Issuu on Google+

ARCHITECTURE
 Lonsdale
Street
Footbridge
 The
Lonsdale
Street
footbridge,
otherwise
known
as
the
Myer
connecting
walkway
or
the
 ‘appalling
two
level
Sky
Bridge’
(Carney,
S
2009)
was
facilitated
in
construction
by
architect
 Ashton
Raggat
McDougall
in
1993.

 Originally
the
Melbourne
based
artefact
was
subjected
to
controversy
over
the
principle
 being
that
it
crossed
over
a
main
road,
however
it
has
also
opened
up
a
new
standpoint
for
 interpretation
in
a
symbolic
architectural
sense.

 As
the
main
material
is
glass,
the
bridge
allows
for
pedestrians
to
see
out
to
the
streets
 below
them
whilst
also
the
buildings
above,
the
view
from
the
top
communicating
a
 particularly
symbolic
message
about
the
city
of
Melbourne.

 P
Hubbard
(2006)
builds
on
the
notion
of
a
vantage
point
at
which
a
city
is
looked
at
from
 above
in
his
book
‘Cities
from
above
and
below’.
Hubbard’s
argument
is
based
on
the
 panoptic
view,
which
allows
the
conceiving
of
a
city
in
which
many
of
the
potentially
 disturbing
conceptions
of
an
ordered
city
can
be
blurred
and
instead
be
seen
from
a
positive
 street
life
perspective.
In
essence
Hubbard
concludes
that
the
view
from
the
top
is
a
 romanticised
version
of
the
facets
of
life
on
ground
level
and
therefore
unrealistic,
thus
 making
a
connection
to
the
Myer/
Melbourne
Central
footbridge
in
a
symbolic
sense.

 The
Myer/Melbourne
central
Lonsdale
street
footbridge
brings
to
Melbourne
the
 opportunity
to
continue
a
classic
retail
experience
with
eradicated
disruption
from
the
city
 floor.
Whilst
pedestrians
cross
the
bridge
they
are
interpellated
with
a
feeling
of
superiority
 and
class
when
opposed
to
the
feeling
of
claustrophobia
and
inferiority
at
ground.
 Along
with
the
sense
of
escape
from
the
realistic
essence
of
street
life,
that
the
footbridge
 brings
to
Melbourne
comes
the
fear
of
decline
in
street
culture
that
the
city
prides
itself
on.
 On
a
totally
different
scale
in
dimension
The
‘Calgary
Plus
15
system’
can
be
linked
to
the
 Lonsdale
Street
footbridge
with
the
concern
of
reduction
in
street
life.
The
Calgary
Plus
15
 system
is
the
name
given
to
57
skywalk
bridges
over
16
kilometres
in
Canada’s
Calgary
 Alberta
which
connect
not
only
shopping
malls
however,
residential
properties,
dining
 facilities,
sporting
gymnasiums
and
hotel
emporiums.
The
notion
of
feeling
connected
is
 interpellated
within
the
crossing
of
bridges.
Whilst
Calgary
on
a
incomparable
scale
connects
 facilities
of
all
types,
the
Lonsdale
Street
bridge
acts
under
the
same
principle
connecting



shoppers
to
hospitality
sites,
and
entertainment
options
confined
within
the
Melbourne
 Central
Mall
walls.
 Editor
Sean
Carney
of
The
Age
2009,
distinctly
expressed
his
disparagement
of
the
sky
bridge
 that
‘befouls
the
street
view’
in
his
article
‘A
piece
of
history
is
demolished
for
a
slice
of
 retail
sameness’.
The
bridge
is
not
a
wonder
piece
of
design
excellence
however
its
 functionality
and
physical
context
including
multipurpose
uses
for
displays
ranging
from
 fashion
to
display‐housing
models
should
count
for
more,
as
all
good
designers
know,
to
be
 aesthetically
pleasing
is
one
thing
but
to
be
functional
and
to
have
the
ability
to
be
used
in
 more
than
one
way,
is
better.

 Alex
Grivas
‐3285253


The
Block
Arcade
 The
 Block
 Arcade
 was
 designed
 by
 Twentyman
 &
 Askew,
 and
 is
 located
 at
 Elizabeth
 and
 Collins
 Streets.
 
 The
 “architectural
 design
 [of
 The
 Bloc
 Arcade]
 facilitated
 new
 ways
 to
 display
 and
 purchase
 fancy
 goods.”(Parsons,
 D.
 2010)
 The
 very
 fact
 that
 the
 Block
 Arcade
 displays
 such
 expensive
 and
 fashionable
 items
 gives
 it’s
 vistitors
 a
 feeling
 of
 superiority
 in
 that
they
can
afford
such
prestigious
items,
and
awe
that
they
are
in
the
presence
of
such
an
 establishment.
 
First
 opened
 in
 February
 1892,
 the
 arcade
 not
 only
 gives
 residence
 to
 expensive
 and
 desireable
 products,
 but
 houses
 varying
 architectural
 features
 modelled
 on
 arcades
 “developed
in
European
cities
such
as
Milan,
Paris
and
London.”(Parsons,
D.
2010)
The
Block
 Aracde
 specifically
 takes
 inspiration
 from
 the
 Milano
 Galleria
 Vittorio
 Emmanual
 arcade
 in
 Italy.
 Melbournes
 very
 own
 Aracade
 features
 skylights,
 wrought
 iron
 decoration,
 stained
 glass
windows
and
mosaic
tiles.

 Each
architectural
element
within
the
Block
Arcade
works
together
to
create
a
specific
mood
 and
 affect
 the
 behaviour
 and
 mindset
 of
 its
 visitors.
 Such
 elements
 include
 size,
 width,
 lighting,
temperature
and
flooring.
Each
of
these
components
work
together
to
create
a
slice
 of
Europe
that
can
be
experienced
and
enjoyed
by
shoppers
and
browsers.

 The
mosaic
tiles
are
an
important
architectural
aspect
in
the
Block
Arcade.
The
mosaic
tiles
 help
“break
up
the
monotony
of
lengthy
malls
or
walkways”
(Casazza,
J.A,
Spink
F.
H,
et
al,
 1985)
and
add
to
the
distinguished
European
feel
of
the
Block.



The
bright
lighting
in
the
Block
Arcade
flows
from
the
ceilings
and
the
electric
lamps
that
line
 the
 walls.
 The
 bright
 lighting
 is
 well
 suited
 to
 the
 activities
 that
 take
 place
 within
 the
 building.

 “Requirements
for
illumination…must
be
based
on
the
activities
being
designed
 for,
 as
 well
 as
 the
 intended
 psychological
 and
 visual
 experiences…desired
 in
 those
spaces.”
(Lang,
J.
et
al,
1974)
 People
need
to
be
able
to
see
the
items
they
might
be
purchasing,
and
people
enjoy
being
 able
 to
 survey
 and
 analyse
 architectural
 features,
 which
 can
 only
 be
 done
 well
 with
 sufficient
light.
Furthermore,
brighter
lights
affect
peoples’
moods,
as
people
are
generally
 more
likely
to
feel
energised
in
spaces
where
the
lighting
is
bright,
while
dim
lighting
tends
 to
make
people
feel
relaxed.


 The
stained
glass
windows
are
also
a
key
feature
to
the
design.
The
stained
glass
windows
 add
vibrancy
and
colour
to
the
building,
giving
it
an
aesthetic
appeal
that
regular
windows
 would
not
have
been
able
to
deliver.
This
adds
to
the
European
aura
of
the
Block
Arcade,
as
 stained
glass
windows
appear
in
many
European
cathedrals
and
churches.

 The
design
of
the
Block
Arcade
ensures
that
it
is
well
ventilated.
Fresh
air
floods
through
the
 entrances
and
circulates
within
the
building.
This
helps
create
a
lively
mood,
as
the
cool
air
 tends
to
invigorate
and
energise
people.
This
is
more
desirable
than
an
over
heated
building,
 for
if
the
Arcade
were
over
heated,
people
would
begin
to
feel
sluggish
and
tired.

 To
 conclude,
 the
 style
 and
 design
 of
 the
 Block
 Arcade
 mimics
 European
 architecture.
 As
 a
 result,
the
building
creates
a
feeling
of
sophistication,
class,
and
superiority
within
the
minds
 of
those
who
enter
it.
 Elana
Julia
Monteleone‐
3286242


City
Lights
on
buildings
 This
artefact
is
located
at
Yarra
riverside
where
links
to
Flinders
street
station,
Southgate
 and
Federation
Square,
presents
a
part
of
Melbourne’s
inner‐city
landmarks
and
riverscapes.
 The
city
seems
likely
transformed
at
night,
usually
is
visionary
then
inspires
people
to
 imagine
and
contemplate
the
city
with
a
different
appearance.
In
other
words,
light
could
be
 seen
as
a
build
form,
which
helps
the
city
temporarily
transform
out
of
daylight
into
the
 other
artistic
and
more
attractive
place.
Overall,
the
city
light
does
not
only
present
the



city’s
design
or
architecture
aspect
but
also
it
shows
the
actual
life
at
night,
the
connection
 between
the
city
and
with
its
citizen
and
other
cities.

 In
the
design
aspect,
the
light
architecture
is
considered
as
a
new
creative
material.
It
is
 about
more
than
illumination
of
buildings,
following
Saunders
(2009)
the
use
of
light
to
 create
architectural
effects
and
the
city
at
night
is
not
only
a
place
for
sex,
drunk
or
other
 midnight
pleasure.
However,
the
city
itself
needs
black,
grey
scale
to
balance
the
contrast.
 Without
them,
people
can
never
learn
how
to
love
the
light.
Furthermore,
the
article
points
 out
interestingly
the
communication
between
light,
urban
space
and
people
lives.
We‐
 people
should
learn
how
to
use
the
light
more
effective
and
in
fact,
more
and
more
people
 are
aware
of
light
and
they
also
become
aware
of
the
city
as
an
accessible
place.

 On
the
other
point
of
view,
the
city
light
helps
to
present
Melbourne
as
a
modern
city
that
 offers
opportunities.
In
fact,
Melbourne
attracts
many
immigrations
and
it
becomes
a
 multicultural
city
with
many
different
languages
and
foods,
life
styles.
According
to
the
 article
‘Melbourne‐is
their
life
after
Florida?’
(Berry,
2009),
a
dynamic
fast‐growing
city
 region
can
manage
to
attract
and
keep
creative
workers
and
entrepreneurs
and
growth
 depends
on
the
collective
and
cooperative
of
people
who
work/live
in
particular
place.
 Otherwise,
in
the
highly
integrated
and
competitive
world,
growth
depends
on
the
collective
 and
cooperative
of
people
live/work
in
particular
cities.
The
level
of
development,
economy,
 civilization,
modernization
is
clearly
shown
through.
Related
to
Florida
article
(Berry,
2009),
 light
offers
hope
for
prosperity
and
opportunity
for
work
and
betterment
of
one’s
life.

 Even
though
Melbourne
is
artistic
and
modern
city,
it
keeps
on
finding
a
particular
identity
 (Dovey,
2005).
What
Melbourne
needs
is
not
only
a
public
place
but
also
it
must
be
 important
of
communication
perspective
between
the
city
and
its
citizen
or
other
cities.
 Federation
Square
now
could
be
seen
as
Melbourne’s
identity
where
the
lights
depict
 Melbourne
as
a
welcoming
city
to
all.
Moreover,
in
terms
of
symbolic
nature
of
lights,
lights
 communicate
safety,
that’s
obviously
we
stay
away
from
dark
alleys
and
a
city
is
full
of
light
 usually
more
believable.

 Minh
Y
Nguyen
–
3223636


The
Sandridge
Bridge
 The
idea
of
giving
old
spaces
new
life
or
new
meaning
is
a
design
practice
favoured
 throughout
the
city
of
Melbourne.
If
you
wander
around
the
town
you
can
see
this
love
of
 renovation
and
rejuvenation
is
extremely
evident
in
the
stylized
laneways,
converted
church



spaces
and
old
architecture
framing
the
landscapes.
Melbournians
are
keen
preservers
of
 tradition
yet
also
embrace
individuality;
therefore
design
professionals
are
often
finding
the
 balance
between
nostalgia,
modernity
and
convenience.
The
transformation
of
the
1880’s
 coal
carrying
railway
line,
Sandridge
Bridge,
is
a
prime
example
of
design
principles
mixing
 with
a
city’s
values,
postmodern
architectural
theory
and
multiculturalism.

 Today,
the
Sandridge
is
a
footbridge
carrying
pedestrians
to
and
fro
the
Southbank
precinct
 and
Flinders
St.
Station
over
the
Yarra
River.
As
people
cross
the
landmark
they
pass
128
 glass
panels
revealing
immigration
statistics
from
countries
all
over
the
world.
As
 businessmen
hurry
to
make
the
next
train,
or
tourist
amble
across
the
river,
eyes
flitter
over
 the
number
of
Sudanese
who
fled
in
the
70’s
or
Italian
families
seeking
peace
after
World
 War
Two.

Melbournians
footfalls
mimic
those
of
the
immigrants
who
made
the
same
 journey
from
homelands
to
foreign
Australia.
‘The
Traveller’s
Project’
bridge
symbolizes
the
 walk
undertaken
by
those
immigrants
who
now
comprise
a
large
part
of
Melbourne
culture.

 The
bridge
concisely
summarizes
the
theories
of
Michael
Zimmerman
(2009,
p
162)
by
 proving
commonalities
exist
between
postmodern
design
theory
and
multiculturalism.
 Echoed
in
the
bridge,
post
modernism
and
cultural
diversity
share
the
same
foundation
 values;
not
all
buildings
and
spaces
need
conform
to
one
style
and
that
architectural
 practices
need
not
mimic
modernity.

 As
discussed
by
the
City
of
Melbourne
council
(see
City
Council
site,
2010),
the
redesign
of
 the
bridge
serves
an
important
purpose‐to
communicate
visually
with
the
city’s
inhabitants
 and
to
be
utilized
by
another
generation
of
Victorians
as
a
meeting
place
of
different
 cultures.
‘The
Traveller’s
Project’
reflects
Melbourne’s
strong
belief
in
maintaining
 multiculturalism
and
the
importance
of
recognizing
how
immigration
trends
have
helped
 shape
the
city
and
influence
design
practices.

 Design
ultimately
is
seen
as
the
creative
solution
to
a
problem.
Good
design
efficiently
 communicates
with
its
target
audience.
‘The
Travellers
Project’
was
designed
by
a
Lebanese
 artist,
Nadim
Karan,
who
applied
the
same
basic
design
principles
to
his
work
with
the
 bridge.
The
target
audience
being
everyday
civilians
meant
the
transformation
of
the
bridge
 required
a
certain
appeal
to
ensure
it
was
noted
and
message
conveyed.

As
Foster
(2009,
 p22)
highlights,
landscape
architecture,
like
the
Sandridge
Bridge,
aims
to
create
imaginative
 outdoor
environments
that
are
responsible
and
sensitive
to
both
aesthetic
and
ecological
 issues.
Because
the
bridge
is
public
space,
the
redesign
balances
aesthetics,
functionality
 and
usability.




The
bridge
remains
in
essence
a
bridge,
whether
it
be
carrying
coal
or
people,
on
foot
or
by
 train.
However
nowadays,
it
has
been
redesigned
as
a
functional
aspect
of
Melbourne
city
 architecture
which
serves
to
highlight
the
importance
of
our
cultural
diversity.
And
as
Foster
 (2009,
p26)
emphasizes,
design
aims
to
“create
places
with
purpose...
we
want
to
come
up
 with
a
design
that
says
something
about
the
space
of
that
site;
creating
a
contemporary
 design
extracts
all
the
qualities
that
are
special
about
that
place,
because
every
site
is
 special.”
 Tayla
Gentle
–
3238500


Reference
List:
 Carney,
S
2009,
‘A
piece
of
history
is
demolished
for
a
slice
of
retail
sameness’,
The
Age,
29
July,
 viewed
17
April
2010,
<
www.theage.com.au/.../a‐piece‐of‐history‐is‐demolished‐for‐a‐slice‐of‐retail‐
 sameness‐20090728‐e02h.html>
 Hubbard,
P
2006,
Cities
from
above
and
below,
course
reading
from
COMM2411,
RMIT
University,
 Melbourne,
viewed
14
April
2010,
RMIT
University
Learning
Hub.
 Hallswoth,
A
1988,
‘Downtown
in
Canada’,
International
journal
of
Retail
&
Distribution
Management,
 Volume
16
Issue
4
Page
26‐28
Published
by
MCB
UP
Ltd.

 nd

Casazza,
 J.A,
 Spink
 F.
 H,
 et
 al,
 1985,
 Shopping
 Centre
 development
 handbook
 2 
 ed.
 ULI‐the
 Urban
 Land
Institute,
Washington,
D.C.
 Lang,
 J.
 et
 al,
 1974,
 Designing
 for
 Human
 Behaviour:
 Architecture
 and
 the
 Behavioural
 
 Sciences
 Dowden,
Hutchinson
&
Ross
Inc;
Pennsylvania.
 Parsons,
D.
2010,
The
Brief
History
of
The
Block
Arcade
The
Block
Arcade
Melbourne,
Viewed
14
April
 2010,
 http://www.theblockarcade.com.au/index.php?option=com_phocadownload&view=category&id=2& Itemid=90
 Berry.M,
Melbourne‐
Is
there
Life
after
Florida?,
Urban
Policy
and
Research,
vol.
23,
no.
4,
p381‐392,
 December
2005.
 Dovey.K,
2005,
Federation,
Fluid
City:
Transform
Melbourne’s
Urban
Waterfront,
chapter
six,
p93‐261,
 University
of
New
South
Wales
press:
Sydney.
 
 Saunders.A,
2009,
City
light,
the
Nation
Reviewed,
the
Monthly
August
2009.
 Foster,
K
2009,
‘Landscape
Architectural
Design’,
in
Becoming
a
Landscape
Architect:
A
Guide
to
 Careers
in
Design,
Wiley,
New
York,
pp.
22‐27.

 Zimmerman,
M
2009,
‘Globalization,
multiculturalism
and
architectural
ethics’,
in
Architecture,
Ethics
 and
Globalization,
ed.
Owens,
G,
Routledge,
New
York,
pp.
154‐172.
 City
of
Melbourne,
2009,
Sandridge
Bridge
Precinct
Redevelopment,
City
of
Melbourne,
viewed
11
 April
2010,
 http://www.melbourne.vic.gov.au/AboutMelbourne/projectsandinitiatives/majorprojects/pages/San dridgeBridge.aspx



Melbourne Architecture- Tutorial Wednesday 9:30am Matthew Loads