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June 2019

Vol. 7, Issue 6

STONEBRIDGE RANCH NEWS www.stonebridgeranch.com


June 2019

Vol. 7 Issue 6

STONEBRIDGE RANCH NEWS The official publication of the Stonebridge Ranch Community Association, Inc.

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Easter Bunny/Children’s Fishing Tournament

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Community Calendar

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Cartoon Ranch

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Curb Appeal Corner

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Modification Design Guidelines Update

Annual review results in amendments to one of our most important documents

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Passion for Flying

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Save Water & Money

Resident hot air balloonist keeps his aunt’s legacy alive

Social Scene

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Save the Date April 2019 Events

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Got Bare Spots?

Compliance tips for keeping your lawn looking beautiful this summer

Copyright © 2019. All rights reserved. Published by Community Matters, Inc., this magazine is produced at no cost to the Association and is mailed monthly to all Stonebridge Ranch residences free of charge.

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Cover Photo by Erica Lee

Smart irrigation can lead to a greener yard and more money in the bank

Every year we look forward to our Family Beach Parties, which we host monthly each summer. We hope to see you and your family at one of these parties in 2019. They will be held June 3, July 15, and August 5.


F ROM T HE P RESIDENT In this month’s issue, you will find information about some upcoming events. We will have a Concert on the Circle on June 14. Also, there will be an article on smart controllers and irrigation tips for your yard and updated Modif ication Design Guidelines. Board Meeting The Board meeting of April 18, 2019 was called to order at 1:00 PM. All Board members were present. The meeting began with a Homeowners Open Forum. Several homeowners appeared to discuss a change in the pool schedule, one homeowner addressed the Modification Committee process, and one homeowner requested a change to an approved modification. The next item of business was to ratify the minutes of the previous Board meeting and all decisions made since the last Board meeting. We also approved the appointment of Alton Sheek to the Amenities Committee and Maureen Dudley to the Communications Committee. Old Business In its continuing review of all Board guidelines, we reviewed and updated the guidelines for Leasing of Single Occupancy Dwellings, Covenant Enforcement and Fining Policy, MARC Fining Policy, Modifications Committee Charter, Appeals Committee Guidelines, and the Time Saving Collection Guideline. We completed our annual review of Modif ication Design Guidelines and approved several changes. 380 Project Update. Subsequent to the Board meeting, on Monday, May 6, TxDOT announced their preferred alignment as bypass Red Option-A. This is not favorable to Stonebridge as it would enter 380 with six new lanes just above Kensington village. This would cause an interchange to be built at that point and a “canyon style” highway from there West toward Custer Road creating a very interesting traffic situation for us. It should be noted that the City of McKinney is categorically opposed to this option as well as opposing the Green Alignment (widening of 380). There are many discussions taking place to find an alternative solution that works better for everyone. I continue to monitor and work actively on this project to make sure Stonebridge interests are represented.

period of 30 days from the date of a weather event provided the weather event is declared by the Board President. We also updated the pool calendar to make it possible for schools to hold their annual school parties. Executive Session The Board reviewed and approved the monthly foreclosure report. We also reviewed and accepted the Collections Committee report and the Violations report, reviewed and approved the report of the Appeals Committee, and reviewed the Website analytics report for the previous month. The Director of Operations updated us on pending legal matters. Association Reports Board Liaisons presented updates on committee activities reflected in Committee minutes available on our website. The Director of Operations updated the Board regarding first quarter water usage, issues with the landscape vendor (Brightview) in areas B and C, the Winter Haven dredging project, and cost estimates to expand the community room or build a new community building. Neither project appears likely at this time. The meeting adjourned at 6:05 PM. Jon Dell’Antonia President, Board of Directors

New Business We approved a Common Area usage agreement with Smiles Charity for their annual Charity event in July. We also approved a change to allow roofing signs in yards for a STONEBRIDGE RANCH NEWS

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June 2019

Vol. 7 Issue 6

STONEBRIDGE RANCH COMMUNITY ASSOCIATION, INC. 6201 Virginia Parkway, McKinney, TX 75071

Office Hours: Monday to Friday, 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. Ph: (214) 733-5800 Fax: (214) 778-0595 website: www.stonebridgeranch.com Courtesy Patrol: (214) 794-4945

CONTRIBUTORS TO THIS ISSUE Jon Dell’Antonia, Erica Lee, Cheryl Unnone, Dave Wiest

BOARD OF DIRECTORS President Jon Dell’Antonia

Vice President & Treasurer Norm Counts Secretary Jim Norton

Director Kristen Vartian Director Rick Chaffin Director Joe Closs

Director Michael Kaltenbaugh

STAFF

Professional management by

RTI/Community Management Associates Inc. (CMA)

Director of Operations Greg Herbst

Maintenance Supervisor Michael Cawley

Landscape & Grounds Manager Brock Whetstone Lifestyle Director David Wiest

Executive Assistant Rony Peterson

Maintenance Assistant Eric Ortega, Jeff Torres Compliance Supervisor Kelli Koehler

Compliance Coordinators Gwen Burns, Randy Cain, Pat Liles, Jarred Mercer

Administrative Assistant Melba Siebel

Community Services Coordinator Tamra Collins Communications Coordinator Erica Lee

Operations Support Representative Allison Bedgood Irrigation Specialist Christ Talbot

PUBLISHER

To place an advertisement, please contact:

Community Matters, Inc., PO Box 5900, Frisco, TX 75035 Ph: (972) 370-1778

website: www.communitymattersinc.com

Stonebridge Ranch News is the only authorized publication of the Stonebridge Ranch Community Association, Inc. It is published on behalf of residents for informational purposes only. The Association does not guarantee any work or claims made by advertisers herein and claims no responsibility or liability for statements made in the publication. The Association does not support or take responsibility for services, whether paid or volunteer, mentioned herein, nor for statements published in articles or letters herein which are not endorsed by group decision of the Board of Directors.

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Updates to Modification Design Guidelines Approved by Board of Directors Some homeowners join our community because they want to live closer to family or because they must relocate for a job. Others join our association because they know it’s a good value. The Stonebridge Ranch Community Association (SRCA) has a proven track record for maintaining high property values and preserving a premier way of life for over three decades! Of course, maintaining high property values does not happen by accident. Rather, it results from all the hard work and care that our homeowners, volunteers and staff invest in our community. One of the most important areas for our collective attention is our home maintenance standards. These guidelines grow in importance as our community ages and more of our homeowners update and improve their homes through exterior modifications.

The Design Guidelines and Review Procedures for Residential Modif ications—commonly referred to as the Modif ication Design Guidelines—provide the foundation we follow to keep Stonebridge Ranch looking as good as new. Annually with the help of our professional staff, the Modifications Committee volunteers review and recommend edits to this document.* Their suggested updates do not go into effect until they have also been reviewed and approved by the SRCA Board of Directors. Many times, edits to this document arise from the committee’s interactions with their fellow homeowners. Each year, the Modifications Committee review an average of 1,919 Modification Applications submitted by their neighbors. The volunteers learn a lot from

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these applications. Sometimes this is how they learn about new home exterior products that may—or may not—fit within the Stonebridge Ranch aesthetic; other times they identify text within the Modif ication Design Guidelines which could be clarified to aid homeowners. At their April 2019 meeting, the Board of Directors reviewed and approved a number of changes to the Modif ication Design Guidelines. If you have never read the Modif ication Design Guidelines before, you may be surprised by the level of detail covered in the document. However, community-wide attention to such details is precisely what it takes to maintain the premier status of such a large association over time. None of these guidelines are meant to be punitive: the intent of standards is simply to protect property values for all 9,000+ member households across our association. Note Before Reading Ahead Because the Modif ication Design Guidelines document

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is lengthy and many of the 2019 edits merely clarified existing text rather than changing a guideline, we have not listed all of the changes here. Further, we have not listed them word-for-word, and we are not printing here the complete guideline for each category listed below. This list simply denotes points of significance. As always, we recommend: if you are thinking of making any exterior modification (including repairs, replacements, or additions), be sure to read the current form of the Modif ication Design Guidelines online at www.stonebridgeranch.com as the FIRST STEP in your planning. Accesory Structures Updates • Covered Arbor/Pergola—guideline added. • Modification Application requirements—for accessory structures, we now require a photograph of the existing house showing where the proposed structure will be added.

One tried and true way to be a good neighbor? Pay attention to the community design standards which protect the property values of everyone across our large and lovely community. stonebridgeranch.com


Fencing Guidelines Updates • Board beside board fences may have no space between pickets. • Steel pipe columns may be encased in a matching cedar or redwood material. • Stand-alone fences are prohibited. • Trash Tote fencing must be between a minimum 50” and maximum 72” height. • Guideline added regarding single panel screening for Trash Tote fencing. • Once a perimeter fence is placed it may not be permanently removed. • Screening for privacy along open metal fences must be made of approved landscaping no higher than 5 feet. Trash Tote & Recycling Bins Updates • Required: minimum of 2-foot setback from front corner of the home with approved screening. • Totes may not be stored in a flower bed. • Trash Tote/Recycle Bins can be placed out ready for pick up no earlier than 6 p.m. on the day prior to the trash pickup day and must be properly stored by 7 a.m. the day following trash pickup.

A Final Note Your Modifications Committee volunteers and SRCA professionals study the guidelines on your behalf so they can assist you through the Modification Application process. Please consider them your partners and a go-to resource: they serve to protect you from making modifications that are not allowed according to community guidelines. If you have big dreams for a home improvement project and have any questions whatsoever, please call our staff at 214.733.5800 as a first step in your planning so they may assist you! * We recommend that homeowners who are considering an exterior modif ication f irst review the Modif ication Design Guidelines on the website at www.stonebridgeranch.com. You can always f ind the current form of the guidelines online. Because they periodically change, please do not print the guidelines out to refer to later—your paper copy could become outdated. ◀

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Passion for Flying When Stonebridge Ranch resident Jason Myers was five years old, he took his first hot air balloon ride with his father and his aunt Gayle, who piloted the flight. He still has the log book documenting the flight, which took place on Sept. 11, 1980. When he recalls that day, his voice is charged. “I just fell in love with it,” he says. “I talked about it so much afterward. I started dreaming about flying. My perspective of the world even changed. I started seeing it from above, looking down on the trees and the houses.” Like Jason, his Aunt Gayle had instantly fallen in love with hot air ballooning, too. A travel agent for American Express, in 1978 Gayle coordinated a group trip to Africa, and she was invited to go along. One of the experiences she booked for the group was a hot air balloon safari for 25 people. Says Jason with a grin, “She loved it so much that she came home to Ohio and said to my uncle, ‘We are buying a balloon.’ She and my uncle actually sold a car to buy it.” Because Gayle loved to scuba dive, Jason says, “She wanted to marry her love of flying with diving. She had gone swimming with dolphins once, and it really touched her.” Gayle and her husband chose a custom design for their balloon, which was sewn entirely by hand by a team in Ohio. Named ‘The Dolphin’, the balloon was unique for the large gray dolphin on the front. Buying and learning to fly a balloon is no small feat. Not only does it require an investment to purchase the balloon, but hot air ballooning is regulated by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA). To earn their private flying license, would-be pilots must take at least ten hours of flying instruction. Commercial pilots must receive thirty more hours of instruction. All pilots must pass a written proficiency test. They must also pass a solo flight test with an examiner to prove they are able to control the aircraft.

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Both Gayle and her husband got their private licenses immediately. Says Jason, “My aunt was unique because it was rare to see a female balloon pilot. My aunt and uncle were flying in the 80’s when they didn’t have as many gadgets as they do now. They were essentially flying without instruments.” Given Jason’s love for flight, he naturally couldn’t wait to get his own license. His uncle took him on many flights to train him. Recalls Jason, “He was a great teacher. He’d ask me questions to help me pay attention to what was happening with the balloon. I started my own flight log book in high school. I do fly with equipment now, but when you are at 2,000 feet it’s hard to feel time and space. And because you are moving with the wind, you don’t have many directional cues. You have to pick a spot on the horizon and measure your movement against that.” Today Jason works for a lumber manufacturer, but he also has his commercial flying license and his own balloon. He tries to fly as often as he can, and he provides private rides for all occasions. “I feel so blessed that I get to fly and share my love of flying with others,” he says. Among the flight packages he provides are gender reveals, birthday celebrations, wedding proposals, and bucket list flights. One patron was a 91-year-old woman who had legally died twice but was still hanging on to life. Says Jason: “It was her dying wish to fly in a hot air balloon.” Jason took the woman on a flight with her daughter and her nurse. “They told me that she watched the video we took over and over in bed with a smile on her face before she passed away.” “One of my favorite things about being a pilot,” he adds, “is that I’ve only just met the people I’m taking up in the basket. But I get to witness some of their most important life moments—moments they don’t even get to share with their friends and their families. It’s very special.” He recalls one recent engagement flight he flew with a young couple. “It was just perfect,” he says with a smile. “The weather was good, and I managed to distract the girl by pointing at things as we neared the spot where the ground crew had set up the engagement banner. When she turned and saw it, she gasped, and there was her boyfriend holding the ring for her.” Importantly, says Jason, “Ballooning is not something


you can do on your own. Every time you fly, you need a ground crew. Their primary purpose is to retrieve you when you land. They go ahead of you in the truck, and they try to keep a visual on you at all times. They have to anticipate where you’ll land, so they can make sure the area is ready. Sometimes, they even have to ask permission from landowners so you can land.” Simply setting up the balloon requires teamwork, too. Balloons of average size are made of 220 pounds of fabric and hold 90,000 cubic feet of air. “That’s a lot when you consider that a basketball holds one cubic foot of air,” says Jason. The crew assists the pilot when inflating the balloon, a process which requires a large fan. This is followed by “burner time” when the pilot adds heat so the balloon will inflate to a standing position. In Jason’s case as a commercial pilot offering gift packages, the ground crew is also essential for driving ahead and setting up banners, such as the “Will You Marry Me?” sign that is large enough to be read from a height of 800 to 2,000 feet (the average flying height). At the end of the flight, the crew helps during the deflation process, which is called “milking the balloon.” Jason sincerely values the sense of community that develops between anyone who loves ballooning. It includes ground crew members, pilots, passengers, and observers alike. “It’s just such a tight-knit community,” he says. “Balloonists tend to have an adventurous spirit. It takes a unique person to pilot because there are so many variables that you have to take into account. You have to have a carefree attitude and be able to come up with a Plan B while in flight because you’re going where the wind takes you,” he notes. “As we pilots say, ‘There is no crying in ballooning.’” In the case of the Myers family, it’s practically a family sport thanks to Aunt Gayle. They’ve even hosted family reunions at hot air balloon festivals, such as the world’s largest, which is held annually in Albuquerque (where conditions are especially suited to flight). “Ballooning is so centered around family,” says Jason. “Going to festivals creates chances to take road trips with the kids.” Today his own children Abigayle (age seven, named for Aunt Gayle) and Greydon (age three) are learning the love of flying from their father. One challenge to Jason’s flying obsession is that there are many “unflyable” days in Texas. “We have strong ground winds here,” he says. “The winds need to be at 10 knots or less because the balloon stands 70 feet tall and that creates a lot of drag. And the upper winds need to be stable with minimal thermals. This is

while you’ll never see a balloon flying in the afternoon in Texas—only within an hour of sunrise or sunset.” He adds with a laugh, “We don’t have landing gear, so we often have what I call a ‘Texas landing’—landing when you are going 15 miles per hour or more!” It’s clear that for Jason, flying in a hot air balloon has deep meaning that is rooted in near-magical family lore. His daughter Abigayle was born on March 31, Aunt Gayle’s birthday. And though Aunt Gayle has passed away, she gifted her nephew with something that is difficult to describe in words. In 2017, Jason purchased The Dolphin from his uncle. This year, when the trusted family treasure did not pass its annual stress test, Jason decided to commission a replacement that looks just like it, which he has named “The Dolphin Legacy.” Says Jason, “Aunt Gayle actually died on my birthday. She gave me something so special. Ballooning has opened so many doors for me. It’s a great escape. The conversations I have with people at 3,000 feet are unbelievable. They tell me their most meaningful stories—things they wouldn’t otherwise tell a stranger.” In his voice, you can almost hear the sounds he first heard as a five-year-old boy when he took his first flight—the “shush” of the wind and the creaking of the wicker basket. In his eyes, you can almost see a great expanse of blue sky, the clouds, and far below, all the rooftops and trees. And who knows? You might even get lucky enough to spot The Dolphin Legacy one of these days. Keep your eyes on the horizon at dawn and dusk. Jason often flies in McKinney and has been seen over Stonebridge Lake and our villages by many residents. If you see him, feel free to give him a wave! Jason invites others to chase the balloon to where he lands. He loves to introduce new friends to the sport of hot air ballooning— kids enjoy climbing in the basket, and strangers often help his ground crew milk the balloon at the end of a flight. ◀

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Got Bare Spots? Tips for Keep Your Yard Looking Beautiful This year’s spring showers encouraged landscaping as well as weeds and unwanted plants to grow throughout Stonebridge Ranch. Section 9.12 of the Association’s Covenants, Conditions, and Restrictions (CC&R’s) provides homeowners with landscape maintenance guidelines to help keep each property in a “safe, clean and attractive condition.” Maintenance is to include, for example, “the proper seeding and consistent watering and mowing of lawns,” “the pruning…of all trees and shrubbery,” and “keeping lawn and garden areas…free of weeds and attractive.” Read ahead for tips on a variety of topics. Bare Spots Bare spots are prone to occur over time in shady areas of your lawn or in areas of unhealthy soil. What can you do to address this issue?

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• Pay attention to how shade falls in your yard throughout the day. This will help you predict where bare spots might develop. • If you develop bare spots beneath your trees, one step you can take in supporting the grass is to trim and thin the canopy above. • To help prevent the onset of bare spots, lawn professionals recommend planting a shade tolerant grass such as Zoysia or St. Augustine in the shady areas of your yard. • When attempting to correct a bare spot by restoring the grass, a homeowner can either seed new grass or install sod patches. The drawback to seeding is that the grass can take a long time to fully grow in, delaying your correction of a bare spot. In contrast, sod patches cover bare areas instantly and can root very quickly. If you do install new sod to areas of your yard, note that sod needs to be watered regularly in order to properly root. • You may be wondering: what size of bare spot in my lawn could lead to a compliance violation? Stonebridge Ranch compliance coordinators identify bare spots as a single area of a lawn, or multiple areas of a lawn, which amount to approximately 2’ x 2’ of bare area (or its stonebridgeranch.com

equivalent, the area need not be perfectly square). Importantly, note: we provide this dimension only as a rough guideline to aid you as you review your own yard. Our compliance coordinators follow the best practice of not exiting their vehicles when inspecting. Because of this, identifying this dimension as is relates to any particular yard is a matter of the coordinator’s best judgement and is based on what they can reasonably see from their position in their car. • If shaded areas of grass can’t get the sunlight they need to thrive, one solution to consider is installing mulch beds or tree rings. However, if you are considering this fix for your bare spots, please call the association office first at 214.733.5800. We’ll connect you to a compliance coordinator, who will support you as you plan your exterior modification. • Many homeowners depend on professionals to help them maintain healthy soil, but there are also many resources available online and at the library which can advise you how to create a nutrient-rich environment for your grass. Your Village Standards Each village has specific subdivision guidelines which relate to landscaping. These requirements include how many large canopy trees, ornamental trees, and shrub placements you need in your yard. Below are a few basic guidelines for all property owners in Stonebridge Ranch to keep in mind. For specifics related to your village, visit www.stonebridgeranch.com and review the guidelines for your village. The basics: • All villages in Stonebridge Ranch require at least one large canopy tree in each front yard (though some require more). This is not only an association requirement, but a City of McKinney requirement as well. • A minimum of 50% turf grasses is required in front yards and in side yards to your front facing gate. • To remove an existing required caliper tree, you must have prior written approval by the


Modifications Committee. • Landscaping must be maintained— and when needed, replaced—following the highly recommended or acceptable plant material list from the Stonebridge Ranch plant palette. • Landscape improvements must not impact the function of any drainage easement. Landscape Bed Edging Our compliance staff often field questions from residents regarding landscape bed edging. While the preferred edging is a neat, 2-inch deep trench, other options are accepted as well. Importantly, before utilizing any of the other options listed here, see the Modif ication Design Guidelines for specifics. Other landscape bed edging options include: metal edging; stones cut in uniform rectangular shapes and consistent in height; segmental interlocking concrete units; regular brick edging; and natural stone boulders set in a natural dry stacked pattern and not mortared. Got Questions? As always, if you have any questions about your yard upkeep, have received a lawn violation notice, or are unsure what steps to follow as you plan a yard modification, please call the association office at 214.733.5800. Staff members are here to assist you toward a resolution. Please keep in mind that compliance violations are not meant to be punitive. Instead, the intention behind every postcard reminder the association sends is the upkeep of standards in support of premier property values. Let’s all work together to keep our community looking top-notch this summer! ◀

Bare spots are a common lawn care issue homeowners face during the heat of summer.

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Somebunny lost her tooth at the event this year! What a fun childhood memory!

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Tips to Conserve Water and Keep Your Yard Looking Great By Amanda Griffin

Amanda Griff in is the President of Smart Outdoor Services (SOS) and a consultant to the Board of Directors since 2013 regarding ways to reduce Association water usage rates and irrigation expenses. She has been instrumental in helping the Board identify our highestvolume water meters and installing pressure regulators at these locations. The Board expanded this replacement further last year, having seen an average usage rate reduction of 29% in test areas. With help from Amanda and SOS, the Association has also installed water flow meters for early leak detection; utilized more detailed programming through smart controllers; and implemented zone mapping and more frequent on-site inspections for leaking heads and valves. If you’ve been wondering what you can do to reduce your own water usage this summer, read ahead. Amanda provides the following tips for the average homeowner. What can homeowners do today to reduce water use on their lawns? If someone wants to do something to save water today, I would tell them to go look at their controller/time clock and to go online to pull up the owner’s manual. People are usually surprised at how many features their controller has that they never knew how to utilize. From the landscaping side, I would advise installing hardwood mulch in all bed areas. This helps reduce evaporation and shade root zones. The water that is applied sinks in and lasts longer because of the insulating layer of the mulch.

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What is the biggest mistake you see people make when trying to save water? Probably the biggest mistake people make is assuming that their yard maintenance provider is managing their sprinkler system and schedule. If your yard guy just wants everything to look green, his first response may be to increase the water if something looks stressed. The issue is that a lack of water may or may not be the plant’s problem. Weekly mowing service companies may not take the time to turn on every sprinkler to make sure nothing is broken and everything is aimed the correct direction. I can’t tell you how many homes stonebridgeranch.com

our technicians go to where the homeowner says they haven’t touched their controller in their garage since they moved in! So much water is wasted by just not paying attention. The average household wastes about 50% of their outdoor water, which is preventable. Another mistake is that many people, wanting to save water, just turn their controllers to a lower setting. They do so without going outside to look at their system in the daylight, to see what is right and what is wrong with it. Homeowners need to pay attention to where the water is standing or pooling, where it looks like the coverage is less than adequate, and where plants have grown higher than the sprinkler head. Cutting back without studying the system first can sabotage conservation efforts because the homeowner may think, “I just can’t cut down the water,” and then dial it back up. But cutting back water use benefits everybody. Homeowners see a reduction in their water bill. Often their plants are actually healthier and more resilient when the water is right, and our water resources in North Texas get some relief as well. I encourage everyone to turn their system on once or twice a month, during the day, and walk around and watch it run. Do smart controllers really save water? They certainly can, but they can also waste water. Smart controllers have extra features or use additional data to create a “smarter” schedule for a property. But as with all technology, “garbage in, garbage out.” If the controller is not set up correctly the first time, and if nobody is paying attention to it over time, a smart controller can waste as much water as a regular controller can. It is my experience that many, if not most, smart controllers are not being used in the way that encourages the least amount of water use. That is like saving some random numbers in your phone, then expecting to dial those numbers and reach your mom. It just doesn’t work that way. A knowledgeable irrigation professional should take a look at the settings, know the landscape and where the zones are, set up the system, and then show the homeowner how to adjust the settings as well.


What advice do you have for homeowners who feel like they have already done all they can do to water efficiently? If a homeowner is thinking he or she has done everything possible to use water most efficiently, I would double check that they have done all of the following: had a professional check their water pressure and made adjustments if needed, upgraded to new nozzles, installed a rain/freeze sensor, matched their sprinkler layouts to their plant types, completed (or hired an irrigator to complete) regular inspections, and converted to drip everywhere possible. If they have done all that and still want to do more, first I would give them a big hand of applause: we need more people like this to reach the conservation goals set by the water providers in North Texas. Next I would encourage them to look at their plant choices. Adaptive and native perennials use much less water than their annual counterparts, but can still make a home look like a showplace and be in accordance with Stonebridge Ranch requirements. People give up on perennials too quickly. They look best about 3 years in and every year after that, but people want instant results. If they have done all this, then I would tell them to look to the soil. Building healthy soil is critical to reducing chemical inputs, discouraging weed growth, and having a resilient plant population. There are local companies who offer soil food (not fertilizer) and microbes to add to the soil to encourage the microbiologic community that soils need to support healthy plant life.

Have sprinklers changed much in recent years? Sprinkler technology has grown in leaps and bounds. Manufacturers are focused on developing products that use water more efficiently, from basic nozzles and heads to specialty nozzles and smart controllers. Even systems that are 5 years old could probably benefit from a light upgrade. If the sprinkler system came with your home, it was likely put in as a very basic system, and making some small changes with some of this new technology can make a big difference in water bills. What do you wish people knew about their sprinklers or their water bills? I wish that people would look at their sprinkler systems like other systems in their homes: as technology that needs regular maintenance and adjustments to stay working efficiently. I also wish that they wouldn’t be intimidated by their controller, but would get to know it so that they can take a more active stance in managing their water use. If I could have three wishes, my last one would be that people would watch their systems run and adjust their sprinkler schedules once a month. They have to learn their controller in order to feel comfortable doing that. Homeowners can also hire a licensed irrigator who has water conservation in mind to help them manage their water for them. On the water bill side, I wish people knew that the water they paid for today is the cheapest water they will ever buy. Water resources are limited in North Texas, and we are going to keep seeing rates climb in the coming years. ◀

Technology can help homeowners keep their grass looking greener—for less.

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Cartoon Ranch

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Keeping residential fencing in an attractive state adds value to any home. It’s one aspect of home maintenance that prospective buyers notice immediately when touring a new neighborhood. You can help keep property values high in Stonebridge Ranch by paying attention to the state of your own fencing. Be sure to review the Modification Design Guidelines for all regulations regarding fencing in our community. Board on board wooden fence height shall not exceed six (6) feet, eight (8) inches. This may be accomplished through the use of six (6) foot pickets, a single six (6) inch kickboard, and a two (2) inch top cap.

Wooden privacy fences must be constructed in one of two styles, Board on Board or Board beside Board. Both fencing styles require a trim cap.

Application Required Most fencing projects (including identical fence replacements) require application & approval. Fences shall “step” up or down to higher or lower connecting fences or columns. Each step shall have a max. one (1) foot vertical height, and shall be consistent with the grade. Sloping fences are not permitted.

SPOKE TO YOUR DAD, HE SAID TO CALL MIKE FOR A QUOTE

All fencing must be set back a minimum distance of ten (10) feet from the left and right side front corner of the dwelling (unless the subdivision guidelines are more restrictive).

Bundle and Save NEW ROOF DISCOUNTS! 214.726.0468 MICHAEL CRISE Your Local Agent

PS. HE IS EXPECTING TO SEE YOU ON FATHERS DAY!! 22

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175 RIDGE RD STE 600 MCKINNEY, TX 75070-5108 MCRISE@FARMERSAGENT.COM www.iknowmike.com

father’S


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Our exclusive Advanced Pole System® (APS) is the foundation for successfully attracting birds to your backyard. With interchangeable hardware pieces, APS lets you create a customized set up that best suits your yard and the birds you want to attract.

June 2019

Social Scene Family Beach Party Monday, June 3 6 to 8:30 p.m., Beach Club 6201 Virginia Parkway

20% OFF All Hardware*

Our first Monday Night Family Beach Party of the summer will be complete with a DJ playing everyone’s favorite songs and hot dogs will be served until supplies run out. Feel free to pack a picnic basket or cooler, but as always, no glass containers are allowed within the gates. Because this is a swimming event, children under 12 must be accompanied by an adult. A valid form of Stonebridge Ranch I.D. is required. Guests pay a $5 entrance fee.

*Valid only at the participating store(s) listed below. One gift per purchase. Offer not valid on previous purchases or sale items. Offer valid in-store only 6/7/19 thru 6/17/19.

BIRD FOOD • FEEDERS GARDEN ACCENTS UNIQUE GIFTS

3001 S. Hardin Blvd., Suite 106 McKinney, TX 75070 (in the Tom Thumb shopping center next to Hallmark) (972) 472-2022 www.wbu.com/McKinney 24

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Book Club

NO MEETING THIS MONTH

Book Club does not meet during the months of June, July and August. Prep for the September meeting by reading The Day the World Came to Town: 9/11 in Gander, Newfoundland by Jim DeFede.


Travel Club

Tuesday, June 11 9 to 10 a.m., Community Room 6201 Virginia Parkway Travel Club meets the second Tuesday of each month. For more information, please email David Wiest at dwiest@cmamanagment.com.

Evening Bingo

Tuesday, June 11 6:30 to 8:30 p.m., Community Room 6201 Virginia Parkway

June 2019

Vol. 7, Issue

STONEBRIDG

6

E R ANCH N

www.stonebridger

anch.com

EWS

Limited space is available in the July 2019 issue!

Call TODAY for ad rates and more information!

972-370-1778

If you’re looking to make new friends or enjoy a relaxed evening with old friends, Evening Bingo is for you! We provide snacks, sodas and water, and a prize for the winner of each round. RSVP online at https://whoozin.com/9QU-EWM-4NVU-KC4F. Seating is limited to the first 40 who sign up. This adults-only event is free for Stonebridge Ranch residents. Residents can bring up to one non-resident friend; guests pay a $5 fee.

Grilling & BBQ Tips

Wednesday, June 12 10:30 to 11:30 a.m., Community Room 6201 Virginia Parkway We’re hosting an educational seminar on a yummy topic—BBQ! The speaker will be Stonebridge Ranch resident, Jim Norton, who has been involved in grilling

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and smoking meats for over 35 years. Jim has attended several BBQ schools and is currently a Kansas City Barbeque Society (KCBS) certified judge. Topics to be discussed include: types of grills (charcoal, gas, and wood smokers); preparation of various meats; tools of the trade (cutting boards, knives, thermometers, pans, foil, seasonings, sauces, and other handy gadgets); and suggested books and resources.

Family Movie Night Thursday, June 13 9 to 10:30 p.m., circle drive 6201 Virginia Parkway Remember drive-in theatres? It’s 2019, and the next best thing to parking your car and popping in a staticfilled speaker is bringing a blanket, the cooler and the kids, and watching a movie outdoors. Join us to view Ralph Breaks the Internet on the big screen! The movie will begin right at dusk (likely around 9:00 p.m.). Be sure to bring blankets, camp chairs, snacks and beverages (plastic containers only—no glass), and don’t forget the bug spray. About the movie: Six years after saving the arcade from Turbo’s vengeance, the Sugar Rush arcade cabinet has broken. Ralph and Vanellope are forced to travel to the Internet via the newly-installed Wi-Fi router in Litwak’s Arcade to retrieve the piece capable of saving the game. Rated PG, 1hr 51 min. Animated/Fantasy.

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Concert on the Circle Friday, June 14 7:30 to 9:30 p.m., circle drive 6201 Virginia Parkway Start the weekend off right! Bring the whole family for a neighborly evening of fun-filled games and live music. We’ll be joined by the Audio House Band, one of the best party bands in Texas. You can preview their sound at www.greenlightbooking.com/audio-house-party-band/. This event will be held on the circle drive at the Beach Club, so be sure to bring your blankets, lounge chairs, favorite picnic foods, and to BYOB in plastic or aluminum containers only. This is smoke-free family event, with music beginning at 7:30 p.m. (The beach will be open until 8:00 p.m., so consider taking a dip before joining us for the concert.) For Stonebridge Ranch residents only.

Coffee, Cars & Cycles and Book Exhange Saturday, June 15 8:30 to 10 a.m., circle drive 6201 Virginia Parkway

“A cup of coffee shared with a friend is happiness tasted and time well spent.” If you can’t make it to our weekday Coffee Talk meet-up (Wednesdays at 9:30 a.m. in the Community Room), join us for refreshments at our monthly get-together. Coffee, burritos, and donuts STONEBRIDGE RANCH NEWS

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will be provided in the Community Room. Bring your classic or fancy car or motorcycle (not required) to park in the circular drive! A book exchange is also held at this event in the Community Room. We have a wide variety of books, movies and puzzles to choose from. This event is for Stonebridge Ranch residents only.

Craft Time

Tuesday, June 18 1 to 3 p.m., Community Room 6201 Virginia Parkway The friendly crafters who get together during this meetup enjoy sharing stories and offering crafting tips. Bring your own projects and supplies (i.e. quilt blocks, beadwork, knitting, crocheting, darning, mending, etc.). The coffee pot will be on, and residents get in free. RSVP at https://whoozin.com/GYG-F4U-U9R3-JFKJ. Guests pay $5 each.

Kids Splash Hop Tuesday, June 18 7 to 9 p.m., Aquatic Center 7501 Coronado Drive

“I love the friends I have made here & the staff! They are so helpful & friendly. They have so many activities, I never get bored. It truly feels like home. Overall – I just love living here, it is the place to be!”

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The Kids Splash Hop will be held at the Aquatic Center for ages 10-12 years ONLY. Consider it a “date night”, Mom and Dad, and drop off the kids! There will be plenty of security with a pool manager, lifeguards, and the McKinney Police Department in attendance. Hot dogs will be served, and a disc jockey will play kid-friendly pop tunes. Stonebridge Ranch residents get in free; guests pay a $5 fee. All resident children must have a current Stonebridge Ranch I.D. If they do not, they will be required to pay the guest fee. The front gate will be monitored by the McKinney Police Department and children will not be allowed


outside the gates once they are checked in. Parents should plan on picking up their children INSIDE the gate by 9:00 p.m.

Morning Bingo

Thursday, June 27 10 a.m. to Noon, Community Room 6201 Virginia Parkway Join us for a morning of Bingo and prizes! We’ll provide a fruit plate, soft drinks, water and coffee, as well as $5 gift cards for the winner of each round. Seating is limited to the first 40 to register online at https://whoozin.com/HXK-RMP-W4UJ-TVJN. Residents get in free to this adults-only event and may bring up to two guests. Non-resident guests pay $5 each.

Select Tennis Academy

Summer 2019 June to August, Beach & Tennis Club 6201 Virginia Parkway 10 & UNDER is an exciting format for learning

tennis, designed to bring kids into the game by adapting the equipment, court dimensions and the scoring to the age and size of the children. This special class enables kids to have more enjoyable tennis experiences early in the learning process, which is the number one factor in keeping kids involved. We meet from 10 to 11 a.m. for ages 5 to 8 and from 10 to 11:30 a.m. for ages 9 and 10. The cost is $65 per week for ages 5 to 8 and $99 per week for ages 9 to 10.

FUTURE STAR CAMP is for kids ages 11

and up. It is designed for beginner and intermediate players. Players are grouped according to ability level, and we cover all aspects of the game. Future Star Camp meets from 10 to 11:30 a.m. and the cost is $99 per week.

McKinney Performing Arts Center Courtroom Theater 111 N. Tennessee, McKinney TX 75069

TENNIS ACADEMY is for players competing

in ZAT, Champ and Super Champ tournaments. We study stroke production, tactics and strategy, quickness drills, as well as mental toughness and match play. STONEBRIDGE RANCH NEWS

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Players should be at a high level of fitness before attending this camp. The Academy class meets from 8 to 11 a.m. for drills and fitness, followed by match play from noon to 2 p.m. The cost is $340 per week for the full camp, $220 per week for the morning session only, and $220 for the match play session only (space limited).

EVENTS next month

TENNIS CAMP DATES

03 04 09 14 15 16 20 25

July 2019 Concert in the Circle 4th of July at the Beach Travel Club; Evening Bingo Stonebridge Ranch Day @ the Dallas Rattlers Family Beach Party Craft Time Coffee, Cars & Cycles; Cardboard Boat Races Morning Bingo

Weekly resident meet-up Coffee Talk Wednesdays 9:30 to 11 a.m. TM

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Week 1: June 3-6, Week 2: June 10-13, Week 3: June 17-20, Week 4: June 24-27, Week 5: July 1-5 (No camp on July 4) Week 6: July 8-11, Week 7: July 1518, Week 8: July 22-25, Week 9: July 29 – August 1, Week 10: August 5-9, Week 11: August 12-15. At times of inclement weather, check the Select Tennis Academy Facebook page half an hour before class time for updates. A 10% discount will be given to all students who sign up for multiple weeks and pay by check. It is the parent’s responsibility to take off the 10% prior to sending the check. A discount is not given when paying by credit card. You can register at www. selecttennisacademy.com or mail payment to Stonebridge Ranch Community Association, Attn: Dave Wiest, 6201 Virginia Parkway, McKinney, TX 75071.


TREAT EVERYDAY LIKE A VACATION AT

Stonebridge Ranch Country Club

With mini golf, resort-style pool area and patio complete with cabanas, splash pad and fire feature, Stonebridge Ranch Country Club offers the perfect backdrop for summer fun. Treat your active kids to summer camp at the Club featuring tennis and golf, swimming activities and more. Plus, all camps include lunch, beverages and snacks throughout the day. From Parents’ Night Out to Dive-In Movie Nights and more, we offer social events for all ages. Join us every week for Open House Saturdays and learn about membership opportunities extraordinary benefits, amenities,and more.

Make this summer the best summer ever at Stonebridge Ranch Country Club. Contact our membership team today. NEW RE S ID E N T 972.529.5991 | stonebridgeranchcountryclub.com S stonebridgeranchcountryclub.com krystie.mcdougall@clubcorp.com natalie.jimenez@clubcorp.com

R E C E IV

E

$1, 000

C R E DIT

T O WA R D IN IT IAT IO N !

Dye Course – 7003 Beacon Hill Road | McKinney, TX 75072 | 972.529.5993 Hills Course – 5901 Glen Oaks Dr. | McKinney, TX 75072 | 972.529.5991 * Membership is contingent on successful completion of Club’s enrollment process. Other restrictions and exclusions may apply. Contact the Club for details. © ClubCorp USA, Inc. All rights reserved. 44597 0419 JM


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Stonebridge Ranch News - June 2019  

Stonebridge Ranch News - June 2019