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r e v o l u tion P

assion -- the fuel that drives a city of ruins to build upon its ashes. Our country has been threading in soot for far too long. It’s time to shake the dust of indifference and apathy.Time to start a revolution. This issue aims

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to highlight the lifestyle of today’s Filipino youth. A revolution is starting. It is found in the clothes we wear, in pencil strokes and paint splats, in the happiness found in delicious food, and at times, in solitary places filled with the warmth of familiar faces.

The magazine aims to highlight the gradual growth of creativity in the city of Manila and in turn, add more fuel to the fire of positive idealogies that keeps the city at its feet. Take a dive on what we have in store for you. Seek inspiration.


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the

BEHIND REVOLUTION Gerard lopez

elson nerona

This avid blogger has a lot of passions. In his free time, he likes to tingle around with Photoshop and adores solitary walks to the fridge.

A sucker for anything sporty. This basketball enthusiast has a knack for shooting hoops and skimming through indie band music.

Kaleidoscope angelica regala A self-confessed theatre geek. This 70s music fan includes illustrating and playing with her pet turtle, Turtle among her list of hobbies.

mariel empit Your average Beatles fan. A night owl that spends 3 am mornings with a cup of Milo, the internet (loved dearly), and cozy blankets.

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Kaleidoscope is a lifestyle magazine that sheds a glimpse upon the creative culture of today’s youth. It is a creative project among four art students from the De La Salle- College St. Benilde. “Kaleido” in lexical terms is a word derived from the greek words -- kal “beautiful” and eidos “form.” The magazine hopes to adapt similiar meanings in terms of design aesthetics. To compel both the minds and eyes of our readers. True to the word, to see and feel every facet in all its colors.

WHO ARE WE?

WE’d LOVE TO HEAR FROM YOU! www.kaleidoscopemagazine.com


START YOUR D A Y RIGHT


the Through revolution 6

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People Behind Revolution: Editor’s Page

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Spectrum: Benildean Art Feature

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60-69

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Behind The Revolution: About The Mag

Ramon Bautista in Benilde

Youth In Revolt: A Fashion Editorial

Kaleidosphere: Places, People, Food

Bloggers In Focus: Fashion Bloggers

DIY or Die: Introductory Article

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Feature: The Collective

Concrete Jungle: Fashion Editorial

DIY: Bleached Denim, Papercutting, Illus

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SDA Street Style: SDA Fashion

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Mixtape Collection

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Feature: The Burger Project

Feature: The Collective

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Photographers In Focus

Graphika Manila 2013

Behind-TheScenes


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Calvin Klein

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c a l v i n k l e i n . c o m13


SYNC UP Track your dog’s current stats and progress while syncing with your own Nike+ profile. Get notified when your dog’s fuel levels are dropping down when you’re away.

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IDEA It’s hard to know if your dog is getting enough exercise. Nike+ Dogs is a FuelBand dog collar that gives dog owners the ability to track their dog’s physical activity and ensure they are living a happy and healthy life.

www.nike.com/15


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KALEIDOSPHERE PEOPLE TO MEET/ PLACES TO BE/ SIGHTS TO SEE


By: Mariel Empit & Gerard Lopez illustration by: angelica regala


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ARTx foodx music


the collective {ULTIMO CHILL PILL} BY: MARIEL EMPIT

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n old warehouse is the last thing you’d think of when opting for a place to hang out. However, some old bat did say once that we find the greatest things in the most unlikely places. The same adage goes for “The Collective” or as some friends from my college call it, “Ang Tambayan Ng Mga Hipsters.” Whatever people may refer it to, the word has spread and the socalled “Hipster Tamabayan” is becoming one of the most popular hang out places of the youth today. What started as a business eandevor for a group of friends have now grown into the go-to place of music buffs, art enthusiasts, toy collectors, fashionistas, and people who are just looking for a place to have some good fun. It stems from the likely family tree of places like Makati-X, Saguijo, and Cubao-X who all similarly aimsto propagate and incorporate more artistic environments in the city of Manila. Silently lurking along the corners of Malugay St. in Makati, those who belong in certain circles are the only ones who are usually aware of its exitence. Because of this, several business joints in “The Collective” have come and gone. For a business to truly stand the test of time, it must be quirky and memorable enough to survive via word-of-the-mouth propagandas and loyal customers. Shops in “The Collective” are undoubtedly unique. Come with us as we recount these stores that have struck a chord with us during our very own visit.

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Kaleidosphere PEOPLE TO MEET/ PLACES TO BE/ SIGHTS TO SEE

BY: MARIEL EMPIT

CALDERa A restaurant that prides itself with humungous pizzas (by humungous, we mean bigger than five people’s heads combined. Customers can gaurantee that everything is made from scratch as pizzas come fresh and hot from the restaurant’s gigantic ovens. We’ve had a taste of the pizza ourselves and we have nothing but good words for it. Best thing about the restaurant? They deliver! Caldera is located in front of “The Collective” beside Mochiko.

Mochiko Rice and ice cream would probably be one of the most least likely combinations when it comes to yummy desserts. Mochiko , one of the more popular food joints in “The Collective” is surely set to prove you wrong.

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Having started out as a simple kiosk in Mercato, these delectable ice cream infused rice cakes have garnered quite a name for itself. What seems to look like tiny balls of dough have grown to a whole array of different flavors. Our favorite so far? Strawberry. Try one yourself in their “The Collective” branch!


uke.ph Music enthusiasts would be thrilled to learn that the first ukelele store in the country has opened in “The Collective.” Uke. ph is a group of ukelele lovers who decided to share their music endeavors to the rest of Manila by putting up a store. The place is filled with ukeleles of different designs. Have your pick by taking up this new hobby!

flying dutchman castle geek A place that could instantly be a part of the series “The Big Bang Theory.” Castle Geek is a novelty store that specializes in comics and toys. It caters to both avid collectors and comic fans alike. A visit would surely ignite your inner kid at heart.

“The online store that went a long way” would probably be the best way to describe Flying Dutchman. From its humble beginnings, the online store has finally made enough fans to venture out with a place in “The Collective.” Having had its opening quite recently, the store is flocked with fashionistas looking for good finds. The Dutchman is famous for its shoes and bags for men, having designs that could easily be adored by anyone regardless of style. Come and have a look to see if you find anything that you might fancy.

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Gerard, one of our editors , leaning on the walls of “The Collective.” The walls in the place are flled with grafitti giving the place a whole wad of character. Street art has never looked this good.

A bright neon purple arrow that leads to the gallery, VinylonVinyl (it was closed when we did our visit).

One of the quirkier stores in “The Collective” is the costume shop “Skitzo.” Drive yourself into one of those cliched chic flick scenes where they try all the clothes out. The Skitzo caters to all, from superhero costumes for kids to sexy maid costumes for women. Visit “Skitzo” to feel the halloween spirit all year.

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THE COLLECTIVE PEOPLE TO MEET/ PLACES TO BE/ SIGHTS TO SEE

A glimpse at Kaleidoscope’s visit Beautiful paper cutting art framed in Mochiko. It says “Always made with love.” We loved how cute it was! The decoration in shops are just stellar.

The atrium at the middle of “The Collective” is a great place to chill out with friends over drinks. It is well ventilated and has enough comfy seats to last you through hour long conversations. Look at all those Mochis! The Mochi menu has grown since the last time one of our editors visited. The more, the merrier, no? If you’re looking for something different, why not try the Chocolate Potato Chip or their new Rose Mochi!

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A TASTY PROJECT WRITTEN & PHOTGRAPHED BY GERARD LOPEZ

Have you ever thought about making your own burger without the hassle of cooking it yourself? Well, this restaurant is for you. A newly-opened burger place called The Burger Project is located along P. Ocampo Street inside the Grand Towers building and offers a wide array of burgers and other meals that will suit your taste. The twist? You can customize your own burger!

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Mysterious meat

I’ve been craving for their burgers since they opened just a few months ago and I never had the chance to do so. But since, I had lots of time this term, I brought along a friend to try it out for ourselves because we’re really curious about their burgers and what makes them special that we have to customize them just to enjoy them.

Make or break

Since I’m a sucker for anything DIY, choosing my own burger from the bun, to the content and the whole thing made me really excited. Since I’m a bit indecisive, it took me a while to decide since I wanted everything but I can’t because I have a limited budget. I ended up with only the bacon and cheese as a paid add-on. The rest are free according to the menu, except for the burger patty of course.

Burger surprise

When the burgers were served on our table, we were surprised by how big the burger was. We did not expect that it was that big. No wonder there was a fork and knife. For me, their burger is best paired with their home-brewed iced tea. Besides burgers, they also offer buffalo wings and milkshakes. All in all, the experience at The Burger Project surely left me wanting more. If you want a more personal and one-of-a-kind dining experience, I suggest you go ahead and try out The Burger Project now. •••••••••••••••••••••••••• BRGR: The Burger Project is located at The Grand Towers, P. Ocampo St. Manila, Philippines and is open weekdays from 12nn-8pm.

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buon giorno.

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G O FORTH INTO T H E NIGHT

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M A N I L A BREATHES LIFE AT NIGHTFALL

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o many, the idea of the City of Manila at night is a scary one. To go into the night is a deed either for those who seek adrenaline-enducing danger or those who are just plain stupid. It is a dangerous place that wreaks of thieves and unpleasant sights. Maybe it’s time to shed a little love to the place many of us and you, our dear readers, call home. Maybe we’ve looked at the city with judgemental eyes for far too long. Manila isn’t all that bad. In fact, at night, it could be quite beautiful (this is not us trying to be meaphorically poetic, it really is.) The Kaleido team decided totake to the streets and take pictures of the photographic city at night. The canvass is the dark sky as Manila’s lights paint the horizons. Our chosen venue was at Manila Bay, a familiar place for most Manilenos. So go ahead and read on to see some of the snippets we shot in our nighttime photowallk! What’s better even, you can do one yourself. Go with friends and shoot away! Photography by: Mariel Empit Gerard Lopez

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moon li g h t i s sculp ture nathaniel hawthorne

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PHOTOGRAPHER PROFILE

yla corotan 20 years old ab-photography student digital photographer

How did you get interested in photography? What age did you get into it? I was 15 when I first got into Photography being the Photojournalist of my high school paper. Analog or digital? Why? Analog or digital? Why? Digital. I have nothing against analog but there’s so much to explore in digital photography, especially now that technology advances rapidly. What genres of Photography do you like the most? Fashion and Human Interest. There’s just something about photographing people. It adds to the how total I feel as someone who carries stories on. Who are your favorite photographers? Mark Nicdao! Where do you get inspiration from? How do you keep inspired? I always get inspiration from other photographers, practicing the caution of not copying what they have done of course. They inspire me in a way that I should feel more driven to do better. Also, I don’t restrict my mind and creativity to what I

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know. I make sure to check out the latest trends in photography by reading books, magazines, and other media that showcases the art. Are you interested in other mediums of art, besides photography? Yes. I also try to incorporate graphic design to my photos, as well as considering how my photos would look like when laid out , which, of course, affects the way I take photos. How is photography an effective medium of communication? It keeps people sane! Do you plan to make Photography as your career someday? Do you think it’s a lucrative industry? Of course! I mean, I’ve been itching to get on the adventure after I graduate from Photography this year. It’s a lucrative job, but I am so looking forward to working because I love it, not because I need to pay some bills. What message do you want to impart on your fellow young photographers? Try to always be a better version of YOU from yesterday. Remember that there will always be someone better than you in the

industry. Keep trying, and never be afraid to fall in love with the highs and lows of photography. What would you be doing if you did not pursue photography? Working for the airlines Visit Yla’s blog at http://ylacorotanphotography.tumblr.com/


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Joaquin talan 19 years old bs-ndustrial design student film photographer

How did you get interested in photography? What age did you get into it?

Where do you get inspiration from? How do you keep inspired?

I started when I was in third year high school. I honestly don’t remember why I started, but I’m so glad I did.

The people around me. They always give me new things to think about, and learn. To keep inspired, I go to BookSale and find cheap photography books.

Analog or digital? Why? Analog or digital? Why?

Analog. It takes so much more patience and discipline, and the results you get are just fantastic. A lot of people our age feel intimidated when they need to use film. It’s actually very easy; we’ve just gotten spoiled by automatic cameras. What genres of Photography do you like the most?

Documentary photography and portraiture. Who are your favorite photographers?

I’m currently in love with the work of Margaret Bourke- White, and of course, Henri Cartier- Bresson.

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Are you interested in other mediums of art, besides photography?

Of course! I’m always drawing in my notebook. How is photography an effective medium of communication?

It is fast and accurate. Take photos with your emotions, and you’ll see how expressive they’ll turn out. As they say: “A picture is worth a thousand words”, right? Do you plan to make Photography as your career someday? Do you think it’s a lucrative industry?

I would love to. It is definitely a very big business; everyone needs photos. Honestly, though, I’d rather be in it

for my passion, not income. What message do you want to impart on your fellow young photographers?

Do not be afraid to take your camera with you everywhere, and get to know it well. More importantly, learn how to treat people with respect. No one likes a rude photographer. What would you be doing if you did not pursue photography?

I would probably be making a bacon weave.


Here are some of Joaquin’s best works all shot with a film camera.

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SPECTRUM

:A look into Benildean Art


Featuring: +Lee Caces +Patricia Mapili +Patmai De Vera +Veronica Chua

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1. What age did you start getting really interested in art? What sparked the interest? I started drawing ever since I could hold a pencil (according to my mom), but I really got into it when I was in my 1st year of high school. I made a lot of friends who were into art and cartoons plus I met more of my mom’s side of the family (who were either artists or doctors) so I was influenced from them as well. 2. How and where do you get your inspirations from? Is it easy for you to conceptualize? I get inspiration from everyday things. I could get inspiration just from walking down the street, or from riding a bus. Actually, the commute going home is my thinking time for my life or if I want to get inspiration. It also depends on the subject and how motivated I am at the moment. 3. What is your most and least favorite medium? Why? My favorite medium is pencil, next is digital, then water color. My least favorite is crayon and markers (I feel like I waste the ink when I use markers!) 4. Share a time when you got really frustrated with your work (your worst experience with an art block). How did you get over it? I remember when I was so drained with org work (I worked in my school’s publication office) during my 3rd year that I didn’t know what to draw unless someone gave me directions, or guides, or basically told me what I needed to draw. It was depressing. I

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got over it by searching art in the internet and in the library. Plus I started carrying around a little notebook (not the big sketchpads) so I could doodle anything that popped into my mind. 5. Do you think artistic freedom that surpasses the boundaries of religion and/ or culture is acceptable? Yes! 6. Do you believe that art is essential to society? If so, why? Yes I think it’s very important. It gives a feel or glance of how the culture was at that time. For example, we would never have known or understood how life was in, let’s say, the 16th century without the paintings and writings done at the time. 7. Which is more important and effective: digital or traditional art? Do you think artists should choose between the two? They’re both equal in my eyes. And I don’t think an artist should be forced to choose between the two. 8. What do you do to keep yourself artistically motivated? Any tips? Follow a lot of different artists! Go out for walks in your neighborhood (stay safe though.), read a book, or watch a bit of t.v. 9. Do you plan on pursuing art as a career or keep it as a hobby while having nanother primary job? Do you think it’s a lucrative industry? Well I took art as a course so it’d be such a waste to not use it right? So yes, I would really want to have art as a career. It’d be great if


I could earn a living by doing what I love. 10. Any message or tips for the many aspiring artists out there? Don’t give up! No matter how long your art block is, just keep moving forward (yes, I love Disney).

patricia mapili Name: Patricia Mapili Age: 21 years young Website: www.patriciamapili.com www.imnotchoosy.tumblr.com

“I would really want to have art as a career. It’d be great if I could earn a living by doing what I love.” 49


patmai de vera Name: Patricia “patmai” de vera Age: breathing since 1991 Website: www.patmai.net

the same age how cartoon series or games will always be more interesting than real life. Then poof! (It became Koko Krunch.) 2. How and where do your get your inspirations from? Is it easy for you to conceptualize? Everywhere: you either keep awake or stay asleep long enough. Inspiration could come from anywhere. Conceptualization efforts depend on whether the project peaks my interest or not. Sometimes it just hits you, other times you’ll have to put a little more effort.

“Always remember that this whole thing was started with a dream.”

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1. What age did you start getting really interested in art? What sparked the interest? I’ve always liked art, I can’t really pinpoint an exact year or age, but I remember always drawing as a kid. I recall thinking at

3. What is your most and least favorite medium? Why? Personally, I like using digital art. It’s very versatile and easy to use, once you have a full grasp of the tools of whichever program you use. This could also be my least favorite medium because it’s so easily abused and there are a lot of ugly artworks I see on the Internet. They’re just so off and unrefined. Just because they know a certain program doesn’t mean they’re good at it. 4. Share a time when you got really frustrated with your work (your worst experience with an art block). How did you get over it? It’s not necessarily an art block—I get moments when I don’t want to get out of bed at all, I just don’t want to work, and all I want to do is dream and play. There’s no such thing as an art block, just a lack of perspective, flow of ideas and initiative towards a certain project.


5. Do you think artistic freedom that surpasses the boundaries of religion and/ or culture is acceptable? As long as you’re not gonna be an asshole about it, why not? 6. Do you believe that art is essential to society? If so, why? I don’t believe that it is essential because it is already essential. I know it’s essential. A lot of people overlook the arts, thinking it’s a “waste of time”. They don’t know that art could redefine society; it’s a visual representation of an account in history. It’s given us glimpse into someone’s life, thought and being—and not many people realize that. It’s what makes us human. 7. Which is more important and effective: digital or traditional art? Do you think artists should choose between the two? Digital art was created so that workflow is more efficient and everything can be achieved at a faster rate, but like many of the “traditional VS. digital” debates, there will always be more “soul” to the traditional ways, because this is where everything came from. Basics are the foundation of everything and anything. I don’t understand the need for a dispute between the two, when they are clearly just different genres of the same category? No, I don’t think artists should choose between the two, if the choosing is a result of pretentiousness. While there should be a fine line, abstract is no less of an art form than graffiti art. It’s only in elitism that destroys

its essence and creates some sort of rift. While people are fighting why their opinion is so much better, the real message of the artist goes unheard. 8. What do you do to keep yourself artistically motivated? Any tips? I always draw. Wherever, whenever, draw what you see, what you feel, what’s on your mind. It doesn’t have to be on paper; sometimes I draw on tissue paper, on receipts, even using the moist droplets on my glass cups. There’s something about putting it down on paper that makes me feel more concrete, more on Earth. It makes me feel like I’m giving a bit of me into everything I create. It exercises my creativity, so it’s like you never turned your creative juices. 9. Do you plan on pursuing art as a career or keep it as a hobby while having another primary job? Do you think it’s a lucrative industry? “If you’re good at something, never do it for free” -Joker; The Dark Knight (2008) I think it’s a competitive industry, one that

will wear you down constantly. You need the integrity and the talent to

emerge like a well-polished diamond—or else.

10. Any message or tips for the many aspiring artists out there? Walt Disney - “If you can dream it, you can do it. Always remember that this whole thing was started with a dream and a mouse.”

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1. What age did you start getting really interested in art? What sparked the interest? I was around 9 years old when I wanted to be an artist. But the only time I took it seriously was at the age of 13. The interest started because of my fondness in anime during my early teenage years. Also looking through works of other artists, both traditional and digital. 2. How and where do you get your inspirations from? Is it easy for you to conceptualize? My inspiration drive usually comes from works of other artists. There are times I get my ideas when I’m in the bathroom or places where I don’t have to extensively think too much. For conceptualization, it relatively easy as long as the theme and details are all laid out. 3. What is your most and least favorite medium? Why? Acrylic for most favorite because it’s the most flexible medium to work on and its beautiful matte finish with gesso. Least would be oil pastels because they get my hands dirty. 4. Share a time when you got really frustrated with your work (your worst experience with an art block). How did you get over it? I’m frustrated with all my works and I get art blocks once every two years. My remedies would be to forcefully draw anyone I’m with and think of new styles to develop my existing one. 5. Do you think artistic freedom that surpasses the

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boundaries of religion and/ or culture is acceptable? Yes 6. Do you believe that art is essential to society? If so, why? Yes, it’s an essential element. Art having the usual generic answer to a form of expression. 7.Which is more important and effective: digital or traditional art? Do you think artists should choose between the two? I would suggest traditional art because it is the most prime and basic form of art. It is the most essential and considered to be the starting point of every artist. But in terms of technology, digital would win for its efficiency and mass production. It is best to learn both mediums but specializing in one of the two. 8. What do you do to keep yourself artistically motivated? Any tips? Deadlines. Keep strict deadlines. 9. Do you plan on pursuing art as a career or keep it as a hobby while having another primary job? Do you think it’s a lucrative industry? I believe that if you like doing something so much, don’t make it into work. Usually what happens is that you eventually hate it. I took up fashion design because of my love for clothing and textiles and also since it’s the closest thing to art. Also because I’m willing to sacrifice hate for fashion rather than hate for illustration. I never took up a visual art major because if it became work, I would definitely hate it.


The industry is very much rewarding and there are certainly a lot of well-off individuals in the field. Not millionaires but enough for a decent salary. It really depends on the company you work for and if the works you produce are worth the money. But if you’re pertaining to Philippine setting, I suggest you migrate.

veronica chua Name: Veronica chua Age: 19 Website: chuaveronica.tumblr.com

10. Any message or tips for the many aspiring artists out there? They say the formula to being a good artist is 10% inspiration and 90% perspiration.

“I believe that if you like doing something so much, don’t make it into work. Usually what happens is that you eventually hate it. I’m willing to sacrifice hate for fashion rather than hate for illustration.”

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lee caces Name: lee caces Age: 21 Website: leecaces.tumblr.com behance.net/leecaces

“I want to own a cafe one day and run it as artsy as possible.� 54


1. What age did you start getting really interested in art? What sparked the interest? I started when I was in grade 4, Art class was my favorite subject next to PE. 2. How and where do you get your inspirations from? Is it easy for you to conceptualize? “Inspiration is for amateurs; the rest of us just show up and get to work.” Chuck Close It’s easier to conceptualize if it’s in your system all you have to do is to practice your mind. 3. What is your most and least favorite medium? Why? My favorite medium is Ink and Watercolor because I like to be spontaneous at times. I like watching colors splash on paper! My least favorite medium is Poster Paint because it deteriorates easily. 4. Share a time when you got really frustrated with your work (your worst experience with an art block). How did you get over it? I’ve had a lot of art blocks, It happens! As a student, sometimes you really don’t like to produce some works when you’re forced to but sometimes you just have to rest get your mind off of it. Once you get back on it you already know what to do if you keep yourself motivated. 5. Do you think artistic freedom that surpasses the boundaries of religion and/ or culture is acceptable? (No answer)

is essential to society? If so, why? Art is! Proof? Look at all the successful people out there, most of them are Right brainers! 7. Which is more important and effective: digital or traditional art? Do you think artist should choose between the two? BOTH is effective it just depends on where you’re going to use it. 8. What do you do to keep yourself artistically motivated? Any tips? I keep myself motivated by practicing a lot, always be hungry to learn and don’t be afraid to experiment with different mediums. 9. Do you plan on pursuing art as a career or keep it as a hobby while having another primary job? Do you think it’s a lucrative industry? I plan to become, If not head of a creative studio, an illustrator for screen and print. I want to own a cafe one day and run it as artsy as possible. 10. Any message or tips for the many aspiring artists out there? Like I’ve said, Experiment on different mediums. Don’t be afraid if your drawing is different because eventually it can become your style. Don’t compare yourself to other artists it can be depressing! Instead, use it as inspiration. Keep yourself motivated and PRACTICE!

6. Do you believe that art

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Quickfire questions! J

ust to have a little fun with the artists, we asked them this set of weird and completely random questions to see how they’d react. kudos to them for being such good sports. Read on for the lulzies! 1. If a watermelon was walking down the street during a Sunday morning, what would you say to it? Veronica: Nothing. He’s minding his own business and I’m minding my own. Patmai: I wouldn’t really talk to it. I’d look around the street if there’s anyone watching, gag the watermelon, then bring him home to chop him up as an offering to my kuya. My kuya likes watermelons. Patricia: Come with me if you want to live! 2. You wake up beside Barney. What do you do? Veronica: Punch him. Patmai: Depends… How good was he last night? ;D Patricia: BARNEY I TOLD YOU: BABY STEPS

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3. It’s the apocalypse. The world is being taken over by zombies. The weapon left is between a carrot and a banana. What would you choose? Why? Veronica: Why can’t I just take both of them??? Patmai: Carrot. Mas matigas eh. (That’s what she said!) Patricia: I would choose a carrot. I’d like to choose the banana but I think there’s an 89.5% chance that zombies wouldn’t like vegetables. 4. Elmo likes wasabi, that’s why Elmo has no eyelids. Comments? Veronica: Hypothesis proven. Don’t search Google, it’s not there. Patmai: Then urvybody on dat sesame street be likin’ dat wasabeh ‘cuz dey all don’t got no lids, yo. Patricia: That’s a lie. Everyone knows he has no eyelids because he’s into one of those weird beauty plastic surgery crazes going on. 5. What’s the ingredient you’d add to a milkshake to bring all the boys to the yard? Why? Answer

as creatively as possible. Veronica: One thousand peso bill. How can you not want a one thousand peso bill? Patmai: My love, milk. Patricia: Bacon (everyone loves bacon), sprinkles (everyone loves color), mix 3 time in a clockwise direction when the moon is full. 6. Why is love soft as an easy chair and fresh as the morning air? Veronica: That’s because you haven’t gone outside yet. Patmai: Because there’s nothing like it Patricia: I can’t really answer this because some easy chairs are not soft! :( 7. Your pet can suddenly speak. What would he/ she sound like? Veronica: Squeaky. Like those fail dubbings. Patmai: British. I taught my guinea pigs to speak in the Queen’s English. No, sir, none of that redneck, boorish, sad excuse for a mode of communication for my little angels.

Patricia: Like a grandma because she’s 1213 years old. 8. Sasayangin mo ba ang pera mo pambili ng lobo? Why/Why not? Veronica: No. My Chinese ancestors will be disappointed in me. Already have shamed the dynasty too much. No need to add more shame. Patmai: Kasi mahal ang baka, per kilo pa ‘yun. Patricia: Of course. It floats and you can play games with it. 9. Describe the dark side of the moon. Veronica: The perfect man. Patmai: Puro black people. Patricia: It’s dark, pero may glow in the dark stickers every five meters. 10. Do you paint with all the colors of the wind? Veronica: I’m Chinese, so no. Patmai: n/a Patricia: Nope. I paint with all the colors of the rainbow.


1. What age did you start getting really interested in art? What sparked the interest? •• I’ve been drawing ever since I was in elementary. I can’t remember anymore what made me interested in art. 2. How and where do you get your inspirations from? Is it easy for you to conceptualize? •• I get inspirations from everyday scenarios. I always draw based on what I feel. I feel scared of what others might think of my works so i find it hard to conceptualize. 3. What is your most and least favorite medium? Why? •• I use pencil all the time,

but I find it boring sometimes I don’t know why I keep on using it :) I think oil pastels are my least favorite. they’re messy and hard to handle. my current favorite medium is watercolor. It’s fun to use and you can do so much with it. 4. Share a time when you got really frustrated with your work (your worst experience with an art block). How did you get over it? •• I get frustrated sometimes, because I can’t stop drawing the same things over and over again. If I can draw something perfectly, I will draw it all the time. I hate seeing my notebook filled with drawings of an eye :))

5. Do you think artistic freedom that surpasses the boundaries of religion and/ or culture is acceptable? •• We are all free to draw whatever we want as long as we don’t harm anyone, because of our drawings or photos :) 6. Do you believe that art is essential to society? If so, why? •• I believe art is essential. I can’t imagine how boring our world will be without art. 7. Which is more important and effective: digital or traditional art? Do you think artist should choose between the two? •• It’s better if you know how to do both, but I think it’s not necessary.

8. What do you do to keep yourself artistically motivated? Any tips? •• It’s important to keep yourself inspired and you should not care about what other people might think of your art. 9. Do you plan on pursuing art as a career or keep it as a hobby while having another primary job? Do you think it’s a lucrative industry? •• I think it can be lucrative if you start a business of your own. 10. Any message or tips for the many aspiring artists out there? •• Don’t be afraid to experiment and always believe in yourself. It’s also important that you practice everyday.

STEPH NG Age: 19 bleeding tiara.tumblr.com

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blogger in focus

MIKO CARREON WRITER GERARD LOPEZ

How and when did you start blogging?

I started blogging in the year 2010 more about photography and lifestyle but I’ve been uploading looks on lookbook.nu that year along with my friend Mikyle Quizon. What are your hobbies besides blogging?

My hobbies besides blogging are dancing, photography, sketching and singing (in the bathroom) haha! How did blogging change your life?

Blogging opened many doors for me and opportunities that i never thought would’ve happen. Who are your style inspirations?

My style inspirations are Ryan Gosling, Peter Adrian and nowadays, Koreans because they’re so effortless when they groom themselves!

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What does fashion mean to you?

Fashion is an expression by the means of clothes. you know what they say, you are what you wear. Fashion is an artistic expression in the form of clothing but fashion is not only the clothes but the branches it branched out to make the fashion industry Big. In short it’s a wide expression of art through clothes. What makes you unique from other bloggers?

I think what makes me unique from other bloggers is that I really don’t have that exact style. As much as I can , I want to try to different styles and see how it works for me.

How did your blog audience grow? What did you do to make people read your material?

I actually don’t know how. Maybe the shameless plugging and promotion of myself did the work. Hahaha! Do you sometimes get pressured on posting new stuff from time to time because of people’s expectations? Or do you just post at your own pace?

I really don’t get pressured because my blog started as a personal blog so I really don’t care what others will say about what I wear. Judegrs gonna judge! lol.

How do you describe your style?

As I said in the previous question, I really try to do different styles but the style that mostly work for me (and according to my friends) is when i groom myself in the mix of preppy/grunge/ sporty. (lol) When do you say that people are fashion forward?

Everyone’s fashion forward for me because everyone has style even if others won’t see it. Like what I said, fashion is an expression so it doesn’t matter if you wear a basic shirt and shorts combo. As long as you express yourself through fashion, you are fashion forward. You can check out Miko’s blog at http://mikocarreon.tumblr.com

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How and when did you start blogging?

Blogging was actually out of my plan. Never in a million years did I imagine myself putting up a blog. It was actually my friend Dani Barretto, top blogger now who convinced me to start blogging. She actually noticed that I’m a huge fashion follower and I should start inspiring other people.

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RYAN SANTIAGO

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What are your hobbies besides blogging?

I’m actually a really dull person. I have no sports, no hobbies, no nothing. The only thing i do is talk and talk and tell my friends jokes and basically be the clown of the barkada. But of course, I’m open with joining sports or whatever as long as I have someone with me.


How did blogging change your life?

When do you say that people are fashion forward?

Blogging changed my life 100%. People think that all bloggers care about it fame and money and free stuff but what they don’t know is that there’s something deeper. Well for me, I want to help people who’s not confident enough to be proud of themselves. They could be whoever they want to be with clothes. Nothing or no one should hold them back. Fashion is freedom. It’s not about what will benefit us. It’s about what will benefit the readers.

How do you say a person is fashion forward? Well that’s simple. Look at the people around you. When they stare at a person, the person he or she is staring at is FASH!

Who are your style inspirations?

This is easy. LADY GAGA! What does fashion mean to you?

For me, fashion is a lifestyle. It is not true that there are people who doesn’t have style. Everyone has style. They may not have GREAT style but they still have style. There’s a reason why you chose that top or that bottom whenever going out. Fashion is life. It was with you the time you were born. Those hospital gowns? 1 word. FASH! ;)

How did your blog audience grow? What did you do to make people read your material?

I actually blog everyday. Or at least 4-5 times a week. I don’t know. I just give people something unique to read about. And of course, I love my readers. Don’t care if they’re only 5 or 50 or 500. I love each and every single one. Do you sometimes get pressured on posting new stuff from time to time because of people’s expectations? Or do you just post at your own pace?

I post for the readers. Not for myself. I don’t want them to be not entertained so I myself try to make every blog post as readable as possible.

What makes you unique from other bloggers?

To be honest, I really don’t know. I just wear whatever I feel like wearing. I’m just me. I’m not plastic, I’m not “feeling sikat”, I don’t belittle people. I’m normal. I’m just like my readers. No hierarchy. How do you describe your style?

My style is more on the COMFORT side. What I would like to change is the view of people that when you’re wearing something comfy, you’re not fashionable. FALSE! You could be fashionable in the most comfortable shirt or shoes or pants. You just have to learn proper styling.

Visit Ryan’s blog at: http://ryansantiago.blogspot.com

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How and when did you start blogging?

I started blogging last year because it was something that has interested me greatly ever since.Whenever I see the blogs of my favorite fashionistas, I can’t help but be inspired and motivated to create my very own blog/diary of what I wear. What are your hobbies besides blogging?

Like any other teens out there. Watching TV, playing dress-up and Instagramming. How did blogging change your life?

blogger in focus

PHYLLIS NGO

Blogging definitely has become a very big part of my life. Not only does it keep me motivated to dress up a little bit day by day, but it also has become my source of confidence. Who are your style inspirations?

I have a lot of style inspirations. But my fave ones are, Camille Co, Kristina Bazan, Andy Torres, Jane Aldridge,

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Melody of missingavenue.com, and a lot more. What does fashion mean to you?

Fashion means half of my everything. What makes you unique from other bloggers?

My own style and perspective of how I mix and match clothes and accessories would be my edge as compared to other bloggers. How do you describe your style?

I’m still in pursuit of getting to know more about my signature style. I like variety and I don’t intend to stick to only one kind of style. When do you say that people are fashion forward?

If what they’re wearing or how they mix/match clothes is something I haven’t seen before, yet it looks appealing or unique enough to start a new trend, then it’s fashion forward. How did your blog audience grow? What did you do to make people read your material?

I’m not really sure how big my audience is now but since I’m just starting out, I advertise my blog through my facebook/twitter/instagram accounts. Do you sometimes get pressured on posting new stuff from time to time because of people’s expectations? Or do you just post at your own pace?

I just post on my own pace. Besides, blogging is something people should enjoy, not get pressures from. I’m just being myself.

You can visit Phyllis’s blog at http://phyllmeup.tumblr.com

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How and when did you start blogging?

I started to really get into blogging around 2010-2011 when I thought of documenting my style so I can look back to it in the future. What are your hobbies besides blogging?

Graphic Design. How did blogging change your life?

I have met a lot new friends throught it and it has opened a few doors to me. Who are your style inspirations?

Alexa Chung, Leandra Medine, Miranda Kerr, Olivia Palermo. There’s too many to mention, actually! What does fashion mean to you?

Fashion is a form of art. What makes you unique from other bloggers?

blogger in focus

MELISSA GATCHALIAN

I also post travel photos and would like to post design related things in the future. How do you describe your style?

I can’t really say. I like to change things up and don’t like to stick with just one style.

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When do you say that people are fashion forward?

When they can carry what they are wearing, be it thrifted or branded. How did your blog audience grow? What did you do to make people read your material?

I just posted whatever I like and what I think people would be interested. Do you sometimes get pressured on posting new stuff from time to time because of people’s expectations? Or do you just post at your own pace?

Check out Melissa’s blog at: http://sartorialpanda.blogspot. com

Yes, sometimes. Most of the time, I post at my own pace though because I’m still a busy student.

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SDA STRE At De La Salle - College of St. Benilde’s School of Design and Arts, they say there’s always a fashion show everyday. People would go to school as if they’re going to attend a big event or a party. Let’s take a look at some of the styles that I came across within these walls of white.

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EET STYLE

PHOTOGRAPHER GERARD LOPEZ

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GRAPHIKA MANILA 2013 WRITER GERARD LOPEZ

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raphika Manila is the premiere multimedia and graphic design event in the Philippines. It is aimed at bringing to the community a sharing of ideas, inspirations and insights on the creative aspect of design. Graphika Manila brings together creative minds to listen to inspiring stories and celebrate the works of the best multimedia and graphic designers from the Philippines and from around the world. On its seventh year, they took it up a notch by bringing an all-international set of speakers and moving to a much larger venue. It was held at the PICC Plenary Hall this year which welcomed thousands of participants that filled up to the balcony of the venue. The downside to this though is that it took a lot of time for the participants to come in which cut off some minutes of the talk. Nevertheless, participants still enjoyed the event. The first one to talk was James White of Signalnoise. He is a visual artist, designer, speaker, and the one-man crew behind the Signalnoise studio in Dartmouth, Nova Scotia, Canada. He really set up the mood for the talk because of his lively personality. Most of his works are illustrations that seem like they came out of the rainbow because of the stunning style and visuals that he implemented in his works. Most of his

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From L-R Benjamin Seide of Pixomondo, James White of Signalnoise, Jessica Walsh, Armand Serrano of Sony Pictures Animation, Benja Harney of Paperform, Shin of Devilrobots, Ryan Honey of Buck and Koto of Devilrobots.

clients include Daft Punk and other big names in the industry. I learned that you should always keep your unwanted files because you’ll never know when you’ll be able to use them in the future. One time he was asked by his friend to make a poster for something which was needed the next day. Luckily, there was an experimental illustration in his files which he worked on a long time ago and used it for that which surprised his friend by how “fast” he did his work. Next set of speakers to talk was Devilrobots and was represented by Koto and Shin. Devilrobots is a five-men design team established in 1997 and based in Tokyo. Main works are graphics, character designs, audio-visual, web designs, toys, CD jackets, clothing and more! I really liked their talk too because I find their presentation really cute because of their style in illustrating. Their office filled with colorful vinyl toys and memorabilia is a hint of their fun vibe towards their brand which is basically an anthromorphic tofu with a worried but smiling face. They’ve already collaborated with Disney and many more, including this year’s Graphika Manila shirt. An on-the-spot bear illustration was done for the whole audience and was done in a few minutes. The key is learning how to alter some parts of the illustration, thus creating new charact-

ers and giving it life. In their case, copying and pasting your illustrations simultaneously isn’t bad either if you’re gonna make a pattern. After Devilrobots, it was Sony Pictures Animation’s turn to take the stage. And it was represented by fellow Filipino, Armand Serrano. He works as a White of Singalnoise loving the Visual Develo- James energetic vibe of the audience. pment artist. He showed some really cool visual development art from Cloudy with a Chance of Meatballs and Hotel Transylvania. Some of his art gets to be in the film but some don’t so the key is persistence. He also worked for Walt Disney Animation before and named the snow cone vendor in Lilo and Stitch after his son’s name. How cool is that? And he also included a parol (an iconic Filipino Christmas decoration) in one of Lilo and Stitch’s episodes. I also found out that it took 10 years for Hotel Transylvania to be fully developed.


for the rest of our lives. Her rule was to “play” while working and the money will soon come after. What made me love her even more is her humbleness. After the event, I found out that she stayed in the venue until everyone had the chance to take a picture with her and have her autograph. That’s very touching for someone of her status. It was Ryan Honey’s turn to take the stage after Sony Pictures Animation. He runs a design-driven production company called Buck and they’ve got lots of really cool stuff to show off. Most of their works are animated and used motion graphics. He worked on commercials such as Keebler cookies and V8 V-Fusion. He also collaborated with Sundance Film Festival which had very funny and entertaining

Armand Serrano of Sony Pictures Animation giving some tidbits on visual development. art

videos. The video editing skills were really great and innovative. I enjoyed most the two muppets for Sundance. Next up was Jessica Walsh. She’s a designer, art director, professor and partner at Sagmeister & Walsh in New York. I consider her my most favorite speaker because of her amazing personality and very inspiring presentation/talk. I almost teared up at how awesome she is. I just love her and her dedication to her profession. Besides her work, she also shared really inspiring stuff with the audience. I learned that we should treat work like play and we would never have to work.

It was Pixomondo’s turn after Jessica. The company was represented by Benjamin Seide. Pixelmondo worked on the visual effects on popular and big budget films and TV shows such as Game of Thrones, Hugo, Sucker Punch, Super 8, Journey 2: The Mysterious Island, Iron Man 2 and many more. He showcased the visual effects process on some movies and shows and I find them really cool because all of them looked so realistic that I thought they were really on set. It turns out, a lot of things are added in post-process such as the train and train station in Hugo and some castles in Game of Thrones. He also talked about the stereoscopic 3D process which got me all giddy. I love 3D! It’s a crazier process if it’s a 3D movie because you’re working with two eyes to get the 3D effect which means longer rendering time. I can’t explain it here that much. It’s just that complicated. He ended his talk by showing a trailer for Star Trek: Into Darkness which got everyone hyped up. And the last speaker but not the least, Benja Harney of Paperform. He is from Australia and he worked on paper crafts and pop-up books for big brands and personalities. He worked for brands such as Hermes and celebrities like Kylie Minogue. Personally, I will never have the patience in doing what he does. I really admire him for dedication with his work and how much he loves it. After the talk, there was a raffle. The prizes were really cool and I secretly wished I won. Haha! I guess I have no luck with this kind of contest. There was supposed to be a Q&A after the show but they ran out of time so they just continued with the photo op. It was really nice meeting some of them. I wished there were more time so I could meet them all and take a picture with them. Of course, included in the event is the Graphika Manila kit.

The kit wouldn’t be complete without the GM book. It has really nice illustrations and other inspirations inside that will surely keep you inspired and motivated. The Graphika Manila experience wouldn’t be complete too if you didn’t get the speakers’ autograph. I’m also happy they included an issue of Status Magazine. And it has Maroon 5 on the cover! It’s my very first issue and I might buy current issues from now on because I rarely see them in news stands that’s why I always miss the chance to buy. I’m a proud friend right here because my friend, Mariel Empit submitted an artwork and it got chosen. And this is not the first time! I even asked her to sign her artwork! What made me like the kit more is that the included doodle books this time. And they also brought back the delgate pass I.D., which makes the event more formal, for me. After attending the vent, I made a blog post about it. I showed the the blog post to Graphika Manila thorugh Facebook and after a while, I got a message saying I am now inluded in the guest list for Graphika Manila 2014. I’m so stoked! See you there!

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S

ino si Ramon Bautista? Yung pogi! If you don’t know Ramon Bautista, you must be living under a rock. Just in case you don’t know Ramon Bautista, he is a Filipino actor, commercial model ,filmmaker, radio DJ and also a professor. He became an internet sensation when he started making films with RA Rivera, which quickly gained fans and followers. To some, he’s become a “shoulder to cry on” when they have problems or questions about love. Just on time for Valentine’s, he was invited to our school for a talk which was called Love, Camera, Action with Mr. Ramon Bautista.

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LOVE, CAMERA, ACTION WITH MR. RAMON BAUTISTA WRITER GERARD LOPEZ

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He talked about love and why some relationships don’t last. I actually understood and learned a lot about love from him. I also like the scientific explanation of people’s affection towards each other. And since we’re talking about love, it wouldn’t be impossible if he also discussed sex. All I can say is his talk was really entertaining and had me in stitches! I was laughing almost throughout the talk. If he’s funny online, he’s even funnier in person! The people in the venue roared with laughter every time he cracks a joke. Even though his talk was funny, it was very informative and inspiring.


Besides talking about love, he also showcased what he loved which is film making. He showed videos creative and funny at the same time. He even spilled a secret in his Nescafe commercial but I won’t tell you that so check it out on YouTube and observe! I liked how Mr. Ramon made the talk interactive and in return, the audience participated a lot. After the talk, there was an open forum for the participants. He gave entertaining but helpful tips to those who asked about love. After that, the event wouldn’t be complete without having a photo op with him. Those who bought his book and brought it with them will also get an autograph. He was nice to talk to and very down-to-earth for a celebrity like him. This left everyone in the venue happy and satisfied.

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CHILDHOOD is a kingdom where nobody dies. PHOTOGRAPHY & ART DIRECTIOM: MARIEL EMPIT & GERARD LOPEZ MODEL: MADS TEOTICO

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“Stay young.”

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{DIYor DIE} BY: MARIEL EMPIT

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hat’s the world without any creativity in it? A lot of people would argue that art and creation is nothing but a cool hobby to pass the time. Nowadays however, more and more people are seeing it as a great way to spice things up, no matter how mundane. DIY or for those poeple living under rocks, “Do It Yourself” items are becoming more and more of a trend. Instead of buying the generic stuff off the rails

in stores, the youth are starting a revolution of creativity with the use of scissors and hot glue gun. Personalization is the name of the game. With each creation -- may it be clothes, bags, accesories, notebooks, you name it -- being more and more unique, there shouldn’t be any reason why you shouldn’t try it out yoursefl! As artist James Howell put it, “Creativity is not finding of a thing, but the making something out of it after it is found.” The Kaleido team is posing a challenge

to its readers to be more hands on and try out our simple DIY projects to get the creative juices flowing! Read on and you just might surprise yourself. Go and get those hands dirty (no pun intended)!

“Creativity is not finding of a thing, but the making something out of it after it is found.” 115


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DIY or DIE

by Angelica Regala


OMBRE DENIM 118

Denim is one of the many easy to wear favourites because they go with just about anything. Trendy yet comfortable, it can be dressed up for a chic, sophisticated look or dressed down for a casual, weekend look. In fashion, the term ombre refers to the graduation of color in clothing. It usually refers to a garment that is monochromatic but has a graduated variation in the saturation of the color. There are a number of ways to create ombre fabrics. One of the easiest ways to get this look is by bleaching. Here are a couple of steps to get your generic-looking denim piece looking unique and fab.


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STEP BY STEP

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Prepare the following: tVinegar A large bucket Bleach Pair of gloves Watera

You can see that the denim is getting lighter now. Keep repeating the bleaching process with lesser fabric being submerged each time.

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Pour water and bleach in the bucket. (Do not forget to wear your gloves.)

When the desired ombre effect is achieved, it is time to rinse your denim garment. Get another container and mix water and vinegar in this ratio:

Soak the denim for about 10 mins. The vinegar helps stop the bleaching process. Rinse the denim again, with only water.

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Here is our denim jacket. It’s quite boring. Dip it intot bucket at desired length for about 15 mins.

Now that you are done bleaching, let the denim dry. Take note that at times, your denim may look bland. In most cases, wait for it to be completey free from moisture.

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Voila! The first layer of bleached has been made. Repeat step 3 with a lower desired portion to be bleached.

And then you’re done! Your denim garment now looks brand new with its ombre effect.

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PAPERCUTTING 122

The art of papercutting is regarded as one of the more complex and low profile of crafts. Best known for its cutesy handiwork, papercuts are a unique and heart-warming way to express your love or gratitude for a loved one. Having been one of the earliest forms of art, papercuts served as means of decoration and templates for embroidery. Papercutting extends its use even into offerings for religious ceremonies. Nowadays, these delicate works are used in scrapbooking, etching, stencils, and many more. In the next pages, we’ll teach you how to create the classic Paperdoll Chain.


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STEP BY STEP

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Other than your paper, prepare a pencil and a pair of scissors for cutting.

2 Then, cut your paper into a long strip.

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After finishing the outlines, you are now ready to start papercutting. Grab your pair of scissors and cut the outline you have drawn. Be sure to be precise and avoid cutting the edges were the ends of the limbs are connected as this is the most important factor in creating paperdoll chains.


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Fold your strip of paper as shown in the illustration. Be sure that all sides are equal.

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Once you have completely folded the strip of paper, draw your desired shape and make sure that the ends of each limb you would like to be paperchained is positioned in the edges of the paper.

After finishing the outlines, you are now ready to start papercutting. Grab your pair of scissors and cut the outline you have drawn. Be sure to be precise and avoid cutting the edges were the ends of the limbs are connected as this is the most important factor in creating paperdoll chains.

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DIGITAL PAINTING 126

The ever-growing rich society of modern art is in a new era of technology yet again. Graphic design is in great demand nowadays and so we give this tutorial for all the aspiring artists out there. Adobe Photoshop is one of the hottest graphic design programs known today. However, it is no secret to many that not only is this an image editor software. It is widely used among artists as their chosen pen & paper in the battlefields of art. Recommended for ones with basic knowledge of Photoshop, we feature a step-bystep process of creating a digital painting.


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STEP BY STEP

1. Create a rough sketch. *Note: A tablet is needed.

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2. Put the base colors in. 3. For shading, I play around with the opacity button and the pressured size button to see best results. 4. Here, it is now being painted on top of the sketch layer. Save backup layers if unsure of your work. 5. While painting, revisions are already being made on the way. Observe that the eyebrows are more defined and the jawline is thinner.

6. The texture of the subject is now smoothened out and most of the rough sketch is now covered. Take note of which direction you would like the light to be, as this will affect the location of your shadows.

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7. Continue to render the whole subject the same way as step 5 is done. Patience is the key. 8.For final touches, you may use Photoshop’s main purpose of image editing. Brightness/Contrast changes how much exposure your work has. 9. Hue/Saturation changes the overall color and vibrance of your work. 10. Color Balance gives you more detailed options on which portions will change into which color.

11. Selective Color gives you the option to change the color of a specific hue you want. These are only a few features of Photoshop. It is up to you to explore the many adjustments it provides. 12. Adjustments are helpful if there is difficulty found in choosing colors. 13. Details are added (such as props, hair strands, etc.) for completion.

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TURN THE MUSIC UP

{SHUT the world out}

sunny bunny

a mixtape by: MARIEL EMPIT

wanderlust

a mixtape by: gerard lopez

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A jolly mix for sunny days and for days when you are longing for its presence.

A mix for those individuals who have a sense of adventure and longing for travel.


Mixtape. n. A compilation of songs that reflect the music taste of the listener, usually in a compact disk. The best company to keep on a boring idle day/night. Caution: May cause heaightened emotions.

Forever young

a mixtape by: elson nerona

b. rythm

a mixtape by: angelica regala

A mix for the young and the young at heart. A nostalgia for the past years.

Get cultured. A compilation of amazing theatre songs to liven up anyone’s mood.

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To Mads, thank you for being such a great and fun model to work with! What a great trooper! The whole Kaleido team, thanks thee!

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To the people who willingly collaborated with us, huge arigato! You all deserve the cupcakes we can’t afford!

behind the scenes a look at the Kaleido team

Working together with crazy (and that’s an understatement) weirdos is always fun! May our creative juices continually flow (wink wink), dear bewbs~ Nothing but the best!

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www.kaleidosc


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copemag.com

MAGAZINE

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Kaledioscope


Kaleidoscope Magazine