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ANNUAL

REPORT

COMMUNITY BENEFIT 2015 2016


TA B L E O F C O N T E N T S

02 INVESTMENT IN OUR COMMUNITY 04 GET CARE 06 UNDERSTANDING COMMUNITY HEALTH NEEDS 08 ACCESS 1 0 CANCER 1 2 ADULT DIABETES 14 TRAUMA CARE AND VIOLENCE PREVENTION 16 HIV AND STI 17 CHILDHOOD OBESITY 18 CHILDHOOD ASTHMA 20 ECONOMIC IMPACT 22 COMMUNITY BENEFIT GRANT PROGRAM 24 COMMUNITY OUTREACH EVENTS AND ACTIVITIES


TO YOU, OUR COMMUNITY

Your participation and valued input have helped the University of Chicago Medicine embark on unprecedented growth that allows us to increase access to much-needed care. Our community continues to face significant health care challenges and disparities. We are proud to present some of the results of programs we offer in partnership with those dedicated to battling these conditions. We’re also pleased to report on the progress we’ve made to expand care for our neighbors. We invite you to read about what we’ve done—with you—and to help us do even more for children and adults in the years to come.

KENNETH S. POLONSKY, MD Dean of the University of Chicago Biological Sciences Division and the Pritzker School of Medicine Executive Vice President for Medical Affairs for the University of Chicago

SHARON O’KEEFE President of the University of Chicago Medical Center

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INVESTMENT IN OUR COMMUNITY

$295.319 million Uncompensated care $171.855 million Medicare Program losses $56.302 million Medicaid Program losses* $14.996 million Charity care* $52.166 million Unrecoverable patient debt $24.362 million Medical education $48.000 million Medical research $4.575 million Uncategorized community benefits $464,000 thousand Cash and in-kind contributions/donations

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TOTAL: $372.720 million in fiscal year 2015*

Medicare Program losses Support to make up for Medicare reimbursement rates, which do not cover the cost of care. Medicare is a federal health insurance program for people 65 and older and those with certain disabilities.

Charity care* Cost of providing free or discounted services to qualified individuals

Medicaid Program losses* Medicaid is a joint federal and state program for those requiring financial assistance.

Medical education Cost to teach and train future health care professionals not covered by tuition, grants, or scholarships

Unrecoverable patient debt Amount absorbed when a hospital cannot collect expected payment for services

*An IRS-defined category of community benefit. Components of community benefit for fiscal 2015 (measured at cost). Data prepared based on Illinois Attorney General and IRS guidelines for fiscal year ending June 30, 2015.

2015—2016 COM M UN IT Y BENEF I T ANNUAL R EP ORT

Medical research Funding to investigate ways to better prevent, detect and treat disease, as well as advance patient care Uncategorized community benefits Includes support for health improvement services, community activities, volunteers and language assistance Cash and in-kind contributions/donations* Gifts to community groups for health-related activities


University of Chicago Medicine at a glance*

8,993

29,809

20,437

Employees

Admissions

Surgeries

2,599

757

141

Nurses

NICU admissions

Organ transplants

958

237

90,736

Residents/fellows

Pediatric trauma admissions

Emergency department visits

878

805

Attending physicians

Licensed beds 03

*Numbers are for fiscal year ending June 30, 2016.

Medicaid acute care days for private hospitals in Metro Chicago** HOSPITAL

MEDICAID DAYS

1. The University of Chicago Medicine

40,600

2. Advocate Christ Medical Center

26,579

3. Rush University Medical Center

25,900

4. Lurie Children’s Hospital

22,252

5. Mount Sinai Hospital

20,817

6. Advocate Lutheran General Hospital

16,252

7. Loyola University Medical Center

11,638

8. Advocate Illinois Masonic Medical Center

9,768

9. Northwestern Medicine

8,115

10. Sts. Mary and Elizabeth Medical Center

6,328

**Source: Illinois Department of Healthcare and Family Services, Medicaid cost reports filed for the state fiscal year ending June 30, 2015.

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GET CARE

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Salim Al Nurridin, CEO of the Healthcare Consortium of Illinois, moderates a community forum addressing the Get CARE initiative.

OUR IMPACT

The University of Chicago Medicine’s Get CARE plan will significantly increase access to health care on Chicago’s South Side in specialty, adult trauma and emergency care.

2015—2016 COM M UN IT Y BENEF I T ANNUAL R EP ORT

25,000 THE GET CARE PLAN WILL ENABLE UCHICAGO MEDICINE TO SERVE 25,000 ADDITIONAL PATIENTS IN OUR NEW EMERGENCY DEPARTMENT EVERY YEAR BEGINNING IN 2021.


In spring 2016, the University of Chicago Medicine earned key regulatory approvals to undertake a bold project to address the lack of access to emergency and adult trauma services and complex care on the South Side. Under the Get CARE (Community, Access, Reliability, Excellence) plan, UChicago Medicine will: • Build an expanded adult emergency department housing operating rooms and critical care units. This will improve patient safety, reduce wait times and serve more patients. • Transform an existing hospital into a facility dedicated to care for cancer, which disproportionately affects South Side residents. This will increase bed capacity for other critical patients.

“Get CARE reduces the disparities that exist in access to critical care on the South Side and addresses the severe capacity constraints our medical center faces.” SHARON O’KEEFE PRESIDENT OF THE UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO MEDICAL CENTER

• Add Level 1 adult trauma care to the existing Level 1 pediatric trauma service and the Burn and Complex Wound Center. Get CARE was developed through discussions with community partners and an assessment of the area’s health care needs. The plan earned wide-ranging support from neighboring health care providers and community and civic leaders. The expansion is expected to cost $269 million and create more than 1,000 permanent positions and 400 construction jobs. Construction of a new adult emergency department—which will house the trauma bays—has begun and is expected to be completed in early 2018. The dedicated cancer hospital is expected to open in 2020.

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Community and faith leaders including, from left, Candace Henley, founder and CEO, Blue Hat Foundation; Michael L. Neal, pastor, Glorious Light Church; and Chris Harris, senior pastor, Bright Star Church, at the groundbreaking of UChicago Medicine’s new adult emergency department and Level 1 trauma center.

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U N D E R S TA N D I N G C O M M U N I T Y H E A LT H N E E D S

Our mission is to provide superior health care in a compassionate manner, ever mindful of each patient’s dignity and individuality. Focusing on improving health for Chicago’s South Side is one way we carry out this mission.

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Identifying the community’s most pressing needs The University of Chicago Medical Center (UCMC) conducts a community health needs assessment (CHNA) every three years. The CHNA is a scientific and comprehensive evaluation of the community’s heath and social conditions. UCMC uses this data to understand and address the health challenges of those we serve. Through community-based forums and a multidisciplinary work group, UChicago Medicine has prioritized its health issue areas for three years of community benefit programming (2016–19). The work group for the CHNA development included representatives from the UCMC Urban Health Initiative, faculty and nursing. These groups were strategically selected for their respective understanding of community perspectives, community-based health engagement and community health education efforts. The Medical Center uses the CHNA and complementary input from the community to identify health priority areas on which it will focus its population health efforts.

2015—2016 COM M UN IT Y BENEF I T ANNUAL R EP ORT

Our community benefit goal We frame our community investments and programming within one overarching goal: To enhance community health and wellness around CHNA priority needs in the University of Chicago Medical Center service area.


Community benefit health priority issues

2013

2016 CANCER (ADULT)

CANCER (ADULT)

DIABETES (ADULT)

DIABETES (ADULT)

ASTHMA (PEDIATRIC)

ASTHMA (PEDIATRIC)

OBESITY (PEDIATRIC)

OBESITY (PEDIATRIC)

+ VIOLENCE PREVENTION (ADULT/PEDIATRIC) + SEXUALLY TRANSMITTED INFECTIONS/HIV (ADULT/PEDIATRIC)

Our approach to addressing health priority issues UCMC uses a variety of strategies for executing activities, services and programs: • Care delivery initiatives: Direct health, medical or wellness services and programs that may leverage resources of UCMC and community partners • Grantmaking: Grants and technical assistance provided to community-based organizations that implement programs to address the UCMC health priority areas • Medical education: Faculty advance medical knowledge in the field by educating providers; medical students serve the community through clinical care, service and education • Community-based education and outreach: Educational activities intended to better inform and educate the community on their health and promote better health self-management practices rather than providing direct patient care • Partnerships: Innovative collaborations with a community health lens leverage technology and cross-sector collaborations to improve health and engage the community

The Community Advisory Council: A new group to assist in addressing the health needs in Chicago

Advisory Council. The council will advise the institution on health issues of interest to its primary service area and surrounding communities. It will be an essential partner in achieving UChicago Medicine’s goals related to the broader community interests, community benefit, access to care and community engagement. Our communities’ interests and concerns span many issues and needs. This group of 20 men and women has the expertise and varied perspectives to help us improve our response to those needs.

“The Community Advisory Council represents a golden opportunity at a critical time for the University of Chicago Medicine to be in deeper partnership with the surrounding community.” JULIAN De SHAZIER SENIOR PASTOR, UNIVERSITY CHURCH CHAIR, COMMUNITY ADVISORY COUNCIL

In the fall of 2016, the University of Chicago Medicine announced the creation of its inaugural Community

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ACCESS

OUR IMPACT

UChicago Medicine care initiatives and strategic partnerships deliver quality health care to patients in a variety of settings.

71,000 CLOSE TO 71,000 PATIENT ENCOUNTERS

Family practice physician Laura Lucero, MD, provides care for Turion Wilson at Beloved Community Family Wellness Center, a South Side Healthcare Collaborative clinic.

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The Medical Home and Specialty Care Connection UChicago Medicine’s Medical Home and Specialty Care Connection program links South Side residents to community health centers and doctors for preventive care, treatment of non-emergency medical conditions, long-term management of chronic diseases and referral to specialists. Patient advocates help individuals find a medical home in a South Side Healthcare Collaborative (SSHC) clinic. The SSHC is a network of more than 30 federally qualified health care clinics, free and charitable clinics, and community hospitals providing medical care, support and social services for optimal health and well-being.

5,968— APPOINTMENTS MADE FOR MEDICAL HOMES

3,648 APPOINTMENTS MADE FOR SPECIALTY CARE

“The patient advocate looked at my information and knew exactly what to do. She made it very easy for me to connect with a primary care doctor. An appointment was made within 10 days. She was spot on.” TURION WILSON, PATIENT

2015—2016 COM M UN IT Y BENEF I T ANNUAL R EP ORT


Washington Park Children’s Free Health Clinic Access to immunizations is vital for personal and public health. The Washington Park Children’s Free Health Clinic provides immunizations, physicals, acute care and lead and hemoglobin tests to area children at no charge. University of Chicago Pritzker School of Medicine student volunteers operate the clinic under the guidance of a medical resident and an attending physician.

“It’s great knowing that I’m helping children get back into school sooner and saving their parents crucial time by administering free vaccines at convenient hours.”

“We provide a critical safety net for families who often experience a myriad of challenges navigating a complex, fragmented health care system.”

RENE BERMEA, MD FORMER MEDICAL STUDENT AT PRITZKER SCHOOL OF MEDICINE

ICY CADE-BELL, MD MEDICAL DIRECTOR, PEDIATRIC MOBILE MEDICAL UNIT

Pediatric Mobile Medical Unit

The Night Ministry The Night Ministry assists with housing, health care and human connection for Chicagoans struggling with homelessness and poverty. UChicago Medicine supported the Night Ministry’s programs addressing access to health care, prevention of emergency room visits and management of chronic diseases.

111— HEALTH ASSESSMENTS 50— HIV/STI TESTS 84— HOMELESS INDIVIDUALS IDENTIFIED FOR SOCIAL

The University of Chicago Medicine Comer Children’s Hospital Pediatric Mobile Medical Unit—a state-ofthe-art doctor’s office on wheels—serves children across Chicago’s South Side. The 40-foot electric blue vehicle is equipped with the most advanced clinical equipment and resources available in a mobile health setting. Comer Children’s staff provides a broad range of services, including primary care, mental health care, acute care, chronic illness management, social services and health education.

1,262— PATIENT ENCOUNTERS 24— CHICAGO PUBLIC SCHOOLS VISITED

9 ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS 15 HIGH SCHOOLS

AND HOUSING SERVICES

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CANCER

OUR IMPACT

The UChicago Medicine Comprehensive Cancer Center’s Office of Community Engagement and Cancer Disparities takes a multifaceted approach to understanding and reducing cancer disparities.

900 NEARLY 900 BREAST AND COLORECTAL CANCER SCREENINGS

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The COMPASS study Research has shown that some racial and ethnic groups are more prone to certain illnesses—including several types of cancer. The ChicagO Multiethnic Prevention and Surveillance Study (COMPASS) examines the lifestyle, environmental and genetic factors that influence health, cancer and chronic diseases. The study aims to understand why these disparities, in disease incidence and in mortality, are higher in Chicago than in other major U.S. cities.

Study participants FIVE-YEAR GOAL

INITIAL PHASE CLOSE TO

3,000

INDIVIDUALS FROM

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100,000 PEOPLE FROM 20 NEIGHBORHOODS

CHICAGO NEIGHBORHOODS

“This type of study of a large representative group of people over an extended period of time has never been done before. The knowledge we acquire will be valuable and applicable to the general population throughout the nation.” HABIBUL AHSAN, MD ASSOCIATE DIRECTOR FOR POPULATION RESEARCH, COMPREHENSIVE CANCER CENTER

2015—2016 COM M UN IT Y BENEF I T ANNUAL R EP ORT


Prostate cancer in African-American men African-American men are more likely to be diagnosed with, and to die from, prostate cancer. By collecting and studying the prostate tissue of men of European and African descent, UChicago Medicine researchers hope to uncover the molecular basis for disease development.

100

TISSUE HAS BEEN COLLECTED FROM 100 PROSTATE CANCER PATIENTS FOR ANALYSIS

Religious beliefs and cancer screening and treatment The impact of religious beliefs on how individuals across racial, ethnic and cultural groups view cancer prevention and treatment is poorly understood. Yet, these beliefs have significant implications for cancer care. Our physician-scientists explore this issue through innovative partnerships with community and religious organizations.

A Walk Through the Cure This online, experiential learning program aims to increase breast health care by addressing barriers to screening: fear, lack of familiarity, inexperience and distrust of the health care system. Through a virtual portal, participants can “walk through” the cancer center’s procedure rooms for mammography, radiation therapy, chemotherapy and surgery. Visit ocecd.uchicago.edu.

Partnership for Healthier Asians The Community Engagement and Cancer Disparities research team conducts colorectal cancer screening and education events at partner organizations in Asian communities. These sessions have resulted in higher screening compliance rates than seen in the general Asian-American population in the U.S.

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39+61+S 61%

OF PARTICIPANTS IN COMMUNITY COLORECTAL CANCER EDUCATION SESSIONS WERE SCREENED

A team led by Aasim Padela, MD, conducted focus groups with women over the age of 40 from nine area mosques to learn more about mammography experiences, cancer beliefs and preventive health practices. The researchers found that religious beliefs shape cancer screening decisions across the racial and ethnic diversity of Muslim women.

Karen Kim, MD, directs the Office of Community Engagement and Cancer Disparities.

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A D U LT D I A B E T E S

OUR IMPACT

We fight diabetes with a variety of prevention efforts, including the South Side Diabetes Project and a grantmaking initiative that supports community-based organizations.

2,000 MORE THAN 2,000 RESIDENTS ON THE SOUTH SIDE HAVE BENEFITED FROM 11 CARE DELIVERY INITIATIVES

Contestant Tasha Harris creates a dish during the popular Diabetes Cook Off at Washburne Culinary Institute. The annual event, hosted by the South Side Diabetes Project, gives cooks an opportunity to share delicious and affordable diabetes-friendly recipes.

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CommunityHealth’s Englewood Clinic

The South Side Diabetes Project

The University of Chicago Medicine supports the Take Action! diabetes management program to provide low-income, uninsured diabetic patients with essential information to help build self-management skills and behaviors for controlling their condition. Services include case management support, diabetes education and measurement of clinical outcomes.

The South Side Diabetes Project engages patients, providers, clinics and the community to provide diabetes education and self-improvement workshops for AfricanAmericans in the community. DIABETES EDUCATION COURSE

22% increased their consumption of fruits and vegetables

DURING A ONE-YEAR PERIOD 63 PATIENTS

98 DIABETIC PATIENTS

received diabetes case management support went to one-on-one education sessions

SURVEY RESULTS OF PARTICIPANTS COMPLETING COMMUNITYHEALTH’S EDUCATION SESSIONS

100

81+19

40+60

100%

81%

40%

began taking medications as prescribed

were controlling their cholesterol

improved their diet

2015—2016 COM M UN IT Y BENEF I T ANNUAL R EP ORT

29% increased their levels of physical activity 74 PATIENTS

378= 600=

54% showed signs of diabetes

55% improved their self-management of diabetes

70% of residents completed the course

74% reported they were keeping their cholesterol under control


The 61st Street Farmers Market Visitors to the 61st Street Farmers Market can learn how to shop right to eat right. Among the offerings for shoppers: free cooking demonstrations; education on affordable and fresh food choices; and tips on creating a balanced meal. The South Side Diabetes Project offers $9 vouchers available at six community health clinics for market purchases. And the market participates in the LINK Up Illinois Double Value Coupon Program, which multiplies the value of Illinois Link Card purchases.

47+53+S 53%

LINK CARD PURCHASES WERE FOR FRUITS AND VEGETABLES

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Asian Health Coalition UChicago Medicine supports the Diabetes Prevention Project in Asian Communities (DPPAC) in partnership with the Chinese American Service League. DPPAC addresses gaps in conventional approaches to diabetes health education and disease management. This innovative program assesses the knowledge and attitudes about diabetes among the limited-English speaking Chinese immigrant community to design a culturally relevant intervention program.

156

44

COMMUNITY FITNESS PROGRAM SESSIONS

ATTENDEES PER SESSION

120— INDIVIDUALS REACHED THROUGH AN EDUCATIONAL TOWN HALL MEETING

39— INDIVIDUALS ATTENDED A SIX-WEEK DIABETES MANAGEMENT EDUCATION PROGRAM

Community Fitness Walkers Established at the Museum of Science and Industry more than two decades ago, this free walking and aerobics program encourages adults in the community to integrate healthy fitness habits into their lifestyle. Among the regular attendees, approximately 21 percent were pre-diabetics or diabetics, 48 percent had high cholesterol, and 58 percent had hypertension.

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TRAUMA CARE AND VIOLENCE PREVENTION

OUR IMPACT

UChicago Medicine reaches out to young people and families affected by violence. Increased access to trauma-informed care, violence prevention programs, counseling, arts education and employment helps them cope and heal.

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The Urban Resilience Network Through The Urban Resilience Network (TURN, formerly called the Bronzeville Dream Center), UChicago Medicine collaborates with Bright Star Community Outreach, Northwestern Medicine and the United Way of Metropolitan Chicago to implement an innovative approach for combating violence and averting behaviors that may lead to violent conflict. Educators, faith leaders and partnering agencies focus on strengthening the community and preventing problem behaviors.

“We believe that change is possible. We believe wounds can be overcome. We believe in extraordinary transformation. And we believe we can TURN from our pain and live life anew.” RODNEY CARTER JR. DIRECTOR, TURN CENTER

2015—2016 COM M UN IT Y BENEF I T ANNUAL R EP ORT


Healing Hurt People-Chicago Healing Hurt People-Chicago (HHP-C) is a collaboration among UChicago Medicine Comer Children’s Hospital, John H. Stroger, Jr. Hospital of Cook County and Drexel University in Philadelphia. HHP-C addresses trauma care and makes therapy services available to young people injured by violent acts. The goal is to promote trauma recovery in order to reduce re-injury, retaliation, involvement with the justice system and death. Operating in two of the busiest pediatric trauma centers in the Chicago area, HHP-C reaches hundreds of youngsters affected by violence.

Project FIRE Launched in June 2015, Project FIRE (Fearless Initiative for Recovery and Empowerment) offers healing through art. A combination of glass arts education, mentoring and counseling supports trauma recovery and creates jobs for youth injured by violence. Co-created by glass artist Pearl Dick and University of Chicago Medicine clinical psychologist Bradley Stolbach, PhD, with the support of the University of Chicago Medicine Urban Health Initiative, Project FIRE is a partnership of ArtReach Chicago, the Firehouse Art Studio and Healing Hurt People-Chicago.

“The kids in the program have been able to stay safe. This feeling of safety allows them to focus on the future and what they can do to create it.” BRADLEY STOLBACH, PHD CLINICAL DIRECTOR, HEALING HURT PEOPLECHICAGO

“[Before] I never thought about the future. Now I have something to look forward to.” YOUNG ARTIST AND PROJECT FIRE PARTICIPANT 15

UChicago Medicine clinical psychologist Bradley Stolbach, PhD, shields Project FIRE participant Latee Smith from the heat while working on a vase with, from left, Marc Thrasher and Trevelli Jones at the Firehouse Art Studio in Chicago.

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HIV AND STI

OUR IMPACT

UChicago Medicine partners with community-based organizations to reduce the effects of HIV and STI through outreach, education, advocacy and screening.

16,000 16,000 INDIVIDUALS SCREENED FOR HIV ACROSS TWO PROGRAMS

Chicago Center for HIV Elimination volunteers Zenon Vivara, left, and Dangelo Woods Wilson at one of the regular screening events held in Jackson Park

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The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and sexually transmitted infections (STI) pose a considerable health threat on Chicago’s South Side. Statistics show the incidence of STI and HIV, as well as mortality rates, are substantially higher among African-American populations compared to white and Latino populations. The University of Chicago Medicine’s Chicago Center for HIV Elimination works with various organizations— including community hospitals, nonprofit organizations and community health centers—to expand its reach. Care delivery initiatives focus on improving accessibility to services for adolescents and adults.

Care2Prevent Care2Prevent (C2P) takes a holistic approach to prevention and treatment for young people living with, or at risk for, HIV and sexually transmitted infections. Through continuity of care, increased sexual health awareness and literacy, and reduced stigma, the dedicated C2P team cares for those living with HIV and works to prevent new cases in those at risk.

2015—2016 COM M UN IT Y BENEF I T ANNUAL R EP ORT

Expanded HIV Testing and Linkage to Care Expanded HIV Testing and Linkage to Care is a partnership of 10 South Side health care facilities that provide HIV screening and connection to care for HIV positive clients.

15,632— SCREENED FOR HIV

56

TESTED POSITIVE AND LINKED TO CARE

Better 2Gether Network The Better 2Gether Network is a collaboration of UChicago Medicine, the Howard Brown Health Center and Project Vida with the shared goal of strengthening and mobilizing community networks for HIV prevention and care. Services include social media awareness campaigns, HIV testing and STI screenings, and linkage to care, prevention and support services for people who are HIV positive.

384— SCREENED FOR HIV 152— TESTED POSITIVE

164— SCREENED FOR SYPHILIS 50— TESTED POSITIVE


CHILDHOOD OBESITY

OUR IMPACT

We support school-based and community programs that focus on risk and prevention and emphasize physical activity and nutrition management.

39 39 SCHOOL PARTNERS

Children in Urban Initiative’s Work to Play program have fun while supporting each other both on the field and in the classroom.

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Work to Play

Namaste Charter School

Urban Initiative's Work to Play program uses soccer to teach young children important lessons about health, character and teamwork. UChicago Medicine supports 253 participants across nine elementary schools on the South Side.

Namaste Charter School in Chicago’s McKinley Park neighborhood “educates kids from the inside out.” The school’s holistic approach combines academic instruction with physical activity and wellness instruction. By supporting Namaste’s model, UChicago Medicine is helping to reduce obesity rates among children in this underserved community.

100% of children in the program: • Consume fruits and vegetables five days a week • Participate in 60 minutes of moderate to vigorous activity three times a week

100% PARTICIPATE IN 60 MINUTES OF PLAY EACH DAY

70% PARTICIPATE IN AFTER SCHOOL EXERCISE

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CHILDHOOD ASTHMA

OUR IMPACT

UChicago Medicine Comer Children’s Hospital teams up with partners in the community to implement new strategies for fighting pediatric asthma.

30 30 COMMUNITY PARTNERS

UChicago Medicine community health workers, from left, Sigrid Tandy, Kenya Vera-Sample and Crystal Stevenson make home visits in neighborhoods across Chicago’s South Side.

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Asthma is one of the most common conditions treated in the pediatric emergency department. Yet, in many instances, the cases are mild and could have been managed by a parent or a primary care physician.

The Community Health Worker program The Community Health Worker program is a collaborative effort among the University of Chicago Medicine and South Side community hospitals and health centers to identify high-risk pediatric asthma patients. Our community health workers serve as liaisons between the families and the patient’s primary medical home. Vital services they offer to those who enroll in the program include: • Delivering patient education on asthma, recognizing its signs and symptoms, medications, devices and environmental triggers • Conducting home environmental assessments to help identify and address common asthma triggers • Connecting families to needed community resources The community health workers also engage in outreach events to provide asthma education to the broader population.

2015—2016 COM M UN IT Y BENEF I T ANNUAL R EP ORT

“The parents of our patients sometimes face challenges that lead to hopelessness. First, we work to make a connection and gain their trust. Then we can address the medical and environmental issues related to their child’s asthma.” KENYA VERA-SAMPLE COMMUNITY HEALTH WORKER


Asthma Center UChicago Medicine is spearheading efforts to develop and advance a collaborative, innovative and high-quality system of care for pediatric asthma management on Chicago’s South Side. The Asthma Center promotes the standardization of asthma education for clinical, educational and community-based practices. A multidisciplinary asthma work group, with representation from four South Side health organizations, meets on a regular basis to develop overall goals and work plans.

4,281 PATIENT ENCOUNTERS

Asthma in Chicago’s South Side Children

Working with our partners

A workshop titled “Asthma in Chicago’s South Side Children” educated local clinical providers, community health workers and educators on how pediatric asthma is affecting the South Side of Chicago. Participants learned about current evidence-based programs, best practices, and screening and treatment resources.

University of Chicago Medicine’s grantmaking initiative funds community organizations to help them address pediatric asthma through outreach, education, trigger removal, policy changes and/or case management. Grantees include:

“I am so glad my community health worker is in my life to help me simplify things.” TAMIKA FORD MOTHER OF TWO CHILDREN WITH ASTHMA

Respiratory Health Association to educate children through Fight Asthma Now and their caregivers through asthma management programs Mobile Care Chicago to increase services of an asthma van for children in the Roseland area St. Bernard Hospital to fund an asthma outreach coordinator to bolster the work within their pediatric asthma clinic Chicago Asthma Consortium to pilot a comprehensive asthma program in a South Side charter school

UChicago Medicine community health worker Sigrid Tandy educates Tamika Ford’s children, Lance, 10, and Nariyah, 4, on asthma symptoms, triggers and care.

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E CO N O M I C I M PAC T

OUR IMPACT

Minority- and women-owned businesses are integral to our long-term goals. Together we help provide jobs and opportunities for our neighbors while we work to improve access to high-quality health care for everyone.

$ 58,600,000 IN FISCAL YEARS 2015 AND 2016, THE UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO MEDICINE SPENT $58.6 MILLION WITH CERTIFIED MINORITY- AND WOMENOWNED CONSTRUCTION AND CONSTRUCTIONRELATED BUSINESSES. 20

With the help of minority- and women-owned businesses, the University of Chicago Medicine opened a number of important facilities over the past year that would not have been possible without these key partners. We are proud of our work together to help drive the economy of our community.

Center for Care and Discovery The third and fourth floors of the Center for Care and Discovery opened in August 2016, marking the final stage of construction for the state-of-the-art hospital. These newly completed floors now house specialty surgical units, the Burn and Complex Wound Center and the Heart and Vascular Center. More than 40 minority- or women-owned firms were awarded $31.5 million in contracts over the two-year project, paying $6.5 million in wages to support women and minority workers.

“Our partnership with the University of Chicago Medicine has been an incredible experience. We look forward to being a part of the work to provide the best care for people on the South Side and beyond.” NOSA EHIMWENMAN, OWNER, BOWA CONSTRUCTION

2015—2016 COM M UN IT Y BENEF I T ANNUAL R EP ORT


The Family Birth Center reception area welcomes patients and visitors from the neighborhood and surrounding communities.

One of the key construction contractors on the project was Bowa Construction. Owned and operated by Nosa Ehimwenman, Bowa Construction has completed 35 projects over the past several years. The firm was also a joint venture partner on the construction of our new ambulatory facility in Orland Park. In addition, they are members of the construction management team for our adult emergency department project.

Family Birth Center New moms and families from the local community are now enjoying our state-of-the-art Family Birth Center, opened in September 2016. The labor and delivery unit, which was moved from Bernard A. Mitchell Adult Hospital, provides mothers with a modern facility that includes nine labor/delivery/recovery rooms, five triage rooms and two operating rooms (C-section suites). Twenty minority-owned firms were contracted to work on the project and were paid nearly $2.9 million.

Bernard A. Mitchell Adult Hospital Recent renovations to Mitchell Hospital created 32 new private postpartum rooms, a new family waiting room and a reception area. This project was built, in part, by 22 minority-owned firms that were paid more than $1.6 million for contracts related to the renovations.

Duchossois Center for Advanced Medicine Minority firms also played key roles in renovating roughly 40,000 square feet of space on the fifth and sixth floors of the Duchossois Center for Advanced Medicine. These vital growth projects improve the lives of our patients and help us better coordinate care for them and their families.

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$5.4 MILLION

21 MINORITY-OWNED FIRMS WERE AWARDED $5.4 MILLION IN CONTRACTS TO CREATE A NEW HEART AND VASCULAR IMAGING CENTER AND A NEW INFUSION THERAPY CLINIC.

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COMMUNITY BENEFIT G R A N T P R O G R A M*

OUR IMPACT

The University of Chicago Medicine provides grant money to community-based organizations and health advocacy groups to implement programming that meets health challenges in our communities. In 2015, we expanded our portfolio of grantees to increase our impact on childhood obesity and diabetes.

Pilot Light teaches children not only how to choose good food but also where food comes from and how it is harvested.

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Roseland Community Hospital: Adult Diabetes Disease Management and Education Program The Adult Diabetes Disease Management and Education Program at Roseland Community Hospital provides diabetes management for adults with type 1 and type 2 diabetes who have health complications related to the disease. The program helps strengthen the community’s capacity to address disparities in health outcomes and education for the at-risk, underserved diabetic population on the South Side.

Pilot Light Pilot Light brings food and nutrition into the classroom. Experienced chefs partner with teachers to create a curriculum using healthy food as a foundation for better learning. The lessons taught in the classroom connect in the lunchroom, at home and in the community.

*The Community Benefit Grant Program is a partnership between

UChicago’s Institute for Translational Medicine and UChicago Medicine’s Urban Health Initiative.

2015—2016 COM M UN IT Y BENEF I T ANNUAL R EP ORT

University of Chicago Charter School: Fresh Fit Fun Built upon a community-academic partnership, Fresh Fit Fun seeks to promote healthy eating and physical activity in urban schools. The program develops, implements and evaluates targeted student and familycentered interventions to reduce the risk of pediatric obesity. Fresh Fit Fun hopes to serve as a model for how schools can impact the health and wellness of students and the school community.


Grantees in fiscal years 2015 and 2016

DIABETES ASIAN HEALTH COALITION Diabetes Prevention Project in Asian Communities COMMUNITYHEALTH Take Action! Diabetes Management Program ROSELAND COMMUNITY HOSPITAL Adult Diabetes Disease Management and Education Program

ASTHMA CHICAGO ASTHMA CONSORTIUM Comprehensive School-Based Approach to Improve Asthma Outcomes MOBILE CARE CHICAGO Roseland Community Initiative RESPIRATORY HEALTH ASSOCIATION Southside Asthma Management Project

OBESITY URBAN INITIATIVES Work to Play PILOT LIGHT Food Education in the Classroom UCHICAGO CHARTER SCHOOL Fresh Fit Fun

ST. BERNARD HOSPITAL Pediatric Asthma Clinic

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Children learn about, and taste, cranberries and other uncommon fruits and vegetables during Fresh Fit Fun sessions in their University of Chicago Charter School classrooms.

UC H OS P I TA L S . E D U/CO MMU N ITY-BEN EFIT


COMMUNITY OUTREACH EVENTS AND ACTIVITIES

OUR IMPACT

Each year, the University of Chicago Medicine sponsors and participates in community events offering the efforts of our employee volunteers and the expertise of our care providers and researchers.

Kenneth S. Polonsky, MD, lends a hand during the 2016 Day of Service and Reflection. Polonsky is Dean of the University of Chicago Biological Sciences Division and the Pritzker School of Medicine, and Executive Vice President for Medical Affairs for the University of Chicago.

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Day of Service and Reflection The Day of Service and Reflection brings together University of Chicago Medicine faculty, staff, students, friends and families to provide meaningful service to local community-based organizations. In 2016, the event drew more than 300 volunteers who undertook 26 service projects. Projects included painting, gardening, cleaning and organizing food pantries.

Community Health Focus Hour UChicago Medicine partners with radio station WVON to air “Community Health Focus Hour.” This weekly medical information program explores community health topics in plain language and encourages listeners to call in with questions and comments for the guests. Susan Peters, above, manager of the UChicago Medicine Office of Community Affairs, is the executive producer.

2015—2016 COM M UN IT Y BENEF I T ANNUAL R EP ORT


First Ladies Health Initiative Pastors’ wives—also known as “first ladies”—team up with health care professionals across Chicago to provide wellness information and screenings. UChicago Medicine physicians, nurses and educators partnered with eight South Side congregations to welcome questions and provide hundreds of free diabetes screenings.

Featured presenters and panelists at the 2016 Urban Health Initiative Summit included, from left, Nirav Shah, MD, JD, director, Illinois Department of Public Health; Julie Morita, MD, commissioner, Chicago Department of Public Health; Doriane Miller, MD, director, Center for Community Health and Vitality; and Brenda Battle, RN, BSN, MBA, vice president, Urban Health Initiative.

Urban Health Initiative Summit UChicago Medicine’s Urban Health Initiative Summit brings together community residents and stakeholders with staff and faculty to discuss the current health status of the South Side and solutions for confronting health challenges. Held at Kennedy-King College in Englewood, the 2016 UHI Summit featured a comprehensive report on UChicago Medicine’s latest community health needs assessment and explored opportunities for partnership through the collective impact model—an emerging community health intervention model aimed at improving health outcomes through collaborative efforts across diverse stakeholders.

Black Women’s Expo Each year, the Black Women’s Expo creates a forum for women to discuss shared issues and to celebrate aspirations and achievements. As one of the event’s sponsors, the Urban Health Initiative reached thousands of attendees over three days with vital information about heart health, breast cancer, reproductive health, fitness and nutrition. African Festival of the Arts This annual festival in Washington Park spotlights African culture and contribution to the arts. UChicago Medicine, an anchor of the health and wellness pavilion, provided free health information, “Ask the Doctor,” exercise classes, cooking demonstrations and a health “game show” during the popular event.

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Partnering with the community The Urban Health Initiative collaborates with community programs to foster strong, long-lasting relationships with residents, civic leaders, nonprofit organizations and care providers to improve health and access to care on Chicago’s South Side. Here is a look at where we’ve been: Real Men Cook

The University of Chicago Medicine supported Real Men Cook, an annual Father’s Day event that highlights the important role of men in their families and communities. Faculty, staff and student volunteers served delicious, healthy menu options along with their recipes. Nutrition and diabetes information was also provided to attendees.

UC H OS P I TA L S . E D U/CO MMU N ITY-BEN EFIT


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uchospitals.edu/community-benefit Program data and metrics included in this report are provided by the University of Chicago Medical Center Community Benefit Evaluation Report, Community Health Needs Assessment and Strategic Implementation Plan. The University of Chicago does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national or ethnic origin, age, status as an individual with a disability, protected veteran status, genetic information, or other protected classes under the law. For additional information, please see equalopportunity.uchicago.edu.


2015-2016 Community Benefit Report: The University of Chicago Medicine