cancer Liaison Physician on the American College of Surgeons’ Commission on Cancer Committee. And, assistant professor Mustafa Hussain, MD, who also is the director of the Center for the Surgical Treatment of Obesity, received the Department of Surgery Teaching Award for the fifth consecutive year.

Chicago magazine highlighted several general surgery physicians on the Top Doctors list. They include:

Jeffrey Matthews, MD, was elected chair of the Residency Review Committee for Surgery (ACGME), and elected to the Southern Surgical Association. He was the keynote speaker for the Society of Black Academic Surgeons annual conference, as well as many named lectures and professorships across the country, including the 20th annual Folkert O. Belzer Visiting Professor at the University of Wisconsin Madison in Madison, WI; and the Samuel L. Perzik, MD Memorial Lectureship at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles, CA.

• Mitchell Posner, MD – Top Doctor and Top Cancer Doctor

• Peter Angelos, MD – Top Cancer Doctor • Nora Jaskowiak, MD – Top Cancer Doctor • Jeffrey B. Matthews, MD, FACS – Top Doctor • Kevin Roggin, MD – Top Cancer Doctor The Section of General Surgery also was well represented on Castle Connolly’s America’s Top Doctors list: • John Alverdy, MD – Top Doctor • Peter Angelos, MD – Top Doctor • Nora Jaskowiak, MD – Exceptional Women in Medicine Award, Honoree for Regional Top Doctor

The Thomas D. Jones Professor of Surgery Mitchell Posner, MD, was named to the Edward G. Mansour Lectureship in Surgical Oncology at Case Western Reserve University. He presented about the surgeon’s central role in making progress in pancreatic cancer. He also gave the keynote lecture to the Israeli Surgical Association about cancer prevention surgery.

• Jeffrey B. Matthews, MD, FACS – Top Doctor • Mitchell Posner, MD – Top Doctor and Top Cancer Doctor

Vivek Prachand, MD, chief quality officer for the Department of Surgery, was appointed as course director for the duodenal switch CME Course at the 2016 National Meeting of the American Society of Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery. He also served on the Advisory Council of the Illinois Surgery Quality Improvement Collaborative.

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Dr. Kiran Turaga operates on a patient using the HIPEC system.

Mitchell C. Posner, MD Thomas D. Jones Professor of Surgery Chief, Section of General Surgery Chief, Surgical Oncology Physician-in-Chief, University of Chicago Medicine Comprehensive Cancer Center

FACULTY LISTING ASSISTANT PROFESSORS OF SURGERY Jean Bao, MD* Mustafa Hussain, MD Stephan Wyers, MD

PROFESSORS OF SURGERY John Alverdy, MD Gary An, MD Peter Angelos, MD, PhD Edwin Kaplan, MD Jeffrey B. Matthews, MD Mitchell C. Posner, MD Kevin K. Roggin, MD

CLINICAL ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR Patricia Turner, MD RESEARCH PROFESSOR Olga Y. Zaborina, PhD

ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS OF SURGERY Nora T. Jaskowiak, MD Vivek N. Prachand, MD Kiran Turaga, MD

*Denotes new faculty

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development

“ I credit Dr. Agrawal with a great deal of persistence and knowledge.

Ozzie Giglio

Throat Cancer Survivor Makes $200k Gift TO RESEARCH AFTER EARLY DETECTION SAVES HIS LIFE

Giglio then underwent robotic surgery to remove the tumor from his throat. Since Dr. Agrawal’s team discovered and removed the cancer at an early juncture with favorable pathology, Giglio did not need further treatment. He celebrated his one-year anniversary of being cancer-free in fall 2017.

Ozzie Giglio of Hinsdale, Ill., had such cryptic throat cancer that even his diagnostic scans did not detect the abnormality. Thankfully, though, he found an experienced doctor who did. When he felt a suspicious lump in his neck in the summer of 2016, Giglio took his cardiologist’s recommendation to seek care at the University of Chicago Medicine, which has one of the leading head and neck cancer programs in the nation. A CT test and biopsy results suggested the lump was benign. However, Nishant Agrawal, MD, chief of the Section of OtolaryngologyHead & Neck Surgery at UChicago Medicine, suspected something was amiss.

“I credit Dr. Agrawal with a great deal of persistence and knowledge,” Giglio said. “If I had waited another six months, this could’ve been a lot worse.” Giglio’s health journey — and his gratefulness for early detection — inspired him and his wife to look for ways to support Dr. Agrawal and to help other patients. The couple, who owns 15 Harley Davidson shops and retail stores across Illinois and Wisconsin, wants to see further advances in physicians’ ability to test for and predict throat and mouth cancer. To that end, they committed to funding Dr. Agrawal’s research through a $200,000 gift.

Dr. Agrawal recognized Giglio’s squamous cell carcinoma from years of treating similar cases and his extensive experience and research in the field. Dr. Agrawal advised for the immediate removal of the mass and possibly other lymph nodes, and of those 34 lymph nodes, one tested positive for stage 3 cancer.

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The gift will help Dr. Agrawal’s lab as the researchers work toward establishing early-detection tests. The novel assay they are currently developing detects tumor-specific mutations in the saliva and blood of patients with head and neck cancer and has great promise for early detection. “Ozzie always tells me that I have a valid excuse every time I come home late from work because I am saving lives,” Dr. Agrawal said. “Now, Ozzie can use the same excuse with his wife and twins because we are saving lives together.” But it wasn’t just Dr. Agrawal’s ability to spot the cancer that made an impact on the couple. The surgeon also provided Giglio with a level of personal care that went beyond anything he had experienced at other healthcare institutions. Whenever Giglio would have a question or a concern about his treatment plan, he knew he could contact Dr. Agrawal for support. “I can’t tell you as a patient how much that means,” Giglio said of Dr. Agrawal’s responsiveness and open communication. “He was so personal and took such a direct interest in me. It was really special. When someone is that interested in what they’re doing for the right reasons, I’m going to support it as much as I can.”

DONORS Mr. Scott Joseph Adelson

The Steve Nash Foundation

Mr. David R. Andalcio and Ms. Eva P. Andalcio

Mr. John P. Paleczny and Mrs. Marlane A. Paleczny

Cinkate Pharmaceutical

POMWONDERFUL LLC

Mr. David Scott Evans and Ms. Joan Evans

Prosper Road Foundation

Mr. Sean U. Fisher and Ms. Diana C. Fisher

Resnick Family Foundation, Inc.

Mr. Sheldon Friedman and Ms. Debi Friedman

Mr. Stewart Allen Resnick and Mrs. Lynda Rae Resnick

Fulk Family Foundation

H. E. Mr. Mohammad Safadi and

Mr. and Mrs. Ozzie Giglio

Mrs. Violette Safadi

Mr. Paul Gurinas Jewish Federation of Metropolitan Chicago

Mr. Frank Smith and Mrs. Jan Smith

Dr. Paul H. Jordan, Jr., and Mrs. Lois R. Jordan

Mr. Michael Sobel and Ms. Amy Sobel

Mr. Michael Kane and Ms. Jamee C. Field Kane

Mr. Quint Studer and Ms. Mary P. Studer

Trust Estate of Courtney A. Klemen

*Dr. James Williams and Mrs. Diane Williams

Kovler Family Foundation

Mr. Francis Wisniewski

Mr. Jonathan Kovler and Ms. Sally Meyers Kovler

*deceased

Mrs. Elisabeth F. Lanzl Multicultural Educational Foundation

23


neuro

SURGERY

24


Brain Stem Tumor Removal GETS PROFESSOR BACK IN THE CLASSROOM

Dr. Warnke performed the surgery to remove the tumor in July 2016, without any damage to the brain stem. Balogun has since made a full recovery, and is back to teaching courses.

When doctors told Joseph Balogun he had a tumor on his brain stem and needed surgery, he considered his options carefully. “I decided to be proactive and choose my doctor,” he said. “I wasn’t going to have just any doctor operate on my brain.”

“This was a very complicated but delineated tumor that had grown into the brain stem,” said Dr. Warnke. “But we were fortunate that we could remove it without the slightest damage.”

Balogun, 62, a distinguished university professor of biostatistics, research methods, alternative healthcare and physical therapy at Chicago State University, wanted the best surgeon he could find. He asked his sister-in-law, Titilayo Abiona, MD, a primary care physician and clinical instructor at the University of Chicago Medicine, for help, and she recommended Peter Warnke, MD. Dr. Warnke, a professor of surgery and director of stereotactic and functional neurosurgery at UChicago Medicine, has performed more than 2,000 brain tumor surgeries, and after meeting him, Balogun knew he was in the right hands.

Balogun says he is grateful to Dr. Warnke and his care team at UChicago Medicine, especially nurse Lisa Petrella, RN, BSN, CNOR, who he called, “the best nurse I’ve ever met in Chicago.” “Any time I needed help, she was there,” he said. “I wouldn’t want to be anywhere else.”

Balogun had an epidermoid tumor growing on his brain stem. These slow-growing, benign tumors are rare, accounting for about one percent of all brain tumors. Balogun first noticed something was wrong when he started having issues with balance, and by the time he was referred to Dr. Warnke, he could no longer drive.

Pre-surgery CT scan (left) showing Balogun’s brain stem tumor in white, and the post-surgery scan (right)

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FACULTY HONORS Issam Awad, MD, John Harper Seeley Professor of Surgery, proudly serves on the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services National Council for Neurological Disorders and Stroke. He also is the medical director at the UChicago Medicine Cerebral Cavernous Malformation Program, and the director of the Safadi Program of Excellence in Clinical and Translational Neuroscience.

senior neurosurgeons who provide support to the board in its construction and administration of the written and oral certification examinations. Assistant professor of surgery Edwin Ramos, MD, began a study this past year of minimally invasive options for adult spinal deformity at the second Principles and Techniques of Complex Spinal Reconstruction Course at Weill Cornell Medical College in New York, NY.

In the past year, Dr. Awad delivered high-profile lectures at the Marine Biology Laboratory in Woods Hole, MA; Angioma Alliance Investigators Workshop on the Pathobiology of Cerebral Cabernopus Malformations in Washington, DC; International Stroke Conference in Houston, TX; American Association of Neurological Surgeons annual meeting in Los Angeles, CA; and World Intracerebral Hemorrhage Conference in Baltimore, MD. Additionally, Dr. Awad was the honored guest special lecturer at the World Association of Lebanese Neurosurgeons and Lebanese Society of Neurosurgery Joint Biannual Meeting in Beirut, Lebanon, where he also received “The Founder’s Cedar Award.”

Peter Warnke, MD, is the UChicago Medicine director of stereotactic and functional neurosurgery, and medical director of neurosurgery. He also serves on the psychosurgery and organizing committees of the American Society of Stereotactic and Functional Neurosurgery. Dr. Warnke is still the associate editor of the Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery and Psychiatry, which achieved the highest impact factor of all neurosurgical journals. And this past year, he gave the MacLean Neuroethics Lecture at the University of Chicago. He served as Surgical Site Principal Investigator for the SanBio clinical trial A Double-Blind, Controlled Phase 2B Study of the Safety and Efficacy of Modified Stem Cells (SB623) in Patients with Chronic Motor Deficit from Ischemic Stroke.

Dr. Awad is the Principal Investigator for the Minimally Invasive Surgery plus rTPA for Intracerebral Hemorrhage Evacuation and Signaling Aberrations and Cerebral Cavernous Malformation Pathogenesis studies. David Frim, MD, PhD, was appointed an American Board of Neurological Surgery Scholar, joining a group of

David M. Frim, MD, PhD Ralph Cannon Professor of Surgery Chief, Section of Neurosurgery

FACULTY LISTING RESEARCH ASSOCIATE (ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR) Robert Shenkar, PhD

PROFESSORS OF SURGERY Issam Awad, MD David M. Frim, MD, PhD Javad Hekmat-panah, MD Peter Christian Warnke, MD Bakhtiar Yamini, MD

RESEARCH ASSISTANT PROFESSOR Le Shen, PhD *Denotes new faculty

ASSISTANT PROFESSORS OF SURGERY Peleg Horowitz, MD, PhD* Edwin Ramos, MD

26


otolaryngologyhead & neck SURGERY

28


Age-Related Sensory Loss AFFECTS 94 PERCENT OF OLDER ADULTS

Jayant Pinto, MD

Age-related sensory loss is a serious problem. Jayant Pinto, MD, professor of surgery at the University of Chicago Medicine, found that olfactory dysfunction predicted mortality better than a diagnosis of heart failure or cancer. A similar study, published last September in JAMA OtolaryngologyHead & Neck Surgery, found that hearing impairment may also be associated with an increased risk of death.

• The vision study measured their ability to see under typical home lighting conditions. • Touch measured subjects’ ability to distinguish between two points on the index finger of their dominant hand. • Smell was assessed using a validated taste that presents five different smells, one at a time. • Taste testing relied on four paper strips — sour, bitter, sweet and salty — applied to the tongue. • The study rated subjects’ ability to hear on a five-point scale based on how they responded during their conversation. The interviewers also assessed participants’ age, physical and mental health, social and financial resources and education, through structured interviews, testing and questionnaires.

Now another study from Dr. Pinto’s team, the first to measure the full spectrum of age-related damage to all five senses, found that 94 percent of older adults in the United States have at least one sensory deficit, 38 percent have two, and 28 percent have three, four or five.

“We need to understand the biology behind the links between age and sensory loss and design better ways to prevent their decline,” Dr. Pinto said. The gradual decline of input from the senses “constrains how the elderly cope with social, physical and cognitive stresses,” Dr. Pinto said. “It is a major part of why older people report decreased quality of life.”

Some of these deficits were mild but many were serious. Nearly two-thirds (64%) of those in the study suffered from a significant deficit in at least one sense; 22 percent had major deficits in two or more senses.

FACULTY HONORS Professor and chief of otolaryngology Nishant Agrawal, MD, received the Outstanding Achievement Award this year from the Society of American Asian Scientists in Cancer Research. The American Association for Cancer Research also bestowed upon him the Team Science Award. In addition to these awards, Dr. Agrawal was named a Bucksbaum Institute Senior Faculty Scholar.

“We know that sensory impairment is common and is often a harbinger of serious health problems, such as cognitive decline or falls,” said Dr. Pinto. “Our findings here give us a better appreciation of the prevalence of multi-sensory loss.” The most prevalent sensory deficit, affecting 74 percent of participants in the study, was a decrease in the sense of taste. Decreased sense of touch was also common.

Professor of surgery Fuad Baroody, MD, received the Faculty Physician Peer Role Model Award from the university’s Physician and Medical Student Professionalism Committee.

The authors found evidence of a common process underlying impairment of the five senses. They suspect that this underlying factor could involve nerve degeneration, environmental insults or underlying genetic susceptibility that contributes to sensory loss associated with aging.

Professors of surgery Elizabeth Blair, MD, and Jayant Pinto, MD, received the Gold Foundation Award to study “Professionalism and Discrimination in Graduate Medical Education: Identifying Challenges and Simulation-Based Solutions for Maintaining Professionalism When Faced with Discrimination.”

The sensory impairment study was part of the National Social Life, Health and Aging Project (NSHAP), the first in-home study of social relationships and health in older adults.

29


Director of the Comprehensive Ear and Hearing Center, and associate professor Michael Gluth, MD, designed what will be known as the “Gluth Alto,” which is an Ossicular Replacement Prosthesis Titanium Middle Ear Implant Line. Dr. Gluth also performed the first endoscopic eustachian tube dilation in the city of Chicago.

Professor Dana Suskind, MD, is the founder and director of the Thirty Million Words Initiative and Project ASPIRE. This year, Dr. Suskind served as the principal investigator for a controlled trial titled, “Thirty Million Words Spanish-Language Adaptation and Evaluation of the Home Visiting Intervention.”

“ We need to understand the biology behind the links between age and sensory loss, and design better ways to prevent their decline.

• Fuad Baroody, MD – Top Doctor

Chicago magazine recognized several physicians from otolaryngology in its Top Doctors list: • Elizabeth Blair, MD – Top Cancer Doctor • Jacquelynne Corey, MD – Top Doctor • Robert Naclerio, MD – Top Doctor • Louis Portugal, MD – Top Cancer Doctor The Section of Otolaryngology-Head & Neck Surgery was wellrepresented on Castle Connolly’s America’s Top Doctors list:

• Fuad Baroody, MD – Pediatric Otolaryngology

Dr. Jayant Pinto

• Elizabeth Blair, MD – Otolaryngology • Jacquelynne Corey, MD - Otolaryngology • Robert Naclerio, MD – Otolaryngology

Zhen Gooi, MD, assistant professor, participated in the first transoral thyroidectomy in the Midwest region. This procedure was only the fourth of its kind completed in the country.

• Jayant M. Pinto, MD – Otolaryngology

Nishant Agrawal, MD Professor of Surgery Chief, Section of Otolaryngology-Head & Neck Surgery Director, Head & Neck Surgery Oncology

FACULTY LISTING ASSISTANT PROFESSORS OF SURGERY Semirra Bayan, MD* Zhen Gooi, MD Andrea Shogan, MD*

PROFESSORS OF SURGERY Nishant Agrawal, MD Fuad Baroody, MD Elizabeth Blair, MD Jacquelynne Corey, MD Robert M. Naclerio, MD Jayant M. Pinto, MD Louis Portugal, MD Dana L. Suskind, MD

CLINICAL PROFESSOR OF SURGERY Anthony J. Geroulis, MD *Denotes new faculty

ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR OF SURGERY Michael Gluth, MD

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select PUBLICATIONS

CARDIAC & THORACIC SURGERY 1. Bindu S, Pillai VB, Gupta MP. Role of Sirtuins in Regulating Pathophysiology of the Heart. Trends Endocrinol Metab. 2016 Aug;27(8):563-73. doi: 10.1016/j.tem.2016.04.015. Epub 2016 May 19. Review. PubMed PMID:27210897 2. Akamata K, Wei J, Bhattacharyya M, Cheresh P, Bonner MY, Arbiser JL, Raparia K, Gupta MP, Kamp DW, Varga J. SIRT3 is attenuated in systemic sclerosis skin and lungs, and its pharmacologic activation mitigates organ fibrosis. Oncotarget. 2016 Oct 25;7(43):69321-69336. doi: 10.18632/ oncotarget.12504. PubMed PMID:27732568 PubMed Central PMCID:PMC5342480 3. Tabit CE, Chen P, Kim GH, Fedson SE, Sayer G, Coplan MJ, Jeevanandam V, Uriel N, Liao JK. Elevated Angiopoietin-2 Level in Patients With ContinuousFlow Left Ventricular Assist Devices Leads to Altered Angiogenesis and Is Associated With Higher Nonsurgical Bleeding. Circulation. 2016 Jul 12;134(2):141-52. doi: 10.1161/CIRCULATIONAHA.115.019692. Epub 2016 Jun 28. PubMed PMID:27354285 PubMed Central PMCID:PMC4942355 4. Hollatz A, Balkhy HH, Chaney MA, Neuburger PJ, Gerlach RM, Guy TS. Robotic Mitral Valve Repair With Right Ventricular Pacing-Induced Ventricular Fibrillatory Arrest. J Cardiothorac Vasc Anesth. 2017 Feb;31(1):345353. doi: 10.1053/j.jvca.2016.06.023. Epub 2016 Jun 18. No abstract available. PubMed PMID:28277246. 5. Beckert AK, Huisingh-Scheetz M, Thompson K, Celauro AD, Williams J, Pachwicewicz P, Ferguson MK. Screening for Frailty in Thoracic Surgical Patients. Ann Thorac Surg. 2017 Mar;103(3):956-961. doi: 10.1016/j.athoracsur.2016.08.078. Epub 2016 Oct 6. PubMed PMID:27720368

COLON & RECTAL SURGERY 1. Steinhagen E, Colwell J, Cannon LM. Intestinal StomasPostoperative Stoma Care and Peristomal Skin Complications. Clin Colon Rectal Surg. 2017 Jul;30(3): 184-192. doi: 10.1055/ s-0037-1598159. Epub 2017 May 22. PubMed PMID: 28684936 PubMed Central PMCID: PMC5498169 2. Alverdy JC, Hyman N, Gilbert J, Luo JN, Krezalek M. Preparing the Bowel for Surgery: Learning from the Past and Planning for the Future. J Am Coll Surg. 2017 Aug;225(2):324332. doi: 10.1016/j.jamcollsurg.2017.05.005. Epub 2017 May 19. Review. No abstract available. PubMed PMID: 28529136 3. Stack ME, Umanskiy K. Robotic-Assisted Transanal Repair of a Rectovaginal Fistula. J Gastrointest Surg. 2016 Dec;20(12):2106. Epub 2016 May 24. PubMed PMID: 27220332

GENERAL SURGERY 1. Belogortseva N, Krezalek M, Guyton K, Labno C, Poroyko V, Zaborina O, Alverdy JC. Media from macrophages co-

incubated with Enterococcus faecalis induces epithelial cell monolayer reassembly and altered cell morphology. PLoS One. 2017 Aug 9;12(8):e0182825. doi: 10.1371/journal. pone.0182825. eCollection 2017. PubMed PMID:28793333 PubMed Central PMCID:PMC5549984 2. White MG, Ward MA, Applewhite MK, Wong H, Prachand V, Angelos P, Kaplan EL, Grogan RH. Rates of secondary hyperparathyroidism after bypass operation for supermorbid obesity: An overlooked phenomenon. Surgery. 2017 Mar;161(3):720-726. doi: 10.1016/j.surg.2016.08.046. Epub 2016 Oct 18. PubMed PMID:27769660 3. Clancy CE, An G, Cannon WR, Liu Y, May EE, Ortoleva P, Popel AS, Sluka JP, Su J, Vicini P, Zhou X, Eckmann DM. Multiscale Modeling in the Clinic: Drug Design and Development. Ann Biomed Eng. 2016 Sep;44(9):2591610. doi: 10.1007/s10439-016-1563-0. Epub 2016 Feb 17. Review. PubMed PMID:26885640 PubMed Central PMCID:PMC4983472 4. Rugo HS, Olopade OI, DeMichele A, Yau C, van ‘t Veer LJ, Buxton MB, Hogarth M, Hylton NM, Paoloni M, Perlmutter J, Symmans WF, Yee D, Chien AJ, Wallace AM, Kaplan HG, Boughey JC, Haddad TC, Albain KS, Liu MC, Isaacs C, Khan QJ, Lang JE, et al. Adaptive Randomization of Veliparib-Carboplatin Treatment in Breast Cancer. N Engl J Med. 2016 Jul 7;375(1):23-34. doi: 10.1056/ NEJMoa1513749. PubMed PMID:27406347 PubMed Central PMCID:PMC5259561 5. Kantor O, Schneider AB, Rojnica M, Benjamin AJ, Schindler N, Posner MC, Matthews JB, Roggin KK. Implementing a resident acute care surgery service: Improving resident education and patient care. Surgery. 2017 Mar;161(3):876883. doi: 10.1016/j.surg.2016.09.033. Epub 2016 Dec 5. PubMed PMID:27932029

NEUROSURGERY 1. Hanley DF, Thompson RE, Muschelli J, Rosenblum M, McBee N, Lane K, Bistran-Hall AJ, Mayo SW, Keyl P, Gandhi D, Morgan TC, Ullman N, Mould WA, Carhuapoma JR, Kase C, Ziai W, Thompson CB, Yenokyan G, Huang E, Broaddus WC, Graham RS, Aldrich EF, et al. Safety and efficacy of minimally invasive surgery plus alteplase in intracerebral haemorrhage evacuation (MISTIE): a randomised, controlled, open-label, phase 2 trial. Lancet Neurol. 2016 Nov;15(12):1228-1237. doi: 10.1016/ S1474-4422(16)30234-4. Epub 2016 Oct 11. PubMed PMID:27751554 PubMed Central PMCID:PMC5154627

Mar 31. doi: 10.1097/BRS.0000000000002180. [Epub ahead of print]. PubMed PMID: 28368986 4. Serafini A, Issa NP, Rose S, Wu S, Warnke P, Tao JX. TIRDA Originating From Lateral Temporal Cortex in a Patient With mTLE Is Not Related to Hippocampal Activity. J Clin Neurophysiol. 2016 Dec;33(6):e34-e38. PubMed PMID:27753735 5. Bi WL, Greenwald NF, Abedalthagafi M, Wala J, Gibson WJ, Agarwalla PK, Horowitz P, Schumacher SE, Esaulova E, Mei Y, Chevalier A, Ducar M, Thorner AR, van Hummelen P, Stemmer-Rachamimov A, Artyomov M, Al-Mefty O, Dunn GP, Santagata S, Dunn IF, Beroukhim R. Genomic landscape of high-grade meningiomas. NPJ Genom Med. 2017;2. pii: 15. doi: 10.1038/s41525-017-0014-7. Epub 2017 Apr 26. PubMed PMID:28713588 PubMed Central PMCID:PMC5506858

OTOLARYNGOLOGY-HEAD & NECK SURGERY 1. Bousquet J, Schünemann HJ, Hellings PW, Arnavielhe S, Bachert C, Bedbrook A, Bergmann KC, Bosnic-Anticevich S, Brozek J, Calderon M, Canonica GW, Casale TB, Chavannes NH, Cox L, Chrystyn H, Cruz AA, Dahl R, De Carlo G, Demoly P, Devillier P, Dray G, Fletcher M, et al. MACVIA clinical decision algorithm in adolescents and adults with allergic rhinitis. J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2016 Aug;138(2):367-374.e2. doi: 10.1016/j.jaci.2016.03.025. Epub 2016 Apr 23. Review. PubMed PMID:27260321 2. Marur S, Li S, Cmelak AJ, Gillison ML, Zhao WJ, Ferris RL, Westra WH, Gilbert J, Bauman JE, Wagner LI, Trevarthen DR, Balkrishna J, Murphy BA, Agrawal N, Colevas AD, Chung CH, Burtness B. E1308: Phase II Trial of Induction Chemotherapy Followed by Reduced-Dose Radiation and Weekly Cetuximab in Patients With HPV-Associated Resectable Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the OropharynxECOG-ACRIN Cancer Research Group. J Clin Oncol. 2016 Dec 28:JCO2016683300. doi: 10.1200/JCO.2016.68.3300. [Epub ahead of print]. PubMed PMID:28029303 PubMed Central PMCID:PMC5455313 3. Paz Lansberg M, DeTineo M, Lane J, Pinto JM, Baroody FM, Naclerio RM. A clinical trial of a microcrystalline cellulose topical nasal spray on the acute response to allergen challenge. Am J Rhinol Allergy. 2016 Jul;30(4):269-73. doi: 10.2500/ajra.2016.30.4314. PubMed PMID:27456597

2. Ralston A, Ogden P, Kohrman MH, Frim DM. In situ repair of vagus nerve stimulator lead damage: technical note. J Neurosurg Pediatr. 2016 Dec; 25(6): 679-682. Epub 2016 Sep 9. PubMed PMID 27611900

4. Yesensky J, Agrawal N, Bayan S, Blair E, Portugal L, Chan J, Goldenberg D, Gooi Z. AHNS Series - Do you know your guidelines? Principles of treatment for glottic cancer: A review of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network guidelines. Head Neck. 2017 Sep;39(9):1729-1732. doi: 10.1002/ hed.24816. Epub 2017 Jun 27. PubMed PMID:28653453

3. Idowu OA, Boyajian HH, Ramos E, Shi LL, Lee MJ. Trend of Spine Surgeries In the Outpatient Hospital Setting vs. Ambulatory Surgical Center. Spine (Phila Pa 1976). 2017

5. Cifu AS, Walker DD, Gluth MB. Guidelines for TinnitusReply. JAMA. 2016 Sep 20; 316(11): 1215. doi: 10.1001/jama. 2016. 11908. No abstract available. PubMed PMID: 27654616

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PEDIATRIC SURGERY 1. Ehrlich PF, Hamilton TE, Gow K, Barnhart D, Ferrer F, Kandel J, Glick R, Dasgupta R, Naranjo A, He Y, Perlman EJ, Kalapurakal JA, Khanna G, Dome JS, Geller J, Mullen E. Surgical protocol violations in children with renal tumors provides an opportunity to improve pediatric cancer care: a report from the Children’s Oncology Group. Pediatr Blood Cancer. 2016 Nov;63(11):1905-10. doi: 10.1002/pbc.26083. Epub 2016 May 27. PubMed PMID:27229358 PubMed Central PMCID:PMC5030129 2. Wu JK, Hooper ED, Laifer-Narin SL, Simpson LL, Kandel J, Shawber CJ; Lymphatics Work Group at CUMC..Initial Experience With Propranolol Treatment of Lymphatic Anomalies: A Case Series. Pediatrics. 2016 Sep;138(3). pii: e20154545. doi: 10.1542/peds.2015-4545. Epub 2016 Aug 25.PubMed PMID:27561730 PubMed Central PMCID:PMC5005016 3. Lal DR, Gadepalli SK, Downard CD, Ostlie DJ, Minneci PC, Swedler RM, Chelius TH, Cassidy L, Rapp CT, Billmire D, Bruch S, Burns RC, Deans KJ, Fallat ME, Fraser JD, Grabowski J, Hebel F, Helmrath MA, Hirschl RB, Kabre R, Kohler J, Landman MP, et al. Challenging surgical dogma in the management of proximal esophageal atresia with distal tracheoesophageal fistula: Outcomes from the Midwest Pediatric Surgery Consortium. J Pediatr Surg. 2017 Jun 1. pii: S0022-3468(17)30342-1. doi: 10.1016/j. jpedsurg.2017.05.024. [Epub ahead of print]. PubMed PMID:28599967 4. Hsieh LB, Tan JM, Trostler M, Scriven R, Lee TK, Seidman PA. Single-shot thoracic epidural: an aid to earlier discharge for pediatric laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Paediatr Anaesth. 2016 Sep;26(9):945-6. doi: 10.1111/pan.12960. PubMed PMID: 27461770. 5. Bawa HS, Moore DD, Pelayo JC, Cipriani N, Mak G, Haydon RC. Pediatric Chondrosarcoma of the Sternum Resected with Thorascopic Assistance. Open Orthop J. 2017 May 31;11:479-485. doi: 10.2174/1874325001711010479. eCollection 2017. PubMed PMID:28694886 PubMed Central PMCID:PMC5481619

PLASTIC & RECONSTRUCTIVE SURGERY 1. Chang DW, Masia J, Garza R 3rd, Skoracki R, Neligan PC. Lymphedema: Surgical and Medical Therapy. Plast Reconstr Surg. 2016 Sep;138(3 Suppl):209S-18S. doi: 10.1097/ PRS.0000000000002683. Review. PubMed PMID:27556764 2. Maldonado AA, Silva AK, Humphries LS, Gottlieb LJ. Complex Orofacial Reconstruction with the Intrinsic Chimeric Flap. J Reconstr Microsurg. 2017 May;33(4):233243. doi: 10.1055/s-0036-1597656. Epub 2017 Jan 5. PubMed PMID:28056483 3. Lam G, Weichman KE, Reavey PL, Wilson SC, Levine JP, Saadeh PB, Allen RJ, Choi M, Karp NS, Thanik VD. Analysis of Flap Weight and Postoperative Complications Based on Flap Weight in Patients Undergoing Microsurgical Breast Reconstruction. J Reconstr Microsurg. 2017 Mar; 33(3): 186-193. doi: 10.1055/s-0036-1594298. Epub 2016 Dec 5. PubMed PMID: 27919113 4. Dumanian ZP, Tollemar V, Ye J, Lu M, Zhu Y, Liao J, Ameer GA, He TC, Reid RR. Repair of critical sized cranial defects with BMP9-transduced calvarial cells delivered in a thermoresponsive scaffold. PLoS One. 2017 Mar 1;12(3):e0172327. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0172327. eCollection 2017. PubMed PMID:28249039 PubMed Central PMCID:PMC5332017

Reconstr Aesthet Surg. 2017 Sep;70(9):1186-1190. doi: 10.1016/j.bjps.2017.05.029. Epub 2017 May 20. PubMed PMID:28625758

SURGICAL RESEARCH 1. Stein MM, Hrusch CL, Gozdz J, Igartua C, Pivniouk V, Murray SE, Ledford JG, Marques Dos Santos M, Anderson RL, Metwali N, Neilson JW, Maier RM, Gilbert JA, Holbreich M, Thorne PS, Martinez FD, von Mutius E, Vercelli D, Ober C, Sperling AI. Innate Immunity and Asthma Risk in Amish and Hutterite Farm Children. N Engl J Med. 2016 Aug 4;375(5):411-421. doi: 10.1056/ NEJMoa1508749. PubMed PMID:27518660 PubMed Central PMCID:PMC5137793 2. Gilbert JA, Quinn RA, Debelius J, Xu ZZ, Morton J, Garg N, Jansson JK, Dorrestein PC, Knight R. Microbiome-wide association studies link dynamic microbial consortia to disease. Nature. 2016 Jul 7;535(7610):94-103. doi: 10.1038/ nature18850. Review. PubMed PMID:27383984 3. Ma B, Wang H, Dsouza M, Lou J, He Y, Dai Z, Brookes PC, Xu J, Gilbert JA. Geographic patterns of co-occurrence network topological features for soil microbiota at continental scale in eastern China. ISME J. 2016 Aug;10(8):1891-901. doi: 10.1038/ismej.2015.261. Epub 2016 Jan 15. PubMed PMID:26771927 PubMed Central PMCID:PMC5029158 4. Matlin KS, Myllymäki SM, Manninen A. Laminins in Epithelial Cell Polarization: Old Questions in Search of New Answers. Cold Spring Harb Perspect Biol. 2017 Feb 3. poo: a027920. doi: 10.1101/cshperspect.a027920. [Epub ahead of print]. PubMed PMID: 28159878. 5. Matlin KS, Caplan MJ. The secretory pathway at 50: a golden anniversary for some momentous grains of silver. Mol Biol Cell. 2017 Jan 15;28(2):229-232. doi: 10.1091/mbc. E16-070508. PubMed PMID: 28082520

TRANSPLANT SURGERY 1. Baker TB. Living liver donation, donor safety, and social media: Preparing for a new frontier. Liver Transpl. 2017 Feb;23(2):131-132. doi: 10.1002/lt.24698. No abstract available. PubMed PMID:28006869 2. Moris D, Tsilimigras DI, Ntanasis-Stathopoulos I, Beal EW, Felekouras E, Vernadakis S, Fung JJ, Pawlik TM. Liver transplantation in patients with liver metastases from neuroendocrine tumors: A systematic review. Surgery. 2017 Sep;162(3):525-536. doi: 10.1016/j.surg.2017.05.006. Epub 2017 Jun 16. PubMed PMID:28624178 3. Gołąb K, Grose R, Trzonkowski P, Wickrema A, Tibudan M, Marek-Trzonkowska N, Matosz S, Solomina J, Ostrega D, Michael Millis J, Witkowski P. Utilization of leukapheresis and CD4 positive selection in Treg isolation and the ex-vivo expansion for a clinical application in transplantation and autoimmune disorders. Oncotarget. 2016 Nov 29;7(48):79474-79484. doi: 10.18632/ oncotarget.13101. PubMed PMID:27821811 PubMed Central PMCID:PMC5346728 4. Young JS, McIntosh C, Alegre ML, Chong AS. Evolving Approaches in the Identification of Allograft-reactive T and B Cells in Mice and Humans. Transplantation. 2017 Jun 8. doi: 10.1097/TP.0000000000001847. [Epub ahead of print]. PubMed PMID:28604446 5. Bodzin AS. Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) recurrence and what to do when it happens. Hepatobiliary Surg Nutr. 2016. Dec;5(6):503-505. doi: 10.21037/hbsn.2016.11.06. PubMed PMID: 28124008

5. Agarwal S, Shenaq D, Teven CM, Prachand V, Roughton M, Zachary L. Body contouring after obesity surgery is associated with a weight loss benefit among patients. J Plast

33

UROLOGY 1. Shah PH, Moreira DM, Okhunov Z, Patel VR, Chopra S, Razmaria AA, Alom M, George AK, Yaskiv O, Schwartz MJ, Desai M, Vira MA, Richstone L, Landman J, Shalhav AL, Gill I, Kavoussi LR. Positive Surgical Margins Increase Risk of Recurrence after Partial Nephrectomy for High Risk Renal Tumors. J Urol. 2016 Aug;196(2):327-34. doi: 10.1016/j.juro.2016.02.075. Epub 2016 Feb 19. PubMed PMID:26907508 2. Rosenkrantz AB, Verma S, Choyke P, Eberhardt SC, Eggener SE, Gaitonde K, Haider MA, Margolis DJ, Marks LS, Pinto P, Sonn GA, Taneja SS. Prostate Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Magnetic Resonance Imaging Targeted Biopsy in Patients with a Prior Negative Biopsy: A Consensus Statement by AUA and SAR. J Urol. 2016 Dec;196(6):16131618. doi: 10.1016/j.juro.2016.06.079. Epub 2016 Jun 16. PubMed PMID:27320841 3. Pearce SM, Pariser JJ, Karrison T, Patel SG, Eggener SE. Comparison of Perioperative and Early Oncologic Outcomes between Open and Robotic Assisted Laparoscopic Prostatectomy in a Contemporary Population Based Cohort. J Urol. 2016 Jul;196(1):76-81. doi: 10.1016/j.juro.2016.01.105. Epub 2016 Feb 6. PubMed PMID:26860793 4. Choy B, Pearce SM, Anderson BB, Shalhav AL, Zagaja G, Eggener SE, Paner GP. Prognostic Significance of Percentage and Architectural Types of Contemporary Gleason Pattern 4 Prostate Cancer in Radical Prostatectomy. Am J Surg Pathol. 2016 Oct;40(10):1400-6. doi: 10.1097/ PAS.0000000000000691. PubMed PMID:27379821 5. Sweis RF, Spranger S, Bao R, Paner GP, Stadler WM, Steinberg G, Gajewski TF. Molecular Drivers of the NonT-cell-Inflamed Tumor Microenvironment in Urothelial Bladder Cancer. Cancer Immunol Res. 2016 Jul;4(7):5638. doi: 10.1158/2326-6066.CIR-15-0274. Epub 2016 May 17. PubMed PMID:27197067 PubMed Central PMCID:PMC4943758

VASCULAR SURGERY & ENDOVASCULAR THERAPY 1. Hart T, Milner R. Surgical Versus Endovascular Aortic Aneurysm Repair: Evidence to Guide the Optmal Approach for the Individual Patient. Curr Atheroscler Rep. 2016 Dec; 18(12):76. Review. PubMed PMID: 27815827 2. Wong LA, Milner R. Interhospital Transfer of Ruptured AAA’s for EVAR: Preposterous or Prudent? Vasc Endovascular Surg. 2016 Aug; 50(6): 455-7. doi: 10.1177/1538574416661106. Epub 2016 Aug 2. Review. No abstract available. PubMed PMID: 27488418 3. Skelly CL, Cifu AS. Screening, Evaluation, and Treatment of Peripheral Arterial Disease. JAMA. 2016 Oct 11;316(14):1486-1487. doi: 10.1001/jama.2016.11103. PubMed PMID: 27727372 4. Skelly CL, Cifu AS. Screening, Evaluation, and Treatment of Peripheral Arterial Disease. JAMA. 2016 Oct 11;316(14):1486-1487. doi: 10.1001/jama.2016.11103. PubMed PMID: 27727372


pediatric SURGERY

34


Trauma Interventions SHOULD BE RIGHT-SIZED FOR KIDS

whereas children younger than 16 can be cared for at a pediatric trauma center. Dr. Slidell and Selwyn Rogers, Jr., MD, MPH, director of the UChicago Medicine adult trauma center, are aligning policies and protocols to build a seamless approach to treating all injured children, regardless of age.

Children with traumatic injuries often have better outcomes when they are treated at pediatric trauma centers rather than adult trauma centers. Recent research suggests that children involved in motor vehicle collisions have fewer complications, and children with severe traumatic brain injuries have lower mortality, when pediatric trauma specialists and critical care teams are managing their care.

“Collaboration across the two trauma centers will augment and strengthen the state-of-the-art trauma services provided by Comer Children’s Hospital and allow us to define a new level of excellence in pediatric trauma care,” says Dr. Slidell. “It will also enable us to expand our efforts to prevent traumatic injuries, and to enhance our current outreach programs that help kids and families heal from both the physical and psychological effects of trauma.”

“We want to take care of injured children where we can deliver the best care for their particular injury,” said pediatric trauma surgeon Mark Slidell, MD, MPH, director of pediatric trauma.

“ Collaboration across

FACULTY HONORS

the two trauma centers will augment and strengthen the state-of-the-art trauma services provided by Comer Children’s Hospital and allow us to define a new level of excellence in pediatric trauma care.

Chief of pediatric surgery at UChicago Medicine, Jessica Kandel, MD, was appointed to the Illinois Department of Public Health Perinatal Levels of Care workgroup last year. This is in addition to her work on the Board of Governors and with the American Pediatric Surgical Association. Grace Mak, MD, associate professor, was thrilled to be appointed in 2017 as the medical director of the Comer Children’s Hospital operating rooms. Mark Slidell, MD, MPH, assistant professor, was pleased to take on responsibilities as the pediatric trauma director. Chicago magazine recognized several physicians from pediatric surgery in its Top Doctors list:

• Nikunj Chokshi, MD – Top Cancer Doctor • Jessica Kandel, MD – Top Doctor and Top Cancer Doctor

Dr. Mark Slidell

• Deborah Loeff, MD – Top Cancer Doctor • Grace Mak, MD – Top Cancer Doctor • Mark Slidell, MD, MPH – Top Cancer Doctor

In a unique collaboration, Comer Children’s Level I Trauma Center will partner with the University of Chicago Medicine’s new adult Level I Trauma Center when it opens in May 2018 to create comprehensive care of pediatric trauma patients. In Illinois, EMS brings children age 16 and older to an adult trauma center,

35


Jessica J. Kandel, MD Mary Campau Ryerson Professor of Surgery Chief, Section of Pediatric Surgery Surgeon-in-Chief, Comer Children’s Hospital

FACULTY LISTING Deborah Loeff, MD Manish Raiji, MD* Bethany Slater, MD* Mark Slidell, MD, MPH

PROFESSORS OF SURGERY Jessica J. Kandel, MD Thomas Lee, MD ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR OF SURGERY Grace Mak, MD

RESEARCH ASSISTANT PROFESSOR Sonia Hernandez, PhD

ASSISTANT PROFESSORS OF SURGERY Erik Barthel, MD* Nikunj Chokshi, MD

*Denotes new faculty

37


plastic & reconstructive SURGERY

38


Lymphedema Surgery Gives Relief FOR BREAST CANCER SURVIVOR

early 2014 and then was referred to Brooke Phillips, MD, a medical oncologist and hematologist at the University of Chicago Medicine Comprehensive Cancer Center at Silver Cross Hospital in New Lenox, Ill.

For Jacquetta Christodolos of Custer Park, Ill., breast cancer was the easy part. About a year after her cancer treatment concluded in early 2014, she developed a chronic, painful swelling in her arm and fingers called lymphedema. The condition, which can affect breast cancer patients after they’ve had lymph nodes removed or damaged during radiation, is the result of lymphatic fluid that cannot drain properly. Instead, the fluid builds up in various parts of the body.

Dr. Phillips coordinated Christodolos’ care as she underwent a year of chemotherapy and radiation. Though the breast cancer went in to remission, Christodolos’ lymphedema was unrelenting. Phillips recommended seeing David Chang, MD, the chief of plastic and reconstructive surgery at UChicago Medicine and a pioneer in the treatment of lymphedema.

Christodolos tried to combat the swelling with various compression garments and physical therapy, but the non-surgical options offered little help. Her arm and fingers swelled to about 20 percent larger than their normal size, and ability to tend to her 10 acres of farmland — including 100 chickens and an expansive vegetable garden — was severely hampered.

Dr. Chang performed a lymph node transfer combined with breast reconstruction in 2015 to combat Christodolos’ lymphedema, bringing healthy lymph nodes from another part of her body to the site near her arm where the lymph nodes had been damaged during cancer treatment.

“For me, lymphedema was worse than the cancer. It made me feel unhappy all the time because I could hardly bend my fingers because of the tightness,” she said. “I thought to myself, ‘I don’t know if I can go through this every day.’”

“The lymph node transfer can help repair damaged lymphatic system by re-establishing connection with the open lymphatic vessels over time,” Dr. Chang said. The thought of yet another surgery made Christodolos wary, but she couldn’t continue to live with the pain and disfigurement of lymphedema. After consulting with Dr. Chang, she felt much

In 2013, Christodolos’ local physician diagnosed her with ductal carcinoma in-situ, an early form of breast cancer that is confined to the layer of cells where it began. She had a mastectomy in

“ It was well worth it,

and I’m glad I had it done. It feels good to have great doctors behind you. Dr. Chang and Dr. Phillips are the best.

Jacquetta Christodolos

39


from the Department of Surgery and the 2017 Distinguished Physician Award from the Illinois Society of Plastic Surgeons. He also was named to U.S.News & World Report’s Best Doctors list, Castle Connolly’s America’s Top Doctors list, and Chicago magazine’s Top 10 Plastic Surgeons in Chicago list.

more at ease and confident that he had the skills and expertise to tackle her condition. “It was well worth it, and I’m glad I had it done,” said Christodolos, whose lymphedema has been kept completely at bay in the two years since her procedures. She has not experienced any side effects. “It feels good to have great doctors behind you. Dr. Chang and Dr. Phillips are the best.”

Dr. Gottlieb was honored to present the Peter Buehler Lecture at the University of Washington. He also was a visiting professor at Montefiore Medical Center, the Albert Einstein College of Medicine and New York University. Dr. Gottlieb’s leadership extends to the American Society for Reconstructive Microsurgery, the American Society for Gender Surgery and the American Society of Plastic Surgery.

FACULTY HONORS Professor David Chang, MD, is the chief of the Section of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery and the director of the Microsurgery Fellowship at UChicago Medicine. This year, he was named to Chicago’s Top Doctors list by Chicago magazine and to Castle Connolly’s America’s Top Cancer Doctors list. Dr. Chang also serves as the President of the American Society for Reconstructive Microsurgery, the President-elect of the World Society for Reconstructive Microsurgery, a member of the Board of Directors for the American Society of Plastic Surgery.

He was the recipient of a prestigious award from the ASRM, and will be giving the annual Buncke Lecture. He was also selected for the Bucksbaum Institute Senior Faculty Scholar Award at the University of Chicago. Paul and Allene Russell Professor of Surgery, Raphael Lee, MD, ScD, received several awards and honors this past year. He was elected to the American Surgical Association and was named to Castle Connolly’s lists of America’s Top Doctors and

Lawrence Gottlieb, MD, director of the Burn and Complex Wound Center, accepted the 2017 Excellence in Teaching Award

40


named as a fellow of the University of Chicago Pritzker School of Medicine Academy of Distinguished Medical Educators. Dr. Reid actively engaged with national healthcare organizations such as the Society of Black Academic Surgeons, American Association of Plastic Surgeons and the Annals of Plastic Surgery. He also worked on his research project titled, “Transcriptome Analysis in Nonsyndromic Craniosynostosis.” In addition to teaching and research, Dr. Reid also contributed a chapter about reconstruction of the scalp and cranium to, “The Unfavorable Result in Plastic Surgery,” by M.M. Cohen and S. Thaller.

Top Plastic Surgeons in Chicago. He served on the executive committee and as the director of adult regenerative surgery for the Center for Advanced Regenerative Engineering. Dr. Lee was selected for the American College of Surgeons’ International Subcommittee on Operation Giving Back, received a lifetime achievement award from Marquis Who’s Who in the World, and was awarded two USPTO patents. Dr. Lee was also named to Chicago magazine’s Top Doctors list. Assistant professor Patrick Reavey, MD, joined the American Society for Surgery of the Hand’s 2016 Young Leaders Class. His class of 14 physicians from across the United States will present their research and findings into the key issues within the upper extremity profession to the Council during the winter meeting. Dr. Reavey was named the associate program director for the Plastic & Reconstructive Surgery Residency Program. He was also appointed a Bucksbaum Institute associate junior faculty scholar at the University of Chicago. He also passed his oral examination for the American Board of Plastic Surgery. Professor Russell Reid, MD, PhD, was named the program director for the Plastic & Reconstructive Surgery Residency Program. He was selected for the Bucksbaum Institute Senior Faculty Scholar Award at the University of Chicago. He was also

David Chang, MD Professor of Surgery Chief, Section of Plastic & Reconstructive Surgery

FACULTY LISTING CLINICAL PROFESSOR Laurie Casas, MD Julius W. Few, MD

PROFESSORS OF SURGERY David Chang, MD Lawrence Gottlieb, MD Raphael Lee, MD, ScD Russell R. Reid, MD, PhD Lawrence S. Zachary, MD

CLINICAL ASSOCIATES Sara Dickie, MD Michael Stosich, DMD

ASSISTANT PROFESSORS OF SURGERY Rebecca Garza, MD* Patrick Reavey, MD

*Denotes new faculty

41


education The Surgical Assessment and Training Tool, STAT 2.0, a software platform created and implemented by one of our own residents, Andrew Schneider, MD, has resulted in more than 3,300 assessments of resident surgical performance over the last year. This allows real-time feedback to surgical residents on their operative skills, informs our Clinical Competency Committee decisions with longitudinal assessment data and supports the development of personal learning plans for our trainees. All of these efforts result in better trained surgeons and better patient care. Based on the outstanding educational experience available at UChicago Medicine, the general surgery program received ACGME approval to increase the yearly complement of surgical trainees from six to seven residents per year.

The future of surgery is only as strong as the next generation of surgeons. Recognizing the fundamental role education plays in shaping the future of surgery and patient care, faculty in the Department of Surgery are dedicated to using evidence-based education to optimize training at the University of Chicago Medicine and globally. Under the direction of Nora Jaskowiak, MD, associate professor of surgery, the Department of Surgery shepherds approximately 85 Pritzker School of Medicine third year students through its Surgery Clerkship each year. The goal is to support students, whether they choose a surgical career or not, to gain the knowledge and skills they will need to recognize, diagnose and triage patients with surgical problems. The student clerkship has been recognized by students as an excellent learning experience. It has also attracted students to surgical careers, with 17 students in last year’s graduating class matching into first year surgical residency positions. Beyond the student clerkship, nine Department of Surgery faculty mentored Pritzker students in the Summer Research Program in 2017.

Beyond student and resident education, the department also provides specialized training for surgical fellows in vascular surgery, pediatric surgery, complex surgical oncology, colorectal surgery, endocrine surgery and cardiothoracic surgery. Furthermore, the department’s relationship with Peking Union Medical College Hospital in China continued to grow. Under the direction of J. Michael Millis, MD, vice chair for global surgery, our department hosted Dr. Guo Chao for a three month visit to share our experience in surgical education and to foster continued exchange programs for students, residents and faculty.

This year, two of our residents — Theodore Hart, MD, PGY4, and Benjamin Ferguson, MD, PGY5 — received awards for their excellent student teaching. Neil Hyman, MD, professor of surgery and chief of the Section of Colon & Rectal Surgery, was awarded the Golden Apple Award for teaching by the residents. Twenty additional faculty were recognized at our Annual Education Day for their outstanding teaching based on learner evaluations. Each year, our General Surgery Residency Program, led by Kevin Roggin, MD, aims to fully prepare the next generation of skilled surgeons. The General Surgery Residency has continued to enhance the training program by expanding the Surgical Skills Training Program, and further developing the Resident Acute Care Surgery Service (RACS). These programs have been recognized as outstanding, and their evidence-based results have been presented at the Association for Surgical Education and the Association for Academic Surgery. The American Board of Surgery and the Association for Accreditation in Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) have expressed interest in learning more about our RACS service and will be visiting UChicago Medicine to do so.

42


43


graduates 2017

NAME

RESIDENT/FELLOW

POSITION AFTER LEAVING UCHICAGO MEDICINE

CARDIAC & THORACIC SURGERY Diego Avella Patino, MD

Resident

University of Missouri Health Care

COLON & RECTAL SURGERY Terrah Paul-Olson, MD

Fellow

Faculty at Emory University, Atlanta, GA

Jennifer DeFazio, MD

Resident

Pediatric Surgery Fellowship at New York Presbyterian, Morgan Stanley Children’s Hospital, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY

Reza Salabat, MD

Resident

Clinical Associate for Cardiac Surgery, University of Chicago Medicine

Baddr Shakhsheer, MD

Resident

Pediatric Surgery Fellowship at Washington University, St. Louis, MO

Abhineet Uppal, MD

Resident

Complex General Surgical Oncology Fellowship at John Wayne Cancer Institute, Santa Monica, CA

Sean Wightman, MD

Resident

Thoracic Surgery Fellowship at Stanford Health Care, Stanford, CA

GENERAL SURGERY

COMPLEX GENERAL SURGICAL ONCOLOGY Jennifer Tseng, MD

Fellow

Faculty at University of Chicago Medicine

Resident

Neurosurgery Fellowship in Neuromodulation & Functional Restoration at Swedish Medical Center in Seattle

NEUROSURGERY Anita Bhansali, MD

OTOLARYNGOLOGY-HEAD & NECK SURGERY David Walker, MD

Fellow

Neurotology fellow at Michigan Ear Institute

Philip Knollman, MD

Fellow

Pediatric Otolaryngology fellow at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center

Manish Raiji, MD

Resident

Pediatric attending at the University of Chicago Medicine Medical Group

Allison Linden, MD

Fellow

Pediatric Surgery Fellowship, Nemours Dupont Medical Center, July 2018

PEDIATRIC SURGERY

PLASTIC & RECONSTRUCTIVE SURGERY Amanda Silva, MD

Fellow

NYU Microsurgery Fellowship

Deana Shenaq, MD

Fellow

Memorial Sloan Kettering Microsurgery Fellowship

Rebecca Garza, MD

Fellow

Assistant Professor at the University of Chicago Medicine

44


graduates 2017

NAME

RESIDENT/FELLOW

POSITION AFTER LEAVING UCHICAGO MEDICINE

Shay Golan, MD

Fellow

Academic practice at Rabin Medical Center, Beilinson Hospital, Department of Urology

Scott Johnson, MD

Fellow

Academic faculty at Medical College of Wisconsin

Blake Anderson, MD

Resident

Endourology fellowship at Indiana University Methodist Hospital

Joseph Pariser, MD

Resident

Male Reconstructive Urology fellowship at Detroit Medical Center

Shane Pearce, MD

Resident

Urologic Oncology fellowship at University of Southern California

UROLOGY

VASCULAR SURGERY & ENDOVASCULAR THERAPY Leslie Wong, MD

Resident

Attending physician at Kaiser Permanente, Oakland, CA

45


residents & fellows 2017

NAME

PGY YEAR

CARDIAC & THORACIC SURGERY

NAME

PGY YEAR

Schneider, Andrew

3

Eridon, Jamie

7

Singh, Puneet

5

Brownlee, Andrew

6

Skowron, Kinga

4

Kitahara, Hiroto

9

Sankary, Seth

1

Mitzman, Bryan

8

Stack, Melinda

5

Stines, Ian

3

Su, Bailey

3

COMPLEX GENERAL SURGICAL ONCOLOGY

Symalla, Trevor

3

Dahdaleh, Fadi

7

Tran, Dong-Kha

2

Sherman, Scott

6

Vigneswaran, Janani

2

Vigneswaran, Yalini

5

Waxman, Zachary

2

White, Michael

4

COLON & RECTAL SURGERY Huang, Emily

6

ENDOCRINE FELLOW Alsafran, Salman

6

GENERAL SURGERY Ahmadpour, Arjang

1

Wong, Harry

2

Assidon, Aviram

1

Wu, Hoover

1

Attaar, Mikhail

1

Zhang, Lindsey

2

Bass, Victoria

3

GENERAL SURGERY RESEARCH RESIDENTS

Benjamin, Andrew

3

Bishop, Elliot

3R

Berian, Julia

4

Bryan, Darren

3R

Buie, Vanessa

3

Gaines, Sara

2R

Corvin, Chase

1

Hedberg, Herbert

3R

Ferguson, Benjamin

5

Liu, Jason

3R

Fleischer, Brian

1

Poli, Elizabeth

2R

Guyton, Kristina

4

Ruhle, Brian

2R

Hart, Theodore

4

Suah, Ashley

2R

Kantor, Olga

4

Williamson, Ashley

2R

Keskey, Robert

2

Xue, Lai

2R

Krezalek, Monika

5

NEUROSURGERY

Lam, Adam

1

Castro, Brandyn

2

McMahon, Michelle

1

Choi, Jason

3

Miller, Jared

2

Hobbs, Jonathan

6

Oyeniyi, James

1

Platt, Andrew

3

5

Polster, Sean

5

Rojnica, Marko

46


residents & fellows 2017

NAME

PGY YEAR

NAME

Ralston, Ashley

7

TRANSPLANT SURGERY

Satzer, David

2

Perez-Gutierrez , Rosario Angelica

Smith, Heather Lynne

1

UROLOGY

Stamates, Melissa

7

Adamsky, Melanie

4

Vasenina, Valentina

4

Adamic, Brittany

3

OTOLARYNGOLOGY-HEAD & NECK SURGERY

Aizen, Joshua

3

Adams, Dara

1

Boysen, William

4

Chiu, Brandon

4

Cohen, Andrew

5

Correia, Camil

3

Fantus, Richard

3R

Howard, Adam

1

Judge, Clark

1

Kennedy, Aimee

5

Kang, Audry

2

Kennedy, Paige

2

Labbate, Craig

3

Paz-Lansberg, Marianella

4

Lindquist, Johnny

1

Sowa, Lauren

3

Mahmoud, Mohammad

4

Yan, Kenneth

2

Nottingham, Charles

5

Yesensky, Jessica

5

Packiam, Vignesh

5

Richgels, John

2

Riedinger, Christopher

3R

PEDIATRIC SURGERY Talbot, Lindsay

7

PLASTIC & RECONSTRUCTIVE SURGERY

PGY YEAR

Rodriguez, Joseph

4

Beederman, Maureen

4

Smith, Zachary

8

Bruce, Timothy

2

Wackerbarth, Joel

2

Hassan, Kareem

3

Watts, Tanya

1

Humphries, Laura

5

Werntz, Ryan

6

Hunter, Cedric

7

VASCULAR SURGERY & ENDOVASCULAR THERAPY

Kim, Jeff

5

Long, Kira

7

Lemelman, Benjamin

6

Maximus, Steven

6

Prescher, Hannes

1

Roy, Tulsi

3

Shakir, Afaaf

1

Smith, Jesse

4

Teven, Chad

6

Williams, Lydia Jay

2

47


transplant surgery

48


Dr. Yolanda Becker, President OF OPTN/UNOS BOARD OF DIRECTORS

on the OPTN/UNOS Membership and Professional Standards Committee (MPSC) and co-chaired an MSPC workgroup addressing certification maintenance workgroups.

Yolanda Becker, MD, has been elected president of the Organ Procurement and Transplantation Network/United Network for Organ Sharing (OPTN/UNOS) Board of Directors.

Dr. Becker has served as an elected member of the American Society of Transplantation (AST) Board of Directors. She has co-chaired its winter symposium and its education committee, additionally serving on the minority affairs committee. She has served on the American Society of Transplant Surgeons (ASTS) scientific studies committee and on the AST/ASTS American Transplant Congress program planning committee. She also has served on the board of directors of the National Kidney Registry.

Dr. Becker, who is a professor of surgery and director of kidney and pancreas transplantation at the University of Chicago Medicine, Yolanda Becker, MD will serve a one-year term beginning in July 2017. As president, she will direct the efforts of the governing body of the organization that serves as the nation’s organ transplant network under federal contract.

She earned her medical degree at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine in Baltimore. Becker has received additional leadership training, completing the Executive Leaders in Academic Medicine program at Drexel University College of Medicine in Philadelphia.

“I am passionate about working to achieve the best outcomes for patients and transplanted organs, while working with our member organizations to support innovation,” Dr. Becker said. “I will continue to build on the strong foundations set by our community to continue to discuss in a balanced, transparent and inclusive way the challenges we face in organ donation and transplantation.”

ABOUT UNOS AND THE OPTN: United Network for Organ Sharing (UNOS) serves as the Organ Procurement and Transplantation Network (OPTN) by contract with the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Health Resources and Services Administration, Division of Transplantation. The OPTN brings together medical professionals, transplant recipients and donor families to develop national organ transplantation policy.

As president, Dr. Becker’s duties include leading semiannual meetings of the OPTN/UNOS board, as well as chairing the OPTN/UNOS Executive Committee and UNOS’ Corporate Affairs Committee. She is responsible for strategic planning, including the establishment of key goals and oversight of progress in areas such as: • increasing the number of transplants • providing equity in access to transplants • improving outcomes for waitlisted patients, living donors and transplant recipients • promoting safety for living donors and transplant recipients • promoting the efficient management of the OPTN Dr. Becker currently serves as vice president/president-elect of the OPTN/UNOS Board of Directors and as vice chair of the UNOS Corporate Affairs Committee. She previously chaired the OPTN/UNOS Policy Oversight Committee. She also has served

49


FACULTY HONORS Talia Baker, MD, associate professor of surgery, was named surgical director and program director of the Liver Transplant Program at UChicago Medicine. Dr. Baker also serves as the director of the Living Donor Liver Transplant Program.

In addition to his awards, Dr. Fung was the William Harridge Memorial Lecturer in August 2016 for the Midwest Surgical Association. He delivered a presentation titled, “The Changing Face of Short Gut Syndrome Management.” And, research continues to be a key focus for Dr. Fung. He recently began a randomized controlled clinical trial of Thymoglobulin® and extended delay of calcineurin inhibitor therapy for renal protection after liver transplantation. This is a multi-center study funded by Sanofi.

Anita S. Chong, PhD, and her collaborator Dr. Maria-Luisa Alegre were awarded another five years of NIH funding to study the mechanism of transplantation tolerance. Findings from these studies have the potential to uncover new therapeutic strategies to achieve transplantation tolerance in the clinic.

Dr. Fung also published a book this year titled, “Surgical Procedures in the Cirrhotic Patient,” and was again named a Castle Connolly Top Doctor (continuously since 2000) and one of the Best Doctors in America (continuously since 1992).

University of Chicago Medicine Transplantation Institute director John Fung, MD, PhD, received the LifeBanc Legacy of Life Healthcare Award and Transplant Recipient International Organization’s (TRIO) Samuel Jones Gift of Breath Award this year.

50


J. Michael Millis, MD, Vice Chair of Global Surgery and Director of Liver Transplantation and Hepatobiliary Surgery, was given the Global Citizen Hero Award from the American Red Cross for his work to transform the organ donation process and establish a central donation registry in China.

Dr. Witkowski is also a research grant reviewer for Research Councils UK, the Fulbright Foundation, the UK Diabetes Foundation and The Chief Scientist Office of the Scottish Government.

Dr. Millis also was named to several top doctor lists, including:

Chicago magazine recognized several physicians from transplant surgery in its Top Doctors list:

• Chicago magazine’s Chicago Top Doctors

• Yolanda T. Becker, MD – Top Doctor

• Castle Connolly’s America’s Top Doctors and America’s Top Cancer Doctors

• John F. Renz, MD, PhD – Top Doctor • John Fung, MD, PhD – Top Doctor

• Best Doctors Inc.’s America’s Best Doctors Additionally, Dr. Millis was honored to give the Neil Lemper Lecture at Albany Medical College in October 2016. His presentation was titled, “What’s Up in China and Why Should Surgeons Care?” Piotr Witkowski, MD, PhD, completed a study to assess the efficacy and safety of Reparixin in pancreatic islet transplantation, sponsored by Dompe Pharmaceuticals. He has begun an Astellas clinical trial to assess the efficacy and safety of Bleselumab in kidney transplant recipients. He is also part of the Collaborative Islet Transplant Registry.

John Fung, MD, PhD Professor of Surgery Chief, Section of Transplant Surgery Director, Transplant Institute

FACULTY LISTING ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF SURGERY Adam Bodzin, MD

PROFESSORS OF SURGERY Yolanda T. Becker, MD Anita S. Chong, PhD John Fung, MD, PhD J. Michael Millis, MD John F. Renz, MD, PhD

CLINICAL ASSOCIATE David Cronin, MD RESEARCH ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR Dengping Yin, PhD

ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS OF SURGERY Talia Baker, MD* Piotr P. Witkowski, MD, PhD

*Denotes new faculty

51


sponsored RESEARCH

PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR

SECTION

RESEARCH TITLE

GRANT

Gupta, Mahesh P.

Cardiac & Thoracic

Activation of sirtuins to prevent adverse cardiac remodeling after CABG

Federal, Research

Gupta, Mahesh P.

Cardiac & Thoracic

Blocking cardio-toxicity of anti-cancer drugs

Federal, Research

Ota, Takeyoshi

Cardiac & Thoracic

Use of the NuPulseCV iVAS for the Treatment of Bridge-to-Transplant Patients: A First-in-Human (FIH) Study

Non-Federal, Clinical Trial

Hyman, Neil

Colon & Rectal

Efficacy and Safety of LifeSeal Kit for Staple Line Sealing in Colorectal and Coloanal Anastomoses: A prospective Randomized Study

Non-Federal, Clinical Trial

Alverdy, John

General

Gut pathogen virulence and its therapeutic modulation during surgical injury

Federal, Research

Alverdy, John

General

Polyphosphate loaded nanoparticles for suppression of gut pathogen collagenase activity and promotion of post-surgical intestinal healing

Federal, Research

An, Gary

General

Adaptive Simulation to Enable Anatomic-scale Agent-based

Federal, Research

An, Gary

General

HPC implementation of Agent-Based Models in Biology

Federal, Research

Awad, Issam

Neurosurgery

BIOMARKERS OF BRAIN PERMEABILITY IN HUMAN CEREBRAL CAVERNOUS MALFORMATIONS

Federal, Research

Awad, Issam

Neurosurgery

Development of BA-1049 for treatment of cerebral cavernous malformations

Federal, Research

Awad, Issam

Neurosurgery

MIS+rtPA for ICH Evacuation Phase III (MISTIE III)

Federal, Research

Awad, Issam

Neurosurgery

Rock Inhibition as Therapy for Cerebral Cavernous Malformation

Federal, Research

Awad, Issam

Neurosurgery

Signaling Aberrations and Cerebral Cavernous Malformation Pathogenesis

Federal, Research

Warnke, Peter Christian

Neurosurgery

Chemotherapy Induced Glioma Stem Cell Niche

Non-Federal, Research

Yamini, Bakhtiar

Neurosurgery

NF-kB1-p50 in the Response to DNA Alkylation Damage

Federal, Research

Agrawal, Nishant

Otolaryngology-Head & Neck

SPORE Clinical Leadership

Federal, Research

Gluth, Michael

Otolaryngology-Head & Neck

The human temporal bone laboratory resource for basic and applied inner ear sciences

Federal, Research

Pinto, Jayant M.

Otolaryngology, Head & Neck

"A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, multi-center study of the efficacy and safety of STG320 sublingual tablets of house dust mite (HDM) allergen extracts in adults and adolescents with HDMassociated allergic rhinitis�

Non-Federal, Clinical Trial

52


PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR

SECTION

RESEARCH TITLE

GRANT

Suskind, Dana L.

Otolaryngology-Head & Neck

Bridging the Word Gap Research Network

Non-Federal, Research

Suskind, Dana L.

Otolaryngology-Head & Neck

Thirty Million Words - Early Care

Non-Federal, Research

Suskind, Dana L.

Otolaryngology-Head & Neck

Thirty Million Words Project: Longitudinal Study

Non-Federal, Research

Suskind, Dana L.

Otolaryngology-Head & Neck

Thirty Million Words: WellBaby

Non-Federal, Research

Mak, Grace Z.

Pediatric

Multi-institutional trial of non-operative management of uncomplicated pediatric appendicitis

Non-Federal, Research

Gilbert, Jack A.

Surgical Research

A Predictive Knowledgebase Linking Microbial Signatures to Human Lifestyle Characteristics

Federal, Research

Gilbert, Jack A.

Surgical Research

Collaborative Research: Biogenic Methanogenesis and Biodegradation of Organic Matter in Coals

Federal, Research

Gilbert, Jack A.

Surgical Research

Dimensions US-China: Collaborative Research: How historical constraints, local adaptation, and species interactions shape biodiversity across an ancient floristic disjunction

Federal, Research

Gilbert, Jack A.

Surgical Research

Gut microbiota, short chain fatty acids and adiposity across the epidemiological transition

Federal, Research

Gilbert, Jack A.

Surgical Research

Isolating human gut microbiome bacteria

Non-Federal, Research

Gilbert, Jack A.

Surgical Research

Longitudinal assessment of the influence of lifestyle homogenization on the MoBE in a cohort of Air Force Cadets through comparison to University of Chicago and University of Colorado Boulder Students

Non-Federal, Research

Gilbert, Jack A.

Surgical Research

Mechanistic modeling of microbial metabolic succession in the built environment

Non-Federal, Research

Gilbert, Jack A.

Surgical Research

Primary Immune Deficiency Gut Microbiome Study

Non-Federal, Research

Chong, Anita S.

Transplant Surgery

Deconstructing the allo-specific memory B cell response

Federal, Research

Chong, Anita S.

Transplant Surgery

Immunomodulatory Biomaterials via Peptide and Protein Self-Assembly

Federal, Research

Chong, Anita S.

Transplant Surgery

Infections and The Stability of Transplantation Tolerance

Federal, Research

Chong, Anita S.

Transplant Surgery

Supramolecular nanofiber vaccines

Federal, Research

Witkowski, Piotr P.

Transplant Surgery

Advancing Treatment for Pancreatitis: A Prospective Observational Study of TPIAT

Federal, Research

Witkowski, Piotr P.

Transplant Surgery

“A Phase 2a, Randomized, Open-Label, Active Control, Multi-Center Study to Assess the Efficacy and Safety of Bleselumab in Preventing the Recurrence of Focal Segmental Glomerulosclerosis in de novo Kidney Transplant Recipients�

Non-Federal, Clinical Trial

Eggener, Scott E.

Urology

A prospective evaluation of the 4Kscore test as a predictor of pathological upgrade from Gleason Score 6 biopsy results in men from undergoing radical prostatectomy (RP) at Martini Klinik Hamburg from 2004 to 2013

Non-Federal, Research

53


PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR

SECTION

RESEARCH TITLE

GRANT

Eggener, Scott E.

Urology

Prospective Validation of Prostate Biomarkers for Repeat Biopsy: The PRIORITY Study

Non-Federal, Clinical Trial

Eggener, Scott E.

Urology

"A Phase 3 Study to Evaluate the Safety and Efficacy of 99mTcMIP-1404 SPECT/CT Imaging to Detect Clinically Significant Prostate Cancer in Men with Biopsy Proven Low-Grade Prostate Cancer who are Candidates for Active Surveillance (proSPECT-AS)”

Non-Federal, Clinical Trial

Eggener, Scott E.

Urology

A Prospective Phase 2/3 Multi-Center Study of 18F-DCFPyL PET/CT Imaging in Patients with Prostate Cancer: Examination of Diagnostic Accuracy (OSPREY )

Non-Federal, Clinical Trial

Steinberg, Gary

Urology

A Phase III, Open Label Study to Evaluate the Safety and Efficacy of INSTILADRIN® (rAd-IFN/Syn3) Administered Intravesically to Patients with High Grade, BCG Unresponsive Non-Muscle Invasive Bladder Cancer (NMIBC)

Non-Federal, Clinical Trial

Steinberg, Gary

Urology

“A PHASE Ib/II, OPEN-LABEL STUDY OF THE SAFETY AND PHARMACOLOGY OF MPDL3280A ADMINISTERED WITH OR WITHOUT BACILLE CALMETTE-GUÉRIN IN PATIENTS WITH HIGH-RISK NON−MUSCLE-INVASIVE BLADDER CANCER”

Non-Federal, Clinical Trial

Vander Griend, Donald J.

Urology

Function of the Stem Cell Transcription Factor Sox2 in Prostate Cancer

Federal, Research

Vander Griend, Donald J.

Urology

PC130587 - Function and Clinical Utility of the Hox Protein CoFactors Meis1 and Meis2

Federal, Research

Vander Griend, Donald J.

Urology

Supramolecular matrix materials for prostate cancer cell biology

Federal, Research

Vander Griend, Donald J.

Urology

The Role of Sox2 in prostate epithelium development, regeneration and hyperplasia (F31: Erin McAuley)

Federal, Research

Babrowski, Trissa

Vascular & Endovascular

Explorer Surgical STTR Phase 2

Non-Federal, Research

Babrowski, Trissa

Vascular & Endovascular

Explorer Surgical STTR Phase I

Federal, Research

54


55


urology

56


Surgeons Provide Life-Saving Care FOR CHILD WITH RARE UROLOGIC CONDITION

proper position until it completely healed. Urology resident Vig Packiam, MD, also assisted with the procedures.

When Sandie* visited her obstetrician in Florida for a 20-week ultrasound, the test detected a problem with the baby’s development.

Mohan Gundeti, MD

Additionally, administrative assistant Nancy Kozlar and advanced practice nurse Ashley Wilkens, ANP, FNP-BC, connected Sandie with the on-campus Ronald McDonald House, and guided her through the insurance approval process.

At birth, physicians diagnosed her son Jayden with cloacal exstrophy, a condition that prevents normal growth and development of the pelvic bones and abdominal organs. Jayden required an emergency stabilizing surgery.

Due to his external fixator, Jayden had to be transported to and from the Ronald McDonald House by ambulance, which was not covered by insurance. Lisa Kuntz, a social worker at Comer Children’s, worked with the ambulance company to give the family a reduced rate, and arranged for UChicago Medicine to pay a portion of the remaining cost.

After extensive online research and speaking with other physicians, Sandie decided the University of Chicago Medicine Comer Children’s Hospital physicians Mohan Gundeti, MD, and Robert Bielski, MD, were the right choice for her son.

“ Not everyone can

Dr. Gundeti, a pediatric urologist, and Dr. Bielski, a pediatric orthopaedic surgeon, teamed up to tackle the challenges of Jayden’s condition. Dr. Gundeti is an internationally renowned expert in complex urologic repairs, and he has more than a decade of experience treating children with cloacal exstrophy.

take care of these patients, but we have the experience to complete a repair that will provide the optimal outcomes.

“We were happy to have Jayden at UChicago Medicine,” Dr. Gundeti said. “There are many complications associated with this congenital condition, and the surgical repair is a very technically demanding procedure that requires extensive insight into the process. Not everyone can take care of these patients, but we have the experience to complete a repair that will provide the optimal outcomes.”

Dr. Mohan Gundeti

“Think of the pelvis as a giant ring,” Dr. Bielski said. “Normally, its two halves lock together in the front, but in cloacal exstrophy, the halves separate, and the ring opens up.” Jayden’s pelvic opening extended to the surface of the skin, where his abdominal organs extended out through the front of his body. In order to repair this defect, he needed several surgeries.

Kuntz also worked with Southwest Airlines to get Jayden’s family complimentary airline tickets to Chicago and to get Sandie and Jayden home after his hospital discharge. Jayden has healed well from his surgery and is back home in Florida with his family. He is well on his way to a full recovery, thanks to his life-saving, complex care at Comer Children’s.

Dr. Bielski realigned his pelvic bones; Dr. Gundeti closed Jayden’s bladder, repaired his hernia, moved his testes back into their proper position, closed the abdominal wall defect, and addressed ostomy needs to enable waste to leave his body. Jayden was outfitted with an external fixator device to hold his pelvis in the

*Last names withheld for privacy

57


FACULTY HONORS Donald Vander Griend, PhD, began a research project last year entitled, “Bomb Pulse Carbon-14 Dating of Prostate Tissues to Elucidate the Origins of BPH.” This project is funded by a twoyear grant from the National Institutes of Health and includes a collaboration with the Center for Accelerator Mass Spectrometry at the Lawrence Livermore National Labs.

Sarah Faris, MD, served as the urology teaching instructor for the Pritzker School of Medicine Residency Program. In 2017, Glenn Gerber, MD, was invited to be the Chicago Urological Society speaker about “Urolithiasis in Urinary Diversions.” Last year, professor Mohan Gundeti, MD, had the privilege of serving as the consulting editor for the British Journal of Urology International. He also was the course co-director and consultant for the North American Robotic Urology Symposium.

The urology section was honored to have several professors and surgeons named to the Chicago magazine Top Doctors list:

Norm Smith, MD, served on the Relative Value Scale Update Committee (RUC) for the American Urological Association (AUA) and was the AUA representative on the American Medical Association RUC. Dr. Smith also was appointed to the Chicago Urological Society Board of Directors.

• Scott Eggener, MD – Top Cancer Doctor and Top Doctor

• Gregory Bales, MD – Top Doctor • Mohan Gundeti, MD – Top Doctor • Arieh Shalhav, MD – Top Doctor and Top Cancer Doctor • Norm Smith, MD – Top Cancer Doctor

Headed by Gary Steinberg, MD, UChicago Medicine’s Urologic cancer surgery team is leading Chicagoland in the management of urologic malignancies. With robotic surgery and the most innovative interventions like focal therapy for prostate cancer, bladder preservation protocols in bladder cancer, tackling the most complex kidney-sparing surgeries for kidney cancer, and robotic/ laparoscopic surgery for testicular cancer. The team offers the most robust clinical trials program for urologic malignancies. Patient service is provided in a comprehensive, multi-disciplinary approach, guided by the pursuit of excellence and the best patient experience.

• Gary Steinberg, MD – Top Doctor and Top Cancer Doctor • Gregory Zagaja, MD – Top Cancer Doctor

Arieh L. Shalhav, MD Fritz and Mary Lee Duda Family Endowed Chair Chief, Section of Urology Professor of Surgery Director, Minimally Invasive Urology Director, Robotic Surgery

FACULTY LISTING Norm Smith, MD Gary Steinberg, MD Gregory Zagaja, MD

PROFESSORS OF SURGERY Gregory Bales, MD Scott Eggener, MD Glenn Gerber, MD Mohan S. Gundeti, MD Carrie Rinker-Schaeffer, PhD Arieh Shalhav, MD

ASSISTANT PROFESSORS OF SURGERY Sarah Faris, MD Donald J. Vander Griend, PhD

58


vascular surgery & endovascular THERAPY

60


Rare Vascular Condition MADE EATING ALMOST IMPOSSIBLE

Treating this rare condition would require a two-stage surgical approach in which the doctors remove part of the artery blocking her esophagus while maintaining the blood flow to the rest of her right subclavian artery. On December 19th, Dr. Milner performed a right carotid-to-subclavian artery bypass, a procedure that diverted blood flow from the right carotid artery to the right subclavian artery to enable consistent blood flow after the aberrant part of the artery was removed. Dr. Ota completed stage two on December 21st, when he removed the abnormal portion of the artery.

Brandi Umbarger just wanted to eat a hamburger. Unfortunately, she could barely swallow a bite. The 31-year-old clerical worker first discovered she was having trouble swallowing back in 2012, and by the end of 2016, it was incredibly difficult to keep any food down. “I couldn’t eat burgers or steak anymore. If I did try, I had to suffer the consequences,” she said. Those consequences were severe heartburn and choking. Umbarger had dysphagia lusoria, a rare vascular deformity that caused an aberrant artery in her aortic arch to wrap around her esophagus, making it difficult to eat or drink. Food would get caught in the middle of her esophagus and then would have trouble moving to the stomach. She first started looking for treatment in 2012, but because her condition is rare, finding a physician with enough experience to make her feel confident in the treatment was a challenge. After ending up in the emergency room at Methodist Hospital in Crown Point, Indiana, in 2016, she was referred to the University of Chicago Medicine. While she still had some reservations about pursuing treatment, she knew coming to UChicago Medicine was the right choice, particularly since her mother received lifesaving surgery at UChicago Medicine years earlier.

“ Everyone deserves to

live as comfortably as possible, especially when it comes down to the necessities in life.

Brandi Umbarger

When she arrived, Umbarger went through a series of tests with vascular and cardiac surgeons at UChicago Medicine to determine the best course of treatment. It began with a barium swallow test and a CT scan, which showed a narrowed esophagus compressed by that artery. Umbarger met with surgeons, Dr. Ross Milner and Dr. Takeyoshi Ota, co-directors Takeyoshi Ota, MD, PhD of the Center for Aortic Diseases, to discuss her treatment options. Noticing that she was apprehensive about surgery but wanted her life to improve, they explained that UChicago Medicine had the skill and expertise to safely treat her condition through open surgery or endovascular therapy. Upon hearing her options, and with her physicians’ help, she chose to undergo open surgery.

Following her second surgery, she remained under observation in the hospital, meaning Umbarger would have to spend Christmas at UChicago Medicine. Though she was able to Skype with her family and had a small Christmas tree in her room, the best gift she received was when she was told that she could start eating solid foods again. “Who cries when they eat?” She thought as she looked through the hospital menu, tears running down her face as it dawned on her that she could select anything she wanted. Later that day, she tested her new found ability to eat solid food again when her daughter gave her gummy worms — something she would have never tried to touch before — bringing tears to her eyes at the realization that she is no longer restricted by her condition. “It is such an amazing feeling to eat like a normal person,” she said. “Everyone deserves to live as comfortably as possible, especially when it comes down to the necessities in life.”

61


FACULTY HONORS Assistant professor of surgery Chelsea Dorsey, MD, was named the quality lead for the Section of Vascular Surgery, and presented “The Evolution of Ruptured Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Management” at Greater General Surgery Grand Rounds in March 2017. Dr. Dorsey is also heavily involved with the University of Chicago Pritzker School of Medicine, having been on the admissions committee, the diversity and inclusion committee and acting as a career advisor.

aneurysms. He also assisted in testing the knowledge of future vascular surgeons by writing questions for the Vascular Surgery Certifying Examination.

Additionally, Dr. Dorsey is a reviewer for the Journal of Vascular Surgery Publications and Vascular, and is a medical consultant for Grey’s Anatomy. Dr. Dorsey was a panelist at the Black Women’s Expo, a panelist at the Minority Professional Advancement Summit at Washington University in St. Louis, and a moderator at the Society for Black Academic Surgeon’s Annual Scientific Assembly in Chicago.

Associate professor of surgery Christopher Skelly, MD, was named a Castle Connolly Top Doctor again this year, for the sixth year in a row. Dr. Skelly also co-wrote a chapter in Difficult Decisions in Vascular Surgery; an Evidence Based Approach, along with Dr. Milner. In addition, Dr. Skelly was an invited reviewer for the Patient-Centered Research Institute.

Dr. Milner was selected as the Regional Director for the Aortic Trauma Network. He also served on the International Relations Committee and the Student and Resident Education Committee of the Society for Vascular Surgery.

Professor of surgery Ross Milner, MD, was again honored with the Department of Surgery Teaching Award for the fifth consecutive year. He also was selected as the Favorite Faculty Member at the Pritzker School of Medicine and named a Castle Connolly Top Doctor. In addition to these accolades, Dr. Milner was the Jonathan Towne Visiting Professor at the Medical College of Wisconsin, where he taught students about current management of pararenal

Christopher Skelly, MD Associate Professor of Surgery Chief, Vascular Surgery & Endovascular Therapy Director, Vascular Lab Director, Vascular Surgery Fellowship Program

FACULTY LISTING PROFESSOR OF SURGERY Ross Milner, MD

CLINICAL ASSOCIATE Matthew J. Blecha, MD

ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR OF SURGERY Christopher Skelly, MD

*Denotes new faculty

ASSISTANT PROFESSORS OF SURGERY Trissa Babrowski, MD Chelsea Dorsey, MD*

62


table of contents Letter From The Chair . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3

Select Publications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32

Trauma & Acute Care Surgery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4

Pediatric Surgery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34

Cardiac & Thoracic Surgery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6

Plastic & Reconstructive Surgery . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38

Research . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10

Education . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42

Colon & Rectal Surgery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12

Graduates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44

Surgery By The Numbers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16

Residents & Fellows . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46

General Surgery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18

Transplant Surgery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48

Development . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22

Sponsored Research . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52

Neurosurgery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24

Urology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56

Otolaryngology - Head & Neck Surgery . . . . . . . 28

Vascular Surgery & Endovascular Therapy . . . . . 60

Editor and Writer: Heather Linder Design: Reputation Partners


DEPARTMENT OF SURGERY 2017 ANNUAL REPORT DEPARTMENT OF SURGERY 5841 South Maryland Avenue Chicago, IL 60637 Email: info@surgery.bsd.uchicago.edu Website: surgery.uchicago.edu Facebook: facebook.com/uchicagosurgery Twitter: twitter.com/uchicagosurgery

TRAUMA

GENERAL SURGERY

UROLOGY

Dr. Selwyn Rogers leads UChicago Medicine’s adult trauma center

Gaining hope and healing after a cancer diagnosis

Surgeons provide life-saving care for child with rare urologic condition

UChicago Medicine 2017 Department of Surgery Annual Report  
UChicago Medicine 2017 Department of Surgery Annual Report