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Developing Global Leaders of the Future A report from CSCLeaders 2013

CSCLeaders is a partnership between Common Purpose and HRH The Duke of Edinburgh’s Commonwealth Study Conference (UK Fund).


“As leaders of global businesses and organisations, we are increasingly challenged to lead across multiple cultures. Leaders who are adept at this will thrive in the future. As chair of the Selection Group, I consider CSCLeaders to be a vital opportunity for experienced leaders to engage with a global network of talented leaders across the Commonwealth.” Sir John Parker, Chair, CSCLeaders Selection Group and Chairman, Anglo American

“We are giving the opportunity to some of our brightest in-country talent to go on CSCLeaders to help them make the transition to global.” Hayden Majajas, D&I Director, BP, Asia Pacific


What is CSCLeaders?

CSCLeaders is a renewal of HRH The Duke of Edinburgh’s Commonwealth Study Conferences and a partnership between the leadership development organisation Common Purpose Charitable Trust and HRH The Duke of Edinburgh’s Commonwealth Study Conferences (UK Fund). CSCLeaders is an annual two-part conference which assembles exceptional individuals from across the Commonwealth to tackle challenges that businesses, governments and society face today and build the global relationships needed by the leaders of tomorrow.

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Executive summary

This report assesses the key findings, impact and outcomes of CSCLeaders 2013 During CSCLeaders, participants (listed in Appendix One) were asked to complete three assessments of their leadership skills. The first two assessments were completed at the beginning and end of Part One. Participants completed the third assessment after Part Two in either Mumbai or Johannesburg. We also conducted in-depth one-to-one interviews with a range participants between Parts One and Two. The assessment and interviews illustrate that CSCLeaders has helped to develop in participants their ability to connect with individuals across the globe, adapt to new situations and work on complex problems. For many it has enhanced how they will work with their teams, clients and stakeholders within their countries and beyond. It has created an amazing and unique network of exceptional leaders – all of whom have in some way increased their ability to lead and connect globally.

“Organisations spend time and money building global brands and organisations, but not the global leaders to lead them. These are leaders who can deal with problems that demand multi-stakeholder solutions. IQ will help some of the time, EQ (Emotional Intelligence) will be important but CQ (Cultural Intelligence), especially for leaders who are operating globally, will be essential.” Julia Middleton, Founder and Chief Executive, Common Purpose Charitable Trust

From our analysis of the results of the assessment and interviews, we conclude that CSCLeaders helped to develop in participants the following competencies under four key areas: 1. D eveloping broader horizons • Better equipped to engage with existing customers and engage new stakeholders • Improved ability to challenge blind spots and spot new opportunities • See difference as a real strength to drive innovation 2. D eveloping Cultural Intelligence a greater ability to thrive in multiple cultures • Better equipped to work with the breadth and scale of diversity • Developing a global mindset • Increased ability to adapt to unfamiliar territory 3. Building long-lasting relationships across the globe • Acquiring networks at scale and speed • Knowing how to use these networks 4. D eveloping a stronger impact beyond their circle of authority • Increased ability to operate effectively outside their usual sphere of control It is the conclusion of this report that these competencies are crucial to the development of the global leaders of the future.


“Whilst internal programmes offer valuable networking opportunities, CSCLeaders was powerful and different in that it allows for broad networks to be developed that are uniquely diverse in that you get to interact with thought leaders from NGOs, NPOs, public and private sector and discuss, deliberate and be part of impactful conversations and also have the opportunity to influence perceptions on a broad range of topics.� Vanessa Naicker, Head of Asset Optimisation, Anglo American, South Africa

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The assessment

The interviews

During CSCLeaders 2013, participants were asked to complete assessments on their leadership skills.

In addition to these assessments, Common Purpose conducted 22 in-depth one-to-one interviews with a diverse range of participants which provided the opportunity for deeper insight into the key findings from CSCLeaders.

The results were as follows: 87% now operate as a global leader 86% identified behaviours they need to change in order to become global leaders 89% identified the core values and behaviours that, wherever they are, they should not change 89% met a minimum of eight people with whom they will stay in regular contact 67% are actively implementing new opportunities for their organisation or country 85% are more prepared to lead a project which takes them beyond the world they know and operate within 100% will recommend CSCLeaders to a friend or colleague

We spoke primarily to participants from large global corporations whose support for future conferences will be crucial to their sustainability.


Analysis of the results of both the assessment and interviews shows that CSCLeaders helped to develop in participants the following competencies. These competencies can be broadly grouped under four key areas:

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Global leaders 1. Developing broader horizons

87% now operate as a global leader 67% are actively implementing new opportunities for their organisation or country There were many comments from the participants on the scale and breadth of CSCLeaders – eight days in the UK with 96 participants from 27 countries working on a shared challenge undoubtedly broadened their horizons. Competencies include: •

Better equipped to engage with existing customers and engage new stakeholders

Many of the participants stressed that global leaders need to be able to put themselves in other people’s shoes to be able to see opportunities and challenges from different perspectives and better understand the needs of multiple stakeholders - in particular, their customers, their teams and their organisations.

“It exposes you to very different perspectives. What the Country Manager in Ghana needs is not the same as what the Country Manager in Dubai needs, so a greater empathy and willingness to understand the difference is crucial.” Gavin Dyer, Sales and Marketing Director, Weir Minerals Africa Ltd, South Africa

“As a result of CSCLeaders, I am trying to put myself in other people’s shoes more…you can’t negotiate a deal until you can put yourself in other people’s shoes and understand what really matters to them and what they want. ” David Hart, Head of Economic Regulation, British Airways, United Kingdom

Improved ability to challenge blind spots and spot new opportunities

A number of participants suggested that making connections with people who work in other countries, cities and sectors and openly sharing experiences can challenge your own assumptions, make you question your bias and encourage you to see the world differently. CSCLeaders helped to challenge participants’ perspectives of the world. Immersing themselves in the Challenge and the issues facing the cities on the study tours - and not jumping straight to solutions - required a new way of thinking. As a result, many participants said they would be more open, more responsive to new ideas and more willing to learn from the unexpected.

“Keep your mind open and do not jump to conclusions. There are often other ways to operate and you need to be open to listening and learning to find out what they are.” Carmen Chan, Vice President – Human Resources, Mackenzie Financial Corporation, Canada

“I would now start to suspend questions about areas I am knowledgeable about and not try to jump to solutions. Answers then come from different angles and allow you to reach a much broader, well-informed outcome. You should avoid limiting yourself to the frame of reference you belong to.” Alpna Khera, Chief Executive Officer, Serco India PVT Ltd, India


“CSCLeaders has made our leaders rethink how we can be more successful when entering new markets; how we get the fuller picture, engage a wider group of stakeholders, build greater buy-in, spot the unexpected earlier, hear different voices to shape our plans and share our vision more widely from the start.” Markus Clavin, Head of Brand Reputation, Serco

See difference as a real strength to drive innovation

Participants are deliberately seeking out and are more open to different views in their teams and organisations. Working on the challenge which, for most, was not within their frame of reference provided a chance to see the value they could add to unfamiliar and complex problems. Some participants commented on how they are already seeking opportunities within their organisation to work on unfamiliar problems with unfamiliar teams – a real strength when developing global teams.

“[It] reinforces for me that you need always to search for new ways of doing things – different approaches, different styles to consider when approaching problems…will open up lots of new and, I hope, different possibilities as to how I do my job.” Francisco Cambinda, Functional Planning / Discipline Capability Manager, BP, Angola

“It’s game changing for me as a leader because I tend to work in a structured, commercial environment. I’m used to being in a hierarchical situation which is task-driven and what I am observing here is that to bring about real change this isn’t necessarily the only paradigm to follow. There are other ways to do things.” Duncan Mackison, Operations Director, Serco, United Kingdom

“CSCLeaders exposed me to so many different insights, perspectives and approaches; exploring how others deal with problems, how they approached challenges and actively seeking out perspectives from different industries and sectors, has had a real impact on my role and my teams. We are now actively inviting other people into the organisation to give us a new lens. It’s given us an interesting take on how we see the work that we do.” Firoz Patel, CEO, Childreach, UK 7


Global leaders 2. Developing Cultural Intelligence - a greater ability to thrive in multiple cultures

86% identified behaviours they need to change in order to become global leaders 89% identified the core values and behaviours that, wherever they are, they should not change Many participants emphasised the power of CSCLeaders to bring together such a culturally diverse group and expose participants to a wide range of views, perspectives, experiences and ideas. Working across multiple cultures involves drawing on both Emotional and Cultural Intelligence. This helps makes connections that would otherwise be missed. CSCLeaders created an environment in which people were able to connect across many boundaries and practise collaborative leadership. Participants demonstrated three key competencies related to their increased ability to thrive in multiple cultures: •

Better equipped to work with the breadth and scale of diversity

Many of the CSCLeaders participants already work with people of different nationalities, but these usually come from their organisation or their sector. It is clear that the sheer scale of the diversity of CSCLeaders has helped them to understand the importance of being able to cross boundaries and work with people of all backgrounds, ages, gender, sectors, cultures etc.

“As part of a private sector company with a global footprint, I do interact with governments, but not the amazing diversity that was seen on CSCLeaders. Other sectors NGOs, other public sectors – there were 96 people on CSCLeaders, 96 people I did not know, all of whom had different backgrounds, values, views.”

Developing a global mindset

CSCLeaders reinforced for many that to be an effective global leader you need to have a global mindset. Participants recognise that, in practice, it is important to listen carefully when hearing ideas expressed in unfamiliar accents and styles; it also takes humility to accept that someone else might have a better idea and patience to mediate a clash of cultural assumptions.

“In corporate life, people think the same as you…you’re aligned in thinking. The world you’re dealing with does not work or think in the same way. Being thrown into the mix like that, it’s what the world needs; it’s what a leader needs. Organisations need it. A different space and situation with different value sets than we’re used to, with people who come at things in a starkly different way.” Susan Marrinan, Senior Business Development Manager, Anglo American, United Kingdom / Australia

“I am now much more involved on a day-to-day basis in a far more international environment. I work in multinational teams to an extent, which I haven’t had to do before. I came here with concerns about understanding those cultures and being conscious about the signals I send…I will take back a lot more confidence and some tools to how I manage those discussions and situations.” Duncan Mackison, Operations Director, Serco, United Kingdom

Vanessa Naicker, Head of Asset Optimisation, Anglo American, South Africa

Increased ability to adapt to unfamiliar territory


“In each of the countries in which we work, our organisation needs to gain a license to operate. CSCLeaders helps our leaders understand the factors which contribute towards earning that license”. Les Shingler, Learning and Development Manager, Anglo American

In dealing with different people and experiences, participants recognised that they listened more and suspended their judgment:

“CSCLeaders has taught me the importance of listening, to have an open heart and suspend judgement.” Emma Needham, Communications Director – Asia Pacific, Serco, Australia Similarly, as participants are more exposed to alternative views and perspectives, they have developed an appreciation of difference; participants are becoming more conscious of difference, recognising complacency and seeking out the unfamiliar:

“I constantly need to challenge preconceptions I might not be aware I hold, not accept things at face value and challenge my assumptions.” Paula Laird, Director of Finance and IT, WaterAid, United Kingdom

“Don’t filter the things you don’t agree with – instead, you should seek out alternative views. [Participant gives the example of a conversation around IT where he found himself giving an alternative viewpoint] It wasn’t my view, but I thought about others who weren’t at the decision-making table and what their perspective might be – I found myself taking the other perspective into consideration.” Norman McKinley, UK Director, British Red Cross, United Kingdom

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Global leaders 3. Building long-lasting relationships across the globe

89% met a minimum of eight people with whom they will stay in regular contact CSCLeaders has created a unique network of exceptional leaders – all of whom have in some way increased their ability to lead and connect globally. Participants commented on the value of this network and how it will bring challenge and support to their thinking going forward. •

Acquiring networks at scale and speed

Many participants commented that CSCLeaders provided the space to form incredibly diverse connections unusually quickly. This was helped by the environment of trust and support created by the Common Purpose Conventions (see Appendix Four), but participants agreed that leaders need the ability not only to build diverse networks but to do so in a limited timeframe, even without such a framework to support them.

“When else would you get the opportunity to meet so many other corporates and other leaders? You’re exposed to so many different ideas and experiences. It would take you a lifetime to meet all these people and communities, so to have all these people together is pure quality, quality, quality.” Azdini Nor Azman, Senior Vice President of Treasury and Capital Markets Division, Bank Muamalat, Malaysia

“We gelled so well despite being so different and the extent to which this happened, and the timeframe, was surprising.” Joan Thomas Edwards, Director International Organisations, Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Foreign Trade, Jamaica

Knowing how to use these networks

Whilst for some participants it is still too early to know exactly how they will use the networks, there was an agreement that these networks are essential for innovation and opportunity. Having such a diverse network will generate new business and be a source of new ideas.

“We live in a global world; the effects of policies and challenges are interconnected, so it’s increasingly important for leaders to connect on a global scale. These days, you can’t leverage different opportunities or find new ways of doing things if you don’t have a global network in place.” Byron Grigoratos, Marketing and Business Development, Glencore International Additionally, participants recognised the importance of using networks as a global leader to avoid the silo mentality, challenge thinking and continue to broaden perspectives and understanding.

“I now have access to a group of people I would never have come across…insights into issues, how others lead, how to tackle problems, life in general.” Sanjeev Gupta, Managing Partner, Emerging Opportunity Consulting JLT, India   “The quality and range of networks that I have is of considerable benefit to my organisation. Networks are so crucial to doing business and the quality and reach of this network would take years to acquire. I now have a much broader network who will support, challenge and help me to move my thinking on about issues I had in my mind before CSCLeaders, but am now determined to move on them.” Vanessa Naicker, Head of Asset Optimisation, Anglo American, South Africa


Global leaders 4. Developing a stronger impact beyond their Circle of Authority

85% are more prepared to lead a project which takes them beyond the world they know and operate within CSCLeaders reinforced for many that as the issues and trends facing the Commonwealth become more and more complex, they will need to lead across and outside their organisations, taking up roles beyond their circle of control that they may not have considered otherwise. Many felt that they had developed the following competency: •

Increased ability to operate effectively outside their usual sphere of control

Many of the participants have learnt, successfully, to lead in roles or circumstances where they have clear authority, budget and accountability. By working on an unfamiliar Challenge and visiting different cities - leading peers, partners and stakeholders as they worked on their ideas – they realised that the skills that brought them success may not be enough and started to develop their ability to make positive change happen even when they are not in charge or the subject-expert.

“CSCLeaders reaffirmed for me that as a leader there is never one single agenda. Policing is not just about law and order, it’s much broader. I feel better equipped to lead and influence with all the stakeholders in my city and to have those difficult conversations even though I am not in charge.” Alan Lau, Assistant Commissioner of Police / Regional Commander Marine, Hong Kong Police Force, Hong Kong, Asia

“It’s reinforced some of my thinking about how a broader and more holistic way of doing business is required, now and ahead. I will become a much stronger advocate for this kind of business model and try to drive this change in corporate approach.” Yousif Almutawa, Chief Information Officer, DP World, United Arab Emirates

“I am more aware of the wider context and how I can influence for the benefit of wider society. Going to Bradford helped me see how, on returning to Canada, I can have influence outside my immediate circle.” Ryan Kubik, Chief Financial Officer, Canadian Oil Sands Ltd, Canada

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Appendix One: Participants

*Participants who took part in the in-depth interviews Mohammed Ali Ahmed

Chief Operating Officer

DP World

United Arab Emirates

Middle East

*Yousif Almutawa

Chief Information Officer

DP World

United Arab Emirates

Middle East

Will Anderson

Director

Brunswick Group

United Kingdom

Europe

Maha Arujanan

Executive Director

Malaysian Biotechnology Information Centre (MABIC)

Malaysia

Asia

*Ruth Ashford

Pro Vice Chancellor and Dean, Faculty of Business and Law

Manchester Metropolitan University

United Kingdom

Europe

Dalwardin Babu

Chief Superintendent

Metropolitan Police Service

United Kingdom

Europe

*Justin Baird

Partner, Jumptank and Group Director of Innovation, Aegis Media

Jumptank and Aegis Media

Australia

Australasia and South Pacific

John Biggin

Director, HMP & YOI Doncaster

Serco

United Kingdom

Europe

*Ellie Bird

Chief Superintendent - Area Commander

British Transport Police

United Kingdom

Europe

George Bopi

Managing Director & Principal Consultant

ManTech

Papua New Guinea

Australasia and South Pacific

Matt Brown

General Manager Technical Development

Glencore - Minara

Australia

Australasia and South Pacific

*Francisco Cambinda

Functional Planning/Discipline Capability Manager

BP

Angola

Africa

Mark Carroll

Director, Decentralisation and Big society

Department of Communities and Local Government

United Kingdom

Europe

Stewart Carruth

Director for Corporate Governance

Aberdeen City Council

United Kingdom

Europe

*Carmen Chan

Vice President, Human Resources

Mackenzie Financial Corporation

Canada

Canada

Casmir Chanda

Administrative Secretary

Commonwealth Countries League Education Fund

Zambia

Africa

Rod Chisholm

Managing Director Asia

Serco Asia Pacific

Australia

Australasia and South Pacific

Justin Chinyanta

Chairman, Chief Executive Officer

Loita Holdings Corporation (LOITA Group)

South Africa

Africa

Catherine Clark

Deputy Director

Royal Commonwealth Society

United Kingdom

Europe

Simon Cole

Chief Constable

Leicestershire Police

United Kingdom

Europe

Fraser Cummings

Consultant

University Hospital Southampton Foundation NHS Trust

United Kingdom

Europe

Carole-Anne Davies

Chief Executive Officer

Design Commission for Wales

United Kingdom

Europe

*Gavin Dyer

Sales & Marketing Director

Weir Minerals Africa (Pty) Ltd

South Africa

Africa

Kozel Fraser

Chief Executive Officer

The Windward Islands Farmers Association WINFA

St. Vincent and the Grenadines

Caribbean

Mihe Gaomab II

Chief Executive Officer

Namibian Competition Commission

Namibia

Africa

Dr Indra

Colonel

No.1, Lorong Sentul Endah, Hospital Angkatan

Malaysia

Asia

Raj Gilda

Co-founder

Lend a Hand

India

Asia

*Byron Grigoratos

Marketing and Business Development

Glencore International

South Africa

Africa

*Sanjeev Gupta

Managing Partner

Emerging Opportunity Consulting JLT

India

Asia

Aidah Hanifah

Acting Director of Agriculture and Agrifood

Department of Agriculture and Agrifood

Brunei

Asia

*David Hart

Head of Economic Regulation

British Airways

United Kingdom

Europe

*Damane Hlalele

Southern Africa Leader

Arup

South Africa

South Africa

Peter Holbrook

Chief Executive Officer

Social Enterprise UK

United Kingdom

Europe

Musharraf Hussain

Chief Executive Officer

Karimia Institute

United Kingdom

Europe

Aisha Fofana Ibrahim

Director, Institute for Gender Research and Documentation (INGRADOC)

Fourah Bay College, University Sierra Leone

Sierra Leone

Africa

Azmat Isa

Chief Executive Officer

Pakistan Poverty Alleviation Fund

Pakistan

Asia

Matt Jones

Executive Director

Social Alchemy

Australia

Australasia and South Pacific

Rishi Kapoor

Integration Programme Head

British Airways

United Kingdom

Europe

Caroline R Kayonga

Permanent Secretary

Ministry of Natural Resources

Rwanda

Africa

Mohsin Khalid

Chairman

Islamabad Electric Supply Company Ltd

Pakistan

Asia

Alpna Khera

Chief Executive Officer

Serco India PVT Limited

India

Asia

Bevan Killick

Chairman

NZCU South

New Zealand

Australasia and South Pacific

Sebastian Kopulande

Chief Executive Officer

Zambian International Trade & Investment Centre

Zambia

Africa

*Ryan Kubik

Chief Financial Officer

Canadian Oil Sands Ltd

Canada

Canada

Sarah Kutulakos

Chief Operating Officer and Executive Director

Canada China Business Council

Canada

Canada

*Paula Laird

Director of Finance and IT

Wateraid

United Kingdom

Europe

Lucy Lake

Chief Executive Officer

CAMFED International

United Kingdom

Europe

Andrew Larpent

Chief Executive Officer

Southern Cross Care (SA&NT) Inc

Australia

Australasia and South Pacific


100% will recommend CSCLeaders to a friend or colleague

*Alan Lau

Assistant Commissioner of Police / Regional Commander Marine

Hong Kong Police Force

Hong Kong

Asia

Duncan Mackison

Operations Director

Serco

United Kingdom

Europe

Nemata Majeks-Walker

Founder and Executive Director

The 50/50 Group of Sierra Leone

Sierra Leone

Africa

Julius Makoni

Bishop

Diocese on Manicaland

Zimbabwe

Africa

*Susan Marrinan

Senior Business Development Director

Anglo-American

Australia

Australasia and South Pacific

*Isabella Matambanadzo

Independent Consultant

Zimbabwe

Africa

*Norman McKinley

UK Director

British Red Cross

United Kingdom

Europe

Katy Mecklenburgh

Finance Director, Home Affairs

Serco Home Affairs

United Kingdom

Europe

Kasee Ithana-Mhoney

Manager

The Synergos Institute

Namibia

Africa

Martin Moore

Director

Media Standards Trust

United Kingdom

Europe

Rob Moore

Deputy Vice Chancellor (Partnerships and Advancement)

University of Witswatersrand

South Africa

Africa

Shantal Munro-Knight

Executive Director

Caribbean Policy Development Centre

Barbados

Caribbean

Zippy Musau

Editor

Zen Media

Kenya

Africa

*Trevor Mwamba

Bishop of Botswana

Anglican Diocese of Botswana

Botswana

Africa

*Vanessa Naicker

Head of Asset Optimisation

Anglo American

South Africa

Africa

Emma Needham

Communications Director, Asia Pacific

Serco

Australia

Australasia and South Pacific

David Neita

Director

Elect

United Kingdom

Europe

Susil Nelson

Manager Corporate Governance & Special Projects

PNG Sustainable Development Program Limited

Papua New Guinea

Australasia and South Pacific

*Azdini Nor Azman

Senior Vice President of Treasury and Capital Markets Division

Bank Muamalat

Malaysia

Asia

Francesca Osowska

Director: Housing, Regeneration, the Commonwealth Games and Sport

Scottish Government

United Kingdom

Europe

Firoz Patel

Chief Executive Officer

Childreach

United Kingdom

Europe

Ramji Raghavan

Founder-Chairman

Agastya International Foundation

India

Asia

MN Reddi

Additional Director General of Police and Chairman & MD

Karntaka State Police Housing Corporation

India

Asia

CS Reddy

Chief Executive Officer

Apmas

India

Asia

Rabbi Danny Rich

Chief Executive Officer

Liberal Judaism

United Kingdom

Europe

Kirsty Ruddock

Principal Solicitor

EDO NSW

Australia

Australasia and South Pacific

Jasvinder Sanghera

Chief Executive Officer

Karma Nirvana

United Kingdom

Europe

Augustine Seyuba

Permanent Secretary

Cabinet Office

Zambia

Africa

*Vidya Shah

Executive Director

EdelGive Foundation

India

Asia

Helen Shaw

Head of Commercial, UK and Europe

Serco Home Affairs

United Kingdom

Europe

Ethel Sigimanu

Permanent Secretary

Ministry of Women, Youth, Children and Family Affairs

Solomon Islands

Australasia and South Pacific

Moira Sinclair

Executive Director London

Arts Council

United Kingdom

Europe

Caroline Southey

Special Advisor to Chief Executive Officer

ABSA Bank

South Africa

Africa

Zac Stenning

Commanding Officer

British Army

United Kingdom

Europe

Alka Talwar

Corporate Head Community Development

Tata Chemicals Limited

India

Asia

Chris Tan

Senior Correspondent

The Straits Times

Singapore

Asia

*Joan Thomas Edwards

Director International Organisations

Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Foreign Trade, Jamaica

Jamaica

Caribbean

Aqeel Tirmizi

Professor

SIT Graduate Institute

Pakistan / United States of America

Asia

Mel Tomlin

Customer Experience Director

Royal Mail Group

United Kingdom

Europe

Rob Varley

Operations and Services Director

Met Office

United Kingdom

Europe

Shridhar Venkat

Executive Director

The Akshaya Patra Foundation

India

Asia

Susan Wamala

Headteacher

Mukono Boarding School

Uganda

Africa

Katrina Webb-Denis

Director

Silver 2 Gold High Performance Solutions

Australia

Australasia and South Pacific

Brian Webster

Assistant Dean

Faculty of Health, Life & Social Sciences, Edinburgh Napier University

United Kingdom

Europe

Greg Whitby

Executive Director of Schools

Catholic Education Diocese of Parramatta

Australia

Australasia and South Pacific

Helen Yeo

Head of Brunei Branch

The Great Eastern Life Assurance Company Ltd - Brunei Branch

Brunei

Asia

Julius Yeoh

Managing Director

Galley Reach Holdings Group

Papua New Guinea

Australasia and South Pacific

Peter Yu

Chairman

North Australian Indigenous Land and Sea Management Alliance Ltd

Australia

Australasia and South Pacific

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Appendix Two: Assessment Questions

Appendix Three: Interview Questions

Assessment One: Day One Please rate the following statements from 10-100% by circling the percentage that best represents how you feel:

Preliminary Questions: What does global leadership mean to you? Do you consider yourself a global leader?

Q1: On a scale of 1 – 10 (10 highest, 1 lowest), to what extent do you think that your CSCLeaders experience has broadened your horizons (beyond your city / country / organisation / sector / expertise)?

• •

I am aware or can list things I do which create barriers between myself and people from other cultures I am comfortable reaching out beyond the world I know and operate within I can describe what are my core values and behaviours that I should not change whatever culture I am working in

Assessment Two: Day Eight Please rate the following statements from 10-100% by circling the percentage that best represents how you feel: • • • • • • • • •

CSCLeaders has helped me identify behaviours I need to flex/ change to enable me to develop international relationships I am now more prepared to lead a project which takes me beyond the world I know and operate within The next major project I take on will have input from two sources which I would never even have considered involving prior to CSCLeaders Through CSCLeaders, I have met 8 people with whom I know I will stay in regular contact Through CSCLeaders, I have spotted new opportunities for my organisation or city/country which I would not otherwise have spotted As a result of CSCLeaders, I can describe the core values and behaviours that, where ever I am, I should not change The biggest insight I’ve had is... If anything, the things I would change about CSCLeaders are... I would recommend CSCLeaders to my best friend or colleague?

Assessment Three: Part Two Please rate the following statements from 10-100% by circling the percentage that best represents how you feel: • • • • • •

Since the start of CSCLeaders, I have started to implement new opportunities for my organisation or city/country I am now in regular contact with 8 people I met through CSCLeaders I am now more prepared to lead a project which takes me beyond the world I know and operate within I think there are more changes to my habits/behaviours I could make which would make me better at working across cultures As a result of CSCLeaders, I can describe the values and behaviours that, wherever I am, I should not change As a result of CSCLeaders, I view myself as operating more as a global leader

Assessment Four: Six months post-Part One Please rate the following statements from 10-100% by circling the percentage that best represents how you feel: • • • • • • •

Since the start of CSCLeaders, I have started to implemented new opportunities for my organisation or city/country As a result of CSCLeaders, I can describe the values and behaviours that, where ever I am, I should not change I am now more prepared to lead a project which takes me beyond the world I know and operate within I think there are more changes to my habits/behaviours I could make which would make me better at working across cultures I am now in regular contact with 8 people whom I met through CSCLeaders (yes/no) As a result of CSCLeaders, I view myself as acting and operating more as a global leader Please describe an initiative or project you are involved in as a result of CSCLeaders (open text)

Subsidiary questions: How do you think that will help you as a leader? Why is that important to you / your organisation / your country? Where else have you had such a broadening opportunity (does that make you want to reconsider your score?) Can you give some examples (people and / or places you now have a better understanding of, issues / trends that are now on your radar, greater understanding of dealing with complex, messy problems)? Q2: On a scale of 1 – 10 (10 highest, 1 lowest), to what extent do you think that your CSCLeaders experience has developed your ability to thrive in different cultures? Subsidiary questions: Did anything surprise you about working in such a diverse group? Did you have to adopt any different behaviours / change your leadership style when working across cultures – and if so, how? How do you think this will help you as a global leader? Why is that important to you/your organisation/your country/the Commonwealth? Q3: The feedback from CSCLeaders shows how many strong connections have formed across the participant group – why do you think networks are so important for developing global/international leaders? Subsidiary questions: What can you use this network to achieve, what/how would you want to work with someone you have met on CSCLeaders? What has CSCLeaders made you think about the sorts of leaders (and leadership skills) that are required to deal with international challenges? What do you think will get in the way/ barriers that will need to be overcome? Q4: As a global leader, what would you say was your key learning from CSCLeaders? Subsidiary questions: How are you/will you be taking this back to your organisation? How will this experience help you/your team/your organisation deal more effectively in global context?


Appendix Four: Common Purpose Conventions To help our participants to get the most from their experience on all Common Purpose courses, including CSCLeaders, we ask them to respect the following conventions:. These ground rules have evolved over many years. They ensure participants engage in conversations which add to the quality of our courses. When individuals sign up for a Common Purpose event or course we ask them to: Be open – and open-minded Be prepared to hear views that you may not normally wish to hear and be willing to learn something from them. You will certainly hear views expressed from other participants with whom you deeply disagree; we take the view that leaders need to know what other people are thinking, if they are to work effectively across boundaries. Avoid both giving and taking offence It is important that everyone feels able to say what they really think. When other people’s views are articulated bluntly or clumsily, we ask you to suspend instant judgment and enter into constructive discussion on them. We also ask you to communicate in a respectful way and to listen to any feedback as to why your ideas or language might cause offence. Be a leader Make sure that your contributions are to the point - and be prepared to ask the difficult questions. Speak as yourself. Support fellow participants when they have the courage to go out on a limb. Don’t delegate issues to the Course Director if the group is better placed to deal with them. Be engaged – and positive Show commitment. Make arrangements so that you can attend each event in full, keep to the timings given, prepare yourself well and ensure that you are not interrupted. Be fair and respectful in your dealings with other participants, contributors and alumni. If you can’t help someone, say so. If someone can’t help you, accept this. Use shared knowledge and experience for positive ends.

Adhere to the Chatham House Rule For the learning process to be effective contributors, participants and alumni must feel that they can talk openly and gain insights from each other, so we observe the Chatham House Rule. The Chatham House Rule was devised at Chatham House (the home of the Royal Institute for International Affairs in London) in 1927 and was refined in 1992 and 2002. It is an internationally recognised and respected way of conducting meetings and it reads as follows:

“When a meeting is held under the Chatham House Rule, participants are free to use the information received, but neither the identity nor the affiliation of the speaker(s), nor that of any other participant, may be revealed” This does not mean that the discussions are secret. In fact (and in practice), the Chatham House Rule is there to encourage everyone to speak freely. Speakers can – and do – talk openly and truthfully about issues in their community, challenges in society or their own leadership dilemmas. They are also able to speak as individuals and express views that may not be those of their organisations. In these conditions, real issues or concerns can be aired, genuine debate can flourish and deeper learning can be achieved. The Chatham House Rule simply means that people can talk about anything that they have learnt or discussed on the course but cannot say who it was that expressed a particular view. As well as enhancing the learning experience for everyone this makes it easier for people to talk freely outside the course about what they have heard. If we did not observe the rule, everyone would be more guarded – which would significantly reduce the effectiveness of the educational experience.

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“CSCLeaders provides a unique opportunity for leaders across the Commonwealth to forge vital leadership skills, build the right connections and find the innovative solutions to the most pressing challenges facing a dynamic and changing Commonwealth.” Chris Hyman, Chief Executive, Serco Group PLC

Headline sponsor

Contributing sponsors

CSCLeaders is a partnership between Common Purpose and HRH The Duke of Edinburgh’s Commonwealth Study Conference (UK Fund).

© The Common Purpose Charitable Trust 2014


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