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The TheCommunity CommunityFoundation Foundationof ofMiddle MiddleTennessee Tennessee

2016 2016Report ReporttotothetheCommunity Community


For more information visit CFMT.org or call 615-321-4939 The Community Foundation of Middle Tennessee 3833 Cleghorn Avenue • Nashville, Tennessee 37215-2519

CFMT.ORG


The Community Foundation of Middle Tennessee is honored to tell the stories within these pages, testaments to the many ways people have started something special to address the needs of our community. At The Community Foundation, there is a place for you to start something special, where your story will join hundreds of other stories The Foundation will tell now and forever.

2016 Report to the Community


The unique strength of The Community Foundation is that it serves those who have passed, those who are living, and those not yet born. It binds us in a way which nothing else can. The Community Foundation enables one generation to send a love letter to another. Since “timing is everything,” donors to The Foundation can arrange their gifts to maximum advantage. Gifts of every size are welcome, although an initial contribution of $5,000, ($10,000 for scholarship funds), is needed to establish your own Fund. “How time flies…” How often we say that in a voice tinged with regret or laced with surprise! We share a fascination with time, from the final seconds of a sporting event to the years we spend achieving a goal. When we consider our major achievements, we might pause to measure time in decades or even a lifetime; when we go about our daily lives, sometimes we cringe at the passage of a few minutes at an inopportune juncture. But, our most significant efforts, like raising a family, building our business, or “doing a good deed,” transcend time. They tell the story of our life and become the legacy we create for the future. The Community Foundation is about time. It is a vehicle by which we serve both the here and now and the future. Gifts made through The Foundation address current community issues and, at the same time, become part of the legacy we leave. The Foundation pools our individual contributions with others to build an ongoing, permanent endowment. Each year the hundreds who help The Foundation through contributions of energy, expertise, financial resources and concern for Middle Tennessee take advantage of The Foundation’s virtual “timelessness.” People who understand the flexibility inherent within The Foundation understand that — “over time” — the power of gifts to The Foundation are magnified.

2 • The Community Foundation of Middle Tennessee

The Foundation understands that “time is money” and can move quickly to accommodate your requests. Gifts to The Community Foundation are given the best tax deductibility under the law and there are no fees to establish a fund. Once established, your Fund is administered at costs lower than any other community-wide umbrella agency. Planned gifts may be a proverbial “stitch in time” allowing you to reach your charitable and tax/estate planning goals most effectively. You can provide income for life for a loved one while you also help build and protect a safer, stronger, community in which they can live. Through your Fund, your goals for grants to favorite charities are preserved and protected — in perpetuity. “Time and time again,” gifts bearing your Fund’s name will help worthy recipients continue their good work. The Foundation staff is available to help you accomplish your objectives and to handle your Fund’s administration. We work to free you for the maximum joy with the minimum hassle. Our goal is to hear you say everything “goes like clockwork.” It’s time you joined in our efforts. For more information, please call 615-321-4939. — Ellen Lehman President, The Community Foundation of Middle Tennessee


TABLE OF CONTENTS Intro

1

25 Years of Connecting Generosity with Need

2

Gatlinburg, Pigeon Forge and Sevierville Emergency Response Fund

4-6

Timeline of Disaster Response Funds

7

Sponsors Scholarship Fund

8-10

Scholarship Program

10

Corporate Care Growth

12

Timeline of Corporate Care Funds

13

Opportunity NOW Fund

14-16

Timeline of Private/Public Partnerships

17

Serving Tennessee's Seniors

18-21

The Big Payback: Training Matters

22-23

"Gifts of Stuff"

24-25

Timeline of Zelle Funds

26

Looking Ahead

27

2016 at a Glance

28-31

NEW FUNDS

32-39

Our Staff

39

Our Board

39

Photography by Anthony Scarlati


"We know when disasters strike, there are few quick fixes..."

4 • The Community Foundation of Middle Tennessee


Gatlinburg, Pigeon Forge and Sevierville Emergency Response Fund The word disaster, alone and by its implications, is scary. Add in swells of water, damaging high winds, charring flames and the like … and it’s time to activate. We all recognize the swift rate in which news of a disaster spreads, but the urge to help its victims happens just as quickly. On November 28, 2016, while our neighbors in East Tennessee were enveloped by flames from a wildfire sweeping along the floor of the Great Smoky Mountains, The Community Foundation tapped into the experience garnered from past disasters and established a safe, reliable, and trusted portal for generous donors across the country to support the people of the Great Smoky Mountains. This Fund, the Gatlinburg, Pigeon Forge and Sevierville Emergency Response Fund, was established the very next day. Knowing all too well that recovery efforts for a disaster need to be evaluated from both short-term and long-term perspectives, The Community Foundation quickly dug in to identify the areas of greatest need in the Smoky Mountains’ resort towns. “We know when disasters strike, there are few quick fixes,” said Ellen Lehman, president of The Community Foundation. “We need to support the affected communities and the nonprofits on the ground helping victims and addressing their immediate and long-term needs.” Within days, area nonprofits were funded to aid the medically uninsured and those in need of short-term housing, legal aid, and food to manage volunteer support. Shortly thereafter, a partnership with Dollar General and the Dollywood Foundation had been forged, and hundreds of thousands of dollars in gift cards were supplied to fire victims to help with the cost of essential living items and/or holiday gifts for the quickly approaching celebrations. And as funding permits, long-term needs such as transportation, rebuilding houses and restoring jobs have been the focus, thanks to the generosity of our donors. CFMT.org • 5


In the wake of devastating wildfires in the Great Smoky Mountains, The Community Foundation’s Gatlinburg, Pigeon Forge and Sevierville Emergency Response Fund has prompted several visits to the area to establish and work with nonprofit partnerships involved with recovery efforts. Big smiles greeted The Foundation’s Scott O’Neal as he handdelivered grant checks to the Mountain Hope Good Shepherd Clinic, Sevier County Food Ministries, Smoky Mountain Area Rescue Ministries, Legal Aid of East Tennessee, and Volunteer East Tennessee.

6 • The Community Foundation of Middle Tennessee


September 11 Fund

(September 20, 2001)

DISASTER RESPONSE TIMELINE

Metro Nashville Disaster Response Fund

The Community Foundation has been

Asurion Disaster Relief Fund

(September 13, 2002)

(October 15, 2004)

involved in disaster response funding for more than two decades, starting with

HCA Employee Tsunami Relief Fund (January 1, 2005)

the 1993 ice storm and 1998 tornadoes in

Vanguard Health Systems Employee Tsunami Relief Fund (January 12, 2005)

Middle Tennessee, and a range of hurricanes, tsunamis, earthquakes, fires and floods both near and far.

American Healthways Employee Hurricane Katrina Relief Fund (September 2, 2005) Hurricane Katrina Disaster Response Fund (September 9, 2005) Hurricane Katrina Disaster Response Fund for Alabama (September 9, 2005) Hurricane Katrina Disaster Response Fund for Louisiana (September 9, 2005) Hurricane Katrina Disaster Response Fund for Mississippi (September 9, 2005) Vanguard Hurricane Katrina Fund (September 9, 2005) Steele Advised Fund to benefit the Greater New Orleans Community Foundation

(September 9, 2005)

Tennessee Emergency Response Fund (February 7, 2008) Tennessee Farm Disaster Response Fund (February 26, 2008) Hurricane Response Fund (September 3, 2008) Haiti Earthquake Response Fund (January 13, 2010) HCA Haiti Relief Fund (January 14, 2010) The Lifepoint Hospitals Disaster Response Fund (February 9, 2010) Nashville Rising Fund (May 21, 2010) ACM Lifting Lives Temporary Home Fund (May 27, 2010) BMI Flood Relief Matching Fund (June 23, 2010) The Cheatham County Disaster Response Fund (August 18, 2010) The River Fund (November 24, 2010) Japan Earthquake Response Fund (March 14, 2011) Speak Now, Help Now Charitable Fund (May 10, 2011) Tennessee Emergency Flood 2010 (April 17, 2012) Give 'Em A Hand: the Sandy Disaster Response Fund (October 30, 2012) Oklahoma Disaster Response Fund (May 21, 2013) Philippine Typhoon Fund (November 11, 2013) August 8th Flood Fund (December 26, 2013) To Chattanooga With Love (July 17, 2015) The Williamson County Disaster Response Fund (August 25, 2015) Louisiana Flood Disaster 2016 Relief (August 17, 2016) Hurricane Matthew Disaster Relief Fund (October 7, 2016) Gatlinburg, Pigeon Forge and Sevierville Emergency Response Fund (November 29, 2016)


Sponsors Scholarship Fund George Langstaff clearly remembers one particular day while bailing hay on his Williamson County farm years ago. “It was boring,” says George, a spry 92 years young, as he sits beside his wife of 70 years, Mickey, on a fine summer morning. Perched on his tractor, George would let his mind wander to ponder a weighty question: What are the problems in the world? George quickly answered to himself, “Too many young people that don’t get a good education.”

Understanding the time, attention to detail, and hard work it takes to navigate the application and award process of a scholarship, the Langstaffs recognized the value in The Community Foundation’s experience, and the transition seemed like a natural fit. With more than 110 scholarships funds managed by The Community Foundation, donors, like the Langstaffs, trust that their intent to help students further their education will be carried on, in perpetuity. George says, “I’m tickled to death about the transition.”

“Then a little voice in my head said, ‘What are you going to do about it?’” recalls George. The answer came relatively quickly: Start a scholarship program. So in 1995, after conversations with The Community Foundation, George and Mickey organized the Sponsors Scholarship Program. It went on to award more than $3 million in scholarship assistance for 433 students pursuing college or other post-secondary education. And, for two decades, the Sponsors Scholarship Program relied solely on the efforts of the all-volunteer Sponsors’ Board. “We were overlooking a lot of talent,” the 91-year-old Mickey says of students who are lacking the funds to attend college. She adds, “The fact that it was all volunteers [running the program] ... It makes my heart swell.” “We still get Christmas cards from scholarship winners to this day.” In late 2016, the Langstaffs returned to The Community Foundation to continue the work of their 20-year-old scholarship program and established The Sponsors Scholarship Fund. 20• •The TheCommunity CommunityFoundation FoundationofofMiddle MiddleTennessee Tennessee 8

George Langstaff (photo left) and his wife of 70 years, Mickey, (photo following page) have dedicated a good portion of their lives to helping hundreds of young people attend college.


What are the problems in the world? George quickly answered to himself, "Too many young people that don’t get a good education."


THE COMMUNITY FOUNDATION SCHOLARSHIP PROGRAM Steve Thompson Scholarship Fund On the 50th reunion of Hillsboro High School’s Class of 1957 in 2007, Stephen Meek Thompson was remembered by his classmates with the establishment of the Steve Thompson Scholarship. In October 1955, Steve's junior year, he died at age 17 of a head injury sustained during a football game. Steve was one of the greatest athletes ever to play at Hillsboro High School and left his name in many record books. He lettered in track and basketball. He was the first freshman to letter in football and was destined for a fine career as an athlete in college. In 2016, when the Sponsors Scholarship decided to turn over their scholarship work to The Community Foundation to administer, the Steve Thompson Scholarship became a scholarship fund established specifically for Hillsboro High School seniors.

Whether a student is studying law or horticulture, planning a career in criminal justice or teaching, or studying at a technical school or four-year university, The Community Foundation’s scholarship program supports individuals from various backgrounds and communities seeking funding for educational opportunities. The Foundation administers more than 110 scholarship funds, which are established by individuals, families, companies and civic groups. Students need only complete one application to be eligible for all of the scholarship funds whose criteria they meet. The amounts of awards from The Community Foundation Scholarships vary, averaging between $500 to $2,500, and can be used to cover any designated schools’ Financial Aid Office’s determined cost of attendance, which includes tuition, fees, room, board, books, personal living expenses and transportation. In 2016 The Community Foundation awarded 291 scholarships, totaling more than $548,200, to students pursuing secondary educational goals. DID YOU KNOW? EACH YEAR SCHOLARSHIP APPLICATIONS ARE MADE AVAILABLE TO THE GENERAL PUBLIC IN LATE JANUARY. Applicants can search for scholarships and submit their applications, along with support materials, online at www.cfmt.org. There is no charge for submitting an application. THE LAST DAY TO APPLY FOR A SCHOLARSHIP IS MARCH 15.

Popular and deeply respected by all who knew him, Steve’s famous smile and presence was contagious. He was known as a team player who could serve as a leader or a follower. His courage, determination, competitiveness, and loyalty will never be forgotten, thanks in large part to the Steve Thompson Scholarship Fund.

10 • The Community Foundation of Middle Tennessee

The volunteer Scholarship Selection Committee, appointed by the Board of The Community Foundation and composed of impartial Middle Tennesseans, meets in late April to review each application and selects recipients based on criteria established by donors. Applicants are notified, by mail, about the Committee’s decisions by mid-May.


Nashville native Trehon Cockrell-Coleman, now a software engineer in Tucson, Arizona, returns to Nashville each spring to present leadership awards and scholarships to elected students at Smithson Craighead Academy charter school. The East High School graduate benefited from The Community Foundation’s Teddy Wilburn Scholarship each of his four years at Tennessee State University.

CFMT.org • 11


Needs Greatly Expand for Corporate Care Funds The Corporate Care Fund program provides a solution for corporations looking for a way to help employees during times of crisis. ’Tis often the season for tornadoes, tropical storms, hurricanes and floods, and 2016 went down as one of the deadliest and most costly for natural disasters in many years.

the deadly flooding in Louisiana and Hurricane Matthew’s path of death and destruction in the Caribbean and the Southeast Coast.

Processed applications nearly doubled and approvals more than doubled from the previous year, to 677 and 599, respectively. At year’s end The Foundation had awarded $1,470,960 in grants, levels not reached since the Tennessee Floods of May 2010.

Companies with Corporate Care Funds contributing to victims of Louisiana’s floods include some of Middle Tennessee’s most highprofile names: Dollar General, Genesco Inc., Ingram Industries Inc., Tractor Supply Co., and LifePoint Health. The Baton Rouge, Louisiana-area floods prompted 167 requests for assistance, with a total of 328 Baton Rouge-area residents ultimately benefiting from Corporate Care Funds. Nearly $600,000 in assistance was provided including home repairs (55%), temporary housing (30%) and food and clothing (15%).

Through the years, dozens of Corporate Care Funds have been established with The Community Foundation. The Corporate Care Fund program provides a solution for corporations looking for a way to help employees during times of personal crisis.

It just goes to show that a relatively small amount of money can go a long way to creating a more stable situation for those in need during times of personal financial crisis. 


And this meant busy times for administrators of the numerous Employee Assistance Programs and Corporate Care Funds managed by The Community Foundation of Middle Tennessee.

And the crises were particularly plentiful during 2016, most notably

12 • The Community Foundation of Middle Tennessee


Turner Family Disaster Relief Fund Ingram Disaster Fund

(May 3, 2000)

(September 3, 2005)

Curo Employee Assistance Fund (October 30, 2009) NewsChannel 5 Crisis Care Fund (December 14, 2009) Bretagne LLC Employee Assistance Fund (December 23, 2009) Dare to Care Employee Assistance Fund (April 9, 2010) Ensworth Faculty Assistance Fund (May 6, 2010) Genesco Employee Emergency Fund (May 6, 2010) American General Life and Accident Insurance Company Employee Care Fund (May 11, 2010) A.O. Smth Corporation Employee Care Fund (May 11, 2010) KraftCPAs Care Fund (May 11, 2010) The LifeCare Disaster Recovery Fund (May 11, 2010) The Tivity Health Helping Hands Fund (May 11, 2010) Father Ryan Faculty and Staff Assistance Fund (May 12, 2010) Ingram Castastrophic Loss Fund (May 14, 2010) The Fifth Third Cares Fund (June 15, 2010) BMI Care and Assistance Fund (June 24, 2010) Comcast Cares Fund (July 16, 2010) CGS Employee Recovery Fund (August 4, 2010) The SSR Disaster Relief Cares Fund (August 26, 2010) Tractor Supply Company Employee Assistance Fund (November 8, 2010) Avenue Bank Care Fund (December 30, 2010) Delek Employee Care Fund

(August 18, 2011)

Magazines.com Associate Care Fund (February 23, 2012) Truxton Trust Employee Assistance Fund (March 29, 2012) Integra Relief Fund (November 14, 2012) The Scripps Networks Interactive Employee Relief Fund (November 14, 2012) The Metropolitan Government Employee Emergency Support Fund (November 27, 2012) The Bongo Employee Assistance Fund (December 11, 2012) Truform Manufacturing We Care Fund (September 19, 2013) Belle Meade Country Club Employee Emergency Assistance Fund

(December 3, 2013)

Essendant Associate Care Fund (April 29, 2014) LP Cares Fund (August 14, 2014) Caring for Those Who Care Employee Emergency Assistance Fund BlueCross Family Fund (December 22, 2014)

(December 9, 2014)

The 360 Fund (February 19, 2015) The Grimco Cares Fund (May 5, 2015) The Freeland Cares Fund (June 25, 2015) HealthStream Employee Assistance Fund (July 23, 2015) The Wearwell Employee Care Fund (September 10, 2015) NPL Employee Care Fund (September 18, 2015) The CMA Employee Assistance Fund (April 18, 2016) The John Rochford Employee Assistance Fund for Saint Paul in memory of Richard Johnston (July 8, 2016) The Ingram Emergency Assistance Fund (September 20, 2016) The Hebrews HALO Fund for Special Kids, Inc. Employees (September 28, 2016)

CORPORATE CARE TIMELINE Through good times and bad, a Corporate Care Fund allows a company to focus on its most valued asset: its employees. Such a fund encourages or makes systematic a company’s support during times of natural disaster, life-threatening illnesses or injuries, death, or other catastrophic or extreme circumstances. The Community Foundation administers the Fund, taking care of the application process in an efficient, costeffective, objective, and confidential manner. These tax-deductible charitable solutions provide emergency aid to employees when they need it most.

CFMT.org • 13


14 • The Community Foundation of Middle Tennessee

"They said if they had opportunities, they would very much like to work."


Young adults find their "Opportunity NOW" In its 25-year history of “connecting generosity with need,” The Community Foundation has cleared hurdles, built bridges and made philanthropy possible for anyone interested in supporting their community. In 2016, that experience provided the solution for how to manage the funding of Opportunity NOW, a private/public partnership and youth employment initiative launched by Nashville Mayor Megan Barry’s office to provide young people in Davidson County access to employment.

"Being able to have contributions flow through a fund at The Community Foundation provided us a flexibility that allowed us to take some of the burden off of employers..."

The initiative sprang from Mayor Barry’s Youth Violence Summit in 2015. At the Youth Violence Summit, there were 350 young people in the same room with the Mayor, and it was clear to her that summer provided very few opportunities for them. They said if they had opportunities, they would very much like to work. By the spring of the following year, Opportunity NOW, led by Ellen Zinkiewicz, director of youth services at The Nashville Career Advancement Center, was born. “We’ve been working, essentially, to create a viable summer youth employment program to fit Nashville and reflect what our workforce needs are,” says Zinkiewicz. “It would help young people of all ages, in an age- and stage-appropriate way, to learn the ‘soft’ skills that are really best learned by working.”

(Photo left) UPS representative Antonio McFadden talks with a young job seeker at an Opportunity NOW job fair at the Oasis Center in Nashville in June 2016. (Photos pages 14-15) Young people meet with employers and fill out applications at the job fair.

CFMT.org • 15


There are two main models in Opportunity NOW. Experience Work is a six-week, 20-hour, project-based summer program for 14- and 15-year-olds that focuses on communication, team building and problem-solving. The High School Internship program, also six weeks, places students into positions that allow them to explore career options while working six hours a day for four days a week. They return on the fifth day to continue working on their skills and to reflect on their work week. The $2,500 cost per participant in each program is provided by both public and private contributions and includes wages for students and adult trainers, payroll administration and FICA. To manage those funds, the city turned to The Community Foundation. “We looked for a way that the private business part of the private/public partnership could be no-hassle and sustainable long-term,” says Zinkiewicz. “Being able to have contributions flow through a fund at The Community Foundation provided us the flexibility that allowed us to take some of the burdens off of employers and enable them to contribute as they want to – from HCA’s $250,000 so that nonprofits can participate, to businesses that haven’t contributed but have great work supervision for young people – without necessarily requiring that they take on some of the bureaucratic and administrative burdens of hiring.” “Without The Community Foundation’s support long-term, Opportunity NOW could never work. There are all kinds of things that we are not good at in government that are second nature to The Community Foundation. Through that relationship, The Foundation will be an integral part of paying wages for our young people this summer and beyond.”

16 • The Community Foundation of Middle Tennessee

"Without The Community Foundation’s support long-term, Opportunity NOW could never work..."


PRIVATE/PUBLIC PARTNERSHIP TIMELINE The Community Foundation is dedicated to helping craft and administer charitable solutions needed to address Middle Tennessee’s needs as they emerge and evolve over time.

Student Ticket Subsidy Fund Arts Build Communities

(September 27, 1994)

(October 1, 1996)

Miss Julia Green Fund for Public Education

(February 9, 1999)

Metro Nashville Disaster Response Fund (September 13, 2002) Project Safe Neighborhood - Equipment

(January 20, 2004)

Project Safe Neighborhoods - DA Prosecutors Fund

(April 24, 2007)

Project Safe Neighborhoods - DA II Prosecutors Fund

(August 1, 2007)

Anti Gang 2006 Field-of-Interest Fund

(October 15, 2007)

Anti Gang 2007 Field-of-Interest Fund

(October 15, 2007)

Infant Mortality Reduction Fund

(April 16, 2008)

Project Safe Neighborhoods - DA III Prosecutors Fund Education First Fund

(September 4, 2008)

(September 17, 2008)

Tennessee State Commission on Reforming Education Fund Metropolitan Nashville Police Support Fund The Footprint Fund

(February 18, 2009)

(December 10, 2009)

(December 7, 2011)

Metropolitan Human Relations Commission Support Fund Tennessee Emergency Flood 2010

(February 22, 2012)

(April 17, 2012)

Nashville After Zone Alliance Fund

(May 22, 2012)

The Metropolitan Government Employee Emergency Support Fund (November 27, 2012) August 8th Flood Fund

(December 26, 2013)

Gail Kerr's House the Homeless Fund

(April 2, 2014)

The Highlands Economic Partnership Fund The Nashville Digital Inclusion Fund Welcoming Nashville Fund

(December 17, 2014)

(February 19, 2015)

(March 23, 2015)

The Williamson County Disaster Response Fund The Nashville Community Engagement Fund Opportunity NOW Fund

(October 31, 2016)

(August 25, 2015)

(September 17, 2015)

CFMT.org • 17


Serving Tennessee's Seniors Grants were awarded to 121 organizations through Serving Tennessee’s Seniors, touching every single county in Tennessee.

Serving Tennessee’s Seniors. Seldom have three words so aptly described such a multifaceted endeavor to enrich the quality of life for senior citizens in our neighborhoods, towns, and cities. Part of a one-time grant opportunity provided by the Chancery Court through the settlement of two lawsuits, Serving Tennessee’s Seniors marked a rare case of The Community Foundation of Middle Tennessee having the opportunity to serve the entire state. Significant monies needed to be disbursed but without much time to do so. Just six weeks passed in late 2016 from grant applications out, to grant proposals in, to grants allocated. Ascertaining which organizations were best serving seniors across the state meant homework on the front end, and lots of it. Across the three Grand Divisions of Tennessee — West, Middle, and East — The Foundation queried 37 United Ways, 95 county mayors, state development districts, sister community foundations, and several nonprofits that have senior citizens as their core constituency. The requirements were simple: Each applicant must serve seniors, and the funds MUST be used to build the capacity of

18 • The Community Foundation of Middle Tennessee

the organizations, and those they serve. Examples: Serving more meals on wheels by having better kitchen equipment. Helping seniors without transportation get to medical appointments. Paving parking lots to ensure those wanting to attend programs at senior citizen centers could do so safely. Upgrading computers to track the outcomes of their work. Nonprofit applicants were asked to outline specific items or programs and defined goals. Grants were awarded to 121 organizations through the Serving Tennessee’s Seniors, touching every single county in Tennessee. Recipients included those offering senior services, health, food, housing, technology, transportation, legal aid, financial and the arts. The Foundation visited several organizations from one end of the state to the other to monitor their progress. Grantees were required to submit interim reports three months later, and final reports three months after that.

Staff and board members of Rhea Richland Senior Neighbors in Dayton, Tennessee (photo above), pose before their pride and joy: a new passenger van. Meanwhile (photo right), new treadmills have seen a steady stream of seniors at the Crockett County Senior Citizens Center in Alamo, Tennessee.


We saw smiles. We saw results. We saw seniors being served.


20 • The Community Foundation of Middle Tennessee


Serving Tennessee’s Seniors grants are already paying big dividends to seniors across the state. Sometimes the services come to them — a mobile dental clinic and dental services unit parked behind the Lawrence County Senior Citizens Center Lawrenceburg, for instance, or a new central air conditioning unit for the home of a North Nashville resident. Other times the services are centralized: regular haircuts at Senior Citizens Home Assistance Service in Knoxville, or a daily lunch at the Petersburg Senior Center. CFMT.org • 21


Those participating in The Big Payback’s training sessions walk away energized with new strategies on how they will tell their organization’s story...

Visit www.TheBigPayback.org for information about 2018’s Fifth Annual The Big Payback 24-hour online giving day: May 2, 2018. 22 • The Community Foundation of Middle Tennessee


The Big Payback: Training Matters Middle Tennessee struggles from time to time with how to slice the “charitable pie” as more nonprofits are formed. The answer has become: strengthen local nonprofits by building their capacity to help, teaching them to work together to achieve their mission and their goals. The Big Payback, now entering its fifth year, has been one of the big successes in this work to change the conversation from competition to collaboration among nonprofits and has led the effort to build the capacity of local nonprofits. During the initial four years, thanks to the dozens of training sessions made possible by generous sponsors, Middle Tennessee’s nonprofits are now conversant in engaging donors through social media, using digital tools they formerly feared — or at least about which they were skeptical. These sessions have helped them build their capacity to engage donors, raise awareness, tell the stories of those they serve, and elevate the entire nonprofit sector. Those participating in The Big Payback’s training sessions often walk away energized with new strategies on how they can work more efficiently and effectively.

zone, to learn new fundraising skills, and to create a more diverse funding strategy. That year they were one of the most successful participants. Too often people think that The Big Payback is all about a 24-hour online giving event to equip Middle Tennessee nonprofits that have decided to participate with a source of additional funding. Together we have raised $9,337,591.97 in four days for Middle Tennessee nonprofits. The fact is, however, that The Big Payback is much larger than simply that metaphoric “pot of gold at the end of the rainbow.” A favorite statistic from the first four years of The Big Payback is that 18,606 donors have self-reported making a gift through The Big Payback to a nonprofit they’d not previously supported. A total of 18,606 donations from new donors in four 24-hour days is transformative, and it is safe to say that although it is a 24-hour event, the effects of The Big Payback last 365 days a year. We look forward to The Big Payback 2018 and more training that matters!!!

(Photo left) Representatives from hundreds of nonprofits from across Middle Tennessee fill a conference room at the Nashville Airport Marriott for morning and afternoon kickoff training sessions for The Big Payback.

Kathryn Bennett, one of GivingMatters.com’s coaches, tells the story of a nonprofit that previously relied on government grants for 75% of its funding. That nonprofit reported that participating in The Big Payback forced its staff to get out of their comfort

CFMT.org • 23


"Gifts of Stuff" The most valuable asset people have is rarely found in the balance of their checking or savings account. It’s the shares of stock they picked up at the suggestion of their broker years ago; the home they bought when the interest rates were double what they are today; or the business started by taking out a second mortgage. Receiving these assets as charitable gifts and converting them into grantmaking resources for the community is something with which The Community Foundation has assisted many donors since it first opened for business in 1991. We hope others will call on us for this expertise in the future, just as these generous donors have: A widow in her 70s whose first gift was her family’s 67-acre farm outside of Nashville, which allowed her to open two scholarship funds and a designated fund to support an organization long beloved by her late husband. A pair of serial entrepreneurs and business partners who originally opened funds more than 20 years ago with initial gifts of publicly-traded stock recently returned with a gift of a promissory note associated with a stock purchase agreement in one of their businesses. This gift required a bit more legal paperwork, but one we were equipped to handle. A 55-year-old former Nashvillian who died too soon. He left his estate, including a commercial office building in Knoxville, to a fund that would carry on the work he started in supporting the LGBT community in the South.

24 • The Community Foundation of Middle Tennessee

A woman whose mother recently passed away who donated many of her mom’s prized possessions — fine china, sterling silver, jewelry, fur coats, antiques and the like — to The Foundation in order to carry on support for a cause that mattered to them both.

A mid-70s business owner who opted to make a stock gift to support a small local nonprofit with a new initiative. When he learned they were not set up to receive stock, he contacted us to see if he could make a stock gift to his existing Donor-Advised Fund and to request a grant from there to the nonprofit he was trying to support.

WE GRATEFULLY ACCEPT GIFTS OF: • Cash • Securities • Charitable Remainder Trust • Existing Life Insurance • New Life Insurance • Real Estate • Tangible Personal Property • Assignment of Trust Income • Gifts from an Estate or Trust

A 45-year-old entrepreneur who donated a membership interest in the business she started to The Foundation. After the company was sold, the financial proceeds received helped create a Donor-Advised Fund that she and her husband can use to involve their teenage children in the family’s charitable giving.

To be sure, The Community Foundation accepts gifts of cash and checks on a regular — make that daily — basis. But it is gifts like those mentioned above, what our board member, the late Kitty Moon Emery, called "gifts of stuff," where we can help donors activate even greater financial resources to support the nonprofit causes and organizations about which they care most.

• Life Income, Fixed Amount • Life Income, Variable Amount • Pooled Income Fund • Charitable Lead Trust • Transfer Your Foundation • Partial Transfer of Your Foundation • Options for Corporations • Options for Business Owners • Options for Organizations


gifts of stuff

The most valuable asset people have is rarely found in the balance of their checking or savings account.

Our Planned Giving Team is available to help you invest in a lasting impact. Please call 615-321-4939. Team members: Belinda Dinwiddie-Havron, Amy Fair and Scott O’Neal CFMT.org • 25


BOB AND ANNE ZELLE: A HISTORY OF GIVING

Anne H. and Robert K. Zelle Advised Fund

(December 29, 1992)

Betty Brown introduced Bob Zelle to The Community Foundation of Middle Tennessee, and together they served as board co-chairs from 1996-1998. These leadership roles helped Bob understand the important role Unrestricted Impact Funds play in a community foundation’s leadership and ability to respond to changing community needs and opportunities. Bob and his wife, Anne, started their Advised Fund at

Robert K. Zelle Fund to support Children's Educational Programs Associated with Symphonic Music (June 14, 2011) Robert K. Zelle Fund to benefit Junior Achievement in Nashville, Tennessee (June 14, 2011)

The Foundation in 1992, with many different kinds of funds to follow. Their Unrestricted Fund began in 2016. Even after their deaths, their philanthropy lives on.

Robert K. and Anne H. Zelle Fund for Education (September 9, 2015) Robert K. and Anne H. Zelle Fund for Fine and Performing Arts (September 9, 2015) Robert K. and Anne H. Zelle Fund for Health (September 9, 2015) Robert K. and Anne H. Zelle Fund to benefit Alive Hospice of Nashville (September 29, 2015) Robert K. and Anne H. Zelle Fund to benefit University School of Nashville (September 29, 2015)

Anne and Bob Zelle Unrestricted Fund (April 7, 2016) Anne and Robert K. Zelle Designated Fund for the benefit of the Adventure Science Center (April 11, 2016) Anne and Robert K. Zelle Designated Fund for the benefit of the Cumberland Heights Foundation (April 11, 2016) Anne and Robert K. Zelle Designated Fund for the benefit of First Steps, Inc. (April 11, 2016) Anne and Robert K. Zelle Designated Fund for the benefit of the Nashville Humane Association (April 11, 2016) Anne and Robert K. Zelle Designated Fund for the benefit of St. George's Episcopal Church of Nashville (April 11, 2016) Anne and Robert K. Zelle Designated Fund for the benefit of the United Way of Metropolitan Nashville, Inc. (April 11, 2016) Anne and Robert K. Zelle Designated Fund for the benefit of Walden's Puddle (April 11, 2016)

26 • The Community Foundation of Middle Tennessee


From playing a role as the protector of philanthropy for thousands of people who want their charitable intents to outlive them exactly as they intended, no matter what that charity might be. To arming our nonprofits with the tools, techniques and talents to fulfill their missions boldly, and often in synergy with each other. To pulling the human capital and energy of our city and our region together for far greater good than any of us could have imagined possible. I’ve seen it. I’ve felt it. I’ve benefited from it in many ways. And I live it every day I wake up in this magical city of Nashville, Tennessee. But until everyone in our city can say these things, our work is not done.

As The Community Foundation of Middle Tennessee winds down its 25th year, I’ll be turning 60 and will begin my 10th year of association with The Foundation. And as all of these personal planets align at one time, I do find myself looking at both the future and the past a little differently. I’ve started thinking about maintaining the things I’ve built and the things that have helped build me. My appreciation for The Community Foundation began with a friendship with Ellen Lehman and a handful of board members, then quickly broadened as I saw how many organizations and lives The Foundation was willing and able to touch. From those in need, to those who’ve felt the need to do what they can to make Nashville and the Middle Tennessee area a better place for everyone who lives here. In very personal and heartfelt ways. We’ve heard The Community Foundation’s tagline so often on NPR now that its true essence is perhaps in danger of being lost or forgotten. But I’d like to make sure that never happens. “Connecting generosity with need” is far more than a slogan. It is the living, breathing legacy of this Foundation that has found its way into the DNA of our city.

As we wrap up the 25th year of The Community Foundation of Middle Tennessee, yes, we’re proud of what we’ve done. I’m constantly amazed at the mountains our staff move every day. I’m inspired by Ellen’s vision, creativity and energy. And I’m energized by the incredible people who so enthusiastically say yes to joining our board and giving their time, treasure, talents and ideas in service of the philanthropic needs of Middle Tennessee. Development, commerce and growth fuel the economy of this city and region. But the compassion and generosity of our people fuels its heart. (If you've taken the time to read this, you know.) And I hope you will join us in our incredibly rewarding mission of connecting generosity with need for the next 25 years. — Kerry Graham, Board Chairman, The Community Foundation of Middle Tennessee

"I hope you will join us in our incredibly rewarding mission of connecting generosity with need for the next 25 years..." CFMT.org • 27


From the beginning, we have helped donors and nonprofit organizations make a difference in their communities.


Giving

Grantmaking

Our vision is to help people feel good about giving. We enable people to give according to their passion and their goals through our remarkable flexibility to serve nearly any charitable purpose.

The Community Foundation works to improve our community through strategic grantmaking to nonprofits. Carrying out the wishes of donors and providing expertise in local philanthropy, The Community Foundation works to identify opportunities and help address critical needs.

It is simple to establish a fund within The Community Foundation, whether you want to create an endowment for a favorite nonprofit or craft an entrepreneurial solution to address a pressing need. A fund is created with a minimum contribution of $5,000 ($10,000 for scholarships). There is no cost to set up a fund, and they are established by individuals, families, companies, civic groups, and nonprofit organizations. Contributions of any size are welcome to existing funds, at any time, from any source. Donors may elect to create a fund with contributions of cash, publiclytraded or closely-held securities, real estate, personal property, or by the use of planned giving vehicles such as charitable remainder trusts, charitable lead trusts, life insurance policies, and bequests.

Unrestricted Impact and Field-of-Interest Funds enable The Community Foundation to put resources to work where they are needed most through a competitive grant process. Our discretionary grant program supports local nonprofits that apply for this source of annual funding. We receive hundreds of applications seeking funding to enhance the programs serving Middle Tennessee. In 2016, we funded 321 nonprofit organizations through our discretionary grantmaking totaling more than $1.98 million. We respect the work and mission of our nonprofit partners and are particularly interested in innovative ideas that provide long-term solutions for community needs.

CFMT.org • 29


Types of Funds AGENCY ENDOWMENT FUNDS These are established by nonprofits as a means of building charitable dollars for the future of their mission and work.

CORPORATE CARE FUNDS These funds are charitable vehicles through which employees of participating companies who need assistance when facing serious personal financial hardship can apply for help.

DESIGNATED FUNDS These ensure regular, endowed support in the form of a steady stream of income is provided to specific charitable organizations the donors select.

DONOR-ADVISED FUNDS These allow donors to set aside charitable dollars when it is best for them, then over time make recommendations about the distribution of grants.

FIELD-OF-INTEREST FUNDS These allow donors to target support to broad areas of concern, such as education, the arts, the environment, youth services, the disabled or geographic areas they choose.

MEMORIAL FUNDS These ensure a special person is remembered through a fund that bears his/her name and reflects his or her legacy.

SCHOLARSHIP FUNDS These provide help to further the education of students who are selected based on criteria donors outline, whether a student is from a particular geographic area, attending a certain school, or planning a career in a specific field.

UNRESTRICTED IMPACT FUNDS These funds provide the greatest flexibility, allowing The Community Foundation to respond to changing need and circumstance.

30 • The Community Foundation of Middle Tennessee

CFMT.org • 31


GRANTMAKING BREAKDOWN BY FUNDS IN 2016:

2016 AT A GLANCE As we watch our community evolve, we see growing

$3.3 MILLION

need. We are uniquely positioned to understand issues facing our community through

DESIGNATED FUNDS + AGENCY ENDOWMENT FUNDS

our unique lens and the ability to scan the 40 counties of Middle Tennessee we serve as we identify trends. January 1, 2016 through December 31, 2016

82

$6.5 MILLION UNRESTRICTED IMPACT FUNDS + FIELD-OF-INTEREST FUNDS

$40.2 MILLION

NEW FUNDS

DONOR-ADVISED FUNDS

TOTAL NUMBER

OF FUNDS

IN 2016 ALONE: NUMBER OF GIFTS MADE TO THE COMMUNITY FOUNDATION:

28,047

TOTAL GIFTS MADE BY DONORS TO THE COMMUNITY FOUNDATION:

$55,030,284

GRANTED TO NONPROFIT ORGANIZATIONS :

NONPROFITS WHO RECEIVED GRANTS:

$57,105,721

3,680

827

$

43

Middle Tennessee and Southern Kentucky Counties Served

24 • The Community Foundation of Middle Tennessee

MILLION

Amount of Grant Dollars Distributed Since 1991

SCHOLARSHIP FUNDS OFFERED CFMT.org • 31


New Funds of The Community Foundation of Middle Tennessee Charitable dreams are realized at The Community Foundation of Middle Tennessee. Whether it’s a Scholarship Fund created in honor of a loved one or an organization starting an Employee Assistance Fund, The Community Foundation works with donors to establish funds tailored to their specific interests. Through The Community Foundation’s customized philanthropic services, there are many ways to contribute and accomplish your charitable goals. You can create a fund; select a broad charitable purpose to benefit from your fund; or advise The Community Foundation as to which charitable organizations could receive grants, among other options.

The following is a list of new funds* created through The Community Foundation of Middle Tennessee. *Funds established in 2016.

32 • The Community Foundation of Middle Tennessee


UNRESTRICTED IMPACT FUNDS

These funds help donors provide the greatest flexibility to The Community Foundation as we respond to changing community needs and opportunities.

NEW FUNDS:

4

18 MARKET VALUE OF FUND TYPE: $4.2 million FUND VALUE RANGE: $5,000 -$1.7 million TOTAL FUNDS:

Each year, hundreds of nonprofits receive grants from The Community Foundation's Unrestricted Fund for programs addressing needs and providing long-term solutions in Middle Tennessee.

The Kitty and Pat Emery Fund for Nashville Established 2016

The Kitty and Pat Emery Fund for Nashville, an Unrestricted Fund within The Community Foundation, was established on November 22, 2016. It happened the day after their 19th wedding anniversary and in anticipation of Kitty’s passing as a result of the cancer she had fought and survived for many months. It stemmed, however, from a happier place, the deep and abiding love Kitty and Pat have had for each other and for their community. The goal of the Fund is to ensure that The Community Foundation has resources to address the needs of the community they chose to call home as those needs emerge and evolve. The Fund will be Nashville-centric, but the causes to which the money may be applied are unlimited because Kitty and Pat believed Nashville’s opportunities to be unlimited as well.

Peter and Lois Fyfe Community Fund Established 2016

Those familiar with Peter Fyfe, who died in 2016, and wife Lois, who died in 2014, knew how generous they were as artists and champions of liturgical music. Peter spent 35 years as the organist and choirmaster at Christ Church in downtown Nashville and taught for 40 years as an adjunct organ professor at Blair School of Music at Vanderbilt University. He always worked closely with Lois, his partner in life and music,

who herself was busy as proprietor of the Lois Fyfe Music company in Green Hills. While alive they both established endowments — Peter at Blair and Lois at The Ohio State University. The Fyfes also created a trust that was to be divided among 10 organizations following Peter’s death, with The Community Foundation of Middle Tennessee as one of the benefiting organizations. The gift to The Foundation created an Unrestricted Impact Fund.

The Wayne T. and Cheryl G. Smith Unrestricted Fund Established 2016

An Unrestricted Fund offers the greatest flexibility in responding to the community’s changing needs and opportunities, allowing The Foundation to address our community’s issues as they emerge. By creating an Unrestricted Fund donors, like Cheryl and Wayne, create a legacy that will grow and change as our community does. It is truly the gift that keeps on giving. Future generations will be better off because the Smiths cared.

FIELD-OF-INTEREST FUNDS

These funds help donors support broad areas of concern, such as education, the arts, the environment, youth services, seniors, or geographic areas.

NEW FUNDS:

11

129 MARKET VALUE OF FUND TYPE: $56.4 million FUND VALUE RANGE: $5,000 -$7.9 million TOTAL FUNDS:

Shirley Caldwell-Patterson Wildlife Fund Established 2016

Gatlinburg, Pigeon Forge and Sevierville Emergency Response Fund Established 2016

Anne and Bob Zelle Unrestricted Fund Established 2016

CFMT.org • 33


Grateful Daniel Fund

Opportunity NOW Fund

Established 2016

Established 2016

Daniel Liff was a gentle soul. Born in Nashville in 1959, he was the elder son of Nina and Noah Liff, one of the founders of Steiner-Liff. In his estate plans, Daniel asked that a portion of his estate be used to create an Unrestricted Fund within The Community Foundation of Middle Tennessee. Daniel had a heart for the environment, for the protection of green spaces, and for the “underdog.” He was a chef who worked at several establishments in the decades before Nashville was on any culinary map. Following in the footsteps of both of his parents, Daniel was an avid fan of the arts and music, hence the name of this Fund. Sadly, Daniel died June 27, 2015, at the young age of 56, after suffering from the complications of diabetes.

Hurricane Matthew Disaster Relief Fund Established 2016 - Closed 2016

The Theodore Roosevelt Association Police Award Fund for Nashville and Middle Tennessee Established 2016

Since 1998, annually a metro police officer has received The Theodore Roosevelt Association Police Award. Theodore Roosevelt triumphed over the illness of his youth to lead a vigorous and productive life of public service. He had a lifelong admiration for the police. He served as President of the Board of Police commissioners of New York City (1895-1897) and two terms as President of the United States (1901-1909). This award is given annually to an officer or officers who have overcome a major physical challenge or handicap, and who remain on active duty to render outstanding and praiseworthy service to their department and the community. This Fund will continue the tradition and honor in perpetuity.

Elizabeth Jonas Jacobs Fund For Women, The Elderly and To Encourage Nonprofit Planning

Serving Tennessee’s Seniors Fund

Established 2016

Established 2016

Elizabeth Jonas Jacobs died at the age of 101 in 2007 after spending decades in service to her community in a number of public roles. During the Second World War, Mrs. Jacobs volunteered with Travelers' Aid, assisting soldiers and others passing through Nashville's busy bus and train stations. Her efforts with that group brought her into contact with Davidson County Judge Beverly Briley in the late 1940s, and she signed on enthusiastically to Judge Briley's pet cause of Metro Government for Nashville and Davidson County. In the years that followed, Elizabeth served a host of nonprofit boards, including those that helped women, the elderly, and enhanced the capacity of nonprofits to serve the community. She also became the first woman to head the Grand Jury for Davidson County. This Fund is dedicated to continuing her work.

Louisiana Flood Disaster 2016 Relief Established 2016 - Closed 2016

34 • The Community Foundation of Middle Tennessee

in East Nashville. The congregation has reached out into the neighborhood, the city, and our country time and again to offer aid to those in need. Frances Southerland (1926-2013) was a prominent fixture in the congregation at Tulip Street Church, and those who knew her were always impressed with her generosity of spirit. Her primary concern was always to ensure that Tulip Street remained able to help those within its immediate community, having a particular concern for the children of lower income families. Her bequest is the seed of this Fund.

SCHOLARSHIP FUNDS

These funds help further the education of students who are selected based on criteria donors outline, whether a student is from a particular geographic area, attending a certain school, or planning a career in a certain field.

NEW FUNDS:

9

113 MARKET VALUE OF FUND TYPE: $14.7 million FUND VALUE RANGE: $10,000 -$3.1 million TOTAL FUNDS:

Tennessee Local Food Fund Established 2016

Established by The Barefoot Farmer, this Fund will support local food for Tennessee by recognizing the connection between healthy farms, healthy food, healthy people, and a healthy economy. The goal is to offer opportunities for the education, training, and practical experiences necessary for revitalizing Tennessee’s tradition of diversified family farms and its rural economies while also providing healthful, nutritious food to Middle Tennesseans.

Tulip Street Church Frances Southerland Legacy Fund Established 2016

The congregation of Tulip Street United Methodist Church has a long history of community engagement. Since its founding in 1859, Tulip Street has been a constant community presence

Mick Gray Barnes Memorial Scholarship Fund Established 2016

The Mick Gray Barnes Memorial Scholarship has been established in memory of Mick Gray Barnes, a native of Overton County, who passed away from complications of ALS on January 1, 2016. She was a 1974 graduate of Livingston Academy and a beloved teacher, friend, and mentor to kids. Mick taught art at Livingston Academy and the Livingston campus of Volunteer State Community College. Mick enjoyed traveling across America with her husband, and loved the outdoors, especially pontooning on Dale Hollow Lake. Barnes, as her students called her, was one-of-a-kind, and she lived life to the fullest with her huge smile and laughter. Because Mick shaped everyone she has come in contact with,


this scholarship will be a memorial to her­­— to encourage and support students from Livingston Academy in their pursuit of higher education in the arts.

The Dedication, Service and Thanks Scholarship Established 2016

Follow Your Heart Scholarship Fund

Clay Neiderheiser Scholarship Fund for Fairview High School Established 2016

Jayme Johnson Smith Memorial Scholarship

Brandon Key Scholarship Established 2016

The Brandon Key Scholarship Fund was established in memory of a young man best known for his commitment to his community, volunteering for causes that were most important to him, and interest in human and civil rights. In addition to serving others, Brandon was a terrific athlete and thespian. During his high school years at Montgomery Bell Academy, he was involved with a variety of teams, clubs, and activities — namely football, wrestling, lacrosse, debate, and theater. The scholarship will benefit Middle Tennessee students who embody the life-loving characteristics that Brandon possessed.

These funds allow donors to ensure that annual support — in perpetuity — is provided to specific nonprofit organizations they choose.

NEW FUNDS:

Established 2016

The Sponsors Scholarship Fund Established 2016

Established 2016

When Charlie Worsham was in his early 20s, his parents surprised him with an autographed book of photography by Marty Stuart. Charlie’s parents asked Marty to sign the book, “To Charlie, follow your dreams.” Marty grinned and scribbled something down. When Mr. and Mrs. Worsham opened the book to the autographed page, they discovered that Marty had written “To Charlie, follow your heart.” Charlie has said, “If we are to continue to have great artists from Mississippi succeed in today's world, we have to invest in their hopes and dreams.” He wants the next John Grisham or Marty Stuart to come from Grenada, Mississippi. To help this become a reality, he created the Follow Your Heart Scholarship Fund with The Community Foundation of Middle Tennessee. This scholarship will support the youth of Grenada, Mississippi — Charlie’s hometown — who possess uncommon talent and desire to achieve great things in the arts, just like he has had the opportunity to do.

DESIGNATED FUNDS

The Ed and Charlie B. Temple Scholarship Fund Established 2016

Coach Ed Temple was a Nashville and American legend, the embodiment of perserverance, determination, and success. As women’s track coach at Tennessee State University from 1953 to 1994, and coach of the U.S. Women’s Olympic track team in 1960 and 1964, Coach Temple ranks among the most impressive leaders in the history of sports, both nationally and internationally. Behind his success was his wife, Charlie B. He proudly noted that without her willingness for him to “spend his time with fast women,” he could not have accomplished as much. But Coach Temple may be best remembered not just for the fact that each of his 40 Olympians could compete, but that each of them earned her diploma and each of them learned how to comport themselves in a competitive world. To do so, Coach and Charlie B. often bought their athletes' clothes and Coach would say that he wanted his athletes to go out into the world “looking like foxes rather than oxes.” The success the TSU Tigerbelles achieved in the Deep South during the days of Jim Crow is as much a testament to Coach Temple’s strength and determination and Charlie B.’s steadfast support as any records they set on the track.

The Steve Thompson Scholarship Fund

10

124 MARKET VALUE OF FUND TYPE: $29.5 million FUND VALUE RANGE: $5,000 -$3.8 million TOTAL FUNDS:

Alma and Fannie Baird Scholarship Trust Designated Fund Established 2016

William D. “Bill” Baird, a Cumberland Law graduate, was at one time one of Tennessee’s foremost political leaders, serving as Mayor of the City of Lebanon and the state’s Lieutenant Governor. As State Senator and in the role of Lieutenant Governor, he championed public education and economic development. Sen. Baird believed his success in the practice of law and many of the accomplishments he achieved as an elected public official were a direct result of his studies and time spent as a Cumberland University student. For these reasons, he was always grateful and appreciative of Cumberland and held a close bond with the university. Sen. Baird loved his church, his wife, Alma, the law, the State Senate, his favorite bird dog (Bill, Jr.), and Cumberland University. But what he loved about Cumberland was that it was and remains today a valued institution dedicated to providing an opportunity to succeed in life for many who would never have had that opportunity otherwise. In 2016 the trustees of the Baird Trust created The Alma and Fannie Baird Scholarship Trust Designated Fund to ensure that there is always a steady stream of annual support distributed to Cumberland University for the purpose of providing scholarships to Wilson County Residents.

Established 2016

Brett Kilroe Fund for Pediatric Cancer Established 2016

CFMT.org • 35


Lillian Dunn Thomas Designated Fund for March of Dimes Established 2016

“Doing service for people is the most important thing to me,” Miss Lillian once told The Community Foundation staff. She was especially fond of helping Nashville’s youth and particularly children with physical disabilities. In 2000, Miss Lillian created a Donor Advised Fund to help facilitate her philanthropic work, work that through her 80-plus-years kept her young at heart. After her death, The Foundation made sure that what had been her Donor-Advised Fund would be used to extend Miss Lillian’s legacy by supporting an organization she benefited during her lifetime, dedicated to the wellbeing of children..

Anne and Robert K. Zelle Designated Fund for the Benefit of St. George’s Episcopal Church of Nashville Established 2016

Anne and Robert K. Zelle Designated Fund for the Benefit of United Way of Metropolitan Nashville, Inc. Established 2016

Anne and Robert K. Zelle Designated Fund for the Benefit of Walden’s Puddle Established 2016

AGENCY ENDOWMENT FUNDS

Established 2016

Anne and Robert K. Zelle Designated Fund for the Benefit of the Cumberland Heights Foundation of Nashville Established 2016

Anne and Robert K. Zelle Designated Fund for the Benefit of First Steps, Inc. Established 2016

Anne and Robert K. Zelle Designated Fund for the Benefit of the Nashville Humane Association Established 2016

36 • The Community Foundation of Middle Tennessee

Middle Tennessee Lions Sight Services is an initiative of the Lion’s Clubs, District 12-I and 12-S. Its purpose is to help citizens of Middle Tennessee obtain vision-related medical treatment in designated hospitals by providing financial assistance to those who do not qualify for public or other non-public resources and who would otherwise have to do without necessary treatment.

Established 2016

Established 2016

Anne and Robert K. Zelle Designated Fund for the Benefit of the Adventure Science Center of Nashville

Established 2016

The NAMI Tennessee Endowment Fund

Anne and Robert K. Zelle Designated Funds During their lifetimes, Anne and Bob Zelle supported countless nonprofit organizations with financial resources and volunteer leadership. The Zelles established a Donor-Advised Fund when The Community Foundation was in its infancy and continued to set up other funds over the years. Their final gift to The Foundation was made through their estates and resulted in the establishment of more than a dozen new funds. These designated funds will ensure their favorite organizations receive funding in perpetuity.

Middle Tennessee Lions Sight Services Endowment Fund

These funds are established by nonprofit organizations as a means of building charitable savings for the future of their mission and their work.

118 MARKET VALUE OF FUND TYPE: $7.5 million FUND VALUE RANGE: $5,000 -$1.2 million NEW FUNDS:

5

TOTAL FUNDS:

NAMI Tennessee is a grassroots, self-help organization dedicated to improving the quality of life for individuals with mental illness, their families, and communities through support, education, and advocacy. NAMI educates those affected by mental illness with courses on mental illness, treatment, and coping skills.

The Special Kids Endowment Fund Established 2016

CORPORATE CARE FUNDS

These funds are charitable vehicles through which employees of a participating company who need assistance when facing serious personal financial hardship can apply for help.

The Bill Burleigh Endowment Fund for Operation Stand Down Tennessee

NEW FUNDS:

Established 2016

The Arts Center of Cannon County Endowment Fund Established 2016

This Fund is named in honor of Bill Burleigh, former CEO and executive director of Operation Stand Down Tennessee, a nonprofit that assists veterans and their families so that they can be self-sustaining and better connected to the community. The Fund supports the work of this organization.

5

45 MARKET VALUE OF FUND TYPE: $4.3 million FUND VALUE RANGE: $5,000 - $2.3 million TOTAL FUNDS:

The CMA Employee Assistance Fund Established 2016


The Hebrews HALO Fund For Special Kids, Inc. Employees Established 2016

The Fund takes its name from Hebrews 10:24 that encourages us “And let us consider how we may spur one another on toward love and good deeds,” and Hebrews 13:16 “Do not neglect to do good and to share what you have, for with such sacrifices, God is pleased.” The acronym HALO represents “Help & Love for Others,” and that acronym encapsulates the mission at Special Kids. The agency aims to serve and love out of the compassion of Jesus Christ. It desires to show that love and compassion to its staff members, in addition to the children and families it serves.

DONOR-ADVISED FUNDS

These funds allow donors to set aside charitable dollars when it is best for them, then over the years make recommendations about distributions to their favorite causes and/or nonprofit organizations anywhere in the US.

NEW FUNDS:

39

536 MARKET VALUE OF FUND TYPE: $253.3 million FUND VALUE RANGE: $5,000-$78.3 million TOTAL FUNDS:

The Ingram Emergency Assistance Fund

Bhikha Family Fund

Established 2016

Established 2016

The John Rochford Employee Assistance Fund for Saint Paul in Memory of Richard Johnston Established 2016

Mr. Rochford created the Fund for employees of the Saint Paul Senior Living Community in memory of Richard Johnston. Mr. Johnston was the administrator for Saint Paul for 20 years. He was a caring man, always going the extra mile for all of the residents of Saint Paul. He dedicated his career to helping others and his community. This Fund will carry on his giving spirit by helping others in times of crisis.

The Scripps Network Interactive Emergency Relief Fund Established 2016

We don't create the company's employee safety net; we make it stronger.

A college friend whose mother worked at Vanderbilt helped encourage Kirrit Bhikha to join him in Nashville more than 30 years ago. He and his, wife, Lata, have raised two children and started a few businesses in the Nashville community. This Fund will allow the Bhikhas the opportunity to support the community together as a family.

Epley Advised Fund Established 2016

Ever Green Fund Established 2016

The Mark and Martha Ezell Family Advised Fund Established 2016

The Freedman Family Fund Established 2016

The Freedman Family Fund was established to invest in charities with revenue models that generate enough revenue to ultimately become self-funded and whose mission is to help others become self-reliant. “Give a man a fish and feed him for a

day. Teach a man to fish and you feed him for a lifetime."

Amelia Fearn Frist Advised Fund Established 2016

Campbell Adams Frist Advised Fund Established 2016

Bonick Charitable Giving Fund

Hunter Adams Frist Advised Fund

Established 2016

Established 2016

The John Overton Colton Jr. and Family Donor-Advised Fund

The Fulcher Family Fund

Established 2016

Edgar and Rebecca have been involved in their community in many different ways. They created The Fulcher Family Fund to give them a way to facilitate their charitable giving

The Dinker Family Fund Established 2016

Bill and Jeanne Dinker wanted to create an avenue to facilitate their charitable giving. They also wanted to encourage their three sons to understand the importance of giving back to the community. In 2016, they created the Dinker Family Fund.

The Tate Elliott Literacy and Language Fund

Established 2016

Woodrow and Rosemary Geier Family Fund Established 2016

After the death of their mother, sisters Janet Jernigan and Dr. Gail McRae, along with brother, Dr. Carl Geier, wanted a way to honor their parents. Together they created the Woodrow and Rosemary Geier Family Fund to support their charitable giving.

Established 2016

CFMT.org • 37


Mike Gibbs Charitable Fund Established 2016

The Marguerite Abernathy Massey Memorial Fund "Thank You, MAM" Established 2016

The Ella Hubbard Type 1 Diabetes Charitable Fund Established 2016

The Jacob and Joy Charitable Fund Established 2016

This Fund was established as a special way to honor and celebrate the life of Marguerite, who was described as a loving and charitable mother, grandmother, wife and friend. It will serve as a way for the family to direct financial aid to organizations that were meaningful to Marguerite in Pulaski and beyond. Donors also may make gifts to the Fund in memory or honor of a loved one. Together we can say, “Thank you, MAM” to Marguerite as we keep her loving spirit alive.

The Jimmy Pilkerton Advised Fund Established 2016

The Jimmy Pilkerton Advised Fund was established by Pilkerton Realtors in memory of Jimmy Pilkerton. This Fund provides a way to support our community, with an emphasis on the issues surrounding affordable housing, health care, and human services.

The RaeLynn Diabetes Fund Established 2016

Established 2016

Country singer RaeLynn was diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes at age 12. The excellent care she received from Texas Children’s Hospital, and the experience of her family throughout her initial diagnosis, empowered her and her family to begin living safely with Type 1 diabetes. Now, at age 23, she safely manages her disease. The RaeLynn Diabetes Fund was created to offer support, empowerment, and a community, for all of those facing diabetes. The Fund's mission is to raise funds to support those whose lives are impacted by Type 1, Type 2, and juvenile diabetes.

Pamela Johnson Advised Fund

Robin and John McClellan Charitable Fund

Smallwood Family Fund

Established 2016

Established 2016

Established 2016

Chris and Mary Suzanne Moore Advised Fund

Smallwood Family Fund was created in 2016 by Patti and Brian Smallwood to continue their family’s philanthropic legacy.

Instead of gifts and a traditional wedding registry, Jacob and Joy asked for help to raise $10,000 in order to create a fund with the goal of ending hunger in Nashville. The newlyweds established The Jacob and Joy Charitable Fund, within The Community Foundation of Middle Tennessee, to provide grants to nonprofits and social entrepreneurs for innovative pilot projects that address hunger, food insecurity, food deserts, community gardens, health, and nutrition.

Pamela was encouraged by a professional advisor to explore establishing a fund at The Community Foundation. The grants made from her Fund are likely to reflect a clear pattern of supporting the arts, something Pamela has done personally and professionally for many years in Nashville and beyond.

Matthews Mission Fund Established 2016

The Elizabeth McCarter Advised Fund

Established 2016

Shiksha Charitable Fund Music Has Value Fund Established 2016

The Kovick Family Fund Established 2016

The Kovick Family Fund was created in 2016 by Renee and Tim Kovick to continue their family’s philanthropic legacy.

Ted and Anne Lenz Advised Fund Established 2016

Ted and Anne Lenz started down a path of giving long before they established their Fund. Like many donors, they arrived at The Community Foundation when they felt it was time to start the Fund to help organize and facilitate their philanthropy.

Next Generation Fund Established 2016

Generous families often take the time to plan ahead as the transfer of business holdings and intergenerational wealth loom. Some are sparked by retirement; some by estate planning; and some by illness. But all are motivated by a continuous and continuing devotion to community and to leaving this world better than they found it.

The Nicholas Fund Established 2016

The Lucas Family Fund Established 2016

The Outlaw State of Kind Fund

The Lucas Family Fund was created in 2016 by Cathy and Aeron Lucas to continue their family’s philanthropic legacy.

Established 2016

38 • The Community Foundation of Middle Tennessee

Established 2016

Deborah Taylor Tate Fund Established 2016

Thornton Charitable Fund No. 1 Established 2016

Thornton Charitable Fund No. 2 Established 2016


Our Staff

2016-2017 Board

Jennifer Abrahamson, Communications Manager, Delek Fund for Hope

OFFICERS

BOARD OF TRUSTEES

Melissa Anderson, Staff Accountant

Kerry Graham, Chairman

Judy Liff Barker

Kathryn Bennett, GivingMatters.com Content Associate

Susan W. Simons, Vice Chairman

Jack O. Bovender, Jr.

Debbie Bone, Donor Services and Grants Associate

Ronald L. Corbin, Secretary

Charles W. Cook, Jr.

Thomas Buford, Program Director, Delek Fund for Hope

Decosta E. Jenkins, Treasurer

Ben L. Cundiff

Pat Cole, Senior Coordinator, Scholarships

Ellen E. Lehman, President

Kitty Moon Emery

Cynthia Copeland, Accounting Manager

Richard J. Eskind

BOARD OF DIRECTORS

Farzin Ferdowsi

Leilani S. Boulware

John D. Ferguson

Beth Chase

Thomas F. Frist, Jr.

Jana J. Davis

Joel C. Gordon

Rod Essig

Porter Haile, Technology Systems Administrator

James S. Gulmi

Irwin E. Fisher

Belinda Dinwiddie Havron, Director, Donor Engagement

Aubrey B. Harwell, Jr.

Stephen F. Flatt

Catherine T. Jackson

Jeff Hoffman, Program Manager, Delek Fund for Hope

Jay L. Frank

Kevin P. Lavender

Erin Holcomb, Online Promotions Manager

Ben G. Freeland

Bert Mathews

Kristen Korzenowski, Donor Services Coordinator

Gary A. Garfield

John E. Maupin, Jr.

Jana L. Laiolo, Staff Accountant

Alberto R. Gonzales

Ralph W. Mosley

Ellen Lehman, President

Jose D. Gonzalez

Donna D. Nicely

Laundrea Lewis, Senior Manager, Grants

Mark R. Gwyn

Ben R. Rechter

Carl T. Haley

Howard L. Stringer

Henry B. Hicks, III

Deborah Taylor Tate

Carol O. Hudler

Charles A. Trost

William C. Koch, Jr.

Deborah F. Turner

Robert S. Lipman

Jack B. Turner

Don MacLachlan

Betsy Walkup

Stephen F. Moore

Emily Rutzky, Creative Services Manager

David Williams, II

Joelle J. Phillips

Gina Tek, Childcare Services Coordinator

Jerry B. Williams

Wayne Smith

Kelly Walberg, Communications Manager

Paul Stumb

Shemika Walker, Associate, Employee Care Programs

Stephaine H. Walker

Benja Whitelaw, Director of Employee Care Programs

Kevin J. Wheeler

Melisa Currey, Chief Financial Officer Sharon Derman, Senior Administrative Associate Pat Embry, Director, Media and Community Relations Amy Fair, Vice President, Donor Services

Deborah McClellan, Receptionist Michael McDaniel, Senior Nonprofit and Endowment Liaison Jessica Musman, Online Content Associate, NowPlayingNashville.com ® and GivingMatters.com Scott O’Neal, Regional and Affiliate Initiatives Liaison Joe Pagetta, Director, NowPlayingNashville.com ® Tina Randolph, Online Content Associate, NowPlayingNashville.com ®

CFMT.org • 39


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It's Time: 2016 Report To The Community  

The Community Foundation is about time. It is a vehicle by which we serve both the here and now and the future. Gifts made through The Found...

It's Time: 2016 Report To The Community  

The Community Foundation is about time. It is a vehicle by which we serve both the here and now and the future. Gifts made through The Found...