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TH!NK FLORIDA

ISSUE 1 - 2012

UNIVERSITY + RESEARCH + SCIENCE + TECHNOLOGY

Florida Has More Research Parks to

Grow Your Business Smarter +

GLOBAL RESEARCH IMPACT at Your Fingertips OFFICIAL PUBLICATION FOR FLORIDA RESEARCH PARKS NETWORK

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Contents

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Pantone 376 C

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Chair — Patti Breedlove Vice Chair —Ben DeVries For more information visit: www.floridaresearchparks.com Florida Atlantic Research Park www.research-park.org Florida Gulf Coast University Innovation Hub www.fgcuinnovationhub.com Innovation Park www.innovation-park.com Progress Corporate Park www.progresscorporatepark.com Treasure Coast Research Park www.tcerda.org USF Research Park of Tampa Bay www.research.usf.edu/rf/researchpark.asp University of Miami Life Science & Technology Park www.umlsp.com Central Florida Research Park www.cfrp.org Florida Tech Research Park www.FIT.edu/researchpark

Message . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 - 5 Florida Research Parks Network . . . . . . . . . . . .6 Enterprise Florida . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7 State University System of Florida . . . . . . . .8 - 9 VISIT FLORIDA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .10 University Research Parks Impact . . . . . .12 - 13 Innovation Park Profile . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .14 Progress Corporate Park . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .20 Central Florida Research Park . . . . . . . . . . . . .26 USF Research Park of Tampa . . . . . . . . . . . . . .32 Treasure Coast Research Park . . . . . . . . . . . . .38 Florida Gulf Coast Innovation Hub . . . . . . . . .42 Research Park of Florida Atlantic University . .46 UM Life Science & Technology Park . . . . . . . .52 Florida Tech Research Park . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .58

Designed & Published Comet Group, Inc. www.cometgroupinc.com Copy Editing Lorrie Walker Communications, Inc. www.lorriewalker.com Managing Editor - Robert Pitts robertgpitts@gmail.com Writer - David Wilkening DWilkening@cfl.rr.co Writer - Jennifer LeClaire jennifer@jenniferleclaire.com

Directory of Tenants . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .64

USF established to meet urban needs

Fall 2012 TH!NK FLORIDA magazine is an annual publication of Florida Research Parks Network. All rights reserved. Reproduction without written permission from TH!NK FLORIDA is strictly forbidden.


TH!NK FLORIDA

welcome messages:

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Florida Governor

A focus on innovation drives Florida's efforts to elevate its position as a global economic leader. Innovation also is a key factor that Enterprise Florida and its wide-ranging network of economic development partners consider in business recruitment. Together, we are working to broaden the foundation from which the state’s top-level talent and jobs emerge. High-value R&D projects coupled with the integration of progressive companies that are world-renowned for their innovative feats are generating many professional-level jobs in Florida. In recent years, notable examples have included Draper Laboratory, Max Planck Florida Institute, Sanford-Burnham Medical Research Institute, Scripps Research Institute, SRI International and Torrey Pines Institute for Molecular Studies. Essentially, Florida recognizes that the union of R&D, the university sector and business can be a major economic stimulus.

Rick Scott Governor

Enterprise Florida

Research and development are vital components of Florida’s strategy to expand business in targeted growth industries such as life sciences and clean energy. These and other focal industries thrive in a business climate that welcomes R&D support of the work that is exemplifying Florida’s “knowledge economy.” At the core of this work are high value jobs. Their scope and quality enhance economic development in that they better position Florida as a pro-business state. Furthermore, these jobs reflect the outcome of lucrative partnerships between the state’s government, universities, corporations, entrepreneurs and R&D sector. Florida remains committed to onboarding large scale research projects and companies requiring progressive R&D to meet business goals. Such organizations create educational opportunities as well as the types of jobs that strengthen the state’s economy.

Gray Swoope, President

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WELCOME TO A WEALTH OF

WORLD-CLASS INNOVATION AND RESEARCH On behalf of the Florida Research Park Network, WELCOME to the Florida Research Park Network’s 2012 edition of Th!nkFlorida. In these pages, you will find the details of a remarkable community of world class research professionals and their supporting education and civic organizations. We are proud to be a part of this community and to bring you this Th!nkFlorida edition that highlights the accomplishments and efforts of so many talented Floridian scientists and educators.

Did you know that Florida has more research parks than theme parks? We hope you find that the breadth and depth of the research resources available in Florida inspire you to ask new questions and to explore the boundaries of your curiosity.

Ben DeVries Vice Chair, FRPN

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Why is the Florida Research Parks Network Important to Florida’s Future? OUR PARKS BROADEN Florida’s economic and workforce base to provide economic diversity that will sustain the Florida economy through good times and bad. OUR PARKS CONSTRUCT business incubator facilities; provide venture capital and intellectual property support services that will stimulate startup firm formation; sustain new technology-based business growth; and foster expansion of knowledge-based employment opportunities. OUR PARKS PROVIDE a better life for all Floridians through sustainable knowledge and technology-based development while effectively balancing human needs with economic opportunities.

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THINK FLORIDA

business innovation:

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Research Parks Vital to Industry Development

Q&A

Stuart W. Doyle, ABC Enterprise Florida, Vice President of Communications Th!nk Florida: How important are Florida's research, science and technology parks to development of the leading industry clusters identified by Enterprise Florida? Doyle: When companies, academic institutions and state government pool resources to engage in joint research proposals and projects, innovation results. Florida’s technology and research parks are the hubs where such collaboration thrives. Research, science and technology parks are vital to Enterprise Florida’s efforts to help Florida build and sustain an innovation economy; one that positions the state as a strong competitor in the global marketplace. The parks are vital to the state’s ability to achieve economic development goals pertaining to increased research and development, stronger alliances with universities and recruiting major businesses. Th!nk Florida: In what ways does Enterprise Florida provide support to the development and growth of research, science, and technology parks here?

Doyle: Enterprise Florida supports by promoting Florida’s attributes and capabilities emanating from the partnership of its R&D, research park and academic sectors as part of the state’s job recruitment and industry diversification strategy. Included in this mix are University Centers of Excellence, World Class Scholars and the Florida Technology, Research and Scholarship Board, which is an entity of the state university system’s Board of Governors. Th!nk Florida: How is international trade with Florida benefiting our research, science, and technology parks? Doyle: International trade is helping to increase global awareness of the parks through their role in spurring innovation and commercialization, which is essential to information-sharing and promotion of Florida’s chief industries and business attributes. Be it a tradeshow in South America or a trade mission in Europe, such events allow an opportunity to showcase Florida’s innovations and capabilities, and the partnerships and programs behind them, to a global audience. Florida remains the third largest exporter of high tech in the U.S. Included among our top exports are IT, health tech and aviation equipment. This creates an excellent platform from which small and medium-sized high-tech companies can expand and access opportunities worldwide. Overall, the state’s business climate is conducive for high tech clusters.

Internationally, what is on the horizon regarding intellectual property issues and the free movement of knowledge workers? These are rather complex issues that will require much understanding and extensive discussions and negotiations by relevant entities including the World Trade Organization. Th!nk Florida: What role do Florida's research, science and technology parks play in Florida's economic development strategy? Doyle: As always, a focus is on strengthening the state’s commercial infrastructure. Hard and soft commercialization infrastructure -- i.e., incubators and supported associated business support services, research parks and commercialization assistance programs -- provide and connect entrepreneurs and emerging businesses with resources that can increase their chances of success. To strengthen the infrastructure, the need is to expand the statewide network of incubators, accelerators and research parks. While no single model is used across all these types of facilities, generally, incubators, accelerators and research parks provide flexible, low-cost space and offer business development services to startup companies. There’s substantial evidence that incubator/accelerator graduates benefit from improved business survival rates. Florida has a significant amount of incubator and research park infrastructure, yet gaps exist that must be filled to provide greater geographic access. Initiative:

8www.flbog.edu/new_florida.

Enterprise Florida Inc. Atrium Building, Ste. 201 325 John Knox Rd. Tallahassee, FL 32303 Phone: 850-298-6620 www.eflorida.com

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THINK FLORIDA

education:

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Are You Ready for the 'New Florida Initiative'? "I can't understand why people are frightened of new ideas. I'm frightened of old ones." This is why it is essential - and why all 11 institutions in the State University System are participating - to have a collective effort toward a high-skill, high-wage, more transformative economic portfolio in the state that has so long depended solely on the success of tourism, agriculture, and population growth and development. These are often hyper-fragile sectors that ebb and flow, as we've seen.

Q&A

System. Cumulatively, research parks across Florida - especially the ones collaborating for exponential success - continue to see strong results even in the restricted funding chains. Research parks often mirror the levels of synergies within the local higher education components (not just the state's 11 public universities), and we respect this relationship greatly. Research and technology parks also provide a bridge on the path of our students and faculty to deliver on service learning.

Chancellor Frank T. Brogan and young son, Colby John.

Frank T. Brogan, Chancellor State University System of Florida Th!nk Florida: What are some ways that Florida's research parks contribute back to their affiliated universities? Brogran: Research parks are the cauldron inside which universities, government, and the private sector collaboratively work to forge Florida's future. It is that simple, that real, and that powerful. By moving projects from the laboratory to the marketplace, research parks are part of what can help Florida "slingshot" out of this economic malaise - as opposed to crawling out on its hands and knees and trying to simply endure! There is a collective genius inuniversities that we can never squander - yet that consortium of intellect cannot operate at its fullest capacity without the research parks. Someone gave me a quote recently ‌ it's from the late John Cage, considered to be a legendary American music composer:

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"The future of our state is our 'New Florida Initiative,' which reflects the Board of Governors' focus on utilizing the public universities as a 'javelin tip' for diversifying the state's economy," says Brogan, who added that part of such an effort is ensuring student leaders are active voices in national and international dialogue to keep America and Florida competitive. During a trip to Congress for federal issues earlier this year, Brogan supported Gallop Franklin II, second from left, to Washington, D.C., along with University of Florida Student Government President Ashton Charles. The non-profit Open World Center -- chaired by Dr. James H. Billington, the Librarian of Congress, at right -- selected the student leaders from Florida, a rare selection of two public university leaders, for an all-expenses-paid trip to Russia.

The effort being shepherded by the State University System is called the New Florida Initiative, launched in 2010 and funded by the Legislature - more on that initiative in a moment. Often, the word "innovation" is a part of the name of a research park - that is precisely the kind of "headline" that needs to be promoted on the regional levels and in a true partnership with the State University

Th!nk Florida:Would Florida's extensive network of research, science and technology parks be possible without the state's university infrastructure? Brogran: Not in Florida - and definitely not without the support of the Florida Legislature, which has had keen insight in this regard in the past decade. We are winning over more converts - not an easy thing to do amid term limits and an exceptional


array of competitive interests for limited dollars. I applaud Ben DeVries for his leadership in this regard as well. Research, science, and technology parks are fueled and empowered by the presence of university research. In 1810, when the University of Berlin was created as the first research institution, the world of higher education changed, bringing together the preservation of knowledge with the creation of new knowledge. This model was enhanced in America in the 19th Century with the creation of "land grant" institutions whose missions included the dissemination of that new knowledge. While the "land grant" model is heavily diversified today and replaced with rankings such as the Carnegie designations, the parks are another element in the logical evolution of those models. Why? In an increasingly fiber-optic and cyber-based world, they continue to create a necessary physical environment where applied research can move from potential academic dissemination to the reality of a competitive marketplace. Without this infusion of knowledgebased research, technology parks would be illustrious but mostly empty. Th!nk Florida: How do you see this cooperation between Florida's public universities and research parks benefiting the state's economy as a whole?

Brogran: Here's where I point back with a laser focus on the New Florida Initiative. I would urge your readers to look over the materials and video we have posted at www.flbog.edu/new_florida. This is our No. 1 priority this year and in the years ahead, as the Florida Board of Governors continues to advance utilizing the public universities as the"javelin tip" for diversifying the state's economy. Beyond the information posted at that site, Florida benefits in two primary ways by the cooperative enterprises that take place within the research park environment: 1. They afford university researchers with an exciting and technologically enhanced environment in which to attempt to move their ideas forward toward commercialization. 2. The parks serve as training grounds for future company owners as well as for undergraduate and graduate students whose realtime, applied research often leads to future employment and career advancement - and even professional acclaim, again landing Florida on the national and global map of research. This is why entire countries are investing in mega-research parks in cities such as Seoul and Barcelona, program staff tell me. Th!nk Florida: What areas of research, science and technology do you see emerging that will take this threeway relationship (university research park economy) to new levels?

Brogran: Just a few examples include the entire realm of health care, medical research, drug discovery, and medical assistive devices. Another area includes the cutting-edge world of advanced materials, transforming our notions of travel, security, and building construction. Yet another is the research being conducted in Florida on small satellites, which opens up entirely new possibilities for payloads and telecommunications. Still another is the research being conducted on the next generation of smart sensors for use in government and industry. Then there is the big world of the "small" nanobiodiversity, nanobiochemical compounds, and nanocircuitry to name a few. For a look at what our 11 universities are working on right now in collaborative System-wide projects, don't forget to take a look at, and monitor, the web site area devoted to the New Florida Initiative:

8 www.flbog.org/new_florida.

State University System of Florida 325 W. Gaines Street, # 1614 Tallahassee, FL 32399 Phone: (850) 245-0466 chancellor@flbog.edu www.flbog.edu

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business & hospitality

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Visit Florida Tourism, Research Connection If you look at the vast amount of options available to visitors - some natural and some man-made - Florida tends to get even better as the years go by.

Q&A

Chris Thompson, President Visit Florida Th!nk Florida: Why is Florida still the destination of choice for vacationers? Thompson: Primarily, it's the same reasons why that's been the case for all these years. If you look at what Florida has to offer - the natural attractions, the weather, 825 miles of beaches - you just can't replicate that anywhere else in the country.

Th!nk Florida: What are you seeing in terms of domestic and international visits to Florida? Thompson: With the last two years of the challenging economy, domestic visitation has been down some. That said, even in the two toughest economic years I've seen in my lifetime, overall visitation has been down less than 2 percent in calendar years 2008 and 2009. To get people to travel in a tough economic climate, there had to be some value propositions offered by the tourism industry. But we were still able to hold relatively flat in the overall numbers. In the international markets, we also had challenges. But Canada and the overseas markets are now up double digits. The number of visitors is returning pretty strongly. The Latin American markets have held up extremely well. We see them as really good growth prospects. Canada is our No. 1 overall market, and the U.K. is the No. 1 overseas market. Overall, we're cautiously optimistic about the years ahead.

Th!nk Florida: In what ways does tourism lead to permanent economic development here? How often do visitors stay and relocate or open companies in Florida? Thompson: I don't have any hard figures, but I've heard it said that everything related to economic development starts as a visit. If you're talking about tourism, that's the true form of visitation. In 2009, 22 percent of the sales tax in Florida was paid by someone who doesn't live here. If you look at the other forms of economic development - traditional forms of attracting and retaining new companies and also encouraging expansion - in a lot of cases all of those related to a visit. I think tourism shows off the state on a regular basis to CEOs and other high-level company executives. Th!nk Florida: Can Florida be a serious research destination when everyone thinks of it as a recreation destination? Thompson: I don't see why its reputation as a recreation destination would have any negative impact on the state's ability to become a research destination. Obviously, to be a research destination, there needs to be infrastructure in place. That enhances our ability to attract people as a research destination. I actually would add tourism to the list of assets that attract that kind of economic development, in particular the human resources to develop the research economy. VISIT FLORIDA 2540 W. Executive Ctr. Circle Suite 200 Tallahassee,FL 32301 Office: 850-205-3865 www.visitflorida.org

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TH!NK FLORIDA

Research Parks Network

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What is a University Research Park?

A university research park is defined by the Association of University Research Parks as a property-based venture, which has:

- Master planned property and buildings designed primarily for private/public research and development facilities, high technology and science-based companies and support services. - A contractual, formal or operational relationship with one or more science/research institutions of higher education. - A role in promoting the university's research and development through industry partnerships, assisting in the growth of new ventures and promoting economic development. - A role in aiding the transfer of technology and business skills between university and industry teams. - A role in promoting technology-led economic development for the community or region. The park may be a not-for-profit or for-profit entity owned wholly or partially by a university or a university-related entity. Alternatively, the park may be owned by a non-university entity but have a contractual or other formal relationship with a university,

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including joint or cooperative ventures between a privately developed research park and a university.

The Vision of Florida Network of Research, Science & Technology Parks

Create a legacy of innovation for Florida's future generations Provide a better life for all Floridians through sustainable knowledge and technology-based development that effectively balances human needs and humanities with economic opportunities. Encourage construction of business incubator facilities and provide venture capital and intellectual property support services that will stimulate startup firm formation; sustain new technology-based business growth; and foster expansion of knowledge-based employment opportunities. Broaden Florida's economic and workforce base to provide economic diversity that will sustain the Florida economy through good times and bad. Link Florida's research, science and technology parks Promote university, academic, industry and government collaborations leading to the establishment and maintenance of

technology, scientific and research-based facilities within Florida, creating quality jobs and opportunities for its citizens. Florida's technology parks are not direct competitors for most prospective researchers or grant applicants. The network will support each park's unique science niche. Build a respected global identity Florida research, science and technology parks require a recognizable international brand to compete effectively in the rapidly expanding global marketplace. Florida is the world's 18th largest economy and the 4th largest U.S. state. Together, we will address trends and challenges to keep Florida competitive in the future, enabling it to compete in the national and international marketplace. The network will enable its members to brand Florida's research resources to attract users from across the nation and the globe. Share best practices There's a lot we can learn from each other to improve operational strategies and enhance cost containment efforts. Florida is home to a plethora of innovation and research assets that are not competitors for most stakeholders. Each park has distinct proficiencies in research and innovation to be nurtured. Forming a network will


enable quick roll out of new technology parks and public/private technology initiatives. Foster leadership in digital technology, healing sciences, sustainable food, energy and water resources The network will serve as a clearinghouse option for the state's research, science and technology parks to improve electronic data handling, interpretation and communication; to encourage sustainable energy use; to minimize our carbon footprint; to promote public health; to expand world food sources; and to preserve international freshwater quality capacity.

Inform public policy The network will bring a united voice before the state assembly and Congress with regard to research recruitment and public policy communication. Collaboration in the preparation of a state and federal legislative agenda will expand Florida's national and international role in cuttingedge research and applied sciences.

ECONOMIC BENEFIT OF FNRST PARKS Florida cities benefiting from FNRST parks include Orlando, Fort Lauderdale, Fort Myers, Tallahassee, Gainesville, Miami, Orlando, Tampa and Fort Pierce.

Fiscal Benefit

Planned

Current Phase

Annual fiscal impact

$28,800,000

$60,000,000

$85,700,000

30-year fiscal impact

$914,400,000

$1,904,700,000

$2,720,500,000

Economic Benefit

Planned

Current Phase

Total Build-Out

Annual economic impact $1,744,800,000

$2,977,500,000

$4,468,600,000

30-year impact

$54,595,000,000

$81,502,000,000

$31,371,000,000

Total Build-Out

(February 2010 estimate)

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REGION 1

Innovation Research Park:

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Partnerships Pay Dividends at Innovation Park National High Magnetic Field Laboratory, a world-class facility that attracts researchers from all over the world. “The potential of the park is tremendous,” says Phil Blank, chairman of Innovation Park. “It’s not only the potential in terms of the physical plant. It’s the potential to turn Innovation Park into a breakthrough R&D community and a growth engine for this region. We have a stellar collection of tenants that are dedicated to innovation.”

A Mission of Innovation

PHIL BLANK Executive Director With a name like Innovation Park, you’d expect big things - and that’s exactly what’s happening in Florida’s capital city. Formed in 1978, the Leon County Research and Development Authority was organized to create a research and development park in partnership with Florida State University and the Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University. Two years later, the authority entered into a 94-year land lease with the State of Florida. Development on Innovation Park began in 1985. For the past 25 years, Innovation Park has established a unique location for the technology industry and government scientists to work hand-in-hand with the area’s prestigious research universities. The park is home to a wealth of high-tech and research-based facilities. Tenants represent the university, governmental and industrial sectors, including the Center for Advanced Power Systems, Center for Biomedical and Toxicological Research, DiscoverRx and nanoStrata. FAMU and FSU also have a strong presence in the park. In fact, the park is home to The

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The mission of the Leon County Research and Development Authority is to work in affiliation with FAMU and FSU to develop the research park in a way that promotes scientific research and development activities and fosters economic development in Leon County. In fact, in addition to working closely with both universities, Innovation Park works closely with many organizations in the Tallahassee community to accomplish its mission. With the technological infrastructure already in place and a positive business climate supported by state and local government, Innovation Park is a prime location for companies seeking an edge over the competition. Innovation Park is located in

Southwest Leon County just minutes from the state capital, FSU, FAMU, Tallahassee Community College and the Tallahassee Regional Airport. Sixteen buildings totaling 1 million square feet provide the 2,000 employees of Innovation Park with the space to develop the most advanced technology in the region. Fifty organizations call Innovation Park home, a number that continues to grow. “Our focus is technology-based research and the commercialization of technology,” says Ken Morris, director of Legislative Affairs and Economic Development for the Leon County Research and Development Authority. “The staple of the park is FSU’s Magnetic Lab. That’s the big draw. “There are many stories to tell with the Mag Lab, which serves as the crown jewel for the park’s research and technology efforts,” Morris says. “It has spurred several startup efforts and has drawn the interest of companies wishing to relocate.”

Mag Lab Attraction

The National High Magnetic Field Laboratory’s mission was set forth by the National Science Foundation: “To provide the highest magnetic fields and necessary


CASE STUDY

TENANT INTERVIEW

Danfoss Turbocor

services for scientific research conducted by users from a wide range of disciplines, including physics, chemistry, materials science, engineering, biology and geology.” The Mag Lab is the only facility of its kind in the United States. It’s also the largest and highest-powered magnet laboratory in the world, headquartered in a sprawling 370,000-square-foot complex near FSU. Centralizing the country's greatest magnet-related tools, resources and expertise is not only efficient and cost-effective, but also encourages fruitful, collaborative research at the highest level. Every year, more than 1,000 visiting scientists and engineers from across the world conduct experiments using the lab's state-of-the-art equipment. For example, using a combination of high-powered computers and advanced experimental magnetic resonance data, Dr. Rafael Bruschweiler, an FSU biophysical chemist, has developed techniques that improve the way scientists can study and predict the structure and dynamics of proteins found in the human body. His innovations, birthed at the Mag Lab, could ultimately shorten the time it takes researchers to develop new, more effective drugs and better understand biomedical processes that underlie a variety of health conditions.

Meet the Tech Incubator

Innovation Park is also home to a technology incubator. The Incubator at Innovation Park is a public partnership established by the Leon County Research and Development Authority and the FAMU Small Business Development Center. It is a community-based support entity for startup companies developing technology products and services.

The mission of The Incubator at Innovation Park is to stimulate economic growth in the capital region of Florida by helping startup businesses get off the ground. The incubator has developed a customized process that walks technologyrelated startups step-by-step through the various stages of creating job growth. The Incubator at Innovation Park promises a nurturing environment characterized by hands-on technical assistance and an array of services for startup and emerging companies during the critical first years of development. It - together with a network of business and economic development partners - works to minimize risk for new companies.

Innovating at Innovation

Spread over 208 acres in Florida's panhandle, Innovation Park has building sites available for immediate development. The Tallahassee Regional Airport is located within a 10-minute drive of Innovation Park, offering convenient and affordable access for business travelers. Innovation Park offers close access to a skilled, available workforce. The park is next door to the FAMU/FSU College of Engineering, and works hand-in-hand with the universities to create a highly educated and trained workforce. Innovation Park Leon County Research and Development Authority 1736 W. Paul Dirac Dr. Tallahassee, FL 32310 850-575-0343 www.innoparkcenter.org

When Danfoss acquired 50 percent of Turbocor in 2004, the company decided to move from Canada to the United States to be closer to the future market for its potentially market-changing, oil-free compressors. Tallahassee - and Innovation Park - won the site selection contest hands down. “We needed to be close to the decision-makers for energy legislation. One of the biggest challenges we have in our industry is to educate the legislators and local authorities about different opportunities to save energy,” says Ricardo Schneider, president and CEO of Danfoss Turbocor. “Finally, Florida is a huge market for air conditioning, and we sell a lot of equipment in Florida.” Danfoss Turbocor’s family of compressors, the first totally oil-free compressors, are specifically designed for the Heating, Ventilation, Air Conditioning and Refrigeration industry. The convergence of aerospace and industrially proven technologies including magnetic bearings, variablespeed centrifugal compression and digital electronic controls, help Turbocor’s compressors drive efficiencies for middle-market, water-cooled, evaporatively cooled and air-cooled HVACR applications. Innovation Park was the ideal location for Danfoss Turbocor not only because it put the company close to legislators, but also because it put the company close to Florida State University and Tallahassee Community College. Having major educational facilities nearby offered Danfoss Turbocor support for its research activities, as well as access to talent. Innovation Park is located in Southwest Leon County just minutes from the state capital, FSU, Florida A&M University, TCC and the Tallahassee Regional Airport. Sixteen buildings totaling 1 million square feet provide the 2,000 employees of Innovation Park with the space to develop the most advanced technology in the region.

8 For more information:

www.turbocor.com

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REGION 1

Innovation Research Park:

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Florida A&M University and Innovation Park Th!nk Florida: Describe some ways in which the university research program has, in return, benefited Innovation Park. Redda: FAMU is heavily involved in the operation and management of Innovation Park. FAMU's vice president for research serves as a member of the Board of Governors of the Leon County Research and Development Authority that manages the park. FAMU provides a well-educated and prepared pool of graduates in the fields of business, engineering, biomedical and agricultural sciences to meet the workforce needs of Innovation Park.

Q&A

K. Ken Redda, Ph.D.,

Professor and Acting Vice President for Research Th!nk Florida interviewed K. Ken Redda, Ph.D., professor and acting vice president for research at Florida A&M University, on the beneficial relationship between FAMU and Innovation Park. Th!nk Florida: In what ways does having access to Innovation Park complement and support FAMU's research program? Redda: The best part about a research park being located close to the university is that several technologies can reside in the research park. The areas of research that are most likely to enhance FAMU's existence in Innovation Park are technologies involving homeland and airport security, new pharmaceutical and engineering devices, agricultural products, drugs and their delivery systems, photography, linguistics, and education.

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Th!nk Florida: What areas of research, science and technology do you see enhancing the relationship between FAMU's research program and Innovation Park? Redda: The Incubator concept is ideal for university researchers and the perfect low budget way of establishing university startup businesses. The concept supports the notion that young or newly established businesses will have a better chance of surviving beyond two or three years if the business resides in a place where it can be incubated - providing lease space and sup-

port services at or below market prices. Innovation Park's Incubator is an excellent facility to support FAMU's potential startup companies. While many university researchers may have impressive technologies that can be developed into commercial products, many of the startup companies could not exist without the support services provided by most incubators such as mailing services, Internet, conference rooms, accounting and payroll services, etc. Thanks to the recent State University Research Commercialization Assistance Grant, FAMU is expected to establish at least two or three new startup companies in the next six to nine months. Because of the low-cost lease space offered, it is likely that the new startups could reside in the Innovation Park Incubator, thus further maximizing the potential of the government, university and industry collaboration. Florida A&M University Tallahassee, FL 32307 Phone: 850-599-3000 www.famu.edu


Largest single historically black university campus founded on Oct. 3, 1887. CAMPUS PROFILE

Florida A&M University is part of the State University System of Florida and is fully accredited by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools. Distinguished by lush foliage and massive oaks, FAMU's main campus comprises 156 buildings spread over 422 acres atop the highest of Tallahassee’s seven hills. The university also has several satellite campuses, including a site in Orlando where the College of Law is located, and sites in Miami, Jacksonville and Tampa for its pharmacy program. FAMU offers 62 bachelor’s degrees and 39 master’s degrees. The university has 13 schools and colleges and one institute. FAMU has 11 doctoral programs which include 10 Ph.D. programs. Top undergraduate programs are architecture, journalism, computer information sciences and psychology. FAMU’s top graduate programs include pharmaceutical sciences, public health, physical therapy, engineering, physics, master's of applied social sciences (especially history and public administration); business and sociology. Not only is FAMU the largest single historically black university campus in terms of enrollment, it is also the No. 1 granter of baccalaureate degrees to AfricanAmericans and one of the country’s leading enrollers of National Merit Achievement Scholars. FAMU’s growing reputation for excellence was recently recognized by Black Enterprise magazine, which named it the Best Public University in America for Black Students. FAMU also was listed in BusinessWeek as one of the country’s "Most Innovative Colleges" in the area of technology transfer. Technology transfer involves moving a novel development from one organization or environment into another. Often this movement is from a federal or university laboratory into a commercial operation, capitalizing on the investment in research and development that was initially intended for use by the government or for the advancement of science. The FAMU School of Business and Industry won the National MBA Association 2007 CASE competition sponsored by

Chrysler Corporation. The SBI students competed against such major universities as Duke, Penn State and Rutgers.

FAST FACTS: Florida A&M University Students: 12,000+. Programs: 62 bachelor’s degrees; 39 master’s degrees; 11 doctoral degrees. Popular majors: Top undergraduate programs are architecture, journalism, computer information sciences and psychology. Top graduate programs include pharmaceutical sciences, public health, physical therapy, engineering, physics, master's of applied social sciences (especially history and public administration), business and sociology. Libraries: Coleman Library, along with its branch libraries, holds nearly 1 million cataloged volumes, more than 12,000 serial subscriptions, about 192,000 microforms and 76,000 non-print items. Research: Florida A&M University’s research funding currently exceeds $50 million.


Tallahassee Lifestyle

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Florida’s Capitol is a Capital City It calls itself Florida’s Capital City (a play on words because in this case Tallahassee is really home to the state’s capitol, while the usage of capital generally refers to accumulated goods or money). So it’s not hard to imagine the best-known visitor haunts. It's government, of course, and even the 22nd floor of the Capitol at the Capitol Complex open to the public features a panoramic view of the city, making it one of only four state capitols in the U.S. with such a view. But visitors also find here a wide variety of museums to choose from and many outdoor attractions in what is generally known as the Florida Panhandle. In part because it is a capital city, Tallahassee is also known for its art and historical attractions.

Where to go

Before taking that elevator to the 22nd floor, visitors can follow the state’s history through photographs, recordings and audiovisual displays at the Historic Capitol on the first floor. There’s a restored 1902 governor’s office as well as 250 artifacts in 21 rooms that invite visitors to trace the evolution of Florida government from territorial days to the present. Florida is also among states where public tours of the Governor’s Mansion are available throughout the year. Tours are 30minutes long and admission is free. Letchworth-Love Mounds Archaeological State Park is one of the state’s most significant Native American ceremonial sites, featuring Florida’s tallest Native American ceremonial mound - 46 feet tall. The people who built the mound are believed to have been members of the Weedon Island Culture, a group of Native Americans who lived in North Florida between 200 and 800 A.D. Located in the downtown Tallahassee historic district, the LeMoyne for the Visual Arts welcomes more than 80,000 visitors annually. The main galleries are

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located in the historic Meginiss-Munroe House (c.1850) and feature monthly changing art exhibits by regional and area artists. The 1.5-acre site also includes a lush sculpture garden that has become an urban oasis and bird sanctuary. Children 12 and under get in free, and Sundays are free for everyone. For anyone interested in the state’s history, the Museum of Florida History is a must-see. It chronicles early Florida with more than 40,000 artifacts and permanent exhibits - from the prehistoric mastodons to the Paleo-Indians and the state’s industrial growth. Another popular museum here is the Mary Brogan Museum of Art and Science, which has two floors of exhibits and hands-on science demonstrations. Still another museum, the Tallahassee Museum, shows off a slave cabin and a one-room schoolhouse. It is also one of the few museums in the U.S. that combines a natural habitat zoo of indigenous wildlife with a collection of 14 historic buildings and artifacts in a beautiful 52-acre lakeside setting. If you’re not tired of museums, you can also see Florida’s oldest surviving bank at the Union Bank museum. Built in 1841, it once held the money of newly emancipated slaves. For something a little more contemporary, try the Tallahassee Antique Automobile

Museum that features more than 130 rare automobiles. Where else would you find a 1894 Duryea, 1931 Duesenberg and the Tucker (shown in the movie), and even the Batmobile. Other collectibles include antique boat motors and motorcycles. Florida Caverns State Park located an hour west of Tallahassee is the state’s only park with dry (air filled) caves. Visitors going on daily public tours can see dazzling formations of limestone stalactites (formed from the ceiling or sides). The 45-minute tours are moderately stressful but inexpensive: just $8 for adults.

Where to eat (upscale)

Closer to Atlanta than Miami in proximity and spirit, Tallahassee maintains that Southern "Other Florida" attitude, reflected food-wise in tasty comfort-oriented cuisine. Recent times also have brought in touches of ethnic flair. Chez Pierre combines French charm and Southern hospitality, delicious homemade soups and fresh Gulf seafood. The Chez often wins the title of the best French restaurant in the city. Another well-known place to eat is Broken Egg Cafe, which offers made-toorder items using great ingredients and has also been voted among the best in Tallahassee. The locally owned Cypress Restaurant features sophisticated Southern


dishes of chef-cut fish and aged meats. Upscale, around the world cuisines are also on the menu at Food Glorious Food.

Where to eat (affordable)

Hopkins Eatery has often-praised sandwiches. Luna’s Italian Food offers deli sandwiches and inexpensive pasta dishes along with a large selection of imported wines, cheeses and Italian grocery items for picnics. There’s also Italian gelato. For Mexican food, you can’t go wrong at El Jalisco, where there are two-for-one margaritas offered on most nights.

Outdoor activities and sports

Tallahassee is well-known for its park system, and a pristine addition is its Apalachee Regional Park Trail, which when not used for local races is a perfect place to hike, run and bike. Edward Ball (named after a famous state entrepreneur) Wakulla Springs State Park includes floodplain forest and a firstmagnitude spring that entices a large number of bird species to winter within its bounds. The park’s river cruises provide entertaining and informative guides to get you close to birds on the Wakulla River.

The 1,184 acres of Alfred B. Maclay Gardens State Park include ornamental gardens, hammocks, ravines, pine woods and hardwood forest. The state park offers swimming and fishing, along with nonmotorized boating for canoers and kayakers. Pavilions and grills along the shore provide a comfortable setting for picnicking. Two short nature trails through the woods overlooking the lake will please walking enthusiasts, while hikers, bicyclists and equestrians can enjoy five miles of multiuse trails surrounding Lake Overstreet, which adjoins the gardens. High blooming season is from Jan. 1 through April 30, peaking in mid-to late March. For $15, visitors can play all day.

Nightlife

Tallahassee’s only traditional jazz club, B Sharp’s, features both local and national talent. It’s located in the 1921 Woman’s Working Bank Building. Beer, wine and appetizers are on the menu. A unique location and atmosphere has drawn an impressive list of nationally renowned blues acts at the Bradfordville Blues Club. Tiki torches down a dirt road illuminate and guide visitors to a one-room cinder block‚ “juke joint‚” under the stars. There’s a bonfire in the winter, and the beer is always cold.

Events

Tallahassee’s premier variety showcase for total entertainment is The Moon, which hosts major concerts featuring country, rock, reggae, rap, jazz, rhythm and blues and other popular formats. This is also the venue for pay-per-view closed circuit events, political gatherings, cultural happenings and private affairs.

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REGION 2

UF Progress Corporate Park:

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Biotech thrives at Progress Corporate Park

Patti Breedlove Executive Director Progress. That’s what Dr. Robert Marston, president of the University of Florida during the early 1980s, had in mind when he envisioned the Progress Corporate Park. Cutting-edge science is going on here. Marston’s vision for an office and research park where university technology projects and private startup companies worked on the same campus has evolved over the years. The 59,000-square-foot UF Progress Center was developed in 1987, followed by the Sid Martin Biotechnology Incubator in 1994. In 1999, the park began to diversify to include light industrial, general office, distribution, medical, retail and hotel uses. Park development accelerated when Innovation Partners purchased it in 2000. The Progress One building opened in 2007, followed by Progress Two and ProgressThree in 2009. Today Progress Corporate Park is a productive setting for bioscience, technology companies and other firms with a common vision: progress.

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With research awards to UF faculty increasing from $104 million to a record $678 million in 2010, Progress Corporate Park could find new interest from biotech companies in the months and years ahead. Although Florida is home to an increasing number of private research institutes including Scripps, UF is still the largest in the state. The new research funding could potentially lead to a new wave of spinout companies. “If you combine all of our research with our strong commercialization process - we know how to write the contracts, how to woo venture capitalists, and how to attract entrepreneurs to the area - the result is more startup activity,” says Patti Breedlove, assistant manager and director of UF’s Sid Martin Incubator. “More bioscience starups come out of the University of Florida than any other institution in the state.”

Making Progress

Progress Corporate Park has been largely shaped by UF spinout RTI Biologics and UF’s Sid Martin Biotechnology incubator program. In fact, two-thirds of the nearly 30 park businesses are bioscience or technology companies. Nearly 1,200 people now work in the park - 80 percent work for UF spinout companies. “The reason Progress Corporate Park is developing along the biotech and technology route is because RTI Biologics, one of the most successful tech spinouts from UF, is located in the park,” Breedlove says. “Another reason is because of the Sid Martin Biotechnology incubator program.” RTI Biologics is a leading provider of sterile biologic implants. The company is at the forefront of tissue-based innovations that repair and support the natural healing of human bone and tissues. And the Sid Martin Biotechnology Incubation program offers the most experienced and fully equipped biosicence incubator in the U.S.,

with 22 wet labs, small and large animal facilities, pilot-scale fermentation facilities, climate controlled greenhouses, and shared scientific equipment. Also on campus is the Center of Excellence for Regenerative Health Biotechnology, a UF program that provides workforce education and training and translational research to support the growing biotechnology-based industry. The CERHB’s state-of-the-art biopharmaceutical cGMP manufacturing and testing facility, known as Florida Biologix, offers early phase, biologic drug development services. “It’s very unusual to have a manufacturing facility like Florida Biologix in a park. It’s essentially a building full of clean rooms,” Breedlove says. “Florida Biologix has contracts with private clients all over the world who are doing Phase 1 and Phase 2 clinical trials.” A Santa Fe College campus is across from the park. The Charles R. and Nancy V. Perry Emerging Technologies Center promotes training and education in the life sciences and will be home to two programs: an Associate of Science degree in biotechnology laboratory technology and a Bachelor of Applied Science degree in Clinical Laboratory Science. Finally, Sante Fe High School is just five minutes from the park. It’s one of the first high schools in Florida to offer an industrial biotechnology program. “We have an unusual clustering of educational programs here to train a bioscience workforce,” Breedlove says. “Students can earn everything from certificates on how to work in a clean room environment to more advanced certifications. Sante Fe College has 2- and 4-year degrees designed for people who want to enter the biotech workforce. It’s been so well-run and popular that it’s been exported to other colleges around the state.”


CASE STUDY

TENANT INTERVIEW

RTI Biologics

Progressive Tenants

Progress Corporate Park’s tenants are making progress in the realms of biotechnology and technology. But there is still room for new companies there. The Progress Center offers labs, clean rooms, offices, open work areas and executive suites for lease. Gross lease terms vary between three to five years with rates of $17 to $20 per square foot. In addition to the original Progress Center, the trio of Progress Buildings offers nearly 100,000 square feet of space for lease. Wigshaw LLC also leases space within the park, and companies have the option to build facilities to suit their specialized needs, which they can then lease or purchase. Finally, the UF Sid Martin Biotechnology Incubator is a specialized, restricted program available to bioscience companies that have or have the potential to establish a relationship with UF. Companies apply for admission and are subject to a review process. Most companies admitted to the program are licensing UF technology. Located off Interstate 75 in the City of Alachua, Progress Corporate Park offers easy access to UF and the Gainesville Regional Airport. It is conveniently located just two hours from Orlando, Tampa, Jacksonville and Tallahassee. And bordering

the Park is San Felasco Hammock Preserve State Park with miles of trails for hikers, bicyclists and horseback riders. These amenities combine the small-town charm of Alachua and the intellectual and cultural opportunities of Gainesville to offer an appealing lifestyle that attracts and retains a talented workforce. All this has attracted companies like Banyan Biomarkers, BIKAM Pharmaceuticals, Applied Food Technologies, Applied Genetic Technologies Corporation and dozens of others to Progress Corporate Park. “Most of the bioscience and some of the tech companies in this region have settled in Progress Corporate Park, so there is actually a physical bioscience cluster here,” Breedlove says. “When you are in close proximity, you can interact and leverage those relationships. That’s what Silicon Valley does so well. So we have some natural advantages that make Progress Corporate Park an attractive place for companies to settle.” UF Progress Corporate Park UF Sid Martin Biotechnology Incubator 12085 Research Drive Alachua, FL 32615 386-462-0880 info@progresscorporatepark.com www.progresscorporatepark.com

Regeneration Technologies merged with Tutogen Medical in 2008 to become RTI Biologics, a leading provider of sterile biological implants for surgeries around the world. RTI prepares donated human tissue and bovine tissue for transplantation through extensive testing and screening, precision shaping and proprietary, validated sterilization processes. These allograft and xenograft implants are used in spine, sports medicine, orthopedic, dental and other surgical specialties. “We initially located in Progress Corporate Park because of the relationship with UF,” says Wendy Crites Wacker, executive director of global corporate and marketing communications for RTI Biologics. “Today, we have three buildings in the park totaling 172,000 square feet of space and the park still has room for us to grow as we continue to expand through research and development.” Indeed, RTI has a long history of innovation in the park. The company made history in March 2000 by developing BioCleanse®, a low-temperature chemical sterilization process that inactivates or removes bacteria, fungi, spores and viruses from tissue without compromising the biocompatibility or structural integrity of the tissue. RTI opened a state-of-the-art facility in 2002 at Progress Corporate Park to ensure the safety and quality of its implants. With support from UF and Progress Corporate Park tenants, RTI continued its research and development. “We appreciate being part of the largest physical cluster of life sciences companies in this region. It’s also beneficial to collaborate with other companies in the park that have similar missions. ”

8 For more information: www.rtix.com

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REGION 2

UF Progress Corporate Park:

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University of Florida, Progress Corporate Park, and Treasure Coast Research Park Th!nk Florida: Describe some ways in which the university research program has, in return, benefited Progress Corporate Park and Treasure Coast Research Park. Phillips: When we attract faculty that are doing research, they have a better opportunity to have the technology they create get out into the world. They may want to participate in the companies taking the technology to market. You attract a better faculty into that environment.

Q&A

Dr. Winfred M. Phillips

Vice President for Research Th!nk Florida interviewed Dr. Winfred M. Phillips, vice president for research at the University of Florida, on the beneficial relationship between UF, Progress Corporate Park in Alachua County, and Treasure Coast Research Park in St. Lucie County. Th!nk Florida: In what ways does having access to Progress Corporate Park and Treasure Coast Research Park complement and support UF's research program? Phillips: In general, research parks are a critical part of the transition of spinoff businesses. Those businesses require incubation. An isolated incubator is a small neighborhood, but a research park is a big neighborhood. At Progress Corporate Park, all of our tenants have regular meetings with each other and chat about common problems and opportunities.

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Th!nk Florida: What areas of research, science and technology do you see enhancing the relationship between UF's research program, Progress Corporate Park and Treasure Coast Research Park?

Phillips: In Alachua, it's fundamentally a biological research park. In St. Lucie County, it's USDA agriculture-related activity. We have the research enterprise for agriculture in the state of Florida.

University of Florida 222 Criser Hall Gainesville, FL 32611 Phone: 352-392-3261 www.ufl.edu


University of Florida one of largest in the U.S. CAMPUS PROFILE

The University of Florida had its roots in perhaps an unlikely place: as a state-funded seminary. The East Florida Seminary took over the Kingsbury Academy in 1853 in nearby Ocala. The seminary moved to Gainesville in the 1860s when it was consolidated with the state of Florida's land-grant Florida Agricultural College. The state legislature made it a university in 1905 and moved it to Gainesville. Classes first met with 102 students at its present site in 1906. Forty-one years later, the school opened its doors to women. Today, with more than 50,000 students, UF is one of the largest universities in the country. It is a major public, comprehensive, land-grant, research university. The state's oldest and most comprehensive school, UF is among the nation's most academically diverse public universities. UF has a long history of established programs in international education, research and service. It is one of only 17 public, land-grant universities that belong to the Association of American Universities. "One of our big initiatives today is going global. That's a key. We're no longer competing to be the best university in the state or country. We're competing with universities around the world," says a spokesman. UF has a 2,000-acre campus and more than 900 buildings, including 170 with classrooms and laboratories. The northeast corner of campus is listed as a Historic District on the National Register of Historic Places. UF has 16 colleges and more than 100 research, service and education centers, bureaus and institutes. More than 100 undergraduate majors are offered. Most classes are limited to no more than 25 students.

University of Florida faculty made news recently by:

- A team of three UF astronomers contributed to the Kepler spacecraft's discovery of two Saturn-sized planets, plus a possible third planet with a radius just one-and-a-half times that of Earth, orbiting a distant star. - Production of new nerve cells in the human brain is linked to learning and memory, according to a new UF study. The research is the first to show such a link in humans. - A study by the school's Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences documented new

bacteria species carried by flies, all of which cause human illness. These range from food poisoning to respiratory infections. The university libraries form one of the largest information resource systems in the state of Florida, containing more than 4 million volumes, 4.2 million microfilms and thousands of full-text electronic journals. Among UF's artistic venues is housed a permanent collection of more than 6,000 original works, the largest natural history museum in the Southeast, musical and theatrical centers, two television stations and four radio stations. UF is nationally famous for its football and basketball programs, and it has ranked among the nation's 10 best athletic programs in each of the last 20 years.

FAST FACTS: University of Florida Students: 50,000+. Programs: More than 100 bachelor's degrees and 200 master's degrees. Professional degree programs in dentistry, law, medicine, pharmacy, and veterinary medicine. Popular majors: Business/marketing, health professions, education, communications/journalism and psychology. Libraries: 4 million volumes, 4.2 million microfilms and thousands of fulltext electronic journals. Research: UF received more than $574 million in research awards in 2008-09. The school has more than $750 million in new research facilities recently completed or under construction, including the Nanoscale Research Facility, the Pathogens Research Facility and the Biomedical Sciences Building.


Gainesville Lifestyle

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College town of Gainesville offers variety of indoor and outdoor attractions It’s easy to see why promoters of tourism in Gainesville stress nature and culture. Museums are plentiful for a small city of about 124,000, but tourists at times take detours from theme park-oriented Orlando, a two-hour drive, to get here for the wide variety of things to do.

What to do

A don’t-miss is one of the permanent exhibits at the very popular Florida Museum of Natural History. It’s a screened home that supports up to 80 species and hundreds of free-flying butterflies. Yearround, visitors can stroll through the Butterfly Rainforest on a winding path and relax to the sounds of cascading waterfalls. Come on weekend afternoons when there are live butterfly releases. Want some of your own? Don’t go home without a butterfly-friendly plant, which the museum sells

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on weekends. Families can dig fossils and other environmental wonders at other exhibits at the largest collections-based natural history museum in the Southeast. More museums? Sure! the Samuel P. Harn Museum of Art is one of the largest university-owned art museums in the United States. The permanent collections feature African, pre-Columbian, Asian, American and contemporary works. Want more exercise? Get on the 1,400mile Florida Trail. Hikers can sample any of the 80 trails that offer a variety of habitats for mild and easy day hikes or long and strenuous backpacking trips. Guidebooks and maps are available from the Florida Trail Association’s Gainesville office. A 15-minute ride into the countryside brings you to tiny Cross Creek and the Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings house and grounds. Guided tours are available that

explain the life and work of Rawlings, who lived from 1896 to 1953 and who wrote such beloved American classics as “The Yearling.” Her nearby tombstone reads: “Wife of Norton Baskin. Through Her Writings, She Endeared Herself to the People of the World.” Back in Gainesville, the Morningside Nature Center is a popular family attraction that offers a living history farm with turnof-the-century buildings and live farm animals. The diverse wildlife population includes deer, wild turkeys, gopher tortoises, box turtles and even skunks. There’s also an open-air museum and a bird sanctuary. Most visitors don’t know it, but The Santa Fe Teaching Zoo offers another place to find animals. It offers weekend tours. The zoo is a hands-on training program for students pursuing zoo animal technology. If you have any interest in theater, put The Hippodrome - referred to by locals as "The Hipp-" on your tour agenda. It’s a regional professional theater located in the restored 1912 Federal Building, listed on the National Register of Historic Places. The Hipp also screens first-run foreign, limited release and avant-garde films- more than 700 per year.


Where to eat (upscale)

Grilled duck breast and pan-roasted angus filet are popular dishes served at the Paramount, which many claim is the best restaurant in town. They offer “elegant, American cuisine from an outstanding chef. They have a solid wine selection, and a very friendly staff,” according to one reviewer. Leonardo’s 706 also offers gourmet cuisine in an upscale atmosphere.

Where to eat (affordable)

For take-out Mexican, Burrito Brothers Taco Co. is the Mecca of bring-it-home food. Ashley’s Mexican & American Restaurant also offers generous margaritas and nacho chips. Cheap and tasty delights are served at Caribbean Spice, where you can get mild or spicy beef patties or even vegetarian-style patties.

Outdoor activities and sports

You’ve heard of Florida’s famous sinkholes. The Devil’s Millhopper has long been a favorite for those who want to climb around in one. Visitors can learn about the sinkhole through its many interpretive displays. More than 200 steps lead to boardwalks and an observation deck at the bottom. Another natural attraction is the Kanapaha Botanical Garden, which offers 62 acres of plant collections that include the state’s largest bamboo garden and the Southeast’s largest herb garden. Visitors can also stop for a picnic. For spectator sports, there are the perennially potent football and basketball teams at the University of Florida, but visitors can

check there for a host of spectator sports throughout the year, including such lesserfollowed activities as cross country, golf, gymnastics, soccer, tennis and track.

Shopping

Dominating the scene here is The Oaks Mall, which has more than 120 stores including Abercrombie & Fitch and JCPenney. There’s also a food court, sit down restaurants and several quick bite places.

Events

The area enjoys a kaleidoscope of festivals spread throughout the year. Zucchini and watermelon festivals, renaissance fairs and craft shows are just a sampling. The City of Gainesville Festival and Art Show Downtown has been around for three decades. This highly acclaimed event has been rated in the top 200 best shows in the country by Sunshine Artist Magazine. The Santa Fe College Spring Arts Festival, which

attracts more than 100,000 art lovers annually, is the largest of its kind in North Central Florida. The University of Florida also consistently attracts world-class symphony orchestras, Broadway plays, opera and largescale ballet performances.

Nightlife

Yes, this is a college town. So the area naturally enough plays center stage to a full spectrum of after-hours entertainment. There are dozens of nightclubs, bars and restaurants featuring live entertainment every night. One of the most popular is Emeralds Lounge, well-known to locals with a happy hour and regularly scheduled karaoke. Fans of alternative rock, country, disco, reggae, jazz, blues and many other music styles can all find nighttime homes. The area regularly features local bands and internationally known touring groups.

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REGION 3

Central Florida Research Park:

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Central Florida Research Park brings Cutting-Edge Science to Tourism Mecca the region. So we worked to attract government and industry to move to the park and work closer with UCF.”

Young University, Established Park

Joe Wallace Executive Director Orange County is well-known for its tourist attractions, but the region isn’t playing Mickey Mouse games when it comes to research. In fact, the Central Florida Research Park dates back to the mid-1980s and has established a reputation for cutting-edge science. The Orange County Research and Development Authority, the governing body of the Central Florida Research Park, was formed in 1981. One of its first moves was to purchase six pieces of land next to the University of Central Florida. The idea was to create an innovative research park that leveraged the university’s strengths and diversified the region’s economy. The first tenants came to the park in 1985. “A research focus worked in Silicon Valley at Stanford University. It worked at the Research Triangle in North Carolina. So we decided it could work at UCF,” says Joe Wallace, executive director of the Central Florida Research Park. “The university had expertise in simulation training, computer science, engineering, laser systems and optics because of NASA, Lockheed-Martin and other companies in

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The Orange County Research and Development Authority established its vision when UCF was 12 years old. The Central Florida Research Park developed slowly, but today it claims bragging rights as the oldest research park in Florida. There are 1,027 acres, 56 buildings and 116 companies there. More than 10,000 employees go to work at the park every day - and the campus is only two-thirds full. The park’s current tenants include BAE Systems, Boeing Corporation, Center for Drug Discovery and Diagnostics, EDS Information Systems, Institute for Simulation and Training, Laser Institute of America, Raytheon Systems and Silicon Optix. UCF also has a strong presence in the park, with an Advanced Materials Processing & Analysis Center, a Biomolecular Research Annex, Florida Center for Lifestyle Medicine and more than a dozen other interests.

“Our biggest niche is simulation training - everything from airplane simulators and submarine simulators to computer desktop training for our military forces around the world,” Wallace says. “The second biggest industry we have is lasers and optics. Orlando’s history with lasers and optics goes back to literally the early 1970s. Medical devices is a third cluster.”

Building a Cluster

The Central Florida Research Park can accommodate companies as small as one person or more than 2,000 people. On the startup side, UCF operates an incubator in the research park that is home to 40 companies in addition to the 116 established companies. The UCF Business Incubation Program works to facilitate smarter, faster startup and growth of emerging companies so those companies can succeed. The Central Florida Research Park offers a campus-like environment. Established and startup companies alike can find support from UCF through technology transfer, research, faculty consultations, graduate and undergraduate internships and part-time employment programs. All research park tenants can contract with the university for use of computer resources and laboratory facilities. Although the Central Florida Research Park welcomes technology companies of all shapes and sizes, Wallace isn’t currently pursuing biotech companies because biotech is not the strength of his park. He remains focused on attracting companies within the disciplines that complement UCF’s expertise, as well as the collection of tenants that are already established in the park. As he sees it, companies will naturally gravitate to parks where they can find the critical mass in academic and research expertise that helps forward their mission. “My goal is to offer attractive buildings for multiple uses within our niche. We can serve companies that need multi-story


CASE STUDY

TENANT INTERVIEW

nScrypt

office Class A space. If you need raw manufacturing one-story space with dock-high load-up in the back, we can do that, too,” Wallace says. “We are a full-service research park that serves companies of all sizes - all the way up to Fortune 300 companies.”

Room to Grow

The Central Florida Research Park can accommodate another 2 million square feet, enough to house 20 new buildings and add another 7,000 employees. Organizations can purchase land in the research park on which to construct a facility, or lease space for office, office/lab or light manufacturing uses. The utilities and telecom infrastructure is readily available. Class A office space leases for $22 to $24 a square foot at the park, which is comparable to the Orlando office market at large. One-story space for manufacturing and labs with truck loading capabilities leases for $14 to $15 per square foot on a net basis, with tenants paying their own utilities. Land prices range from $5 to $7 per square foot. “Tenants coming to the research park are going to pay about the same as they would if they went into any other suburban space in Orlando,” Wallace says. “But our tenants have unique benefits. There are fiber optic networks in the research park, the ability to have a UCF parking decal, the ability to have university ID cards, and the shuttle bus that goes back and forth picking up.”

Wallace sees a bright future for the Central Florida Research Park and other Florida research parks. He is quick to point out that, despite the state’s reputation for tourism and oil spills, Florida has a greater number of research parks than major theme parks. And the Orange County Research and Development Authority is planning yet another research park that will eventually be home to 10,000 employees. Dubbed the Central Florida Research Park at Innovation, the project will focus on clean tech and medical simulation. When the new park opens, Orlando will be home to three research parks, the third being The Burnham Institute for Medical Research. “There are very few cities in the country that can say they have three research parks. We’re well-known for our tourism and our hospitality business, and justifiably so,” Wallace says. “What most people don’t know is that there is a thriving technology base across the state. It’s not just in Orlando. It’s all the research parks. Florida is not just about sunshine and retirement and Mickey Mouse. We have cutting-edge science going on here. Central Florida Research Park 12424 Research Parkway, Ste. 100 Orlando, FL 32826 407-282-3944 www.cfrp.org

Dr. Ken Church is a serial entrepreneur who found his way to Orlando looking for a better quality of life for one of his spinoff companies. Founded in 1996, Oklahoma City, Okla.-based Sciperio is on the forefront of cutting-edge R&D projects to develop technologies for the future. The firm has steadily grown in revenue, employees, and scope of research. Its diverse research focus includes water, printing and laser micromachining systems, technology integration, wireless communications antenna design, systems integration and bioengineering. Sciperio has seen a number of spinoffs and more of them are coming to the Central Florida Research Park. nScrypt, an automation and design services company, was the first to land at the Central Florida Research Park in 2004. R&D magazine named nScrypt’s micro-dispensing system one of the top 100 products in 2003. Research firm Frost & Sullivan gave the system its Product Leadership Award in 2004. “We first came to Orlando for the airport, and that has turned out to be a good decision for us,” says Church, CEO of nScrypt. Central Florida (UCF) and has collaborated with faulty members. The company also “works the Hill” in partnership with UCF. But one of the biggest benefits for nScrypt has been catering to potential clients in Orlando. “nScrypt has done well at the Central Florida Research Park,” Church says. “We’ve signed a couple of strategic relationships with DuPont International and Johnson & Johnson. We have started shipping worldwide and we’re seeing some growth.

8 For more information:

www.nscryptinc.com

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REGION 3

University of Central Florida

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University of Central Florida and Central Florida Research Park Companies in the park are natural partners with the university as part of the Florida High Tech Corridor program. The park's proximity to the university means ease of placement of students as well as opportunities for those students while they are still at UCF. For the partners this proximity makes partnerships easy. In addition, the park is the location of one of UCF's incubator sites. This provides opportunities for university spin-outs and for new companies in the region wanting to partner with the university. And the availability of 2,500,000 square feet of facilities in the park gives the university the opportunity

Q&A

Dr. M.J. Soileau Vise President of Research and Commercialization. Th!nk Florida interviewed Dr. M.J. Soileau, vice president for research and commercialization at the University of Central Florida, on the beneficial relationship between UCF and Central Florida Research Park. Th!nk Florida: In what ways does having access to Central Florida Research Park complement and support UCF's research program? Soileau: UCF picks areas of concentration to overlap the economic interests and aspirations of the region and state. Therefore, it is natural to have collaboration with companies in the park. Examples include companies and agencies in simulation and training, optics, photonics and lasers, information technology and, in general, areas that support the region's aerospace and defense sectors.

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to expand through acquisition of facilities or lease of needed space. Th!nk Florida: Describe some ways in which the university research program has, in return, benefited Central Florida Research Park. Soileau: The main opportunity to the park itself is that the university is the "grand attractor" that the park uses in placement of companies. I think that Joe Wallace, director of the park, would confirm that the university is his chief marketing tool. Organizations in the park benefit from enhanced access to university faculty, students, and highly specialized research facilities.

Th!nk Florida: What areas of research, science and technology do you see enhancing the relationship between the UCF research program and Central Florida Research Park? Soileau: Simulation and training, optics, lasers, photonics, information technology, materials, energy, aerospace and defense are all priorities for UCF and are all represented in the park. University of Central Florida 9907 Universal Blvd. Orlando, FL 32819-8701 (407) 903-8000


UCF Started Out to Support U.S. Space Program CAMPUS PROFILE

The state's largest university owes its existence in part to Central Florida's scientific scene. One of the main reasons for its founding was to provide support for the nearby Kennedy Space Center. It was first named Florida Technological University when it was founded in what was then a desolate farmland area of Orlando in the 1960s before Disney World. The site was so remote from Orlando that when its first president, Charles Millican, went to visit prior to its opening, he could not find it, according to several accounts. He had to return weeks later with specific directions on how to get there. Classes began in 1968 with 1,948 students, 90 instructors and 150 staff members. Fifty-five degree programs were opened that first year within its five colleges: Business Administration, Education, Humanities and Social Sciences, Natural Sciences and Engineering and Technology. The university's first mascot was Citronaut, a mixture between an orange and an astronaut. The short name for the college was Florida Tech until 1978 when it was labeled the University of Central Florida. The mascot became the "Knights of Pegasus." Once known mainly as a small commuter and technology school, UCF in the past few decades has dramatically increased its academic base while also evolving into a more traditional research university. As of 2009, there were about 53,644 students attending classes on 12 campuses spread across Central Florida. The university consists of 12 colleges and employs more than 10,150 faculty and staff. UCF is the largest university in the nation in terms of undergraduate enrollment. It is also the largest university in Florida and in 2003 was named the fastest-growing university in the U.S. In 2006, in part to meet a projected physician shortage, the UCF College of Medicine was established. It is projected to produce 120 medical graduates a year. The college is an integral part of the growing medical city at nearby Lake Nona. Another key part of education at UCF is The Rosen College of Hospitality Management. It's known as the largest,

most modern facility ever built for hospitality management. The college has also broadened its scope in research. "UCF researchers attract more than $100 million annually. Last year, a record $122 million came from federal, state and industry partners," according to the school's website. The university is also involved in the community. "UCF professors help and work side-by-side with the community on joint projects - from helping underprivileged children learn to read to developing alternative energy solutions," the website states. UCF's 1,415-acre main campus provides modern facilities, most of which have wireless Internet abilities, with 600 acres set aside for lakes, woodlands and an arboretum.

FAST FACTS: University of Central Florida Students: 50,000+. Programs: 90 bachelor's degrees, 91 master's degrees, and 29 doctoral degrees. Popular majors: Psychology, elementary education, finance, hospitality management, nursing, marketing, interdisciplinary studies, management, accounting and political science. Libraries: UCF Libraries collections include more than 1,800,000 print volumes, 2.9 million microforms, 304,000 government documents, 9,200 fulltext electronic journal subscriptions, 60,000 e-books, 40,000 media titles, a base of 17,000 serial subscriptions, in addition to special collections and university archives materials. Research: UCF researchers attract more than $100 million annually. In 2009, a record $122 million came from federal, state and industry partners.


Orlando City Lifestyle

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Beyond the Thrill of Theme Parks Once-sleepy Orlando woke up in the 1960s when Walt Disney opened his most successful theme park. And since then, Orlando and Central Florida have emerged as the theme park capital of the world. New attractions of all kinds are constantly being added, and major parks such as Universal Studios are regularly adding new rides, the latest of which is "The Wizarding World of Harry Potter." So what else might you want to know about Orlando? Some elements of what to do here will surprise you. You probably were not aware this is a golfer's Mecca. But that includes more than top-rated courses. For families, there are also a great variety of miniature golf outlets. Water parks are as common as Central Florida lakes. You may also be surprised if you haven't visited in a while to find that the bland chain restaurants have given way to a variety of places that serve sophisticated international cuisine. And the spirit of some visitors may be brightened to find they can spend a long vacation looking at art and cultural activities here without stepping past a single theme park turnstile.

What to do

One of the latest water parks is the CoCo Key Hotel and Water Resort, which has three water slides and an interactive play island. It joins the famous Wet N Wild, SeaWorld's waterpark and Disney's Blizzard Beach, which with its gentle water slides is the perfect place for toddlers. Little ones will also love the indoor-outdoor Fun Spot, which has rides just for younger children. Everyone of all ages loves Gatorland, where the animal feedings are among the most popular daily activities. Children love the train ride. Green Meadows Petting Farm is a lesser known attraction where young ones can feed the farm critters or even learn to milk a cow. It's a smaller attraction that is never crowded.

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The fake animals in Central Florida can mostly be found at Disney, though Disney's Animal Kingdom Park has live ones, but there's the Central Florida Zoo & Botanical Gardens that showcases hundreds of rare and endangered animals. Visitors can also kayak through the Brevard Zoo a half-hour away in Melbourne. One of the best of many miniature golf experiences is the Congo River Golf & Exploration Co., which has 36 holes and 25 live alligators. Ripley's Believe it or Not has long been a popular oddity destination. The culturally inclined might want to buy a Loch Haven Cultural Pass, which offers 20 percent discounts to the Orlando Museum of Art and the Mennello Museum of American Art, among other attractions that include the Orlando Science Center, which is of particular interest to families. Florida Cultural Tours recently began offering sightseeing tours for groups. Reservations are required. Most visitors don't come here for the history but it's there at the downtown Orange County Regional History Center. It also offers a self-guided tour of historical sites.

Where to eat (upscale)

Ethiopian. Brazilian. Argentinean. Moroccan. Russian. The list of ethnic restaurants goes on. Offering dishes such as shrimp ceviche and pan-cooked filet of Key West Yellowtail, Norman's has won just about every award available to restaurants. Another favorite for locals and visitors is Seasons 52, a fresh grill and wine bar that invites guests to discover the sensational flavors of a seasonally-inspired menu and award-winning international wine list in a casually-sophisticated ambiance. For wine lovers, there's also Jiko - The Cooking Place, which boasts the largest collection of South African wines outside of Africa.

Where to eat (affordable)

Many of the area's good but inexpensive restaurants are along the International Drive area. A must-visit is Cafe Tu Tu Tango, where the menu is a mixture of Spanish, Latin and Asian. Most dishes are under $10. Local artists have created the art work on the walls, and there's live entertainment that includes roving musicians, tarot card readers and belly dancers.


Tex-Mex is the draw at Don Pablo's a block away. Regular specials such as "allyou-can-eat enchiladas" are always on the menu. Prices are generally under $10. Vittorio's Brazilian Restaurant packs a lot of flavor into a small space. It offers a huge all-you-can-eat buffet with a lot of seafood. If in doubt, try the Brazilian stew made from beans, beef, pork and vegetables.

Outdoor and participatory sports

Orlando was voted "North American Golf Destination of the Year 2010" by the International Association of Golf Tour Operators. There are nearly 200 golf courses and 23 academies where visitors can improve their game. Famous course designers here include Arnold Palmer, Jack Nicklaus and Annika Sorenstam. Many of the major hotels such as the Waldorf Astoria and the Ritz-Carlton also have their own signature courses. There's also a new Orlando Golf Trail that links nine premier golf facilities and six lodging properties along the Interstate 4 corridor that runs from the north suburbs of Orlando to its tourist corridor south of the downtown area. The spirit of adventure goes outside the theme parks with balloon and helicopter rides, skydiving, hang gliding, horseback riding, eco-tours, various bicycle and skateboarding trails, and zip lining. Visitors who want a taste of the "Wild West" can find archery, skeet and trap shooting at the Westgate River Ranch.

Shopping

Shopping is a theme here, too. In fact, the 2009 International Shopping Travel Study found Orlando to be the fourth most popular shopping destination after New York, Los Angeles and Las Vegas. In all, Orlando has nine world-class malls with more than 1,000 stores. Florida Mall has more than 250 stores. The 150-store Mall at Millenia is the most upscale in the area. Orlando Premium Outlets and Prime Outlets International Orlando offer big names at reduced prices. Gift shops are everywhere as well.

Events

The Amway Center opened in 2010 as the new home of the Orlando Magic and the Orlando Predators. It also is where some of the area's best-known special events will be scheduled in the future.

Orlando also hosts more professional golf tour competitions than any other city, according to the local convention and visitor's bureau. There's the Arnold Palmer Invitational presented by MasterCard and the Children's Miracle Network Classic. Free events are also commonplace all yearround, many of which can be found at Walt Disney World. Marathons and halfmarathons are particularly popular.

Nightlife

There are several areas to live it up when the sun goes down. Tourists staying in Orlando's south side where the major attractions are located often stick around International Drive - or I-Drive - where the dueling piano bar known as Howl at the Moon is located. Others prefer to "chill out" at ICEBAR, where the temperature is kept at a frosty 27 degrees (capes and gloves are provided). In Downtown Orlando, one of the hottest spots is Club Firestone. Icon Nightclub and Tabu Nightclub provide a "big city" dance experience while the music at the Independent Bar features '80s alternative and '90s indie. A variety of theater groups are represented here including Mad Cow, which is a young company that has distinguished itself with award-winning contemporary and classic plays and musicals in downtown Orlando.

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REGION 4

...................................................... USF Research Park of Tampa Bay: ......................................................

Life Sciences—Driving Force Behind the University of South Florida’s Award-Winning Research Park

Dr. Paul R. Sanberg USF Vice President for Research and Innovation President of the USF Research Foundation, Inc. The USF Research Park of Tampa Bay is a critical player in the elaborate mosaic of high-tech economic development transforming the Tampa Bay region. While many people and organizations have put in place other pieces of the mosaic, the USF Research Park supplies the vital mechanism that systematically links research faculty to businesses in need of research partners. Named “Emerging Research Park of the Year” in 2008 by the Association of University Research Parks for its success in moving technology from the laboratory to economic viability, the park’s primary focus is on biotechnology and life sciences research and entrepreneurship. The USF Research Park’s success embodies the unprecedented vision and passion that University of South Florida System President Judy Genshaft has brought to her university’s role in stimulating economic development across the region.

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The core philosophy behind the USF Research Park was the establishment of an innovation complex that brings together the best interdisciplinary research teams in an environment of collaboration with private sector research and entrepreneurs, and includes laboratories, offices for corporate partners, and a large, successful business incubator. The innovation complex concept allows scientists and entrepreneurs to work side-by-side, share discoveries and ideas, and make advancements that succeed in both the laboratory and the marketplace. Located in the heart of Tampa’s “Innovation Zone” on the flagship campus of the University of South Florida, the USF Research Park sits in a beautiful metropolitan setting, just minutes from interstate highways I-75, I-275 and I-4, and less than 15 minutes from one of the best airports in the world. Most importantly, the park lies within steps of world-class researchers, inventors and entrepreneurs eager to collaborate, and a highly trained, high tech workforce. Housed within the USF Research Park, the Tampa Bay Technology Incubator (TBTI) supports technology research as a catalyst for economic development and facilitates the growth and development of life science and other high tech companies. TBTI has been recognized as one of the fastest growing incubation systems in the nation, with demonstrated results in the areas of job creation, new business development and facilitation of researchbased commercialization. TBTI provides entrepreneurial support programs, services and physical infrastructure to start-up and advancing technology companies. Many companies that originate in the community seek USF’s support to evolve their concepts to commercialization. Among the many ways TBTI assists is by providing access to costly critical research equipment, thus saving incubator companies more than $1.8 million.

The University of South Florida is a high-impact, global research university dedicated to student success. It is classified by the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching in the top tier of research universities, a distinction attained by only 2.2 percent of all universities, and ranks 50th in the nation for federal and total expenditures in research among all U.S. universities, public or private, according to the National Science Foundation. As the 9th largest public research university in the nation, USF is home to medical clinics and hospitals, a major mental health research institute, and two public broadcasting stations, and fuels substantial economic growth in the Tampa Bay area and throughout Florida. The USF System has an annual budget of $1.5 billion, an annual economic impact of $3.7 billion, serves 47,000 students in Tampa, St. Petersburg and Sarasota-Manatee, and is one of the top employers in the Tampa Bay region, with more than 1,679 full-time instructional faculty and over 6,535 fulltime staff. The university has a focus on partnering university research with corporate and entrepreneurial partners. With strong research programs in medicine, engineering and the basic sciences, USF maximizes its partnerships with the H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center & Research Institute, Tampa General Hospital, All Children’s Hospital, and the James A. Haley Veterans’ Hospital. The USF Research Park offers an exceptional environment and amenity package for commercial tenants with access to first-class university research and stateof-the-art laboratory equipment and infrastructure. It is home to organizations such as BioMedTech Laboratories, the Center for Biological Defense, Draper Laboratory, the Center for Drug Discovery and Innovation, the Florida Department of Health, the


CASE STUDY

TENANT INTERVIEW

Intezyne, Inc.

(Photo: Julie Busch Branaman, 83degreesmedia.com)

INTEZYNE IS DISCOVERING HOW TO TREAT CANCER BETTER

Florida Economic Development Council, Graphicstudio, the Moffitt Cancer Center Foundation, the Pediatric Epidemiology Center and many others. And, according to Allison Madden, director of operations for the park, there is room for more. The 87 acres of land are zoned for up to 1.2 million square feet of mixed-use development. There is office space available in 3802 Spectrum Boulevard, a three-story, multi-tenant Class A office building with access to shared laboratories, meeting and conference facilities, and first-class university research. Tenants enjoy the infrastructure to support heavy research needs, including wet labs and core facilities in the adjacent building, wireless capabilities, and an on-site Embassy Suites hotel. “We have land available for companies that want to build their own facilities, along with small labs for entrepreneurs just beginning,” said Dr. Paul R. Sanberg, USF vice president for research and innovation and

president of the USF Research Foundation, which owns and operates the park. “We focus on supporting the growth and success of our companies at every stage of their development, and work constantly to increase the value we provide to them as they evolve. We have the capacity and infrastructure to do it. With startups located right next to established enterprises, it’s an incubator model that accelerates innovation and success.” said Sanberg. Allison Madden can be reached at 813-974-1082 or amadden@usf.edu. www.research.usf.edu/rf/research-park.asp

University of South Florida Research Park of Tampa 3802 Spectrum Boulevard, Suite 100 Tampa, FL 33612-9220

Intezyne is a small biotech startup company developing technologies that increase the efficiency of drug delivery and improve patient outcome. The company’s patented IVECTTM method reduces the exposure of anti-tumor activity to healthy tissues by limiting the delivery of chemotherapeutics to within the tumor site. Cofounders Dr. Habib Skaff, a synthetic chemist specializing in nanotechnology, and Dr. Kevin Sill, a synthetic polymer chemist, moved Intezyne from Massachusetts to join the Tampa Bay Technology Incubator in 2004. “We had been also looking at biotech hubs in Boston, San Diego and Research Triangle Park but ultimately came to Tampa,” said Skaff, CEO of Intezyne. "The community, environment and services provided by USF Connect, and the TBTI were critical in our decision to establish the company in the Tampa Bay area." In 2010, the company announced the issuance of seven patents that cover its IVECT method in the United States, Europe, and Japan. Intezyne has a total of 31 issued patents in the U.S. and worldwide. Intezyne has two oncology products in preparation for Investigative New Drug submission and two more products in early stage preclinical trials.

8 For more information:

www.intezyne.com

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REGION 4

USF Research Park of Tampa:

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University of South Florida and USF Research Park of Tampa Bay

Q&A

Karen A. Holbrook, Ph.D.

Senior Vice President for Research, Innovation and Global Affairs Th!nk Florida interviewed Karen A. Holbrook, Ph.D., senior vice president for research, innovation and global affairs at the University of South Florida, on the beneficial relationship between USF and USF Research Park of Tampa Bay.

Th!nk Florida: In what ways does having access to the USF Research Park of Tampa Bay complement and support USF’s research program? Holbrook: The USF Research Park of Tampa Bay is fundamentally important to provide public-private partnerships for our faculty, students and staff. Entrepreneurial USF professors start companies based on their university research that are housed and fostered in our busi-

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ness incubator, USF CONNECT. Students have a significant opportunity to engage in real-world business, research and development training activities within all the businesses in the park. USF CONNECT is an organization within our Research Park that focuses on the needs of Tampa Bay’s entrepreneurs and faculty at all stages of the business life cycle. It is a single point of contact for businesses seeking resources such as technology transfer, financing, relation assistance or marketing and management. USF CONNECT’S network of local serial entrepreneurs, bankers, attorneys and mentors helps local entrepreneurs and faculty by sharing what it takes to build a successful business. Th!nk Florida: Describe some ways in which the university research program has, in return, benefited the USF Research Park of Tampa Bay. Holbrook: The USF Research Park is designed to provide a mixing of faculty from many colleges on campus to interact with startup and graduate companies of our incubator. In addition, companies recruited from outside into the park have provided a fertile ground for new research and funding relationships for USF faculty, as well as additional jobs for graduates and students. Finally, the USF Research Park companies have provided a unique opportunity for USF faculty to apply for federal Small Business Innovation Research, Small Business Technology Transfer and other commercialization-oriented grants for joint research. Th!nk Florida: What areas of research, science, and technology do you see enhancing the relationship between your university’s research program and the USF Research Park of Tampa Bay? Soileau: Strengths within USF research and the USF Research Park are

highly correlated. These include engineering, nanotechnology, medical devices, public health, drug discovery, rehabilitation, and information technology, among others. However, the USF Research Park also promotes interdisciplinary research, which has resulted in new areas of discovery and invention for USF and company scientists. It has been an instrumental part of our changing the culture of the university to increase innovation and technology transfer from our university to society. Such invention, patents and application of our

technology to commercialization and economic development, in part, through the research park encouraged us to found the National Academy of Inventors, an organization that honors our faculty inventors and promotes innovation throughout the university and community, thus helping build strong, sustainable regional economies.

University of South Florida 4202 East Fowler Avenue Tampa, FL 33620 Phone: 813-974-2301 www.usf.edu


USF established to Meet Urban Needs CAMPUS PROFILE

The University of South Florida was essentially the brainchild of long-time U.S. Rep. Sam Gibbons. The goal was to create the first public university established specifically to address the needs of Florida’s rapidly emerging urban regions. On Sept. 26, 1960, nearly 2,000 students began classes in five buildings. USF developed rapidly. In 1965, the St. Petersburg campus opened and USF was accredited, gaining additional academic respect. In 1967, enrollment passed 10,000. In the 1970s, the College of Medicine was established, New College in Sarasota became part of USF, and a strong academic program in Sarasota/Manatee was developed. The university came of age in the 1980s. The graduate school was established, as well as the H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center & Research Institute. Enrollment passed 30,000. Around that time, the school started to tout itself as the “Harvard of the South.” USF emerged as a major research institution during the 1980s. That reputation has been solidified in recent years. The University of South Florida System today includes two separately accredited institutions, USF and USF St. Petersburg. USF includes the main campus in Tampa, its College of Marine Science in St. Petersburg, USF Health and a regional campus - USF Sarasota-Manatee. With more than 47,000 students, the USF system has a $1.8 billion annual budget, an annual economic impact of $3.2 billion and was awarded $380.4 million in research contracts and grants in fiscal year 2008-09. The USF system is a member of the Big East Athletic Conference.

Distinctions for the school include:

- USF is ranked 16th as an “Up-andComer” among the country’s national universities in the 2011 edition of U.S. News & World Report’s Best Colleges edition. USF is included in three lists in the exclusive rankings of more than 1,400 schools. - USF is ranked 44th in total research expenditures and 38th in federal research expenditures for public universities for FY 2008 by the National Science Foundation. - USF offers 232 degree programs at the undergraduate, graduate, specialist and doctoral levels, including 89 bachelor, 97 master, two education specialist, 36 research doctoral, and four professional doctoral programs.

FAST FACTS: University of South Florida Students: 47,000+. Programs: 89 bachelor's degrees, 97 master's degrees, two educational specialist degrees, 36 research doctoral degrees and four professional doctoral programs. Popular majors: Business/marketing, social sciences, education, biology, psychology, English, engineering and health professions. Libraries: 2.4 million volumes, 81,572 serials, and 806 licensed databases. Research: $380.4 million in research contracts and grants in fiscal year 2008/2009.


Tampa City Lifestyle

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One-Time Cigar Capital Becomes Great City for Exploring the Outdoors Spanish explorer Ponce de Leon first arrived in the Tampa Bay area in 1513. There were no permanent American or European settlements in the area until 1824, when the U.S. Army set up a frontier outpost called Fort Brooke. Their purpose: to protect the strategic harbor at Tampa Bay. Tampa owes its commercial success to Tampa Bay and the Hillsborough River. When phosphates were discovered nearby in the late 1880s, the resulting mining and shipping industries prompted a boom of growth and wealth that lasted through the 1890s. In 1886, Vicente Martinez Ybor established a cigar factory in Tampa. From the steps of Ybor's factory, Jose Marti - sometimes called the George Washington of Cuba - exhorted the cigar workers to take up arms against Spain in the late 1800s. Today, one of the area’s most attractive spots for visitors is Ybor City, which has become a popular artist’s colony where the factories are long gone but there remain small craft operators who will happily sell you a hand-made cigar. The greater Tampa Bay area that includes the city itself - the two other major cities are St. Petersburg and Clearwater - has grown into a top metropolitan area. So much so that it has a number of nationally known sports teams such as the National Football League’s Tampa Bay Buccaneers, Major League Baseball’s Tampa Bay Rays and the National Hockey League’s Tampa Bay Lightning. It’s not uncommon to find tourists attending some of the sports activities here, but it’s even more common for visitors to discover the great outdoors. Tampa was ranked the fifth best outdoor city by Forbes Magazine in 2005. But if Tampa Bay is known for only one thing, it would be its beaches. If you restrict yourself to the area’s top three

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cities, there are 26 miles of beaches to choose from. Outdoor activities abound throughout the Tampa Bay area, and many smaller beach communities offer rentals of boats, jet skis, sail boards and canoes and other water options. More than 20 public golf courses are located in Pinellas County alone. The Suncoast Beach Trolley provides shuttle service along the entire stretch of gulf beaches from Clearwater Beach down to Pass-AGrille.

What to do

Long before Disney discovered neighboring Orlando 90 miles away, Tampa Bay had one of the best theme parks in the world: Busch Gardens Tampa Bay. It’s a unique blend of thrill rides, one of the country’s premier zoos featuring more than 2,000 live animals, live shows, restaurants, shops and games. It’s not as well publicized as more obvious park elements, but visitors can arrange an open-truck morning tour where giraffes and antelopes are fed by hand. The park is certainly a family attraction, but couples and others find it a highlight as well. One of its latest attractions is an African adventure with water rides and lovable characters.

One of the best aquariums in the country can be found at The Florida Aquarium, where more than 2,300 species of fish can be seen. The “Swim with the Fishes” program allows children older than 6 to scuba dive on the surface and explore the water reef adventure. Parents who want to combine entertainment with education find it at Dinosaur World, which has 150 life-size exhibits set in a lush landscape. There’s also a Fossil Dig environment where children can imitate paleontologists finding shark teeth and dinosaur bone fragments. The kids can keep three of the items they find. The attraction is best suited for elementary and pre-teen students. Even casual art lovers should not miss the Salvador Dali Museum in St. Petersburg. It is the unlikely location housing the largest collection of the famous surrealist’s paintings. You might expect this in New York or Chicago.

Where to eat (upscale)

If the area has a signature restaurant known far and wide, it’s the upscale Bern’s. Diners can start with one of the 24 varieties


of caviar. Then sample the creamy vichyssoise served cold with homemade potato chips. Steaks are the king here. For upscale Spanish cuisine, the obvious choice is the Columbia Restaurant, established in 1905. Lunch choices include an authentic Cuban sandwich, and the national dish of Spain - paella - can be had for dinner.

Where to eat (affordable)

A family-owned institution for more than half a century, Ted Peter’s Famous Smoked Fish is a tiny, picnic-table-style place that is almost always crowded with diners eager to sample the smoked salmon, mackerel or mullet flavored with bacon and onion. The food is not only affordable but it’s also served in mammoth, one-pound portions. If you want smaller sizes, choose lunch. For more unpretentious items on the menu, stop at Mugs Grill & Bar, known for its soups and tasty wings, not to mention 27 large TVs and 24 beers on tap. For excellent homestyle Spanish and Cuban food in generous portions, visit La Teresita. Be sure to order the restaurant's signature dish, Ropa Vieja- shredded beef.

Outdoor and participatory sports

If you follow the crowd, the most popular beaches are in Clearwater. But this is also where visitors find a host of restaurants, nightclubs and beachwear/souvenir shops. The quieter beaches are in the northern Tampa Bay area where perhaps the best-known is Honeymoon Island State Park or Caladesi Island State Park.

Accessible by private boat or by the Caladesi Connection ferry service from Honeymoon Island State Park, Caladesi is one of the few unspoiled natural islands along Florida’s Gulf Coast. In addition to swimming, sunbathing and shelling, visitors can enjoy a three-mile nature trail or a glide through mangroves along the threemile kayak trail. Sand Key Park is another quiet alternative. For something in between, Indian Rocks Beach features public beach access with parking and showers on every block.

Shopping

International Plaza and Bay Street, an enclosed, two-story regional shopping center with an adjacent outdoor lifestyle center, is located on the southeast edge of the Tampa International Airport. It features 200 specialty stores and 16 restaurants, plus Neiman Marcus, Nordstrom, Dillard’s, Robb & Stucky Interiors and Renaissance Tampa Hotel International Plaza.

bration of strawberries that dates back to 1930. The 11-day festival attracts hundreds of thousands of visitors from all over the world to the Strawberry Capital of the World - nearby Plant City.

Nightlife

Ybor City’s extensive and varied weekend nightlife is so popular that many young Orlandoans regularly make the 90-minute drive. Ybor City is downtown, and the socalled SoHo area is also popular. Kennedy, one of the area’s newest nightclubs there, has been drawing lines outside the door on weekends. Women always get in free unless there’s a special event. Men pay a $7 fee. The fast-growing suburb of Brandon is also attracting a vibrant nightlife with new bars such as The Rack Brandon, where there’s a sushi bar and billiard tables in a bright orange-colored building that once was a Piccadilly Cafeteria.

Events

The area’s best-known and most attended event is the century-old Gasparilla Pirate Fest when hundreds of colorfully-costumed pirates “sail” across downtown on floats with canons and pistols blazing. It’s a historic and often drinksodden parade that draws hundreds of thousands of revelers. But the area is also known for its annual Florida State Fair, featuring the best arts, crafts, livestock, entertainment and food found throughout Florida. Other numerous events include the Florida Strawberry Festival, which is a cele-

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REGION 5

Treasure Coast Research Park:

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Ag Focus Brings Growth to Treasure Coast Research Park “My project is a build-to-suit-and-theywill-come park,” says Ben DeVries, FRICS, CRE, executive director of the Treasure Coast Research Park. “We’re in the early stage of development where we are working on conceptual plans, but we have a strong base with world-class laboratories willing to partner with local companies.”

An agricultural focus

Ben DeVries Executive Director St. Lucie County is sowing the seeds of the future by developing a 1,650-acre research and education park in the heart of Florida’s Treasure Coast. The Treasure Coast Research Park is anchored by the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s 170,000-square-foot Horticultural Research Laboratory and the 90,000-square-foot University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences. The Treasure Coast Research Park’s master plan calls for more than 1,650 acres of development, including 800 acres to house the education and development of components and 850 acres for agricultural fields and future growth. The park is already home to scientists, researchers and educators focused on agricultural interests. In fact, researchers at the park have the opportunity to collaborate with scientists currently working within St. Lucie County at the Smithsonian Marine Station, Harbor Branch Oceanographic Institution and Florida’s Center for Excellence in Biomedical and Marine Biotechnology located in Fort Pierce.

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The Treasure Coast Education, Research and Development Authority is working to attract research organizations that will make an investment in commercial innovation and scientific research. Part of the goal is to drive economic diversity and security in the region, but the park’s overarching mission is to find solutions to society’s biggest challenges. Developed in 2000, the USDA’s Horticultural Research Laboratory has about 100 employees, including 20 research scientists in three separate research units: Horticulture and Breeding, Subtropical Plant Pathology, and Subtropical Insects. The lab operates two research farms- in Fort Pierce and Leesburg- collectively totaling 800 acres. Meanwhile, IFAS specializes in agricultural research, extension and education. The local region offers plenty of support

for an agricultural focus. UF’s Indian River Research and Education Center in Fort Pierce is home to more than 20 scientists and researchers. The School Board of St. Lucie County has launched educational programs that focus on science, technology and applied research. Institutions such as Harbor Branch Oceanographic Institution, Indian River Community College, Florida Atlantic University and University of Florida are dedicated to teaching and training students in specialized areas of exploration and research. At the Indian River Research and Education Center, students who hold an Associate in Arts degree can pursue a bachelor’s degree in either agribusiness management or environmental management. Master’s degree programs include agricultural education and communication, entomology, environmental horticulture, and environmental science. Additionally, the Center offers a non-degree professional certificate in agribusiness management, agricultural education and communication, and entomology. As DeVries sees it, focusing on creating sustainable food sources is critical with the world’s population booming. By focusing on food, energy and water - and how they


CASE STUDY

TENANT INTERVIEW

USDA

are interrelated - Treasure Coast Research Park is part of a regional life sciences cluster that includes Torrey Pines and VGTI and the Harbor Branch Oceanographic Institute. “We are also exploring opportunities in algae and biofuel,” DeVries says. “We’re talking to folks at the state and federal level to think about how we work together on food technology and farm-to-fuel research. We want to play a leadership role in this area because food has to be transported. It all relates back to our agricultural focus.”

A location treasure chest

The Treasure Coast Research Park is centrally located among many of Florida’s main attractions, and can be easily reached within a two-hour drive from more 70 percent of the state’s population. The Park site is easily accessible from both of Florida’s main highways: Interstate 95 and Florida’s Turnpike. Currently, there are five roads with access to the Education and Research Park: Pruitt Research Center Road, Picos Road, FFA Road, Campbell Road and Rock Road. St. Lucie County and the Treasure Coast Education, Research and Development Authority are getting ready to begin Phase I of the county-owned park. Phase I will cover 200 acres of the 1,650acre park that was purchased in 2004. Architectural standards are based on the existing park occupants, the U.S. Department of Agriculture lab, and the University of Florida Indian River Research & Education Center. Developers can lease land on sevenyear and nine-year ground leases for $3 a square foot. There are also purchase options. The Port St. Lucie Town Center Land, for example, is available for $11.5 million and ready for 37 acres of retail,

office and residential use. And 2550 Peters Road is located on 83 acres with over a half mile of I-95 frontage. “We have options for tenants that are concerned about global warming,” DeVries says. “We provide a minimum carbon footprint alternative where we would provide and use solar energy arras and biofuels to reduce the carbon footprint. We can offer free electric for the first five years of the lease.” The Treasure Coast Research Park is designed to be low density, which allows more recreational space for tenants. Flexible site plans can accommodate small or large entities. The Treasure Coast Research Park offers utilities and services that make it possible for a broad range of science- or technology-based companies to locate there, including potable water, natural gas and sanitary sewer, fiber optic communications and the highest speed Internet via the Florida Lambda Rail with connections to the National Lambda Rail system. “We’ve laid 18 32-acre quads. We are going to build roads and sanitary and sewer in the first four quads,” DeVries says. “We want to build a community, not just buildings. We call it a community of innovation. We will include art and music venues, amphitheaters and biking trails.” Treasure Coast Research Park 2199 South Rock Road Fort Pierce, FL 34945 772-467-3107 director@tcerda.org www.tcerda.org

The USDA came to the Treasure Coast Research Center Park from an urban site in Orlando where it had settled for 40 years. Urban encroachment forced the USDA off the site, and the department conducted an extensive feasibility study across Florida to look for a new home. The USDA settled on the Treasure Coast because it was close to a University of Florida research center in the heart of a significant agricultural production region. “When we located here 10 years ago, there were some discussions about a research and education park, but that was not solidified when we made our decision,” says Dr. Calvin Arnold, laboratory director of the United States Horticultural Research Laboratory. “We are very glad to be here, and we are working with the local economic development council to build up the park. The potential synergies here could be huge.” Arnold points to the Research Triangle Park in North Carolina as a model for what the Treasure Coast Research Park could be. Arnold is working hard to help attract other science-based research and development entities to the region - and to the park - to create those synergies. The USDA has led the way with a $40 million investment in its facility at the research park, which includes 30 active research labs and a staff of about 120. Arnold is ready and willing to sign any number of different types of agreements with science and research companies that take on space in the park. He sees the possibilities of Cooperative Research and Development Agreements with private companies that help drive toward breakthroughs. The USDA already has strong agreements in place with the nearby Torrey Pines Institute for Molecular Studies and Harbor Branch Oceanographic Institute. Many of the laboratory's professional staff hold adjunct appointments with these institutions and actively interact with the student population at the high school, college undergraduate and graduate levels.

8 For more information:

www.ars.usda.gov

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Fort Pierce City Lifestyle

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"Sunrise City" Could Wake up the Tourist in You Fort Pierce story "Sunrise City" could wake up the tourist in you. As one of the oldest communities on the east coast of Florida, the Atlantic Ocean-hugging Fort Pierce going back to the 1830s was a quiet community dominated by small log houses. Its population today has grown to more than 44,000, and it's now the county seat of St. Lucie County. As a tourist destination, the area is definitely overshadowed, and it lacks the hustle and bustle of much larger neighbors West Palm Beach and Orlando. But for some visitors, the area's quiet reputation is part of its charm. Major recreation outlets include the Indian River Lagoon, and visitors can find history and culture here in attractions such as the 1,200-seat Sunrise Theatre, a regional outlet. Outdoor and nature sights also abound. This may be the best place in the world to see Florida's beloved manatees. There are also some museums that everyone in the family will appreciate. Fort Pierce's motto is "The Sunrise City," and there's enough under the sun to keep you here for a while.

Where to go

There's something here you won't find anywhere else and, in itself, it's a reason some tourists choose to visit. The National Navy UDT-SEAL Museum is the only memorial in the world dedicated exclusively to the United States Navy SEALS and their various "frogman" predecessors. A lot of visitors come to Florida to see alligators, but manatees may come second in popularity. Here, visitors will find live versions at the Manatee Observation and Education Center, a waterfront wildlife observation and nature education center. The endangered Florida manatee, also called the sea cow, is the main attraction. Unlike some areas where manatees are only winter visitors, the sea cows here can be viewed yearround. Keep in mind the "gentle giants" are

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wild and not captive manatees, so feeding is not allowed. Nature is also the star at the Heathcote Botanical Gardens, which began as a commercial nursery for landscape architect Molly Crimmons. Today, the gardens include displays of rainforest plants, herb gardens and extensive Bonsai collections. No one seems to know how the town got its slogan of "Sunrise City," but visitors to the Old Fort Pierce Park can learn about how it got its name: for the first commander of the fort, Benjamin Pierce, circa 1830s. Other aspects of the area's history are also on display here. The fort built in 1838 was abandoned in 1842 at the end of the Second Seminole War. The site now includes ancient burial mounds of the Ais Indians. All ages will appreciate the Hallstrom Planetarium. A theatre has 71 reclining seats with a stateof-the-art Spitz automated star projector that recreates the sky on a 40-foot domed ceiling. There may be no better way to explore the area's history and some of its

wildlife than Florida Dolphin Tours, which are intimate trips carrying no more than six passengers. A guide describes the history of the area. Want to be sure you see dolphins? The private company says there's a 90 percent chance if you go during the November to March season of high dolphin activity.

Where to eat

The pulled pork at Dale's BBQ South is famous. Diners are offered iced tea in huge cups. No refills needed. If you want to be steered by the locals, go to the Captain's Galley, where you're likely to find police and firemen and friendly, fast service. The fluffy banana pancakes are surprisingly light. But it's only open until 2 p.m. Great crab salads and thick Mahi sandwiches are on the menu at 12A Buoy.

Outdoor activities and sports

The Inlet State Park on North Hutchinson Island is among the most


beautiful stretch of beaches on the east coast. They have picnic tables, grills and restroom facilities. You can hike around to look for the wildlife, play in the surf, fish off the jetty or just float around on the cove side. Naturally, low tide is the best time. There is also a play area for the kids. If you are there at the right time you can see or swim with a few of the local manatees on the cove side. At the Fort Pierce City Marina, you can dock your boat or book a fishing charter to hook your next big catch. Species caught off Fort Pierce include sailfish, dolphin (mahi-mahi), swordfish, marlin, wahoo, kingfish, cobia, barracuda, amberjack, tuna, bonito and Spanish mackerel. Reef and bottom fishing is just as plentiful for grouper, snapper and sea bass. The inshore fishing is world-class on the famous Indian River Lagoon. Species caught in the IRL include crevalle jack, snook, tarpon, redfish, flounder, bluefish, permit, snapper and trout. Along A1A, or the Atlantic Ocean, Avalon State Park is a popular state facility. It's about four miles north of the Fort Pierce Inlet State Park. There is no entrance charge. Florida state parks are open from 8 a.m. to sundown every day of the year, including holidays. Golfers can find a "buried in the rough" attraction. It's the PGA Village in Port St. Lucie, which was ranked among the "75 Best Golf Resorts" by Golf Digest. It has 54 outstanding holes of championship golf by Pete Dye and Tom Fazio. There's also a

learning center for duffers and others to improve their game and a golf museum.

Shopping

Shopping here, as in all Florida tourist areas, is plentiful, particularly in the restored Downtown Fort Pierce. But for those mainly looking for major variety, the malls remain the place to go. The Mall at Wellington Green, less than an hour away, is in the heart of Palm Beach County. It has two levels of 160 stores. Comfort-level major chains such as Dillard's and Macy's are here. Customer-friendly amenities include a children's play area, and there's a variety of restaurants.

Events

At the heart of Port St. Lucie’s new downtown is Village Square. Enjoy the free concert series here on the second Friday of every month, or splash and play in the

interactive fountains. Or pick up the very freshest of local produce at the Port St. Lucie Green Market every Tuesday. The painstakingly restored Sunrise Theatre presents a wide variety of performances. The St. Lucie Community Theater also stages an array of productions. Not only is the dress informal, but tickets are inexpensive. Main Street Fort Pierce puts on a series of regular events including classic car cruises and bike weeks. There are also regular raffles and other events. Friday Fest is the longest running Main Street event. Held every first Friday of the month from 5:30-8:30 p.m., Friday Fest has become the most popular street festival in the area. More than 5,000 people attend monthly. The event features live entertainment, food, drinks, arts and crafts, and children's activities. On the second Wednesday of each month, check out our local art galleries while enjoying music and food at the Downtown ArtWalk. Nightlife Visitors can find nightlife here but a better choice with more options is nearby Port St. Lucie, where Whiskey J's offers billiards, gaming and live music. If you are an all-night partier, the Club Byrd Cage will stay open for you. West End Grill offers live entertainment daily in the winter and on Friday and Saturday nights the rest of the year. Local entertainers are the lure. There's a wide variety of wine and beer offerings.

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REGION 6

Innovation Hub:

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FGCU Innovation Hub Beckons Researchers to Study the Sun developing a renewable energy research park would be a way to change the physical infrastructure in Southwest Florida and stimulate the local economy. If you want to study the sun, Florida is the right place.”

Breaking ground

Rich Galvano Executive Director A future beacon of power in Southwest Florida, the Florida Gulf Coast University Innovation Hub - also known as the I-Hub - is a powerful vision that will soon become a reality. The park will be a hot spot for renewable energy, but it could just as easily have become a site for the Boston Red Sox spring training or a major theme park. Indeed, Galvano Development, which purchased the 241 acres of land in 2007, considered several uses before deciding on a renewable energy research park. After exploring the opportunities, Rich Galvano, president of Galvano Development, approached the university about the notion of establishing a university-affiliated research park in 2009. Fort Myers’ Florida Gulf Coast University agreed to join forces with Galvano in a public-private partnership to develop 1.2 million square feet of state-of-the-art research and development space. “We made our decision about the use of the land when the market crashed and everybody was talking about reliance on foreign oil,” Galvano says. “We felt that

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The future I-Hub is located on 241 acres adjacent to and on the south side of the Southwest Florida International Airport. The park is also within a mile of FGCU’s main campus. The project has yet to break ground, but Galvano is planning on building a spec research facility in the first quarter of 2011 that is already gaining interest from companies. “We’re in the midst of site work. We cleared the property, and the site is approved for 1.2 million square feet of mixed-use development,” Galvano says. “Southwest Florida is taking hold of the vision. We are now calling our area the Research Diamond, and we plan to attract major players to the region.” The I-Hub has reserved five acres for FGCU, which was founded in 1991 and has been in operation since 1997. The university will occupy a 50,000-square-foot renewable energy building at the park. Galvano is also in talks with biomass companies, bio-diesel companies, an algae com-

pany, and various solar companies about taking on space there. From research to manufacturing and distribution, Galvano is seeing plenty of interest in the I-Hub. “Considering the growing importance of ‘green’ and ‘sustainability’ on a national and global scale, we feel the hub will attract attention to the area and create a leadership role for Florida Gulf Coast University in the area of environmental sustainability,” says John Backe, president of the Backe Foundation and a member of the team that will develop the I-Hub in collaboration with FGCU. Backe donated $1 million to FGCU to create an endowed fund to hire an eminent scholar to lead the university in the study of renewable energy. “I believe the creation of the FGCU Innovation Hub is a reflection of a new level of maturation for the university,” says FGCU President Wilson Bradshaw. “The range of programs and areas of study at FGCU, and the faculty expertise and wide spectrum of research interests, make this a perfect time to engage in this kind of cooperative initiative.”

Reserving a Hub

The Innovation Hub will reflect its commitment to renewable energy using innovative lake-based solar panels to power


the park. University research and sponsored programs include aging, alternative energy sources, biotechnology, bioterrorism, ecology, green technology, magnetic fields, photonics, renewable energy, solar energy, photovoltaic and wetland research. “This park is special because we’re adjacent to an international airport so you can easily travel to China or anywhere else in the world that you need to bring in labor or materials, or to distribute goods,” Galvano says. “We’re also right near the I-75 interchange. People can buy land here or lease land, or locate in one of our spec buildings. This is truly shovel-ready ground.” All permits are in place at the park for 1.2 million square feet of research and development space. The site is in the epicenter of future growth and is easily accessible. From a practical perspective, the I-Hub

is located within two miles of 730 brand new hotel rooms and the 2 million-squarefoot, 205-acre Gulf Coast Town Shopping Center. The center is home to some of the area’s best restaurants, fine dining and shops.

A powerful opportunity

The I-Hub is a timely addition to Florida’s research park community. The solar market will soon experience renewed demand, according to a new report from Lux Research. Strong demand growth in Asia and the U.S. will push the market to $39 billion in 2010, while continued price reductions will open new markets and drive solar to $77 billion in revenue by 2015. “We found that solar’s short-term pain will enable it to exceed growth expecta-

tions over the very long-term,” says Ted Sullivan, a senior analyst for Lux Research. “The volume of solar installations will grow at a 23 percent annual rate through 2015, but revenue will grow by just 14 percent, as prices fall due to remaining over-capacity.” Green technology could also be a boon for the park. General Electric invested $10 billion in cleantech research and development in June. That’s on top of $5 billion the company invested into its Ecomagination initiative five years ago. LG Electronics plans to invest $18 billion in greening its product lines, and Samsung is spending $21 billion on its green roadmap. “We are changing the economic composition of this area and implementing the physical infrastructure to attract companies that want to study the sun in the Sunshine State,” Galvano says. “It’s much like when the Research Triangle started out. The idea is to pull in companies and retain our students. We don’t want our graduates moving to Boston anymore. Soon, they will have world-class research facilities here.”

Florida Gulf Coast University Innovation Hub Alico Road and Airport Haul Road Fort Myers, FL 941-822-9585 Galvano Development, LLC www.fgcuinnovationhub.com

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Fort Myers Lifestyle

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Beaches of Fort Myers & Sanibel offer more than fun and sun This area of Southwest Florida is generally described as three cities - Fort Myers, Cape Coral and Bonita Springs - and three islands that include Fort Myers Beach, and Sanibel and Captiva Islands. With an abundance of shell-strewn shores and palm-fringed boulevards, the Fort Myers area on the Gulf of Mexico is sometimes characterized as a blueribbon beach town. But it’s also the former winter home of such American intellectual titans as Henry Ford and Thomas Edison, so never dismiss it as just another muscle beach. There are many museums, historical buildings and a variety of nature-oriented attractions.

What to do

The Edison Ford Museum is one of the area’s most visited attractions. The Edison & Ford Winter Estates is an unusual sort of museum, consisting of the two homes, associated properties including their gardens, and Edison's laboratory. Associated with the laboratory is a huge collection of his various inventions and a truly first-rate movie about his life. Both houses are models for life in the tropics with good porches and screened rooms. The Lee County Alliance for the Arts is the heart of cultural activity here. It is based in the 12,000-square-foot William R. Frizzell Cultural Centre, which is home to Theatre Conspiracy, a professional equity theater group; the Film Society of Southwest Florida; and many other cultural organizations. For serious theater-goers, there’s also Broadway Palm Dinner Theatre where real Broadway-style shows are accompanied by a fresh salad bar and hot entrees. Desserts are lavish. Stop in the Playbill Bar for a pre-dinner or post-show cocktail. The Bailey-Matthews Shell Museum features more than 30 species of mollusks from around the world. Shells are portrayed

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in art and history with shell habitats, rare specimens, a live fish tank and a children’s learning lab with hands-on play areas. The museum store offers a wide selection of shell books. Since this is a beach area, there are no limits to what you can do around the water. A long-established attraction, Adventures in Paradise Cruises, says it hopes to “bring you our love of the sea.” A varied program of cruises concentrates on fishing, shelling, dolphin watches and sunset cruises. The site also offers canoe and kayak eco-tours through a private mangrove forest.

Where to eat (upscale)

With an abundance of local fresh fish, shrimp and clams, seafood is the base for many restaurant menus. Some of the world’s most picturesque waterfront restaurants are found here. Visitors can sample the best in seafood at The Mad Hatter in Sanibel and the Mucky Duck on Captiva Island For real exclusivity once reserved just for hotel guests, try the Dining Room at Gasparilla Inn & Club in Boca Grande, which shares its new brand of creativity and historic romance with the public. For supreme sushi, try Ichiban in Fort Myers and North Fort Myers, and Blu Sushi, with

two locations in Fort Myers- both with patio seating. There’s even a bit of fame to be found here. The Cabbage Key Inn north of Captiva is where Jimmy Buffett was inspired to write “Cheeseburger in Paradise” after devouring one of the Inn’s huge, juicy burgers.

Where to eat (affordable)

Crave in Fort Myers serves homecooked specialties such as meatloaf with mushroom gravy and short ribs.

Outdoor activities and sports

A don’t-miss-it-while-you’re-here place: Paddling Sanibel Island’s Tarpon Bay on the stern-side with a usually witty and learned Tarpon Bay Explorers naturalist guide through canoe trails traveled hundreds of years ago by Calusa Indians. Be on the lookout for local wildlife and learn about the workings of a mangrove forest. Another don’t-miss-it: A sure winner for visitors of all ages is the Audubon Corkscrew Swamp Sanctuary, a 13,000-acre ancient forest with a two-mile-plus boardwalk that meanders through the fores’s most picturesque mammoth cypress trees, alligator holes and pristine lakes where colorful wad-


ing birds feast. For those who do not wish to walk the full 2.25 miles, an optional trail shortens the walk to one mile. Volunteer naturalists are usually on the boardwalk to answer questions. When you tire of walking, the state-ofthe-art Blair Audubon Center also offers innovative exhibits and interactive productions that explain in more depth what you’ve just visited. Allow about three hours for a comfortable visit. For further relaxation in nature, hop aboard the 1/8th scale choo-choo for a 1.5mile tour of Lakes Regional Park in Fort Myers, then cool off in the interactive fountain. If families are looking for quality beach together-time, LynnHall Memorial Park has kid-sized waves and a playground to boot. You’ll find other scenic playgrounds at Centennial Park overlooking the Caloosahatchee River and near the beach at Bonita Beach Park in Bonita Springs. Bowman’s Beach on Sanibel Island boasts a new play area. Calusa Nature Center & Planetarium features aviaries, raccoons, gray foxes, a bobcat and animal feedings with educational commentary that makes nature come alive in Fort Myers.

Shopping

Shopping ranges from one-of-a-kind gifts and souvenirs found in boutiques, art galleries and flea markets to the familiar labels of upscale malls and outlet centers. On Sanibel, Periwinkle Place is a cluster of intimate shops set in a pleasant, park-like

atmosphere with covered walkways shaded by banyan trees. Captiva Village Square presents novel gift shops and galleries displaying turn-of-the-century antiques and art from the area's heyday, when Lee County hosted inventors like Thomas Edison. One of the more unusual places to shop is at the ship recovery expert Mel Fisher’s Treasure Company, where 400-year-old sunken emeralds can be found.There’s no lack of shopping malls in the area, either. As the largest indoor shopping mall in Southwest Florida, Edison Mall in Fort Myers showcases more than 150 specialty shops and eateries.

Events

Art Walk is a monthly art event held the first Friday of each month from 6-10 p.m. in the downtown Fort Myers River District. The event is a self-guided and self-paced tour of downtown art galleries and businesses. There’s a free trolley service. Expect to meet gallery owners, artists and art collectors in a relaxed atmosphere.

Nightlife

Ellington’s Jazz Club and Restaurant on Sanibel Island features live jazz every night and a dance floor that jumps and jives until the wee hours. Doc Ford’s (yes, the novelist) Rum Bar and Grille, located directly on the water just before the Sky Bridge to Fort Myers Beach, is famous for hosting a wide array of local bands, from rock ‘n’ roll to reggae. The Edison, on palm-lined McGregor

Boulevard just one mile south of The Edison-Ford Winter Estates, is the place to see and be seen any night of the week, but especially on Wednesday Ladies Nights when ladies drink free.

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REGION 7

Research Park at Florida Atlantic University

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Entrepreneurial Environment Draws Businesses to the Research Park at Florida Atlantic University

Andrew Duffell President and CEO

The Research Park at Florida Atlantic University is home to 22 mature technology and R&D companies and the Technology Business Incubator with 22 early stage technology companies. It is the only state university affiliated research park in South Florida. The Research Park was established and is governed by Florida Atlantic Research and Development Authority. It is made up of two campuses and was created in 1985 by the Broward and Palm Beach County Commissions together with FAU under state statutes. The Boca Raton Research Park is located adjacent to the Boca Raton Executive Airport, with a 5,000-foot runway and strategic executive air-service facilities on the north edge of FAU’s main campus in Boca Raton. The Deerfield Beach Research Park is just minutes away from I-95, the Sawgrass Expressway and the Florida Turnpike. Tri-Rail commuter train service stops nearby. FAU and the Research Park are linked firmly through the day-to-day process of two-way collaboration. Entrepreneurial

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company tenants can access the FAU student body and faculty and potential joint grant opportunities with the intent of enabling faster, more cost effective paths to bring new products and services to market. FAU students and faculty gain access to and experience working in real-time entrepreneurial business. Entrepreneurs have a unique opportunity to work in conjunction with the FAU College of Engineering and Computer Science, the FAU Charles E. Schmidt College of Medicine and the FAU College of Business, ranked by Princeton Review for three years in a row as one of the best business schools in the US. The park also supports the Statewide LamdaRail data connection for high-speed research.

Resident companies thrive in high growth sectors of Florida and the world’s economy. •

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Medical imaging technologies and devices Advanced engineering for aerospace and defense Software design, development and architecture Medical health technologies Advanced testing and compliance testing and research

Companies in the Research Park include the Pace Americas, North American headquarters for one of the top 250 companies on the London Stock Exchange, a Fortune 1000 company and a host of other companies many with international trade channels and headquarters across the United States. Mixed among the entrepreneurial companies are legacy companies searching for the right mix of business and academics to reenergize their R&D efforts. Recently American Sugar Refining made the decision to come into the Research Park.

“The move to the Research Park at Florida Atlantic University is a key growth strategy for our company for the creation of new products, processes and packages for customers on a global basis,” stated Richard Dyer, Chief Science and Technology Officer for American Sugar. “A strong reason for our selection of the Research Park is because of its synergy with FAU.” “Businesses at the Research Park find our unique relationship with FAU to be a distinct advantage,” said Andrew Duffell, president and CEO of the Research Park at Florida Atlantic University. “American Sugar will be augmenting its research and development efforts by offering internships and positions to FAU chemistry and engineering students as well selecting key professors to sit on a technical advisory committee.” The Research Park’s 782 employees have an average salary of $86,000 or 188% of the average salary county-wide. The resulting economic impact is $265 million.


THE TECHNOLOGY BUSINESS INCUBATOR A Serial Entrepreneur’s Haven The Research Park is home to the Technology Business Incubator with 22 startup and emerging technology companies each of which receives business and consulting services, with the goal of becoming established businesses and permanent residents of the Research Park. Enterprise Development Corp. of South Florida, a non-profit organization that assists emerging science and technology companies, manages the incubator. Through its BusinessLINC mentoring program, EDC offers expertise in new product development and commercialization, business strategy development and execution, technology transfer, strategic alliances, and preparing for fundraising. EDC manages business incubation programs throughout South Florida, and works closely with the investment community to connect entrepreneurs with early stage capital. The EDC also administers the New World Angels (a group of private investors dedicated to providing equity capital to early-stage entrepreneurial companies in Florida), and production of two major conferences each year to drive visibility for young companies. The Research Park is also home to the Florida Institute for Commercialization of Public Research, Florida’s one-stop clearinghouse for technology transfer for

Florida Universities. This is a must-do stop for investors and entrepreneurs who are looking for new opportunities based on technologies developed through publiclyfunded research. The Institute facilitates new venture creation through commercially-viable technologies in major industries that are driving the global economy, including clean energy, life science, information technology, aviation and aerospace, homeland security/defense, and other emerging sectors. Startups that locate in the Technology Business Incubator benefit from access to FAU technical and human resources, flexible month-to-month lease terms, a secure building with 24-hour access, private, locked office space, shared copier, fax, kitchen, conference room and restroom facilities, Gigabit Ethernet and fiber optic communications, access to EDC programs and services, and mentors from research park and regional tech industries. Recently in response to a growing demand for its services the Incubator expanded to allow for additional growth welcoming startups in the fields of pharmaceutical development, software development, transpiration logistics management and medical devices. The new and larger space features a Student innovation and Invention lab designed for use by FAU student-based teams working on industry projects. Also included is a dedicated office for the annual FAU Business Plan Competition winner. “Success by our graduates has attracted attention to our brand of special assistance available to startup technology companies,”

said Andrew Duffell, president and CEO of the Research Park at Florida Atlantic University. “Under one roof, resident companies find resources for mentors, investors, community collaborators, and business services such as accounting, all in close proximity to FAU research and faculty.” “The Incubator provides a stimulating environment every day,” said Edwin Hernandez, owner, EGLA Corp., a tenant in the Incubator. “When like businesses work in close proximity of one another, you find a variety of mentors and a collection of bright minds to tap into and bounce off new ideas. It creates an exciting synergy.” Available programs include applied research directed at the tenant’s specific needs, customized educational programs, and access to faculty and students to work for the tenant on a part-time basis. The park also offers professional staff participation in advanced degree programs. “This is the ideal environment, particularly for startups. Some of our tenants are on their second or third startups - they are serial entrepreneurs,” Duffell says. “Many of our tenants are sophisticated, experienced entrepreneurs, but we also have a couple of hundred students who have created startups in the park.” “We want to create an environment in the park that attracts a unique brand of businesses,” says Duffell. “What makes the Research Park and the Incubator different is our affiliation with the university and our programs. The job of developing products and promoting and marketing those products is the tenant’s, but we assist them through the ties that they establish with the university, as well as with other park tenants. We are creating sustainable businesses and sustainable jobs.” Both the Boca Raton and Deerfield Research Parks have sufficient space to add tenants and available land to create new buildings to suite a tenant’s special needs. Research Park at Florida Atlantic University Florida Atlantic Research and Development Authority 3701 FAU Blvd., Ste. 208 Boca Raton, FL 33431 561-416-6092 aduffell@research-park.org www.research-park.org

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REGION 7

Florida Atlantic University:

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Florida Atlantic University and Research Park at Florida Atlantic University

Q&A

Barry T. Rosson Ph.D.

Interim Vice President Th!nk Florida interviewed Barry T. Rosson, Ph.D., interim vice president for research at Florida Atlantic University, on the beneficial relationship between FAU and Florida Atlantic Research Park. Th!nk Florida: In what ways does having access to Florida Atlantic Research Park complement and support your university's research program? Rosson: The research parks offer a host of amenities to the university community including more than 400,000 square feet of space and state-of-the-art technology and equipment to enhance the research and development efforts of our faculty, students and staff. Several tenants in the research parks are developing medical devices and utilizing high-tech medical equipment which FAU does not have. By partnering with tenants in the research parks, our faculty and students have access to millions of dol-

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lars worth of equipment spanning a broad range of fields including medicine, medical technology and environmental sciences. Giving our students access to this type of technology is critical because it provides them with unique opportunities for specialized training and practical experience as an enhancement to their education. Another unique aspect of the research park is the Technology Business Incubator which currently houses 19 emerging technology companies across multiple industries. It’s important to mention that the synergy between FAU and the research parks extends beyond just the sciences, engineering and business. Our faculty and students have worked with tenants in the research parks on various projects involving graphic design, photography, linguistics and education. Th!nk Florida: Describe some ways in which the university research program has, in return, benefited Florida Atlantic Research Park. Rosson: There are significant advantages for businesses situated in the research parks, including access to the university’s state-of-the-art equipment and the opportunity to collaborate with university professors through partnering and consulting. As companies locate to the research park, they become part of a networked environment, sharing resources and expertise with other companies in the park as well as with the university. This network is especially useful for startup companies. FAU and tenants in the research parks have pursued programs of mutual interest including applied research directed at the industry partner’s specific needs, joint funded research, customized educational programs and employee training and continuing education. FAU is also able to assist tenants in their employee recruitment efforts, particularly in science, engineering and computer science. NovaVision, which initially started in the Technology Business Incubator, is developing a medical device to provide

therapy that may restore vision in stroke and traumatic brain injury patients with visual deficits. They have sought expertise from FAU’s Center for Complex Systems and Brain Sciences as well as the College of Engineering and Computer Science and the College of Business. The Arc Center and Art School located in the research park is a school for children with special needs. Working directly with the Center, students in FAU’s College of Engineering and Computer Science designed and developed a special “musical” walker for the children in the school. In addition, our College of Business is currently working with the school on a strategic business plan for future growth and development. Researchers in the Louis and Anne Green Memory and Wellness Center at FAU have worked jointly with Glades Medical to research and develop instruments to diagnose dementia. Th!nk Florida: What areas of research, science and technology do you see enhancing the relationship between your university's research program and Florida Atlantic University Research Park? Rosson: As FAU’s medical school and programs advance, businesses in healthcare, medical devices, diagnostics and therapeutics will be instrumental for the success of our students and faculty, as well as our medical and biomedical research enterprise. The university has previously partnered with healthcare and medical companies in the research parks to conduct joint research and to develop medical devices and diagnostic tools. The medical school will also serve as a magnet to attract industry and businesses in this field to the research park. Florida Atlantic University 777 Glades Road Boca Raton, FL 33431 (561) 297-3000


Faculty and student researchers are at work in more than 40 research centers. CAMPUS PROFILE

New breed of American university

On a bright October day in 1964, the 36th president of the United States squinted into the South Florida sun and declared Florida Atlantic University officially open. "It is time now for a new, adventurous, imaginative, courageous breakthrough - for a new revolution in education in America," said Lyndon Baines Johnson in his famous Southern drawl. "From its very inception, FAU was envisioned as the first of a new breed of American universities that would quite deliberately throw off the ivy-covered trappings of the tradition-bound world of academe and invent new and better ways of making higher education available to those who sought it," according to the college’s website. FAU opened its doors as the first public university in Southeast Florida and the first in America designed for upper division students only. Since then, FAU has pushed the boundaries of higher education. "Today, the university is a greatly expanded institution spanning seven campuses and serving 28,000 students from first-time-incollege freshmen to graduate students," according to the website. FAU students can choose among more than 170 degree programs. Faculty and student researchers are at work in more than 40 research centers. Additionally, the university presents hundreds of cultural and educational events every year to engage members of the outside community. FAU's first and largest campus sits on more than 850 acres just east of Interstate 95 in Boca Raton. The campus features everything you expect from a modern university including stateof-the-art labs and classrooms, suite-style housing for students, plus athletic and recreational facilities. It is also home to the A.D. Henderson University School, FAU High School and FAU Research Park. Innovative programs include The Lifelong Learning Society, which is dedicated to offering intellectually enriching educational experiences to adults of all ages. The non-credit courses with state-of-the-art facilities are particularly popular for senior citizens. More than 19,500 students register each year for the classes. There is a varied curriculum as well as concerts and

entertainment. Course offerings taught by professors include such varied subjects as foreign policy, music, art, history, science, literature, philosophy, current events and films. - The College Reach-Out Program provides academic support to assist students in grades six through 12 to successfully pursue and complete a post-secondary education. Program components include academic tutoring, summer enrichment programs and others. The Office of Multicultural Affairs aims to be a leader in fostering a supportive academic environment and increasing retention of the diversified student population in higher education. The Book Loan Program helps FAU students on a temporary basis who are financially unable to purchase books. Books are issued on a first-come, first-served basis and are dependent upon availability. "Some universities measure greatness in decades and centuries. Florida Atlantic University measures it with every student who earns a degree, every researcher who makes a discovery, and every community that is transformed," states the college’s website.

FAST FACTS: Florida Atlantic University Students: 28,000+. Programs: 67 bachelor's degrees, 60 master's degrees, 20 doctoral degrees. Popular majors: Top undergraduate programs are elementary education, biological sciences, accounting, pyschology, criminal justice, business administration, visual art, communication and media studies, nursing and political science. Libraries: 2.5 million items, including books, periodicals, government documents, microforms, maps, media and other materials. 200,000 full-text electronic books and 20,000 full-text electronic journals, plus access to several hundred proprietary databases. Research: In 2008-09, sponsored research


Boca City Lifestyle

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The Town That Mizner Built If you live in or visit Boca Raton, don’t even try to escape the influence of Addison Cairus Mizner. He’s everywhere. A tall, colorful but hugely talented man known for traipsing around with a spider monkey (Johnnie Brown) on one shoulder and a nameless parrot on the other, he was America’s best-known architect in 1925 when he started his most ambitious project: develop a fabulous resort at Boca Raton. Schools, streets and restaurants are named after him. There’s an 11-foot statue at Mizner Boulevard and US 1. And there’s even a Monkey Bar at the upscale Boca Raton Resort. This is a modern, middlesized city of about 83,000 residents whose name means “Mouse Mouth” in Spanish, attributed to its location as an inlet. Much of its makeup today was molded in the booming 1920s. Boca Raton’s strict development code gives it a stark and businesslike look because it prohibits such commonplace Florida staples as flashy car dealers, tall buildings and garish signs. Even major highways have no big direction signs, and billboards are banned in the city. Boca is known for its affluent social community and high-income demographics. Ala' Mizner, the building style is mostly Spanish and Mediterranean.

Where to go

Art is big here. One of South Florida's finest cultural attractions, the Boca Raton Museum of Art, presents changing exhibitions from well-known national and international artists. The museum's permanent collection includes a classy assembly of modern masters including works by Degas, Matisse, Modigliani and Picasso; important American and European modern and contemporary works by artists ranging from Louise Nevelson to Andy Warhol; an outstanding photography collection; and important collections of Pre-Columbian and African art. Most visitors quickly find their way to the upscale lifestyle center

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Mizner Park, which is the site for the Boca Raton Museum. This is the area's premier place to shop, dine and settle down for various types of entertainment in a state-of-the-art amphitheater accommodating 5,000 people, and a 1,800-seat concert hall. Boca Raton is part of the seven-town area known as the Palm Beaches, a seaside stretch of Southeast Florida that was pioneered by railroad builder Henry Flagler. He opened the Royal Poinciana luxury hotel in Palm Beach in 1894 and called it "paradise." Only minutes away from Boca are some of South Florida’s most well-liked attractions including: - The world-famous Ann Norton Sculpture Gardens in West Palm Beach gives visitors of all ages a rare look at the life’s work of a great American sculptor. Her often oversized works of bronze, stone and wood are built directly into the gardens, which invoke mystery and suspense for viewers. - The Jupiter Inlet Lighthouse & Museum offers climbing tours of the land-

mark 1860 lighthouse. The waterfront museum in the restored WWII building offers indoor Florida history exhibits, outdoor exhibits, and a pioneer homestead building. Call ahead to ask about sunset tours. If you happen to be there at the right time, you might see a wedding. - Florida's only drive-through safari and walk-through amusement park just outside of West Palm Beach is long-established Lion Country Safari. Viewers in cars can imagine they are on a real safari as they see more than 900 animals in their natural habitat during a four-mile drive. Time your visit with animal feeding times. Note that convertibles are banned.

Where to eat (upscale)

The Addison occupies the historic building that was once home and office for Addison Mizner. This is a long-time Boca favorite where locals like their steaks, chops and seafood. Another local favorite is 32 East. Believing that the best ingredients make the best food, chef Nick Morfogen


creates a daily menu, incorporating what's freshest at the market. Artfully presented plates include pan-seared salmon, grilled scallops, glazed halibut, and grilled pork chops. In season, locals also create crowds at Kathy’s Gazebo Cafe, which is another long-time favorite. Duck and shellfish are also exceptional, keeping company with such standards as calf's liver and veal with morel mushrooms.

Where to eat (affordable)

Mixing the convenience and accessibility of a diner with Greek and Italian fare, the Kosta Greek Eatery is a neighborhood favorite any time of day. Their decor can be described as “functiona” at best, but they take their mission seriously: warding off hunger. Good-sized portions, friendly service and plenty of Greek favorites.

Outdoor activities and sports

The Atlantic Ocean beaches east of Boca are among the best in South Florida. Try Red Reef Park, which is open seven days a week. Access to the beach and the Atlantic Ocean is available from designated locations. Snorkeling is popular here and lifeguards are on duty seven days a week from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. The South County Regional Park is perhaps the city’s best sports complex. In addition to baseball and softball fields, the facility has 19 tennis courts, four children’s play areas, picnic pavilions, bike paths and exercise courts. There’s also a Canine Cover dog park. The city boast is true: it’s never too cold to play golf here. Boca Raton has more than 22

golf courses, most of them private but also an inexpensive city-owned course, the Boca Raton Municipal, that is open 365 days from daylight to dark. For $15, visitors can play all day.

Shopping

The Town Center at Boca Raton features approximately 220 specialty stores, including Tiffany & Co., WilliamsSonoma, Cartier, Hugo Boss, Godiva Chocolatier and many others. The department stores are Bloomingdale's, Macy’s, Neiman Marcus, Nordstrom, Saks Fifth Avenue and Sears. The Shops at Boca Center is a boutique luxury collection. The open-air plaza features more than 30 shops with the latest European fashions and several fine dining restaurants.

Events

The city of Boca Raton puts on a series of free events throughout the year that

range from "Summer Music in the Park" to "Holiday Tree Lightings." Families will enjoy the Sol Children Theatre Troupe, where plays year-round often focus on classics such as the Grimm Brothers’ Hansel and Gretel tale. Tickets are under $10.

Nightlife

They’re not plentiful, but Boca does have some inviting places for nightlife. Elwood’s Dixie Bar-B-Q has live music nightly featuring local talent. That’s also one enticement of Navaka Bar, but if you’re tired of the same old alcoholic drinks, ask for a Kava, which is based on a root used in the South Pacific. The bar claims it is the first and only establishment in all of North America to serve the euphoric drink. Gatsby’s is an always-busy bar known as “singles central.” It offers bigscreen TVs, microbrews and martinis. Thursday college nights are especially popular, as are Friday happy hours.

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................................................... UM Life Science & Technology Park ...................................................

University of Miami Life Science & Technology Park has Global Appeal The mission of the UMLSTP is to provide first-class facilities in an urban park setting that promotes research, collaboration between the university and private and public enterprise, and economic benefits to the local community. It will bring meaningful medical and technological advances to the world. Development of the park will also make a direct impact on the South Florida economy, resulting in the creation of jobs and further diversifying the region’s economic landscape.

A private-public partnership

William D. Hunter Regional Leasing Director The University of Miami has long been one of the world’s top research institutions. With its laboratories, clinics and classrooms, UM researchers pursue discoveries that improve people’s lives. As UM’s research program has continued to gain international momentum - and attract leaders in a broad range of influential disciplines - a focus on life sciences and technology has emerged as vital to the university’s future. UM raised $1 billion through fundraising efforts to expand the scope and impact of bioscience and other leading-edge technologies. The UM Life Science & Technology Park represents some of the first fruits of that focus. Located in Miami’s Health District, which includes the University of Miami Leonard M. Miller School of Medicine, six hospitals and one of the largest health care footprints in the country, the UMLSTP is expected to comprise best-in-class facilities that nurture research, development and commercialization of university-based innovations.

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The UMLSTP is a predominantly privately-funded endeavor developed by Wexford Miami, LLC, a subsidiary of Wexford Science & Technology, LLC, in partnership with UM. The park will be home to research facilities that bridge academia and industry, thereby fostering collaboration and innovation. UMLSTP is located on an 8.8-acre site bounded by Interstate 95 on the east, NW 7th Avenue on the west, NW 17th Street on the south and NW 20th Street on the north. Construction has begun, and R&D Building One opened in 2011. “Recognizing that a truly international city requires a diverse economy capable of riding out down cycles, Miami is now turning to the life sciences and biotechnology sector as the proverbial ‘third-leg’ of the economic stool - with the region’s proximity to the Americas playing a key role in that plan,” said Joe Reagan, vice president of Wexford Science & Technology, LLC, the developer of UMLSTP. “At the center of this ‘big bet on biotech’ is the UM Life Science & Technology Park, a state-of-the-art research complex under way in Miami’s Health District. The park is drawing interest among knowledge-based research and product development teams seeking to advance the creation and commercialization of life science and technology prod-

ucts, services and treatments,” he said in Real Estate Forum magazine.

A worldclass gateway location

There are already more than 1,700 life sciences companies in Miami, including the likes of Beckman Coulter, BD, Boston Scientific, Cordis and Schering-Plough Steifel Laboratories. The UMLSTP will continue to foster this environment with a park aimed at startups and global entities alike in a gateway city that offers unique advantages. “Our firm set its sights on Miami after finding success building similar research parks with universities in Baltimore, Philadelphia, Chicago and other U.S. cities in large part because of the University of Miami’s rapidly growing sponsored research activity and faculty recruitments,” Reagan told Real Estate Forum. “An added advantage is Miami’s existing business infrastructure and potential as a global center for scientific innovation. In contrast with other life science clusters across the nation, the UMLSTP is just minutes away from an international airport and Downtown Miami, one of the country’s largest centers of global banking and commerce.” Indeed, Miami is a global hub for international companies doing business in Europe, Asia and Africa, not to mention Latin America. Miami is home to more than 150 consulates, trade office and binational chambers of commerce, more air service from Miami International Airport to Latin America and the Caribbean than any other U.S. airport, and strong logistical and multimodal infrastructure to move goods and services around the world. “For foreign companies seeking to break into the U.S. market, this project serves as a ‘soft landing’ spot given Miami’s diverse community and the large contin-


CASE STUDY

TENANT INTERVIEW

The Miami Innovation Center

gent of multilingual faculty members at UM,” Reagan said. “For domestic and multinational firms with an existing U.S. presence, the UMLSTP will be a gateway to lucrative markets across Latin America and the Caribbean, where spending as a portion of GDP has grown by 51 percent in recent years.”

Ground-floor opportunity

The UMLSTP’s current master plan includes five buildings offering between 1.6 and 2 million square feet of space. The project made headlines in June 2010 when it announced that UM would be leasing 80,000 square feet of space in R&D Building One, making it the UMLSTP’s first major tenant. The building topped-off construction in mid-September 2010 and is now 40 percent leased. UMLSTP’s site plan aims to attract a diverse group of biotech and life science companies. The park will incorporate a 24/7 Green “U” mixed-use approach focusing on facilities that accommodate life science researchers and healthcare organizations, as well as services like on-site parking, shuttling and tram access with connections to the Metrorail and public buses, and public open space and amenities

that meet the future needs of an urban research and business park as a center for technology development. In addition to lab and office space, the park will contain restaurants and retail to serve the Miami Health District and residents of nearby neighborhoods. The development of the UMLSTP’s first building is projected to create more than 1,150 direct and indirect jobs, with an additional 2,700plus direct and indirect positions created by ongoing operations, according to a recent study by the Washington Economics Group.

University of Miami Life Science & Technology Park 1951 NW 7th Avenue Miami, Florida 33136 www.UMLSTP.com Wexford Miami, LLC Mobile: (305) 298-4578 Email: whunter@wexfordequities.com www.wexfordequities.com

Miami Innovation Center provides an ideal staging point for business. This includes those who wish to do business with the hospitals and institutes of the health district and the University of Miami's Miller School of Medicine. Also important is the close proximity to Miami's central business district, located just five minutes and two stops away via the region's Metrorail system. "We are proud to be a part of the health district community, the ground breaking research being done by UM and affiliated institutions, and what clearly is the key economic driver for Miami's future." says Ms. Rendeiro. "We are honored to be a part of what Wexford and UM have been doing, and look forward to tying together the expertise that they and long term stakeholders Jackson, VA Hospital and many others have been doing. Miami's future looks bright from where we stand." The Miami Health Disctict is the se ond largest medical district in the US. With five hospitals and leading Institutes all located here, the Miami Health District is a key economic driver for Miami. It will continbue to play an important part of its future prosperity. On the east end of the health district, the UM Life Science & Technology Park is the crown jewel of making Miami a prominent science and research center, with a key driver being the groundbreaking medical care being provided in the district. UM's research programs and leading researchers such as stem cell expert Dr. Joshua Hare, the innovators at top ranked eye hospital Bascom Palmer, make Miami an innovation center on the rise and the core of a leading research cluster in South Florida.

8 For more information: www.MiamiInnovationCente .com

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UM Life Science & Technology Park ................................................... ...................................................

University of Miami and University of Miami Life Science & Technology Park devices, biotechnology, IT and pharmaceuticals. We will encourage new companies to take root and nurture the development of spinoffs based on UM technology.

Q&A

Richard J. Bookman, Ph.D. Vice Provost for Research

Th!nk Florida interviewed Richard J. Bookman, Ph.D., vice provost for research at the University of Miami, on the beneficial relationship between UM and the University of Miami Life Science & Technology Park. Th!nk Florida: In what ways does having access to the University of Miami Life Science & Technology Park complement and support your university's research program? Bookman: UM sees the University of Miami Life Science & Technology Park as the Latin American headquarters for healthcare and life sciences. This complements perfectly our research programs by hosting partners from industry in medical

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Th!nk Florida: Describe some ways in which the university research program has, in return, benefited the University of Miami Life Science & Technology Park. Bookman: Our research program will benefit the University of Miami Life Science & Technology Park because we spin out many innovative ideas for new companies, and the park will be a great place for them to take up residence. The park’s proximity to the Miller School of Medicine and its outstanding clinical and research programs are clearly a draw for new and existing companies.

Th!nk Florida: What areas of research, science and technology do you see enhancing the relationship between your university's research program and the University of Miami Life Science & Technology Park? Bookman: We anticipate that initiatives in biomedical sciences and information technology will enhance the relationship between our research program and the University of Miami Life Science & Technology Park. We also want to encourage the growth of green technology. University of Miami Coral Gables, FL 33124 Phone: 305-284-2211 www.miami.edu


"Cardboard College" Emerges as a Leading U.S. University CAMPUS PROFILE

The University of Miami has come a long way since it was dreamed of in the 1920s during the region's famous real estate boom. Its history started auspiciously enough with the support of one-time U.S. presidential candidate William Jennings Bryan. But when money ran short, work could not be completed on a new dormitory. In a rush to finish the job, cardboard-covered partitions were used to separate rooms, leading to the name "Cardboard College." In September, just before the first classes were to begin, the monster hurricane of 1926 swept through South Florida, causing destruction that left the university further in debt. In spite of tremendous adversity, the university managed to open its doors in 1926, offering programs in the liberal arts and music to 560 students. The School of Law was added in 1928, and the schools of Business and Education were created in 1929. "The Florida depression that followed the collapse of the real estate market and the national depression that started in 1929 added further financial burdens that brought the survival of the school into question," states the college's website. The president of the college had to resort to borrowing on his personal insurance policy to pay faculty salaries. Its status has risen since then to the point where in 2010, U.S. News & World Report named UM as the No. 1 school in Florida. It also ranked No. 47 in its listings of "America's Best Colleges," and several of its programs were cited in "America's Best Graduate Schools." A private research university with more than 15,000 students from around the world, UM is comprised of a dozen schools and colleges where 180 majors and programs are offered. The school is known as a major research university engaged in more than $326 million in research and sponsored programs. While the majority of this work is housed at the Miller School of Medicine, investigators conduct dozens of studies in other areas that include marine science, engineering, education and psychology, among others. Add to that its attractive

nature: tall palms, wide lawns, flowering vines, outdoor sculptures, and even a butterfly garden make the university's 260-acre campus a stop for tourists visiting the area. For undergraduate students, learning here not only takes place inside the classroom but also outside of it. In addition to the coursework offered in more than 180 undergraduate majors and programs, students learn by doing through a variety of activities and projects. These include pairings in undergraduate research projects with a faculty mentor; possible study abroad; internships; and summer experience-building programs. The college is particularly proud of its libraries, which rank among the top research libraries in North America with a combined collection of more than 3.2 million volumes, with 74,000 current electronic and print serials.

FAST FACTS: University of Miami Students: 15,000+. Programs: 113 bachelor's degrees, 106 master's degrees, and 53 doctoral degrees (49 research/scholarship and four professional practice). Popular majors: Business/marketing, social sciences, biology, visual and performing arts, communications/journalism, psychology and health professions. Libraries: More than 3.2 million volumes, with 74,000 current electronic and print serials. Research: Research and sponsored program expenditures totaled $318 million (FY '09). UM ranked 62nd of all universities in expenditures of federal funds for research and development (FY '08).


Miami City Lifestyle

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For visitors, the Real Miami is the Beach Side Visitors aren't always aware of this: There is a Miami and a Miami Beach. The Miami that is often missed by most visitors is one of the country's largest cities. It is a rarity in that it was founded by a woman, Julie Tuttle, a citrus grower. Since it was founded in the late 1890s, the city of 300 has become one of the United States' largest with more than 5.5 million residents. It has been described as the "Gateway to the Americas." It is perhaps best known for having the largest concentration of international banks in the U.S. Miami Beach is a city of perhaps 100,000 that is best known for its many miles of beaches and as a place that knows

arts and cultural landscape. Miami Beach, where most visitors will likely spend most of their time here, is a rare destination.

how to throw a party. That reputation grew with the popular 1980s television program "Miami Vice." But that is also a simplification because visitors who look beyond the sand and lounging around at the "in" hangouts of South Beach also find there's a lot more to do here. Families find a range of activities that go from high-tech gadgetry to animal shows where dolphins do backflips and parrots ride bicycles. This is the subtropics, after all, and natural wonders are also the norm here. The miles of beaches are an attraction for all ages, of course, but visitors find a vibrant

If you want to get away from the crowds, Virginia Key Beach in Key Biscayne is ultra-secluded, where you can substitute shady areas for hordes of people. A long-time favorite for visitors: the 38 acres of entertainment, shows and exhibits at the Miami Seaquarium. It's home for "Lolita," the Killer Whale, and TV superstar "Flipper." For land animals, the 327-acre Miami Zoo with 1,200 animals is often rated among the top 10 in the country. Visitors find koalas, flamingos and elephants in large, open-air exhibits. Don't miss the nation's largest 20th Century

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What to do

You start with the beaches. If you choose a busy one, head for South Beach where all your needs - including dozens of food and drink concession stands, rented beach chairs, watersport rentals and just about anything else you might need - are provided. Lifeguards are on patrol. It is the best place in the area to watch the many cruise ships sailing out to sea. And there are hiking areas.

National Register Historic District, which is right here. The area features more than 800 historic buildings erected during the 1920s, '30s and '40s. Walking, bicycle and private group tours are available.

Outdoor and participatory sports

Miami is the only place in the country with two national parks: Everglades National Park, an untamed ecosystem unlike any found elsewhere, and Biscayne National Park, the only living tropical reef within the continental U.S. If you're a diver, Biscayne National Park has been rated as one of the 20 best reefs au natural. The park sprawls over 180,000 acres. It's simply a diver's dream. But diver or not, the Everglades Park is for everyone. It's the only place in the world where alligators and crocodiles exist side by side. If that was its only claim to fame, it would suffice, but it's also a World Heritage Site and a Wetland of International Importance. What that means to its millions of visitors is that you'll find a rich bird population and tropical plants you've never seen before. Ranger-led walks and talks are offered year-round, as are boat and tram tours. Reservations are suggested. The 1.5 million-acre-park has four visitor centers, miles of hiking and biking nature trails, and excellent flat fishing. Other amenities include a full-service marina, boat launching ramps, motor and nonmotorized boat rentals and camping facilities.

Where to eat (upscale)

Dining here is distinguished by its diversity. With so many different cultures, how could it be anything else? Be warned: prices here are not the highest you'll find in big cities, but they are far from cheap. Over the years, Joe's Stone Crab has perhaps had the most publicity . One thing is sure: if you go during normal dining hours you will have to wait. Historically, its policy has been no reservations.


Consider trying some other upscale places such as Ola, where famed chef Douglas Rodriguez creates his famous Nuevo Latino Cuisine in South Beach. His ceviche is highly creative. Wish serves classic American cooking with accents from contemporary Asian cuisine. It offers outdoor and indoor dining. Cascata Grill is located in the famous Fairmont Turnberry Isle Resort & Club in Aventura, offering innovative Florida food infusing the freshest and most interesting regional and organic ingredients. There are small, medium and large dishes on the menu to please all appetites at this award-winning restaurant.

Juice. For perhaps the best people-watching restaurant in the area, try the News Cafe on the Atlantic Ocean in South Beach.

Believe it or not, similar to New York City, diners can easily find affordable eateries among the area's many upscale dining choices. The tiny, 18-seat lime fresh Mexican Grill offers a signature homemade salsa bar. The 11th St. Diner offers great breakfasts. A La Folie has an authentic French feel with perhaps the best crepes in South Florida. Large TVs and huge desserts are on hand at Big Pink. Cheeseburger Baby has the real thing: greasy hamburgers. This isn't the cheapest place for sandwiches but it might be the best in town: Le Sandwicherie. For smoothies and wraps, served promptly and in the friendliest fashion, try Ocean

Everyone knows summers are hot in Florida, but events are cool in Miami where the summer is perhaps the busiest time. There's everything from restaurant and auto shows, to triathlons and bed races. The area is also known for its many film festivals. Throughout the year, arts-related events are popular. There's a Chilean and an Italian Film Festival, among others, and film offerings such as the Miami Jazz Film Festival that focuses on jazz and films. During August and September, more than 100 of the area's top restaurants offer three-course meals (lunch, $22, dinner, $35) with signature dishes created by world-renowned chefs.

Where to eat (affordable)

Shopping

For size alone, the 280-store, 2.7 million square feet Aventura Mall will attract your attention. It's got all the big name stores, a 24-screen AMC movie theater and a dozen restaurants. Lincoln Road is another wellknown pedestrian mall known for unique shops, galleries and restaurants. It's recommended for shoppers and non-shoppers because it has indoor and outdoor seating for those who only want to watch the passing people parade.

Events

Every Sunday, there's an open-air market at Mary Brickell Village, featuring olive oil, pastas, baked goods, plants, arts and crafts, jewelry and more.

Nightlife

With some thanks due to "Miami Vice," nightspots are everywhere, of course. But recognized as one of the country's hottest by People Magazine is Mansion. The club's residence-meets-nightlife concept features multiple floors of design and architectural decadence. It's often host to the area's most memorable parties. Locals can often be found at the Play Bar & Lounge. There's a cabaret show on Sundays. One of South Beach's most elegant and sophisticated nighttime destinations is the Gemma Lounge, which is within easy walking distance of the hotels near the Miami Beach Convention Center.

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Florida Tech Research Park:

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Florida Tech Research Park at Melbourne International Airport—Your High Tech Future Starts Here! Space Coast, as well as Enterprise Florida, Space Florida, NASA, and other government and civic organizations. We believe that a world-class university should exhibit world-class citizenship. To that end our office is always looking for opportunities to become a more viable part of our community. The Florida Tech mantra is “High Tech with a Human Touch.” The office of external relations will ensure that the human touch extends well beyond the boundaries of our main campus.

Winston Scott Senior VP External Relations and Economic Development Welcome to the office of External Relations and Economic Development. As one of the newest entities on campus, we are extremely excited about doing our part to enhance the tremendous growth which Florida Institute of Technology is currently undergoing. Our office is focused, among other things, on the development of the Florida Tech Research Park (FTRP) at Melbourne International Airport, currently home to more than 75 high tech, global companies. We are thrilled at the variety of cuttingedge corporations and diverse technologies represented. These industry leaders are involved in activities ranging from aerospace and aviation, to communications and cybersecurity. We are excited and welcome our universitie’s expanding role in our local, state, national and world communities. We are privileged to be a member of the Melbourne Regional Chamber of East Central Florida and My Region while working closely with the Economic Development Commission of Florida’s

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Through the creation of the FTRP at the airport, FT and the airport embark on an innovative partnership aim at fostering economic development and increasing the region’s high tech competitiveness. We invite you to call or email if you have questions about Florida Tech or the FTRP. We hope you will plan a visit to meet our external relations staff and tour the research park. Join us in collaboration, design to enhance and expand Brevard’s’ counties technology-research infrastructure and create jobs for the Space Coast and Central Florida.

Emil Buehler Center for Aviation Training and Research

Discover Florida Tech Research Park The Florida Tech Research Park is where the elements for innovation, development and economic growth partner with business and community in collaboration with a national research university, Florida Institute of Technology. Located within 6200 acres of Melbourne International Airport, on Brevard County’s Space Coast, the intermodal transportation hub is home to many hightech companies and research-based facilities. Site incentives are in place for prime office and research space as well as available buildto-suit sites for immediate development. The FTRP's first phase of 100 acres, envisions 10 major buildings offering up to 600,000 square feet of office/research space and as many as 3,000 jobs. Future phases — an additional 500 acres of developable land is available — could boost space to more than 1 million square feet and as many as 10,000 jobs.


CASE STUDY

TENANT INTERVIEW

Revolution Technologies, LLC.

When you locate your company to the Florida Tech Research Park at Melbourne International Airport, get ready for things to happen. This park presents technological and innovative businesses of all sizes with the opportunity to join one of the most promising research parks in the country. The park’s ideal location on Florida’s Space Coast offers exceptional quality of life, convenient support services and amenities, a high-tech work force, business friendly incentives, strong research partners and key intermodal transportation links by land, sea, air and space, making it a natural incubator for research, innovation and success. The park is located in Foreign Trade Zone No. 136, which is operated in conjunction with Port Canaveral, facilitating close cooperation between the two major transportation facilities. U.S. Customs operations located at the airport are available to clear shipments and provide assistance. This proximity can offer significant savings to companies that import and export products. Having the airport land for the research park in place, major high-tech companies on site as well as near-by and an on-site business incubation center are major pluses that make this park stand out.

“High Tech with a Human Touch”

Florida Tech is respected as one of the nation’s top research universities and is known for its “High Tech with a Human Touch” approach. Its 5 colleges, combined

with more than 20 centers and institutes, over 75 laboratories and distinguished research faculty, offer outstanding research capabilities to support and collaborate with research park tenants. Focused industry research sectors include: • •

Aerospace and Aviation Cybersecurity and Assured Information • Human Factors • Energy, Ecology and Environmental Systems Industry leaders from around the globe are quickly learning that their access to a skilled workforce; the prestige of being in a research park associated with a world-class national research university with its faculty, facilities, and equipment—access to the pool of knowledge the Space Coast as to offer, as well as Melbourne’s business friendly climate are all reasons to call the Florida Tech Research Park home. Take the next step for the future of your company by contacting us to find out how we can help. Economic Development Office Florida Tech Research Park at Melbourne International Airport One Air Terminal Parkway Suite 113 Melbourne, Florida 32901 (321) 914-0742 FTRP@fit.edu www.FIT.edu/researchpark

Announces new corporate headquarters building on Melbourne International Airport in the Florida Tech Research Park. (FTRP) According to Founder and CEO, Ted Parker, “This new facility will allow Revolution Technologies expansion capability in order to support our growth plans both locally and nationally, as well as host functions for the Melbourne community.” The expected move in date is April, 2013. Revolution Technologies, LLC. has signed build-to-suit lease agreement with developer Sutton Properties for the 17,000 square foot corporate headquarters. Sutton Properties has been developing in Brevard County since 1972 and has received several design and landscaping awards for their projects. The building will be designed by the Holeman Group, and other participants are Ingenuity Engineers, Bennett Engineering & Consulting, and MK Structural Engineering. Revolution Technologies LLC is focused on providing IT, Engineering and Professional services and solutions to over 100 of the Fortune 1000 firms and the Federal Government nationwide. The Company operates within two of the fastest growth segments in the staffing industry--VMS/MSP as an engagement model and IT as a vertical, particularly SAP and Oracle implementations.

8 For more information: www.Revolutiontechnologies.com www.SuttonFL.com

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REGION 9

Florida Tech Research Park:

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Florida Institute of Technology and the Florida Tech Research Park at Melbourne International Airport

Florida Tech is located in Melbourne, Fla., a residential community just five minutes from Atlantic Coast beaches and a historic riverside downtown. Main campus spans 130 acres, about 16 of which are home to the university’s own Botanical Garden, a lush oasis of subtropical plant and animal life. The climate in Melbourne is warm and sunny; the average daily temperature is 76°F/24°C. With the Indian River Lagoon and the Atlantic Ocean less than 5 miles from the campus, water sports such as swimming, sailing, surfing, diving, fishing and boating are year-round activities. Bicycling and skateboarding are popular modes of campus transportation. Florida Tech’s proximity to the Atlantic coastline of central Florida in Brevard County, better known as the

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“Space Coast,” puts the university in the center of the state’s High Tech Corridor, which is home to Kennedy Space Center, United Space Alliance, Harris Corporation, and many other scientific government agencies and technology companies. The area has the most concentrated high-tech economy in the state and one of the largest high-tech workforces in the nation, which means ample opportunity for students to find internships, co-op positions and jobs. Melbourne’s attractive, strong, hightech climate and business incentives are matched only by its natural resources, many of them ideal for scientific study and research. These include the estuarine habitats of the Indian River Lagoon, the Atlantic Ocean marine ecosystem, area beaches and wetlands, thousands of acres of protected wildlife habitats, and a variety

of tropical/subtropical Gulf Stream weather phenomena. Research and field projects spearheaded by Florida Tech professors often take students to exotic locations all over the world—from Peru to the Alaskan Arctic and Hungary to Australia. Central Florida attractions such as Walt Disney World, Sea World, Universal Orlando and Kennedy Space Center are about an hour’s drive away; Miami is just 3 hours south of the campus.

Florida Institute of Technology 150 West University Blvd. Melbourne, Florida 32901 Phone: 321-674-8000 www.fit.edu


CAMPUS PROFILE

“High Tech with a Human Touch” In 2008, Florida Tech celebrated its 50th anniversary. Since then, the university has engaged in over $74 million in new construction on the Melbourne, Fla. campus. Recent additions include a state-of-the-art dining facility, aquatic center and residence village, as well as two new academic centers of excellence, the Scott Center for Autism Treatment and Harris Center for Science and Engineering, both designed to further enhance student learning through basic and applied research.

FAST FACTS: Florida Institute of Technology (Florida Tech) Students: 14,000 students served. Florida Institute of Technology is unique among Florida colleges and universities in that it offers the resources of a national research institution as well as the robust, personalized learning experiences of a small college; a combination the university calls “High Tech with a Human Touch.” As a result, Florida Tech students benefit from the rigor of strong academic programs, meaningful relationships with expert faculty, and the excitement of a diverse and dynamic campus life. In official terms, Florida Tech is a regionally accredited, coeducational, independent, privately supported university. But it is so much more. As the only independent technological university in the Southeastern United States, it is also an international center for innovation, high-caliber research and world-class education. A truly global university, Florida Tech attracts students from all 50 United States and more than 100 countries worldwide. The university is ranked a Tier One Best National University by U.S. News and World Report. Additionally, it has been listed as a Barron’s Guide “Best Buy” in college education, ranked a “Best Southeastern College” by The Princeton Review, and named among the top private universities in Florida by Washington Monthly College Rankings.

Programs: The university offers undergraduate, master’s and doctoral programs. Fields of study include science, engineering, aeronautics, business, humanities, mathematics, psychology, communication and education. Popular majors: Mechanical Engineering, Aerospace Engineering, Marine Biology, Aeronautical Science with Flight, Business Administration, Forensic Psychology Research: Over the past decade, Florida Tech has made major additions and improvements to facilities that enhance the research components of nearly all aspects of undergraduate and graduate education. Along with these facility improvements, a number of research centers have been established to focus on particular areas of study and in many cases encourage interdisciplinary collaboration. These centers and the facilities where they are located represent a significant research capability that supplements the various department and program-related activities and facilities.


Melbourne Lifestyle

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Melbourne, FL: An Intermodal City The City of Melbourne, the economic heartbeat of Florida’s Space Coast is a bustling 41 square miles modern city with a population approaching 80,000 residents. With a growing international influence, the Greater Melbourne area of approximately 250,000 people, is made up of many cities, towns, and villages, giving the city and its neighbors a unique quality life few areas can rival.

Where to go

Have you always dreamed of cruising down a beachside highway with the top down, soaking in the scenery and good vibrations? Ever wondered how man reached the moon? Or just want to get back to nature? Stretching 72 miles along Florida's East Coast, the Space Coast is best known as the home of Kennedy Space

Center, its pristine beaches and some of the best surfing in the country, but this is only a taste of what you'll find on our coast! With an average temperature of 76 degrees and at least 300 days of sunshine, Florida's Space Coast is a place to work and play. Bordered by miles of open sand, coves and lush hideaways for naturally exciting eco-adventures, our environment is alive and thriving. Life's a beach on Florida's Space Coast, but you can't do that all day long can you? The area has a great zoo, museums, lots of movie theatres and great restaurants. You’ll want to visit the downtown area of Melbourne where you can sit and eat at an outside restaurant on balmy evenings, hanging out with your friends. The Space Coast has it all! At Brevard Zoo, stroll through shaded boardwalks of Latin America, Native

Florida and Australia featuring over 550 animals including alligator, giant anteaters, cougar, eagles, river otters, parrot feeding and exotic birds in a free-flight aviary, kangaroo, giant fruit bats, several primate species and more. Or explore the "Paws-On Interactive Zone" and contact yard, an adventurous playground full of fun for both children and adults. Or visit some of the Space Coast’s less known gems such as the Astronaut Hall of Fame and see exhibits like Gus Grissom’s Mercury Spacesuit and other parts of the large collection of personal effects of America’s space pioneers, or the Astronaut Memorial Planetarium and Observatory for a show in the 70-foot domed planetarium theater. Play in the Rocket Garden of the Kennedy Space Center’s Visitor Complex only 27 miles north of the FIT campus.

VISIT MELBOURNE O N F L O R I D A ' S S U N N Y AT L A N T I C C O A S T

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Melbourne’s Fine Dining

Along Main Street Historic Downtown Melbourne visitors can dine on a wide variety of cuisines. Just in four city blocks, visitors can dine on sophisticated world foods of Matt’s Casbah to hearty eats of Meg O’Malley’s Restaurant and Irish Pub. Or drive along New Haven Avenue to find other fine establishments like Shells Seafood for distinctive taste and atmosphere.

Cheap Eats in Melbourne

Being a college city has its perks, too. Closer to campus, visitors can find quick and easy eats at places like Old School Pizza or Middle Eastern Aromas. For a quick lunch, Jason’s Deli or Firehouse Subs are always safe bets and quite tasty.

Outdoor Activities and Sports

If the beautiful sunshine is just too much for you, cool off at the Space Coast Iceplex—with open skate every day of the week and matches to attend weeknights. It’s also the home of Florida Tech’s Hockey

Club. Or maybe more serene activities are more to your liking? Then enjoy a nature tour, river ride, sea turtle release or a walk through Erna Nixon Park. For some excitement, catch a game of baseball at the Space Coast Stadium for an up close and personal encounter with the Washington Nationals.

Events

The Space Coast plays host to a number of fantastic events including the Cocoa Beach Jazz Fest, the Cocoa Village Art Festival, the Easter Surfing Festival and the Grant Seafood Festival just to name a few. There’s always something for an evening out on the Space Coast.

Nightlife

There's a bustling nightlife waiting for you onshore. Martini bars and art galleries that turn into dance halls at night are always abuzz and traditional Irish pubs and jazz cabarets host national recording artists to put Melbourne on the map.

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directory

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Florida’s Research and Technology Park Tenants CENTRAL FLORIDA RESEARCH PARK Acudyn www.acudyn.com Advanced Information Systems Group www.aisg.com Advanced Systems Technology Inc/IDE www.astiide.com Aegis Technologies Inc. www.aegis.com Allied Technology Group www. American Systems AOK Networking AON Hewitt Associates Argon AT&T Wireless Atlantis Systems America Inc. AVT Simulation BAE Systems Inc. Bank of America BMH Associates Inc. Boeing Corporation Booz Allen & Hamilton Inc. Carley Corporation Center for Drug Discovery and Diagnostics Chi Systems Inc. Cisco Systems Inc. Cole Engineering Comfort Suites UCF/Research Park Computer Sciences Corporation Cubic Defense Systems 3-D Perception Digital Systems Resources DME Corporation D&S Consultants Dynamic Animation ECS Inc. EDS Information Systems Inc. Experian Information Solutions Fiserv Solutions Inc. General Dynamics General Dynamics C4 Systems Inc. General Dynamics-OTS Gleason Research Associates H.N. Burns Engineering Corp.

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Hudson Highland Group Inc. Ideal Technology Group Infrasafe Institute for Simulation and Training Inter-Coastal Electronics Inc. International Photonics Inc. Invivo Research Inc. J.F. Taylor Inc. JHT Inc. JIL Information Systems JSIMS Kaegan Corporation Kaplan University L-3 Communications L-3 Services Inc. (MPRI) LaQuinta Inn & Suites Laser Institute of America Laser Shot Simulation & Training Center Lightpath Technologies Mentor Graphics Corporation Metters Industries MKI Systems Morgan Research Corporation National Center for Simulation Naval Air Warfare Center Training Systems Division NCI Information Systems Inc. Northrop Grumman Novonics Corporation NSCRYPT PEO STRI Presagis Inc. Pulau Electronics Quadrant Simulation Systems Inc. Raytheon Systems Reiss Environmental Inc. Rockwell Collins RDR SAAB Training USA SAIC Silicon Optix Simigon Inc. Simstaff Technical Services Sparta Inc. Tech USA Inc. Teranex Systems TRW Turbine Technology Services Corporation UCF Biomolecular Research Annex UCF Center for Lifestyle Medicine UCF Division of Continuing Education

UCF Economic Development UCF Federal Credit Union UCF Foundation, Inc. UCF Human Resources UCF Instructional Technology Resource Center UCF Office of Sponsored Research UCF Purchasing Department UCF Technology Incubator UCP of Central Florida/Bailes Campus United Defense University Behavioral Center U.S. Air Force Modeling & Simulation Center U.S. Army Research Institute, Simulator Systems Research Unit U.S. Army Corps of Engineers U.S. Marine Corps Ground Program USGS Valic Vaxdesign Corp. Wyle Laboraties Businesses located at the Central Florida Technology Incubator: 21st Century Learning Solutions 360 Software Inc. 4PSA Abamis IT Solutions Advanced Simulation Research (ASRI) Agilesrc Allogy Interactive AMedia1 APECOR Better Ways to Study BioScript Rx BioTraits Clear Village Inc. Cognition Telematics Collegiate Staffing USA Commercial Training Solution Diversified Industries Electrodynamics Associates Inc. Enterprise Systems Associates Inc. EPIC Engineering & Consulting Excel Recruiting GiveJet GeoCove Grub Taxi H2 It Solutions Innovative Software Products Mydea Technologies Corporation


Pantone 3015 C

Pantone 376 C

Fonts: - Myriad Pro - Prototype

MyInno Venture Nano Discovery LLC NanoSpective NFB Research Labs Inc. NovaComm nSolGel Optigrate Power Education Technologies Speckodyne Corp StrongPoint Research The Safety Doctor

INNOVATION PARK Bing Energy BUC Technologies, LLC College Center for Library Automation (CCLA) Construction Management Development Program and Bond Guarantee Program (CMDP-BGP) Danfoss Turbocor Compressors, Inc. Danfoss Turbocor Compressors, Inc. Department of Agriculture and Consumer Affairs Bureau of Seafood and Aquaculture Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) - Bureau of Mining & Minerals Regulation Department of Transportation (DOT) Structural Research Laboratory Design Arts Educational Development Group FAMU Center for Plasma Science and Technology Florida Center for Interactive Media (FCIM) Florida Center for Reading Research (FCRR) Florida Cybersecurity Institute Florida Distance Learning Consortium Florida State Center on Better Health and Life for Underserved Populations (BHL Center) FSU Applied Superconductivity Center FSU – Aeropropulsion, Mechatronics and Energy FSU Beaches and Shores Resource Center FSU Center for Advanced Power Systems FSU Center for Advancement of Learning and Assessment (CALA) FSU Center for Biomedical and

Toxicological Research and Hazardous Waste Management FSU Center for Information Management & Educational Services (CIMES) FSU Center for Ocean, Atmospheric Prediction Studies (COAPS) FSU Enterprise Resource Planning FSU Foundation, Inc. FSU Human Subjects FSU Institute for Energy Systems, Economics, and Sustainability (IESES) FSU Institute for International Cooperative Environmental Research (IICER) FSU Office of Intellectual Property Development & Commercialization FSU Research Foundation, Inc. Garlin Enterprises Green Phosphor High Performance Materials Institute (HPMI) Infrastructure Marketing Group, LLC Leon County Research & Development Authority nanoStrata, Inc. National High Magnetic Field Laboratory National Park Service Southeast Archeological Center Northwest Regional Data Center Small Business Development Center (SBDC) at FAMU SunnyLand Solar Tai-Yang Research, Inc. Team Simulations

UNIVERSITY OF MIAMI LIFE SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY PARK Advanced Pharma CR, LLC The UPS Store Andago Community Blood Centers of Florida, Inc. BioFlorida UM Tissue Bank DayaMed, Inc. Emunamedica LLC Novak Druce Quigg Enterprise Development Corp.

TREASURE COAST RESEARCH PARK USDA University of Florida (IFAS)

RESEARCH PARK AT ATLANTIC UNIVERSITY ADVANCED COMPLIANCE SOLUTIONS ADW Aerospace Technologies Group Alumiglass ArchieMD, Inc. BBM Boca Raton Airport Authority CopperCom Curtiss Wright/PSI ExamSoft Worldwide, Inc. Experian Research Services FAU Simulation Center Flagship Solutions Group FWC Management Company, LLC Glades Medical Group Modernizing Medicine MobileHelp Pace Americas Palm Beach Institute of Sports Medicine & Physical Therapy Sandow Media South Florida Radiation Oncology University MRI University of Miami - Miller School of Medicine

FLORIDA TECH RESEARCH PARK AIRLINES – SCHEDULED AND CHARTER Delta Air Lines and Atlantic Southeast Airlines U.S. Airways Baer Air AVIATION AAR, Inc. Avidyne Avionics Aircraft Services International Group, Inc.

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directory

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Florida’s Research and Technology Park Tenants Atlantic Jet Center (FBO) ARINC Embraer – Corporate Jet Division First Flight – Health First Medevac Helicopter F.I.T. Aviation, Inc. (FBO and Flight School) Hangar, LLC Harris Corp. Flight Operations Division Heck Aviation Landings at Melbourne (Condo Hangars) Melbourne Airport Authority T-Hangars MidairUSA Royal Atlantic Aviation/Executive Wings, Inc. Sheltair Melbourne, Inc. South Brevard Aviation Southeastern Aerospace (Avionics) CARGO AND WAREHOUSING DynCorp Iron Mountain Inc. Yowell International, Inc. COMMERCIAL/EDUCATIONAL Apollo Professional Center, Inc. Circles of Care - Baker Act Facility Florida Institute of Technology Applied Laboratories Keiser University Kindred Healthcare - LTAC Hospital Liberty Tax Service Melbourne Plaza (Shopping center) Suburban Lodges (Hotel) Treasure Coast Storage (Mini-warehouse) INDUSTRIAL DRS Tactical Systems, Inc Embraer – Business Jet Assembly and Sales Center Evektor Aerotechnik General Electric Corporation Harris Corporation - World Headquarters L-3 Corporation (Titan) Liberty Aerospace, Inc. LiveTV Corporation Maritime Communication Services, Inc (Harris Corp) Northrop Grumman Corporation

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Revolution Technologies, LLC Ricoh Corporation Rockwell Collins Avionics Satcom Direct TRDA – High Technology Incubator GOVERNMENT City of Melbourne Police Headquarters FAA – Air Traffic Control Tower FAA – Airways Facilities Sector Field Office FAA – ATC Radar – ASR-11 FL Technical Research and Development Authority (TRDA) High Tech Incubator Facility Foreign Trade Zone #136 (Port Canaveral) Transportation Security Administratio (TSA) National Weather Service – Nexrad Station U.S. Customs and Border Protection U.S. Postal Service Vehicle Maintenance Facility TERMINAL Car Rentals: Alamo/National Car Rental Avis Rent-A-Car Budget Rent-A-Car Hertz Corporation Florida Tech Research Park Office Greyhound Lines, Inc. Interspace Airport Advertising Melbourne Airport Shuttle MLB Historical Museum Space Coast Credit Union (ATM) MISCELLANEOUS Florida Gas Co. (Natural Gas Pipeline) Florida Power & Light (Sub-station) Jim Rathmann Chevrolet-Cadillac (Auto Storage) Tropical Haven (Mobile Home Park)

USF RESEARCH PARK OF TAMPA BAY Ability Worldwide Advanced Materials Technology Advanced Technologies & Testing

Laboratories, Inc. Belinda Noah Productions, Inc. BioFlorida BioLaminex BioMed Immunotech BioMedTech Laboratories, Inc. Blueye Borda Technology Center for Transformation & Innovation CvergenX EngenNano Technology Florida Department of Health Florida Economic Development Council Florida Institute for Commercialization of Public Research H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center & Research Institute Imigene Innovus Law Group Intezyne, Inc. Isoprenoids John Q. Hammons/Embassy Suites Lighthouse Guidance Systems Modelithics, Inc. Modulation Therapeutics Natura Therapeutics Novel Bio-Spectrum Technologies Saneron CCEL Therapeutics Semilab SDI Senator Marco Rubio StemCell Lab Corp TBARTA/Tampa Bay Area Regional Transportation Authority Thar Pharmaceuticals The Charles Stark Draper Laboratory, Inc University Diagnostic Institute. University of South Florida USF Division of Patents & Licensing USF Division of Sponsored Research USF Engineering/CUTR USF Global Center for Hearing and Speech Research USF Graphicstudio USF Office of Research/Audit & Compliance USF Pediatric Epidemiology Center USF Research Financial Management USF Research Integrity & Compliance Viagene Biotech You Can Learn, Inc.


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TH!NK FLORIDA Research Parks digital magazine is the official publication for Florida Research Parks Network. The magazine offers an in-dept...

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