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The individual and the mass . . . The personal or the universal? Quality or quantity? -Insoluble questions, for the collective is a fact we cannot disregard any moa•e than we can disregard the needs of individuals for the lives of their own. The problem in our times can be stated as: Quantity and quality, the mass and the Indivudual. It is necessassy to solve this problem in buildingart and industaial art.1


The individual and the mass . . . The personal or the universal? Quality or quantity? -Insoluble questions, for the collective is a fact we cannot disregard any moa•e than we can disregard the needs of individuals for the lives of their own. The problem in our times can be stated as: Quantity and quality, the mass and the Indivudual. It is necessassy to solve this problem in buildingart and industaial art.1


The focus of this PhD will be on dwelling as a creative force that binds together Industry, Occupation and Nature. This research will investigate how the making of architecture relates to theses activities and how it can contribute to a self sustaining culture of dwelling. Industry refers directly to

JH: The banal breakfast egg bec Edward Bernays, a nephew of Sig public relations, gave us the another fetish: in 1929 he hire the Easter Sunday Parade in New iour at the time. He did this o co industry. The slogan he used cigarette as symbol of freedom were falling all over themselves cigarette consumption skyrocketed ploy similarly perfidious strategi


comes a polished fetish object. gmund Freud and the inventor of story of the re-evaluation of ed women to smoke cigarettes at w York City – scandalous behavon behalf of the American tobacwas ‘torches of freedom’ – the m and emancipation. Newspapers s to cover the story and women’s d. Mr Welzer, don’t you have to emies in the quest to change reality?

the act of extracting and processing materials. Occupation refers to both the inhabitation of a territory and the required activities needed to enable and sustain inhabitation. Nature refers to the resulting condition of the combination of topography, resources and infrastructures of living;


Families.

In 1920 [sic] a Frenchman, Robert Briffault, published The Mothers, in which he marshaled a multitude of arguments and facts to demolish totally the volume by Westennarck that had been a standard work for an entire generation.4 Now it was argued that far from monogamy being instinct in humanity, on the contrary, hardly any primitive communities could be found without polygamy, and that where monogamy existed it had been forced on them by poverty.


Families.

In 1920 [sic] a Frenchman, Robert Briffault, published The Mothers, in which he marshaled a multitude of arguments and facts to demolish totally the volume by Westennarck that had been a standard work for an entire generation.4 Now it was argued that far from monogamy being instinct in humanity, on the contrary, hardly any primitive communities could be found without polygamy, and that where monogamy existed it had been forced on them by poverty.


The Third Nature.The focus of this PhD will be on dwelling as a creative force that binds together Industry, Occupation and Nature. This research will investigate how the making of architecture relates to theses activities and how it can contribute to a self sustaining culture of dwelling.

HW: I guess that’s the case. Smo of emancipation par excellence. Cowboy is being forced to disappe become loaded and then unloaded w quickly. How can we make use of munity gardens. They originated Chicago or Berlin, and now they far beyond the reaches of the art to see that the underlying idea impulse of saying ‘there’s somet something else’.


oking quickly became the gesture . Today, however, the Marlboro ear. Longstanding traditions can with symbolic meaning incredibly this? Take the example of comas artist’s projects in London, y have become a global movement t world. It is interesting though is a genuine artistic one, this thing that we can also turn into

Vasterbotten is a mix of Urbanisation, Hinterlands and Wilderness. As a case study it is rich in native industrial activity. Its modes of occupation are wide ranging; river valleys to cities; telecom masts to managed forests; factories to universities; farmsteads to supermarkets, hunting to social housing, nature trails to shipping lanes, remoteness to suburbia.


On holiday.


On holiday.


On the surface it appears to have been relatively untouched by the global financial crisis of 2008. A crisis that has seen a variety of new conditions emerge throughout Europe. Economic and social restructuring through measures of austerity have been visible but not exclusive

HW: Suddenly a city district be interface. As for the concept o evident that it has spread acros That’s how social innovation wor Edible City’, a formerly niche con green space policy of a German mu imitate this. And it wasn’t init research project, but rather gre


ecomes a radically altered user of community gardens, it’s selfss the globe in just a few years. rks, in my view. With ‘Andernach, ncept has turned into the official unicipality. vA lot of towns will tiated by â‚Ź500,000 funding for a ew out of an aesthetic approach.

to Greece, Ireland, Cyprus, Portugal, Italy and Spain. It appears that contamination from this financial crisis has been avoided, however the mechanisms that have protected the region from economic destabilisation have effected its ability to export its processed materials.


Greater Norrland in Sweden- nature and culture.

Sweden-now and Sweden-then. Every civilization has its own visage and involves an intervention in what came before. In the old Europe major revolutions had to take place and much of the culturalsuperstructure of the centuries has been challenged or directly imperiled. In actual fact in every country an A-Europe and a B-Europe still survives. If we look at our own Sweden, it could be said that the new and the old have completely permeated each other. We have one culture that we have inherited from our fathers, of villages and market towns, and another that we have constructed ourselves, of railroad communities and factory towns.9 We could call them Sweden-then and Sweden now. If you imagine the maps of these two Swedens superimposed on each othe1; great differences will be revealed. Admittedly a population map of Sweden-now would in terms of relative population densities agree in certain substantial respects with one of Sweden-then. And if we could reconstruct the latter, we would probably see that the same density zones form a belt from southern Uppland through arke down to eastern Vastergotland and back east of Lake Vattern around the lakes of Boren, Roxcn, and Clan out to the Baltic. We would see the same high levels of density in the counties of Malmohus and Halland. But we would not find such dense zones in the uncultivated areas of western


Greater Norrland in Sweden- nature and culture.

Sweden-now and Sweden-then. Every civilization has its own visage and involves an intervention in what came before. In the old Europe major revolutions had to take place and much of the culturalsuperstructure of the centuries has been challenged or directly imperiled. In actual fact in every country an A-Europe and a B-Europe still survives. If we look at our own Sweden, it could be said that the new and the old have completely permeated each other. We have one culture that we have inherited from our fathers, of villages and market towns, and another that we have constructed ourselves, of railroad communities and factory towns.9 We could call them Sweden-then and Sweden now. If you imagine the maps of these two Swedens superimposed on each othe1; great differences will be revealed. Admittedly a population map of Sweden-now would in terms of relative population densities agree in certain substantial respects with one of Sweden-then. And if we could reconstruct the latter, we would probably see that the same density zones form a belt from southern Uppland through arke down to eastern Vastergotland and back east of Lake Vattern around the lakes of Boren, Roxcn, and Clan out to the Baltic. We would see the same high levels of density in the counties of Malmohus and Halland. But we would not find such dense zones in the uncultivated areas of western


More often these compositions are fashioned through globalised ideologies of construction and methods of producing space. This research proposal believes that the making of architecture can be used as a way of anticipating future combinations of Industry, Occupation and Nature, providing critical insight into the organisation and structuring

JH: But how would it be possi consumption – a central demand connotations at a libidinous lev strategies of ‘greenwashing’ consciences?


ible to imbue the reduction of d of your book – with positive vel? Does it come down to similar products, of alleviating bad

of a self sustaining culture of dwelling. It is the intention of this investigation to identify key aspects of Industry, Occupation and Nature in Vasterbotten including material cultures; sources, flows, productions and wastes and to situate them within an existing and performed culture of dwelling.


An ideal villa in the eyes of the cynical observer.


? An ideal villa in the eyes of the cynical observer.


As a generative research project the thesis will include through proposition and making works, that are both prospective and

JH: So availability, what’s on o tering behaviour. How does the 3D specific objects fit in? Is it a s of the problem?


offer, plays a major role in alD printer that allows you to plot subversion of the system or part

speculative. It is the ambition of the PhD project to communicate the research through making projects and exhibition.


Roof terraces are not only justified in the Orient.

when renting somewhere to live. Perhaps this circumstance can be partially explained by the fact that the balconies of older build ings were on the whole less appealing because of the na rrow and dark streets of the earlier town plans.

Bedrooms. The second main task of a dwelling is to provide somewhere to relax and sleep. This is probably what has been neglected most in Sweden’s building tradition in the last century, in contrast, for instance, to what has been the case in the AngloSaxon countries. A sepa rate place to sleep for each member of the fami ly is a requirement that should not be overlooked. Unfortunately we a re still far from being able to realize this desire. On the contra ry, it seems that Sweden, because of the high cost of building, is probably the count ry in the civilized world that is furthest from achieving this aim. Far too la rge a percentage of fa milies in this count ry st ill have to content themselves with dwell ings that do not have separate bed rooms. At best these arc replaced by an alcove in the living room. The plans of minimal dwellings from some other countries illustrated here a re examples of housing intended for wage earners who in Sweden would have to settle for one room with a kitchenette or at best one room with a kitchen. In order to fulfill the requirement of a separate bedroom for the different members of the family as far as possible, one is obliged , when there is no other option, to reduce the floor space of the individual bedrooms to a minimum. The result, however, is that the volume of air is small. How far it


Roof terraces are not only justified in the Orient.

when renting somewhere to live. Perhaps this circumstance can be partially explained by the fact that the balconies of older build ings were on the whole less appealing because of the na rrow and dark streets of the earlier town plans.

Bedrooms. The second main task of a dwelling is to provide somewhere to relax and sleep. This is probably what has been neglected most in Sweden’s building tradition in the last century, in contrast, for instance, to what has been the case in the AngloSaxon countries. A sepa rate place to sleep for each member of the fami ly is a requirement that should not be overlooked. Unfortunately we a re still far from being able to realize this desire. On the contra ry, it seems that Sweden, because of the high cost of building, is probably the count ry in the civilized world that is furthest from achieving this aim. Far too la rge a percentage of fa milies in this count ry st ill have to content themselves with dwell ings that do not have separate bed rooms. At best these arc replaced by an alcove in the living room. The plans of minimal dwellings from some other countries illustrated here a re examples of housing intended for wage earners who in Sweden would have to settle for one room with a kitchenette or at best one room with a kitchen. In order to fulfill the requirement of a separate bedroom for the different members of the family as far as possible, one is obliged , when there is no other option, to reduce the floor space of the individual bedrooms to a minimum. The result, however, is that the volume of air is small. How far it


While the project is rooted in Vasterbotten the goal is to acquire knowledge of future possibilities of Dwelling in the Third Nature. Contributing an understanding of this condition

JH: The greenwashing disassembly implies HW: With you reacttht isn’tneeded. In Thinking Ourse ness by saying that thefor product isn’t an example of reduction, bu that the critical consumer isn’t producingfuture junk, of ‘throwa ferent if I define certain course when my aunt dies, do I throw oui of living and not as a sacrifice chest of drawers? ‘Made to last I see the real deprivation among

have to look for a parking space that is like the ball and chain a


hat thing can of goconsciousaway, it to anthis altered state Ikea telves, needsthe at piece leastofto be furniture green so ut its opposite: the principle of t ashamed. The debate looks difaway-cheap’. On an theaesthetic other hand, es of action as way ut all her stuff or do I keep her in one’s quality of living. Then forever’ implies a burden. those pooralso people who constantly

for their giant SUVs. A car like around a cartoon prisoner’s leg.


Stockpiling materials. (Dcssau-Tortcn).

is the same as for reusing standard formwork. One repeatedly encounters this kind of example of the difficulty in taking advantage of the resources now offered by modern technology and modern organization caused by the prevailing system of wages and piecework payment. It is clear that the economic development of housing construction will depend to a great extent on sweeping changes in current conditions in the labor market. This is not to say that t his development will be gua ranteed simply through better and more efficient building methods. Production techniques are only one detail, however significant, in the complex of issues that must be dealt with in any rationalization of the way in which housing is built. But to go into problems such as finance and credit, land acquisition, profit margins, unsound speculation , and the like would be going into too much detail for this discussion.

Conversation with a skeptic. “You mean in other words we have to accept these possibilities: industrialization, standardization ?” “Of course. We a lready have when it comes to most of our daily needs, from shoes and sweaters to suitcases and automobiles.” “That’s totally different! Our dwelling is after a ll our home! For the entire working day I am a cog in a machine. When I get home I want to feel like a real person!”


Stockpiling materials. (Dcssau-Tortcn).

is the same as for reusing standard formwork. One repeatedly encounters this kind of example of the difficulty in taking advantage of the resources now offered by modern technology and modern organization caused by the prevailing system of wages and piecework payment. It is clear that the economic development of housing construction will depend to a great extent on sweeping changes in current conditions in the labor market. This is not to say that t his development will be gua ranteed simply through better and more efficient building methods. Production techniques are only one detail, however significant, in the complex of issues that must be dealt with in any rationalization of the way in which housing is built. But to go into problems such as finance and credit, land acquisition, profit margins, unsound speculation , and the like would be going into too much detail for this discussion.

Conversation with a skeptic. “You mean in other words we have to accept these possibilities: industrialization, standardization ?” “Of course. We a lready have when it comes to most of our daily needs, from shoes and sweaters to suitcases and automobiles.” “That’s totally different! Our dwelling is after a ll our home! For the entire working day I am a cog in a machine. When I get home I want to feel like a real person!”


is of upmost importance to the arising crisis of diminishing global resources, financial destabilisation, increased population growth and accelerated urbanisation. As an Architecture Research Project through design the project will be based in Vasterbotten, Northern Sweden. The study will draw on the history of the modernisation

HW: Here rubbish becomes public a would vanish. This disappearance the object possible, as in the er example: until about 50 years wasn’t designed and sewn in such The possibility of just throwing pated conceptually. This is a ve aesthetic stance: value meant ma lose their use value. It’s also bly fast this attitude vanishes. a carpenter? Quick, let’s just d


and remains visible. Normally it e is what makes the debasement of case of Ikea furniture. Anoths ago no suit was ever made that h a way that one could alter it. g away the suit was not anticiery interesting aking things so that they didn’t very interesting how unbelievaWhy should I bother to deal with drive to Ikea instead!


Aqueduct.

be regarded as the flower of the culture that at that time took up the cudgels (and still docs in some places) against industrialization. Art was something that came like manna from heaven. Today the cultural position is different. Industria lism is the major fact of our new culture, if we want one. We must accept it to be able to use it for our own good. To see our situation clearly and arrive at a new and fruitfu l conception we must cleanse ourselves of a ll the old, p urely a esthetic perspectives that in reality we have outgrown.


Aqueduct.

be regarded as the flower of the culture that at that time took up the cudgels (and still docs in some places) against industrialization. Art was something that came like manna from heaven. Today the cultural position is different. Industria lism is the major fact of our new culture, if we want one. We must accept it to be able to use it for our own good. To see our situation clearly and arrive at a new and fruitfu l conception we must cleanse ourselves of a ll the old, p urely a esthetic perspectives that in reality we have outgrown.


of the state from the 1930‘s but will focus primarily on its contemporary condition.

JH: Andy Warhol said he liked McD in the world, he always knew he – a piece of home.


Donald’s because wherever he was e’d get exactly what he expected

The proposed research project is titled, Dwelling in the Garden of Crisis.

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Less acceptera is  

Janek Ozmin - A sketch for the RESARC course - "Staging the Message, MODULE 01 Cultural Production’s Gearbox"

Less acceptera is  

Janek Ozmin - A sketch for the RESARC course - "Staging the Message, MODULE 01 Cultural Production’s Gearbox"

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